Mad Style: Waterloo

Posted on May 27, 2014

We have liftoff, so let’s get to it.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-&-Episode-7-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (1)A brief and simple rendering of Bert’s home life before he goes. Here are things that are not at all surprising: the surroundings are spare, punctuated by astonishing works of art (Hello, Jackson Pollock) and well appointed furniture from the ’20s and ’30s, with just the slightest touches of Asian art and influence; he’s the type of man who watches television in a bowtie; his carpet is immaculate. That poor maid must spend 4 hours a day vacuuming.

More art direction and set design as characterization:

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We noted the animal skin rug in Jim Cutler’s office once before, finding it perfectly appropriate for such a predatory character, but now that the camera’s swung around in the opposite direction, we can see the animals lined up on the wall, taking the comparison even further. His office is masculine but well-appointed, from the leather couch and giant ugly executive chair to the tea service and telescope (the first of several in the episode).

Note that the skyward pointing telescope in Jim’s office is answered by the earth bound cracked-open bar globe in Ted’s. In an episode where almost every character was shown watching the greatest aerospace event in history, the actual aviator was drunkenly watching soap operas and feeling sorry for himself. Note the (no doubt Sunkist) orange juice with the vodka bottle right next to it. That’s Ted’s whole state of mind and story told almost entirely through art direction.

Alright, now we’re gonna zig-zag all over the place. First, domestic suburbia:

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Betty and Sally start off this episode dressed nothing alike. Betty’s in a pretty, mostly purple floral and Sally’s in her signature plaid, which we’ve always read as a signal of the bond she has with her father. It’s played out in several scenes and callbacks before, so every time we see Sally in plaid now, we think, “She’s Don’s daughter.”

Look at how formally Betty and Henry are dressed to receive company for a weekend in July. She’s in pearls and he’s in a suit. That’s just a tad over the top for them, but they’ve grown increasingly formal and aristocratic the longer they’ve lived in that house. The other family is dressed exactly like a family who’s been on a car trip in July would be. It’s Betty’s intention to be more dressed up than her guests. That’s both old school hostessing and just a little snobbish.

Given Betty’s brief, subtle shirtless teenage boy-ogling later in the episode, we choose to see Bobby’s shirt as hilarious.

 

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Here, have some cigarette-and-resentment-scented overcooked eggs. Mommy’s done for the day. You can bet those eggs were cooked in bacon grease.

We like the play of their blouses with each other. Betty continues to come across as if she’s dressing competitively. Her friend is in a slightly dowdy fruit print while Betty’s got the perfect little floral motif going on. And again with the pearl touches, this time in her earrings.

 

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Loved Betty’s well-timed drag and “Call me Betty” at the sight of Sean. Koo Koo Ka Choo, Mrs. Francis.

Sally’s hair seems to be pretty clearly modeled on Betty’s. We saw this as an example of a fumbling teen girl with a crush taking her cues from her movie-star pretty mother instead of following the trends. The look for most girls Sally’s age in 1969 was more along the lines of Marcia Brady than Betty Francis. There’s a reason why Betty’s so amused by this display. It flatters the hell out of her. As much as we all want Sally to put on her bell bottoms and love beads, there’s every indication that she’ll be fairly conservative in her style, like her mother. She’s a Miss Porter’s girl ,and while she loves her father, there’s a part of her that finds his poverty-stricken background and very messy personal life embarrassing.

You could argue that Sally’s dolled up to impress the younger brother here, but that wouldn’t explain why she was parroting the older brother’s lines about the moon landing being a waste of money. This is her taking the Betty route, going after the hot football player. The last time we saw Sally, she was cutting her mother down and making some rather acid comments about how Betty looks at men and how she doesn’t need one. Despite all her protestations – and even the occasional wearing of plaid – she can’t escape her mother’s influence in her life any more than she can escape her father’s.

Meanwhile:

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We joked on twitter that there was a “There’s a hot guy in my house unexpectedly” theme to this episode. Is Peggy going to get the Miranda Hobbes ending? All those advertising executives, creative directors and writers she’s gone after and she winds up with a hot handyman who doesn’t appear to read that much? Enh. We’re just hoping she gets good and laid. She deserves the fun. Pete, Duck, Abe and Ted. Was there a decent lover in that bunch? Not bloody likely.

 

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This is another in a long line of cute, crew-necked, short-sleeved dresses that Peggy’s been wearing all year. She and Julio are often shown wearing horizontal stripes in the same scene. It’s their shared subtextual bond as pseudo-mother and son rendered in their clothing.

 

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But when that subtext bubbles up into text and both characters realize simultaneously the depth of the bond they have, it stops being “pseudo” and starts being real. She is, very briefly, his mother, and she has to explain to him why sometimes mothers have to make very hard decisions that hurt their children but it’s for the best in the long run. There was a through-line in Peggy’s story this season about coming to terms with the things she’s given up for her career and tapping into that pain, Don Draper-like, to write beautiful copy. She is, as she’s said over and over again, somewhat bitterly, “the voice of moms” in this campaign. This was her getting in touch with her own voice as a mother.

In this instance, she’s not wearing stripes. She’s wearing a highly uncharacteristic-for-Peggy floral.; very traditionally feminine for someone who wears mostly bold plaids and stripes. This was even obliquely referenced in the dialogue as she gave a very “Mad Style” -like explanation to a disinterested Julio about her clothing choices for the upcoming Burger Chef pitch. “This one’s in gray, which is a color men wear.” The costumes in this scene – his and hers – will come into play again as this theme of Peggy’s motherhood and voice as a woman plays out. First, she wears the same robe again when she finds out she has to make the Burger Chef pitch:

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She specifically says she can’t replicate Don’s pitch. “I’m a woman! I’m ‘the voice of moms!'” You can count on one hand the number of times we’ve seen Peggy in a floral on this show.  It’s not that she needs to act or dress all girly in order to be good at her job, but this pitch specifically needed to be made in a woman’s voice and Peggy needed to tap into that in a way far beyond selling panty hose or lipstick required of her. She’s defining family from a woman’s point of view with this pitch; from her point of view. That’s tapping into way deeper stuff than “Mark Your Man.”

It’s perhaps not surprising then, that when it came time to choose the outfit for her pitch, she took her inspiration directly from Julio:

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Once again, referenced in the dialogue: “There’s a little ten-year-old boy at home in front of my TV set.” And she’s dressed exactly how he was the last time she saw him. How ironic that blue and green, which repeated itself more than any other color motif we’ve ever noted in the costuming and art direction before, used to pop up in scenes dealing with or characters committing adultery. But here it is now, representing Peggy and Julio’s new definition of family.

It’s interesting to note also that this is a pretty flirty and feminine look for a pitch. Peggy tends to dress more business-like than this for her pitches, as she herself told Julio. We’ve never seen her in that much makeup with her hair done up that much at any other time in the show. She never looked better or more grownup than she does in this scene.

Note the orange and blue Burger Chef colors. They pop up in Megan’s bikini:

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Which we wouldn’t try to impose too much deeper meaning into. Corporate colors often come up in the costuming, based on who’s being pitched and how important that pitch is to the story. The days of Heinz Baked Beans saw a lot of bean-colored ties, for instance. Megan obviously has nothing to do with Burger Chef, but it deepens the storytelling to have little callbacks like this sprinkled throughout.

It’s more interesting, however, that she’s lounging around in a bikini in the first place. She appears to be doing nothing but living a life of leisure at the moment. All she ever does in L.A. is hang around the house, go shopping, get her nails done or throw parties. We suppose we should give her some credit for breaking up with Don when she could be treating him like a meal ticket in perpetuity, but we wonder what she’s going to do with herself now. She’s almost 30 with a very spotty resume – and Don’s about to make millions of dollars. We wonder if we’re really done with Megan in this story.

Note the brown flowers of her robe. Janie Bryant did that before with Joan when her marriage ended. Note also the telescope behind her.

Okay, zig-zagging again:

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Meredith used to dress almost exactly like a little girl before she became Don’s secretary. Then she started making the attempt to dress a little more grown up, missing the mark slightly each time. The suit is really cute, but the daisy jewelry and the giant rick rack can’t help but render her in a slightly silly and naive light.

 

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We’re always impressed when Janie Bryant has the task of dressing six men in suits for a scene and managing to make each of them look entirely distinct from each other. Pete is in a blue shirt so that he and Don don’t look alike. Cutler and Roger are wildly different from each other; one in a sober black and the other in an electric blue. Bert has a bright green bow tie to differentiate him and Harry’s, as usual, off in his own little style world.

We couldn’t help thinking of Joan’s dress as some sort of reversal of her usual “red  roses of disappointment” motif. Instead of red roses on a black background, we get these stark white flowers on a red background. She’s done being disappointed. She’s furious now. It’s a relatively simple look, but the bold jewelry and the wild print make her look formidable and angry. The writing has failed to sell her anger effectively, in our opinion, but the costuming sure picked up the slack.

Back to family life:

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With unconventional families and television figuring so heavily in the Burger Chef pitch, it played out in the storytelling as well, as several families formed around the most watched television event of all time. As Peggy astutely noted in the pitch, this is what Burger Chef has to figure out how to do; how to get families away from their TVs and into their restaurants.

Just look at all that print and color. There was all kinds of tension here, with moms in competition, cranky dads, mouthy teenage boys and horny teenage girls in this group, which is why it’s such an explosion of competing prints.

Moms wear florals, of course (calling back to Peggy’s floral mom robe).

 

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It’s room service and liquor for the Sterling clan. Divorce has been good for Mona. She’s more stylish now than she was when she was married to Roger. Can’t help noticing that they’re both wearing plaids. Possible reconciliation?

 

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But of all the people watching this event in front of us, it’s Don and Peggy who look almost directly at us. It’s unnerving and it’s a bold choice from Matthew Weiner and a hard thing to do for the actors, but it placed Don and Peggy above everyone else watching this event. They are the leads of this story, after all, and while we’re watching them, they are, in turn, watching us back. Look at how Harry, who is all about unrestrained outbursts and reactions, can’t control himself. Contrast that with Peggy, who takes this moment to look around and see how everyone else is reacting. That’s the essence of Peggy; in the middle of things, but observing them at the same time.

She’s wearing yet another horizontal Julio stripe, just as she has throughout this episode, with the exception of her mom robe. Julio is never really far from her mind.

 

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And in Bert’s impromptu family, his maid is allowed to stop vacuuming for a moment and get some leisurely knitting done while he quietly dies next to her in his dressing gown. How aristocratic.

 


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Things of note: They’re all rendered in bland neutral shades. Roger and Jim are neat reversals of each other; one in a blue shirt with a tan coat over it, the other in a tan shirt with a blue jacket over it. Oppositional. Joan is wearing pants in the office, continuing Peggy’s tradition of wearing them in the office after hours. Although to be fair, Joan got there first: the last time she wore pants in the office is when they formed the new agency by robbing the old one, in “Shut the Door, Have a Seat,” which this episode called back to over and over again.

Joan’s wearing a polka dot coat over a striped shirt, which we assume she’d never do if she wasn’t so distraught. Joan doesn’t do pattern-mixing.

 

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This is easily the most grownup thing Sally’s ever worn. The mini-skirt and lace-up top is just a tiny bit racy; just enough to let you know she’s maturing sexually without being something that Betty wouldn’t approve of. And speaking of which, as we said, this is some Betty hair, but she’s making an un-Betty-like choice here; choosing the smart, shy guy over the football player. Betty at 15 would have made fun of this guy. After Don reprimanded her for sounding so cynical, she stomped off, leaving the Don Draper-like alpha male older brother alone and forging her own path. If there’s any meaning to his plaid shirt, it’s as ironic as her Betty hair. He’s no more Don than she is Betty. For her first kiss, Sally made a choice to not be like her parents. That’s why we think she’s going to be fine – and why she looks so damn satisfied with herself at the end. Like we said, pure Betty in affect, but totally unlike Betty in her thinking.

 

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Jim Hobart is very casually dressed while Roger is all business. He’s not fooling around here.

He’s also no fool, as he clearly asked Jim to meet him at his go-to place for meetings that he doesn’t want anyone to know about. This is the same place he took Joan to talk about paying for her abortion:

hands and knees

Of course Roger would have hideaways like this. He probably has half a dozen spots in Manhattan where he can take potential clients or mistresses without anyone knowing about them.

 

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In the wake of the moon landing, there’s a subtle explosion of patriotic pride in the clothing, as red, white, and blue runs through the outfits here, even Ted’s. Joan is wearing another Peggy-like dress, done up Joan-style, with a scarf. Roger’s in mourning, wearing the most sober outfit we’ve seen on him all year. All the men have striped or patterned ties except Harry, who’s not a partner and doesn’t belong there.

 

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Orange and Blue. “We did it. We got Burger Chef.” Well of course you did. You’re wearing their colors.  And she’s still wearing her Julio stripes – now with attached pseudo-nipples, for the pseudo-mom on the go!

And finally – and we do mean finally:

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We’re not saying anything new here when we note that this is clearly calling back to the aesthetic of “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying,” many examples of which you can find in our Musical Monday entry on the film. Janie Bryant had a little fun with the dream secretaries here, bumping up their outfits just enough to make them seem a little more colorful and vivid than the secretarial wear in the real world. The boots and kneesocks, the bright colors and simple shapes, the way each woman brings a different color into the scene – it’s all out of the movie musical playbook, and looks quite a bit like the “A Secretary is Not a Toy” number in a lot of ways.

Major kudos to Robert Morse, who’s clearly still got the moves. He was known for his exuberantly boyish performing style and it’s a delight to see, when he leans over for a kiss or offers that jaunty shrug as he starts his (quite literal) soft shoe routine, that it hasn’t diminished a bit. A wonderful sendoff for the actor and the character, even if it’s the height of irony to have Bert Cooper sing that the best things in life are free.

We don’t think this scene is evidence of the DTs or a stroke on Don’s part. He’s had several visions of dead people before after all, from his parents, to Anna Draper, to his brother Adam. This is kind of what Don does with the dead people in his life We don’t even think it’s as ominous as it might seem by the end, when he’s crying and slumping on a desk. We think he’s probably questioning whether signing that contract is going to work for him, but he’s learned the lesson that his friends – in this case, Roger and Peggy – are important  to him in ways he never realized. It’s not quite as optimistic as we originally took it to be, but it does leave the future wide open and tips its hat to the lessons Don’s learned this half-season. If the best things in life are free, than perhaps his contract won’t matter at all.

We’ll see, won’t we? Eleven long months from now.

 

 

 

 

[Photo Credit: Justina Mintz/AMC - Stills: tomandlorenzo.com]

    • Kate Andrews

      Thanks, guys. You’re the best! (Bert soft-shoe dancing)

    • Sobaika

      That final sequence was such a delight. Visually too, it looks like the scene was painted in with sorbet.

      Noting that Hobart is at the same diner where Joan was talked to about an abortion – that is nothing short of BRILLIANT.

      • P M

        I am in awe of and slightly terrified by their superpowers of observation and memory.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Beginning to wonder if their home is papered in Mad Men stills. :P

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            Naah, I’m sure T Lo’s home is very tastefully decorated. Though come to think of it, that doesn’t mean it wouldn’t be papered w/ Mad Men stills.

            • Shug

              I wonder what their design aesthetic is. Wonder if the uncles are willing to share.

            • PastryGoddess

              There was an article in a Philly newspaper with a picture that was shot in their house. Very tasteful our uncles

    • Laura Elizabeth

      Thanks for this! I actually thought Joan’s necklace in the scene where she wears the red/white floral dress was a callback to her pen necklace that she wore as a secretary/office manager. She feels marginalized by all these men and like they’ve made so many decisions that affect her life, now as a partner, she finally feels like she’s found her voice and can make decisions that affect the business too.

      • Sobaika

        I loved that pen necklace! I tried hunting around for one on Etsy too, but would’ve looked ridiculous wearing it.

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          I bought one on Amazon – haven’t worn it yet!

        • http://twitter.com/janedonuts Jane Donuts

          I bought a pen necklace at Anthropologie a couple of years ago. Still wear it!

        • Meg0GayGuys6

          Me too! I’m a teacher and I’m very jealous that there’s a way to keep a pen on my ID lanyard thingy without clipping it, but no way to get my hands on it.

        • Alloy Jane

          My last job required a security card so I always wore my ugly lanyard with what I considered the most valuable things I own: my work card, my building key card, and my bus pass. Sometimes I would clip pens or binder clips to it, or use a binder clip to clip something else to my lanyard, or I would clip my hair claw to it when I got tired of having my hair up. And I kept my cell in a little sack that I dangled from my wrist. Ridiculous does not begin to cover how I looked, but sometimes you just have to please yourself and let your coworkers laugh at you and call you an office fairy running around with a bag of fairy dust. You can always leave a folder filled with makeup glitter on their desks. Or cover their work stations in old stickies, or use the nonsensitive trash paper to make a paper doll barrier…

        • Guest

          Joan’s pen necklace reminds me of Wild Bill Hickock’s dagger on a strap necklace from Deadwood. Given Wild Bill’s demise, I wise assume the pen is indeed mightier.

        • Johnny Neill

          Joan’s pen necklace brings to mind Wild Bill Hickock’s dagger necklace from Deadwood. Given the untimely demise of Hickock, I will assume the pen is indeed mightier.

      • amanda siegelson

        she wore another necklace similarly so last week – and noted it to myself then. maybe it’s a way of saying to herself that she could easily go back to that life if she doesn’t keep her mind in the game.

      • P M

        But that’s a jeweled necklace – no pen at all.

      • Chris

        Plus that necklace was just a bit too much with that dress. The red dress on her was just gorgeous, one of the prettiest things on her all year but with the bow on the front and the busy “angry” pattern she didn’t need a tassel necklace on top of it. Joanie loves to over accessorize. She’s a “more is more” kind of gal. She looked really beautiful there. She’s becoming like Peggy in that her work looks are much more flattering now than her “personal” looks. Compare this with her lackluster “date with Bob” look. She’s Ginger Grant here, movie star all the way.

      • mary_berry

        I thought that necklace looked like a Dalek.

        • Chris

          Well Joan did want to “exterminate” Don : )

        • not_Bridget

          Fans of The Doctor know what really happened during the broadcast of the moon landing. What everybody gathered around their TV’s saw–and what we see again with every broadcast, even if we don’t consciously remember. Silence!

          (And we remember River Song & Rory Williams in 60’s outfits, rescuing The Doctor with Nixon’s help!)

      • AnneElliot

        I thought so too! I so want a pen necklace.

      • smayper

        And remember the character she fired making a nasty comment about the pen necklace being a deliberate attempt to draw attention to her tits? I was thinking of that during this scene.

    • Golfkat

      Early Mad Style!?! Yaaay! :D

      Can we talk about how Bobby was wearing a t

      • Cabernet7

        I read somewhere that the teenage hunk, on arrival, was wearing an OJ Simpson jersey. Can anyone confirm this? If so, good on Sally for moving on to the cute nerdy guy!

        • SylviaFowler

          If it was (and it is the right number), it was Simpson’s USC jersey.

          • FibonacciSequins

            I just googled. Sure enough, that shirt is OJ’s number and USC’s colors. He played for USC in the Rose Bowl in 1969. And I suppose by July 1969, he’d been drafted to the Buffalo Bills. That’s impressive attention to detail!

            • MartyBellerMask

              Unbelievable. Janie Bryant is SO GOOD.

          • smayper

            Unbelievable catch, and I am in awe of Janie.

        • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

          Yep, that’s OJ’s jersey alright. He had just won the Heisman Trophy a few months before. Was Janie trying to tell Sally to keep away from this lady killer?

        • Sue Shea

          WOW!

      • Three Dancing Matthews

        Yes, the trio of embarrassed Sally and two knowing moms was fantastic. Did Betty and Kelly Martin spend the whole week doing nothing but exchanging glances?

        I disagree that nerdy guy isn’t like Don. He doesn’t have Don’s swagger (neither did Don at 14), but he has Don’s sense of wonder. Sally imitated shirtless hunk’s playacted cynicism, which Don cut right through. Ironic distance and apathy are not on his list of faults. The reason he called in the first place was to try to share this moment with his children. The nerdy guy made Sally feel the wonder and beauty of the moment- he pitched her. How much more like Don can you get?

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          “Ironic distance and apathy are not on his list of faults.”

          “What you call love was invented by guys like me to sell nylons.”

          It’s been one of his primary faults since episode one. Dick Whitman is a guy full of poetry and wonder. Don Draper is a swaggering facade.

          • Three Dancing Matthews

            Good point. You’re right- we seen cynical moments, though Sally’s also seen plenty of poetry and wonder moments from her dad. Don’s main skill is feeling something deeply and then convincing other people to feel it, too. That’s what the nerdy guy gave Sally in that moment, and why she kissed him. Much like Shakira’s hips, the plaid shirt doesn’t lie.

          • Alana

            That’s it, right there, isn’t it. The more Don accepts Dick, the better Don will be. Accepting himself for being Dick is his character arc.

            • Chris

              Yes, but do other people want to accept Dick? For all Don angers people, they love that facade. Everyone wants the football hero with the swagger and the arrogance. MW did an interview where he was discussing the different messages that men get on what they need to be, to be a “real” man. You need to be aggressive and tough in business and in war, but tender to your children and spouse etc. You have to know when to be all those different facets at all times. Being Dick may be good for Don personally but everyone still wants a lot of Don the tiger in business. He would still be in the fur shop, or in Korea or dead if he hadn’t used the Don part of him. Now he needs to decide how much of each he needs to be and when.

            • Glammie

              It’s been interesting to me to see how the writers are making Don/Dick find that balance–his telling the truth made all the difference in his relationship with Sally. It was a disaster with Hershey’s. It works with Peggy–not his history, but acknowledging that he’s abused those who were there to help him (i.e. Peggy). With Megan I’m not sure it matters–neither entered that relationship being themselves, which, I think, is why it just sort of dissipates without them hating one another.

            • Nancy Aronson

              I question what people think they want versus what they really respond to. Don engages in banter with Roger, because Roger is hard drinking, suck it up old school. Don seems to intuit that Ted needs him to be softer and more open. Roger gives Don the look, and Don gives Ted the Draper pitch, but it’s authentic and fatherly. (I like how Ted responds like a boy: Can I come back to New York?). Perhaps initially people needed a lot of manly imagery to feel confident. But I wonder about all the studies about what makes for effective leadership — does that mean none of them were applicable in the Sixties? ‘Cause none of them argue for being macho, as far as I know.

            • Alana

              Yes. Thanks for these thoughts. I think you’re right that others really don’t want Dick (except, maybe, Sally) –I wonder if the rape is informative of the whole issue of choice for Dick/Don. I think Don sees Dick as a victim, someone he needed to get away from–and what he needs to see is that Dick is someone who chose to be Don. He has to get that he has a choice to be who he needs to be and when (and that once integrated, it’s all authentic)–very existentialist–and I’m not sure exactly how Dick/Don is to get the resources he needs to do that.

            • SylviaFowler

              That’s easy for you to say, but it’s nearly impossible to put into practice. What foundation did he ever have for such self-acceptance? And even once an adult, men are put under SO much pressure to be something they aren’t and continue to be socially punished by women and other men for any perceived weakness or softness.

          • SylviaFowler

            But he IS Dick Whitman, so it’s not one of his primary faults. He puts on the mask for work and the outside world, but it’s just that: a mask.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I disagree. He’s been fighting the battle between Dick Whitman and Don Draper since the beginning.

            • SylviaFowler

              I didn’t say that he hasn’t? But he put on the mask in the first place because he wanted out of the hell his Dick Whitman life was, not because he just has a jolly time juggling multiple identities, and despite any apparent ease he has at being Don for the outside world, he is still Dick. I mean, if he were gay and closeted about it, it wouldn’t make him straight just because he puts on the facade. He might even really wish he was straight, but he is still gay.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I didn’t say that you did. You’re getting defensive.

              I simply disagree that Don Draper is a mask.

            • SylviaFowler

              I’m not defensive, I’m just replying to you. It’s canon that Don Draper is a mask. If you think I mean that every single thing he says or does while living his Don life is entirely the opposite of who he really is, that’s not what I intended to get across. I mean, it wouldn’t be humanly possible to be two different humans like that. There is quite a bit of Dick that he lets into his Don life, and vice versa there would naturally be things (skills, behaviors, etc.) that he’s learned in his Don life that he truly accepts/values for real. It’s just that by the very fact of his public identity being a false one, he’s going to haul out some behaviors and beliefs that don’t truly apply to him. Or else why need a mask in the first place, you know?

              Even in the “love/nylons” scene, that’s a client meeting, hence the swaggering. He meets with her, not for a date, but because he has to smooth things over with her as a client. That’s explicitly how he begins their conversation: “I shouldn’t have treated you like anything less than a client.” Implicit and supported by his bravado body language there is that business is the role he’s determined to take in this dinner. Then she surprises him by quickly accepting his apology and confidently being candid about her admiration of candor. He takes that opportunity to let a little Dick through the cracks: “I’m not really as bad as all that [bad behavior at the office]. I was under a lot of pressure [...to be someone I'm not]. Another account [...another life].” Then he tries to dismiss himself, close the blinds and move fully back into business/market research mode, quizzing her about her life and likes/dislikes just like he did with the waiter regarding Lucky Strike. This is when he throws out the nylons line, but because so much of Dick’s life goes into his ads and because Rachel is an outsider to society like he is, she picks up that this some kind of false armor he’s displaying. When she calls him on it, admitting that they’re both “out of place and disconnected”, he is stunned into silence. His whole demeanor slips for a few seconds, he literally blinks, gulps, can’t meet her eyes and fidgets. He desperately looks around for a waiter to bring them more drinks, but she abruptly ends the meeting there and confirms that he’s got her business; he’s still slack-jawed at that point. Swaggering Don walked into that meeting, but sensitive, gawky Dick walked out of it.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              It’s not “canon” that Don Draper is a mask. That’s entirely your interpretation. Have at it, but as I said, I simply don’t agree. Don is simply all the darker parts of Dick Whitman, pushed to the forefront.

          • Nancy Aronson

            I might say one of Dick/Don’s primary issues in his struggle to come to terms with his identity is, understandably, how to become authentic (as opposed to ironically distant) and to risk honest connection with others. It has taken a decade for him to learn how to mentor Peggy. Was the hug at the end of Waterloo from Dick? T & L, you are so very confident in your analysis. I confess things are much less definitive for me.

          • SylviaFowler

            Why are my comments being deleted? I don’t understand.

          • SylviaFowler

            Wait, nevermind. I’m reading this in Disqus’ frame, and for some reason it doesn’t show everything that’s posted. Carry on!!

        • Fjasmine

          Don couldnt’ be more apathetic.

        • andrea

          Holy crap. I totally missed that was Kelly Martin. Haven’t seen her since her old ER days!

          • Three Dancing Matthews

            I still think of her from the Lifetime movie-est of all Lifetime movies- the one where she’s an unpopular girl who stabs Tori Spelling, the popular cheerleader. It’s a classic.

            • camdiggidy

              YES! “A Friend To Die For”!!! Loved it then… would love to watch it again right now, actually.

    • MarinaCat

      Fabulous as always. Thanks for all the recaps and Mad Styles. I can’t imagine the time and energy these take.

    • imspinningaround

      I actually had a little chill when I realized that Peggy basically chose to wear a dress version of Julio’s blue-and-green striped shirt. Her little tribute to him reads almost like one of those Lanz of Salzburg matching mother-and-child outfits.

      I know I should put this in the recap thread, but it’ll never get seen: Did Meredith turn out to be anyone else’s favorite tertiary character this season? Stephanie Drake’s comedic timing is impeccable.

      • Denise Alden

        Meredith never fails to get a laugh out of me, but honestly: I don’t know how either of them got through that scene without losing it! I don’t know what was funnier: her patting the cushion as invitation, or when Don replies, “You can get my attorney on the phone.” Hilarious!

        Oh, and amazing that you two have this up early! Bittersweet for me; thanks.

        • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

          Yes, yes and yes. I agree. There must have been on-set laughter. I felt like he was trying not to crack up even in the final take we saw. How could he not be? She is a stitch.

          • EarthaKitten

            The final comedic touch was Meredith attempting to hand Don’s handkerchief back to him…he doesn’t react, she continues to hold it out till she finally relents and takes it with her. Brilliant touch.

            • Bluebell

              The scene was great, really cringeworthy.

              It nods back to the scene in that same office when Lane made a clumsy pass at Joan and was gracefully rebuffed. Except I felt sorry for Lane, but Meredith was just hilarious.

      • aesteve212

        She is totally my fave! I love here how TLo point out that she is trying to be adult through her costuming, but then can’t quite stick the landing and has all the girly details. Her character is all “I’m a GROWNUP!” (in a 5 year old’s voice) in her conversation style, her social skills, and her outfits.

        • OmegaMu

          I love that they pointed out the rick-rack on her dress. That will always be wickety-wack trim to me (thank you Uncle Nick) and that’s what I hollered when I saw it.

        • smayper

          I laughed out loud at the daisy earrings. Comedy in the costuming, without in any way stretching the limits of character.

        • Fjasmine

          She looked old to me when we really saw her up close. It made her little girl look seem fearful, like she’s trying hard to catch a man before it’s too late

        • Bluebell

          Meredith is play-acting at being a grown up secretary in the sexy, brash world of advertising.

          She thinks she knows how to look and what to say, in fact she doesn’t understand the game at all. She copies the surface of those around her but falls short because she doesn’t realise that others have deeper motivations too. She thinks going through the motions is enough, in fact it highlights how she is a child in a world of adults.

          • forward_slash_PRS

            I’ve been wanting to comment on this for a long time. I also think Meredith is a great character, but it seems to me that whenever she is shown actually doing secretarial work now (as opposed to when she was the receptionist), she’s right on top of things. They are brief moments, but I notice them because I’m a secretary too, and I’m interested in what these women do in the office.

            I can’t remember the details, but one example is when someone mentioned some files or documents, and she immediately responded, “You gave those to so-and-so this morning” (sorry to be so vague). Anyway, I like to think that she might be goofy, but she’s good at what she does for a living.

      • MartyBellerMask

        In the past, she’s annoyed the crap out of me. I’ve always wondered why they kept her around. This season, we finally get the payoff.

      • Fjasmine

        In this scene Meredith looked older to me than she ever has before. It made her over the top little girl dresses seem different.

      • http://inanimateblog.com/ NoNeinNyet

        I didn’t realize that her pitch dress matched Julio’s shirt until I was reading this post. I gasped when that screencap of him in blue and green came up.

      • GayhawkAZ

        I found Meredith’s attempt to “comfort” Don to be extremely uncomfortable. I mean, I was literally squirming on the couch, wondering what the hell she was doing and why Matthew Weiner wrote the scene. :-

        • VeryCrunchyFrog

          It closely mirrored Megan’s first come-on to Don, in “Chinese Wall,” but with notably different results.

    • Sally

      I thought Peggy looked fantastic this entire episode. Eleven months? What are we going to do?

      • smayper

        I remember my mom in very similar bold stripe dresses in the early ’70s. They were polyester and didn’t wrinkle, and were good for work, unlike her short silk cocktail numbers in bright colors in the ’60s. So short, and yet she assures me that they were in no way scandalous for a wife and mom in that period. I snagged one of the cocktail dresses and wore it in the late ’80s. It made me feel hot as hell (whether I looked it or not doesn’t matter).

        • Glammie

          I’m also one of those who used to wear her mother’s clothes from the ’60s (and ’50s) during the ’80s. It was a big period for retro vintage looks. I wish I still fit them.!

      • VeryCrunchyFrog

        That horrendous housecoat she wore was spot-on. I remember ladies wearing that really small, busy, drab “floral” design that I thought was ugly even then.

      • ikillplants

        She looked sensational. Did you catch the false eyelashes she wore? She brought out the big guns for the biggest pitch of her life.

    • PastryGoddess

      Thank you Thank you Thank you Dear Uncles for all that you do.

      Mad Style 1 day early! Downton Abbey costumes! What a wonderful tuesday this has been

      • tallgirl1204

        I would like to just say that today was the Best TLo Day Ever. 90% of why I read you is Mad Men and Downton Abbey. I think I may pass out from the deliciousness of it all.

        • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

          I agree. Thanks again, TLo. :)

      • Chris

        It’s like Christmas! I was chortling with glee when I opened my iPad tonight and saw this. What a lovely early present. I think the uncles have given up sleeping the past few days to keep us kittens in fresh material.

      • MartyBellerMask

        And here we thought T Lo was RESTING on Monday. They’ve been busy preparing gifts!!

    • amyfromnj

      I’ll miss these posts as much as the show……

      • Glammie

        I know . . .I don’t feel like I’ve watched the show until I’ve seen what TLo and the commenters are saying.

        • smayper

          Agree completely. And the Uncles MUST find another show with great acting and costuming to keep us all fed. I know it will be hard to find one, but please! Find something!

          • Glammie

            I know. GoT is the obvious one, but they don’t want to be spoilered, so they watch and don’t blog. Once they let out a couple of insightful tidbits . . . ah well. This is a ton of work for them, so I get their not wanting to do it on another show.

      • Aurumgirl

        More, actually.

        • greatscoutm

          Agree.

          For me, watching the actual show is only the beginning of the experience, a third actually, and I enjoy watching the show so much more because I know that this isn’t “it.” it’s not over yet, because, there is the TLO recap still to come and then mid-week, Mad Style. Once I have read (and re-read) those posts, and only then, do I feel I have experienced the whole of any given week’s episode–and it is then that I marvel to realize, via the genius of brilliant analysis and the words to describe what I saw, how amazing this show is. I

          Thank you so much, my darlings @ TLO GLOBAL! What a great season made all the greater because of you, dear Uncles, who work so hard to incite a bitter cohort of kittens to engage.#luckyme

          • MartyBellerMask

            OMG. What are we going to do when it’s all over? :(

            • carnush

              I honestly don’t know. It will be devastating.

            • kapalabhati

              What we will do when it’s all over? As Freddy Rumsen said, “Just do the work.”

          • Shug

            I seriously feel as though people who don’t follow the recaps are not really watching the show and have no idea what’s actually going on. Case in point: Mr. Shug, scrolling through the Face-pages and twitter-pages while we watched. Tsk tsk.

    • P M

      Oh wow, this is really early.

      Joan was in her pyjamas when she came into the office. Well, her pyjama top.

      Julio’s orange stripe shirt was the same colours as Peggy’s prints at her apartment.

      There were touches of mustard yellow sprinkled all over the episode. An ode to mustard or a nod to Peggy’s power colour.

      I love that one secretary had a cup and saucer. Actually, I love that each secretary had one item (including a rolodex!)

      Mature Meredith’s hair was flat.

      • heybethpdx

        Oh gosh, I doubt Joan would ever set foot out of her apartment in a pajama top – but it probably was comfortable at-home wear.

        • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

          Do you really think it was her pajama top? Because she clearly had on her armor. If you know what I mean. I understand some people sleep in their bras but I am pretty sure we have seen this top before. As ugly and un-Joanie as it is.

      • Glammie

        It really is a match-up to A Secretary is Not a Toy–there’s a sequence with five secretaries, one of whom is, indeed, a secretary of color.

        • MilaXX

          Yep. a POC, one secretary in plaid, one in mustard and one in powder blue. It’s a nice callback by Janie.

          • Glammie

            Yeah, it caught my eye given Bert’s attitude about Shirley at the front desk. Interesting to go back to a 1967 movie and see the “Shirley” of the actual time.

            • Nanvel

              It was Dawn, not Shirley, at the front desk~

            • Glammie

              Oh right, Dawn got her full promotion at the end of that. There was a lot of desk-juggling in that episode. Who’s at the front desk now since Lou has Shirley and Don has Meredith?

      • http://www.franticbutfabulous.com/ Heidi/FranticButFab

        It looked to me like they might all have had pajamas on, Cutler in particular. My grandpa had pajamas very much like that. (He was born in 1914, so would’ve been 55 in 1969, probably close to Cutler’s age.)

        • FibonacciSequins

          I was iffy on whether Cutler’s shirt was a pajama top. I decided it wasn’t because it didn’t button all the way down, but maybe it was. Roger was wearing the same thing he was wearing while watching the first step on the moon – slacks and a sport shirt.

        • T C

          I thought Cutler’s collar points were far too long for a pajama top, it looked to me more like a non-Izod by an up and coming designer. Roger’s shirt did look like an Izod.

          • decormaven

            Yes, Jim’s shirt was a casual knit top, but not an Izod.

      • judybrowni

        NO, JOAN WOULD NEVER WEAR A PAJAMA TOP OUTSIDE HER APARTMENT!
        My stepmother had a striped blouse very similar, it was a blouse you saw pretty frequently in the ’60s.

        • P M

          What – it looks like it could be a pajama top; plus it looks like those pajamas we’ve seen her in. Although that doesn’t explain the shoes – aren’t those are her office heels?

          • decormaven

            Looks like pajama top, with casual coat thrown on top. Definitely office shoes.

          • Kayceed

            I didn’t think it was pajamas but I gasped at the heels – I thought pants were still pretty much only worn with flats during these years.

        • GayhawkAZ

          Isn’t it possible Joan was so stunned and distraught at Bert’s passing that she just threw on the coat over the pajama top?

    • Sillysally

      I noticed the “hunk on the scene!” motif too….. and started getting so excited to see who might show up at Joan’s doorstep. But it was not to be….

      • Glammie

        Thing is, I think Joan actually needs a hunk around the house more than Peggy does. Peggy’s unbent a bit with her connection to Julio and working things out with Don. Joan’s all wound up. She could use a hot guy sans status. She needs to separate love and money.

        • Jaialaibean

          But if Joan had one of those, her mother would use all that extra time she has around the house to reel him in first, just like what’s-his-name the plumber.

          • Glammie

            True–well, mom may explain Joan’s lack of a lover. Well, maybe we’ll finally see Joan with a larger apartment or a duplex with mom in her own in-law apartment.

            • not_Bridget

              And, if Joan remo’s a place, I bet that no drop-down ceiling will be involved! Peggy was looking good this episode but she expressed her dodgy taste in home decorating. (Well, the ceilings will be removed easily enough in years to come.)

            • Glammie

              Yeah, I’m not sure Peggy-the-character is ever going to have good taste–she’s coming into her looks for other reasons than an official improvement in taste. She’s more at home in herself, but not at home in her home. Maybe the home-repair hunk will end up as her building manager and Pegs will finally get to move to the UES the way she wanted in the first place. And hire an interior designer.

            • bestguess

              The repairman looked like a callback to Don’s dad in those overalls.

            • bigeasybridget

              the drop-ceiling is ugly, but it’s perfect for Peggy – who feels most at home at the office, to have an office-style ceiling in her home.

    • P M

      Oh, Peggy in the hotel room was both professional (nice office dress) with nods to her at-home cringeworthiness (turtleneck). It wasn’t a bad dress, it just reminded me enough of that.

    • Scimommy

      I don’t know what’s worse: that it’s 11 months until the next Mad Men episode (and the next TLo recap/Mad Style post) or that it’ll be only 7 more episodes and that’s it – no more Mad Men. Ever. #depressing

      • Jackie4g

        Yes, because what is going to be able to be better?

    • Gatto Nero

      And with this brilliant analysis, TLo begin their well-earned MM sabbatical.
      Thank you for all the great insights and the civilized discourse. I’ll miss this!

    • crash1212

      Words cannot express how much I hate the oppressive Francis mansion. That is one butt ugly home.

      On a happier note, I was the same age as Sally and I never tire of her style and attitudes! I had the exact same lace-up top in many colors and lived in them.

      ETA: Almost forgot – thanks dear Uncles T and Lo for these brilliant posts on this brilliant show. I will miss both and cannot believe we have to wait a year for the next installments!

      • Wendi126

        I’m a couple of years younger and I had them too. We also had a rendition of the silver and multi globular lamp in Rogers office. This show jolts memories in me like no other show or medium ever has. And I had a crush on Robert Morse the first time I saw him in 1970 in the Boatniks..a perfect movie for a divorced dad to take two kids on a Sunday. Thought he was adorable. Still do ;)

        • barbarasingleterry

          Have to comment on the Boatniks…My uncle Robert Brunner wrote the score and the song for the movie. One of my favorite Disney movies…

          • Cabernet7

            He was in the Boatniks? I remember going to see that as a kid, but I don’t remember the movie itself. I should check that out.

        • FibonacciSequins

          I’m more like Bobby’s age, and I had and loved the lace-up shirts too. Also had a crush on the boyishly adorable Robert Morse!

      • AnneElliot

        Yes, the Francis mansion is just hideous. And how is it possible that a house that huge doesn’t have enough guest bedrooms for another family? The downstairs is enormous, so what’s upstairs? There are probably extra bedrooms up in the attic as well. Unless I’m confusing it with Downton Abbey. :-)

        • French_Swede

          Like how the Brady house was so huge but Greg, Peter and Bobby all shared one room and Marcia, Jan and Cindy all had to share another room. And their dad was an architect!!!

      • not_Bridget

        The house could have been decorated with pizazz, to lighten up the Victorian stodge. But Betty’s not the one to do it. I seem to recall Emma Peel’s place as a witty blend of old & new. But Mrs Peel was not married to a Republican politician….. Even the now-extinct Liberal Republican. .

      • Beaupeep

        Me, too, only Sally is a few months older! I had that sleeveless madras blouse and the little miniskirt with the flowers on it. I didn’t have the purple top but my sister did. I love seeing her clothes. Now to get her in a pair of culottes!

    • John G. Hill

      To the hardest working style bloggers ever, thanks to pointing things out to me that I never would have noticed. Subconsciously perhaps, but this way is so much better, because I can apply this new skill in so many different ways. Girlfriend mad at me? What colors and patterns is she wearing? Is she clashing and confused? Or solid colors and she’s made up her mind? Now I WILL pay attention.

      • not_Bridget

        Yup, TLo don’t have time & energy to analyze every show, but we have learned from them. When I was watching “The Hour” I’d sometimes think “What would TLo say?”

    • Sonia Castleberry

      Here, have some cigarette-and-resentment-scented overcooked eggs. Mommy’s done for the day. You can bet those eggs were cooked in bacon grease.” I’m still laughing. Best line ever (and there have been many). Thanks, uncles!

      • DeniseSchipani

        the closeup on those eggs was priceless. and the football kid wanted oatmeal anyway. In July.

        • P M

          Those eggs looked so unappetizing. ‘Cigarette-scented’ – UGH.

          • aesteve212

            Totally reminded me of that great scene in 16 Candles when one of the grandparents opens the donut box, blows cigarette smoke all over them, and says “voila! Breakfast is served!”

            • Shug

              With approximately six inches ash hanging off her cigarette – which appears to be a 100. Hahahaha.

          • bawoman

            They looked great to me. I love my eyes crunchy like that.

          • Alloy Jane

            Oh man, I have never been fond of an egg *cough*chickenvagina*cough* those particular eggs looked like they had all the toothsomeness of a dog’s chew toy.

          • AnneElliot

            Ew.

        • Sofia

          haha oatmeal in july is such a disgusting choice! betty may have smoked and ashed all over those eggs, but i am impressed that the yolks are all intact.

          • Alloy Jane

            Awww, but oatmeal is so delicious! Oh those yolks, I’m surprised they didn’t explode from the force with which they were put down.

            • Sofia

              hahaha there’s nothing wrong with oatmeal per se, but i would not want to sit down to a steaming bowl of hot, thick oats in the july heat. ugh!!!!!

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            I think oatmeal is disgusting any time of year. (I just don’t like oatmeal. If you like it, you can have mine! Though strangely enough, I like Muesli, which is basically raw oatmeal. Go figure.)

            • AZU403

              Oatmeal is fine as long as you don’t cook it. Just pour hot water on it and let it sit. Or you can eat it raw in milk. Despite what we are led to believe, oatmeal doesn’t have to be a gloppy mess.

            • teensmom99

              As a weightwatchers convert, I’m an oatmeal year-round kind of person. But otherwise I love everything my bk buddies say!

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              I mix my muesli with buttermilk or yogurt. Something in the cultured milk products makes certain nutrients available that are usually only available from the cooked grain. Or something like that.

        • AZU403

          Obviously I need to either get a much larger TV or else sit two feet away from it – I miss so much! Like I completely missed that Bert was in his home and not his office, since we’ve heardly ever seen him anywhere but the firm.

        • greenwich_matron

          Oatmeal, warm (not hot) with a little ricotta, brown sugar, and sliced fruit. Trust me.

      • gogobooty

        I totally rewound and looked closely at that platter of crispy fried eggs and then watched em plunk onto the counter again and again. Heh. Betty, you work hard. Have a ciggie.

    • dash1211

      Thanks to you, dear uncles, it’s been a wonderful day!

    • JulieTy

      THANK YOU for putting this up so soon! Such a lovely episode, and the end felt like a little gift after hanging in through a dreary (half) season.
      Questions:
      1.Didn’t Mona remarry?
      2. Is Bert’s sister still alive, and if so, does she still have a stake in the company?
      Thought:
      I’m having trouble with Joan’s blinding rage towards Don, too. I remember how close they seemed in the hospital after the tractor incident, especially. It’s a stretch, but maybe her anger comes from her shame about the manner in which she became a partner, and the knowledge that he would have talked her out of doing what she did if he’d gotten to her in time.

      • DeniseSchipani

        Mona didn’t remarry. As for Bert’s sister, Don asks Roger that question on the phone, but gets no answer. He wouldn’t have said that, I mean, it wouldn’t have been written into the story, if it wasn’t going to be a plot point later. Maybe something to do with what happens with Bert’s shares, and an issue with the McCann deal?

        • Glammie

          So, did Mona just have a date then for Margaret’s wedding, or something like that? I’m happy she’s not remarried as I’m a Mona/Roger shipper, but maybe someone with a better memory could tell me why I thought she had remarried.

          • Chris

            Yes. She had a date/escort at Roger’s mother’s wake and he was mad and selfish about it (of course).

            • Glammie

              Ah, thanks. Yes, I had the sense that Mona was doing just fine sans Roger.

            • MartyBellerMask

              IIRC, it was somebody Roger knew. She may have been dating him just to get Roger’s goat.

            • Glammie

              Go Mona!

          • kapalabhati

            I don’t count the two of them out. Contrast Roger’s opening scene with his hippie dysfunctional family with the scene of his actual dysfunctional family. True the former “wore” the same thing, nothing (and who wouldn’t want to see Roger wearing nothing but a telephone?) and the latter clashed in a cacophony of patterns and colors (Ellory’s stripes and plaids clashed with each other!). Nonetheless, Roger who brings the fun to dysfunctional, chose his real family to share this most historical event.

            • Glammie

              No, I don’t think they’re out at all–once they brought Mona back on the scene and they went to fetch Marigold, I started to think they might get back together. Now we have them trying to be more of a family for their grandson than they were, perhaps, for their daughter. And I do think they’re deeply compatible in a way, say, Don and Megan aren’t.

              Plus, plaid!

        • FibonacciSequins

          I wonder if that line was meant to show that Bert had no family to speak of, outside the agency.

      • brown-eyed girl

        I wonder about Joan, too, and think that you have something with the shame aspect with Don. (Kind of like: “Why do you hate me? I never did you a favor.”) If these were people that I actually worked with, I’d suspect that her anger has something to do with the fact that he’s not made a play for her. I have to remind myself that they’re not real people.

        • JulieTy

          Thanks! :-*

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Matt Weiner’s explanation for Joan’s attitude (while discussing how upset the fans are) works for me:

        I guess they love Don so much and they love Don and Joan so much, but I always look at it and ask, “Are you friends with the person who lost your lottery ticket for $1 million?” It was a big deal in season six. She was there when they put him on leave, and she was quite firm about it. Don’s alcoholic disregard for her well-being — it was $1 million to go public, she slept with that guy so it would happen, and Don just impulsively merged the agencies, fired that guy, and cost her $1 million in 1968 money. If people can see it that way and wonder why Joan doesn’t want that guy in the firm, maybe it will help.

        The same thing with Peggy. He forced her to come back to the agency after she was on her own, he ruined her relationship with Ted, and he threw the agency into turmoil. She said he was a monster at the end of last season. These two seasons, 6 and 7A, take place eight weeks apart on the show. We’ve never done such a short period, and I think maybe it was hard for the audience to understand that, because it was nine months between them in real time.

        • Alloy Jane

          Thanks for posting this. A few of us have pointed out that without the “security” of a husband, Joan is concerned with entrenching herself in wealth to ensure her and her family’s future, and Don has interfered with that causing her to resent him. I’m curious if maybe there are more people out there who would stay friends with that butthead who lost them a cool 1969 million than Weiner expected, or if the Don Draper charm is just so thick people can’t be objective about why anyone would stay mad at him.

        • Chris

          See I disagree about Don “losing” a million dollars for her. (Apart from the fact that if you don’t let the other half of the partners know about your plans for the company you can’t be justifiably mad if one of them “screws it up”) There is no way that agency isn’t far more valuable merged with CGC and having Chevy as a client plus all that new business and an office on the other coast. Roger’s deal proved what I had been thinking all along. I don’t know why Joan was so mad at Don for losing a lesser client but getting a far more lucrative and prestigious one. The way they handed out a huge raise to Peggy alone had to signify that agency was doing great. In my mind this was MW’s “Avon 2014″.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            Agreed. Weiner seems to have a bit of a blind spot when it comes to Joan. Too much of the character is written in his head with not enough of that appearing in the scripts.

            • not_Bridget

              As you said, the costuming expressed Joan’s anger better than the script. But she was not happy with Cutler when he moved so quickly after Bert’s death. (I remember how Bert advised her not to waste her youth on Roger when they met in the office after his heart attack. If Joan was really 100% mercenary, she wouldn’t have spent so much time with Roger. And she really loves the city, no matter how she talked about retiring to a fancy suburban house.)

              Next season, perhaps all that money will have healed Joan’s anger. And she’ll be dealing with the new problems that will no doubt come with the “new” company.

            • andrea

              And the way she and Pete were ready to flay Ted when he was potentially jacking up their new prospect for loads of cash? Priceless. That to me really hit home that Joan was indeed VERY upset about the money Don “cost” her.

            • decormaven

              Yes, it’s like a mathematician who forgets to show the complete formula for deriving his answer. I think MW believes Joan has been fully fleshed in this department, but gauging from the amount of discussion from BKs, that is obviously not the case. Thanks for continuing to probe this character point.

            • Fritably

              This is my first comment in this site – I had to say this: I’m sorry but doesn’t anyone remember that DON FIRED JAGUAR??? The account for which Joan had to sleep with that man? I suppose that as far as she is concerned, that means Don has no consideration for her but only for himself. He did that because the Jaguar guy told him that he’s taking advertising advice from an another guy, and his ego was offended. Joan’s reaction for that was insanely hurt and angry.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Yes, many people remember that. It’s discussed widely in the comments section here.

            • Fjasmine

              did we ever see how Don approached the other SCDP partners about merging the two agencies? It always seemed strange to me that we didnt’ hear more from Bert and roger about it.

            • Karen North

              So much about Joan has always been in the shadows. What really happened with Avon? What does Greg know? What does her Mom know? Why is all her anger towards every man who has ever wronged her spilling over to the one man who tried to stop her that night?

              Holding hands under the table at the Cleos is one of my favorite moments. That sweet dark joke in the ER about the lawnmower. The time Don kidnapped her from the office before she was about to implode and they played hooky driving Jags and having cocktails; he told her, “people don’t understand how bad it has to get before you end things” We still have seven episodes to go and I seriously hope all this tension is a build up for an answer to these mysteries with a really sweet payoff.

              And Sal… please may he be Director of Media Operations over at McCann Erickson.

          • VDbloom

            I agree that Joan bears the responsibility for not telling Don about the IPO. However, Don definitely did lose her the million dollars – his actions and his actions alone ruined the IPO. The fact that he didn’t know about it should absolve him of any blame though, and I think that we as viewers can see that because we are impartial. Joan, however, is not impartial. Whatever Don’s intentions, he did hurt her, and evidently the hurt was bad enough to make those intentions irrelevant. To me, it’s like that moment when someone drops something on your foot: they didn’t mean to do it, but along with the pain comes a moment of anger when you blame them anyway. Joan is still caught in that moment where the pain outweighs rationality, and so she is treating Don as if he willfully harmed her. I also think that Joan is affected by pride – no matter what the company is worth after Chevy and CGC, it is not a company that Joan helped to build. The IPO was her doing and Jaguar was her get, and a very important one at the time. Again, this isn’t totally rational on Joan’s part, but I feel like after those losses she questions what she contributes, and whether deserves her partnership.

            • Cabernet7

              The problem I have with this is that at the time, she blew up at him in the conference room, but once he got Chevy she got over it. So for Weiner to blame this incident in particular for Joan’s behavior isn’t consistent. When Matt Weiner asks if we would forgive the person who lost your $1 million lottery ticket, well, Joan did. I don’t blame Joan for being angry at Don’s erratic behavior, and I can understand her being wary at having him back. I can even understand her voting against him in this week’s episode. It’s the vindictiveness I don’t get.

            • VDbloom

              How do we know she got over it after Chevy?

            • Cabernet7

              Because after Chevy, she did not act toward Don the way she is acting now. Because when Avon first came up, her first instinct was to go to Don (she tells Peggy this), but he was in LA, so Peggy has to remind her she could talk to Ted instead. Sure, it’s possible she was just suppressing her anger, but then I don’t understand why she would be so openly hostile now, weeks after he came back to the agency, when she wasn’t openly hostile days after the incident.

            • Fjasmine

              That makes sense, she has really lost her cool. I just see her as also being sick of years and years of Don being late…not showing up….doing stuff on his own….

            • Chris

              My fundamental disagreement is that Don lost Joan anything. She owned 5% of a smaller agency, now she still owns 5% (so the other partners must have taken the percentage hit when they merged or her share would have gone down) but it’s a much larger, prestigious and lucrative agency. I think it makes her look foolish and a bit nutty to still be so enraged about Jaguar. She is in a much better financial position. Why not try an IPO now? Because she wouldn’t dare sneak around behind Cutler’s back. Peggy’s anger was far more understandable because her blowout with Don only happened 8 weeks before and she was in a far worse position because of him. And yet Peggy didn’t blindly hate him (she just told him off once), didn’t try to sabotage him (when she could have) or retaliate through work even when he was slacking at first. For all the excuses raised on Joan’s behalf she just looks irrationally spiteful to maintain that level of anger for months and months. It has to be over a year since Jaguar was dumped and the agency has just gone straight up since then. I could understand her being wary of Don, cool with him and distrustful but that kind of hatred seems way over the top.

            • 3hares

              But presumably this isn’t about whether Don literally lost her anything, it’s that Joan feels that way. She saw that money in front of her and it was taken away when Don announced he dumped Jaguar. Of course there’s many ways that’s not really true–she still would have had to go through Don to get the IPO through and he might have said no, Don didn’t know about the thing happening, Pete lost out just as much (he even lost Vicks right afterwards) and he’s gotten over it. But for Joan, it feels like this is a guy who’s always just about to lose her a million dollars and she’s not going to let him do it again. It maybe hasn’t been presented very well so we can really get on board with it, I agree, but I don’t think the whole thing is supposed to rest on Don literally doing it to her.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              The problem with this interpretation – which I agree with, by the way, as it’s the only one that makes sense – is that it casts Joan in a petty, vindictive light. She wants to fire Don and take his shares away from him because she “feels” like he cost her something. None of the other partners feel this way and in fact, they all seem to be taken aback by her anger. She’s now someone who gains power and then uses it to hurt people she feels have wronged her. It’s not a great progression for her character. We suppose it could be seen as an extension of her Queen Bee days, but it makes her look somewhat naive and unprepared for business on this level.

            • 3hares

              I can definitely see that–it’s even contrasted right there on the show since Pete (who’s often linked with Joan in these kinds of things, just like he and Joan are the quickest to get angry at Ted when he says he wants to leave and ruin this deal) was in the same boat and not only has he gotten over it but he’s been trying to guard the company from Cutler’s machinations since last season. So Joan’s anger at Don seems even more personal and arbitrary. They’ve really decided to play it coldly instead of showing her looking conflicted but feeling like she has to go with Cutler–which they could have done.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              We had lunch with Mo Ryan of the Huffington Post last week and we were all talking about the scene last season when the partners confronted Don and asked him to go on leave. He looked at Joan and she quickly looked away from him. That felt true to their relationship; that she was willing to make tough business decisions that hurt him, but that she was somewhat conflicted by it and couldn’t look him in the eye. Then she shows up this season acting like Alexis Carrington around him and it all feels weird and over the top.

            • 3hares

              Yes! The way that scene was played felt totally logical. Somehow she became much more hostile and aggressive between seasons!

            • Shug

              I have to wonder if it has something to do with Don trying to stop her from sleeping with the Jaguar toad — like, he is a reminder that maybe it would have been the more respectable choice to have refused, or that he thinks less of her. Obviously money and security are important to her, and I don’t think she’d do anything differently, but maybe seeing Don makes her feel guilty and slutty for what she did. Speaking from my personal experience, resentments that are rooted in sexual shame don’t ever really go away. Maybe she’s been stewing about that.

            • Lynn

              Joan’s anger really does seem over the top. She’s treating Don like an active threat.
              Do you think Joan could be taking Don’s actions as sort of a reminder of her ex-husband? Don was suposed to be the account-winner and the star of the company and instead he ended up slowly crumbling and threatening her well being. Maybe when Joan’s done with someone, she’s just done and there’s no coming back. …even with that, I’d think her rage would have tempered into disgust or apathy by now.

            • Chris

              Yes, exactly. It was why I was so stunned at Joan’s attitude towards Don when he showed up again. Sometime between then and “now” it turned into white hot rage and I never understood how or why it happened. Peggy seemed to be the same when we left her and when we picked up with her eight weeks later, which made sense to me.

            • GayhawkAZ

              You both score points for the Alexis Carrington reference! ;)

            • VDbloom

              I agree with all of this. Joan’s anger towards Don obviously isn’t rationale, and she is being very vindictive. I also agree that this is an unfortunate character turn. I could tolerate her anger with Don earlier this season because I understood where she was coming from. But in this past episode, the rage and disgust on her face when she addressed Don did seem over the top in ways that it hadn’t in the past, at least to me. I still understand what her motivations are supposed to be, I am just a little disappointed to see that character move this far in this direction. I do like that the other partners seem taken aback at her anger. It shows that like us, they are confused and didn’t see this coming, and to me, that shows that the writers know that their characterization of Joan has been extreme and possibly absurd. I, like you, am hoping that they call her out on it next season. Perhaps then her motivations and rationale for this continued rage and vindictiveness will be better explained.

            • teensmom99

              I actually have been thinking that Joan’s behavior makes sense when you think that she is dealing with an alcoholic. I think you forgive and forgive and forgive and then you reach the breaking point and don’t forgive. It’s not necessarily rational and maybe she got fed up just when she should have realized that he did turn a corner. But someone who married her own rapist might not always get angry at the right time. and she always had a mercenary side. I think Don’s time away (and her time away from his talent and charms) allowed her anger to fester. She is done with the charming men in her life; she also has no patience for Roger and maybe seeing them in cahoots really gets to her.

            • Glammie

              Yep. I don’t mind her being petty, a bit naive about business, and vindictive. But she’s showing a level of stupid that we haven’t seen in the character. It’s consistency sacrificed for the sake of drama, which is a writing problem.

            • Glammie

              All this. You can’t sneak in an IPO anyway. Those things are not cakewalks with multiple filings, months of work and all sorts of stuff with the SEC. Half the partners not knowing? Hello? Not only do you need all the partners on board, Don Draper, in particular, would be a huge part of the IPO’s viability–it would be right there in the Red Herring–the agency’s success is highly dependent on this one man and stuff could happen to him.

              Given that Joan was essentially trying to make her million off Draper’s unique talents, she’s really in no place to be as vindictive as she has. Angry, yes. To the point of destroying him and keeping him out of the agency? No. Just because the agency *is* less valuable without him.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              There’s no way Joan owns 5% of the merged entity. The Mad Men writers are not good with math.

            • Fjasmine

              Pete, Joan and Bert *would* have told the other partners about the IPO, they were just researching it.

            • Cabernet7

              But there was no reason not to let Don (and Roger?) know they were researching it. There was no reason for them to be sneaking around on a Saturday to research it. Unless they were worried that Don would be against it, because they knew that it would take away the power he sought in starting the agency in the first damn place. That’s really another thing that bugs me about all this. Joan takes no responsibility for her own part in all of this.

            • Fjasmine

              It’s true, she doesnt. Maybe we will find out more in a year. Another reason to be frustrated about the abbreviated season.

            • Glammie

              In which case, Don didn’t cost Joan a million. There are a lot of hoops to an IPO before one happens. It’s *not* like winning a lottery ticket. And, at that time, the NASDAQ wasn’t the thing it is today. IPOs were quite a bit less common.

            • Chris

              I have a lot of quibbles with the business aspects of Mad Men at times. Like Don’s agreement. What lawyer in the world would allow him to sign that? I’m not even sure it was legal.

            • Glammie

              Well, we don’t know that he had a lawyer look at it, but most of my quibbles with Mad Men are business related. Definitely the area where the writing’s the sloppiest.

            • greenwich_matron

              I can’t see what consideration Don received for signing the contract. He gave away his indisputable right to a substantial share of the company in exchange for a probationary period as a mid level executive.

              In a real world partnership deal, they couldn’t even have gotten rid of Lane without having him arrested and found guilty. There are lots of cases where partnerships actually had to bribe an shady partner to leave because they didn’t want him around but wanted to avoid a scandal.

            • Chris

              Yes, Don’s contract took me back to first year, Contracts 101- what was his consideration? He already had the job and the shares and I assume the leave wasn’t anything written down because there was no time specified. So he was giving up millions in shares and agreeing to a list of conditions for a job he already had. It made no sense. I didn’t know the specifics of the IPO at the time but I knew it had to be far more complicated than “OK we had some meetings, crunched numbers and decided to do it, now we are all millionaires”. The purchase by McCann is a sure thing and a straight transaction where the IPO would not have been a guarantee of success.

            • greenwich_matron

              Agreed. An IPO would involve several months of the major partners convincing a myriad of relatively small investors to buy the shares. Also, Joan wouldn’t be getting money for nothing, she would be giving up her share of a substantial portion of future profits. This was a mature business: there are virtually no similarities between this and the IPO millionaires we hear about today.

            • Glammie

              Even those IPO millionaires aren’t what they used to be–companies plan IPOs and then pull them for all sorts of reason. (I’m in Silicon Valley–basically, everyone’s been wondering about Twitter for a while.) And, you’re right–it wouldn’t be that great an IPO. There are no assets–basically, it’s an investment in Don. There are a few publicly held agencies, but not many.

              Also, other than the cashing in, which might or might not happen, why would SCDP want to go public and give up absolute control? They don’t need a cash infusion . . .oh well . . .

        • greenwich_matron

          You know, if someone lost my lottery ticket, but I never told them that they had it, and the only way I could play the lottery was by forcing them to play (even though I know they don’t want to), then I hope I would be a better person than Joan is being.

        • Azucena

          MW’s answer bothers me because the lottery thing is not really analogous at all and also, why is he asking the audience how they would react? I’m not Joan and I’m not remotely like her so it doesn’t matter what I or anyone else would do. Why is the character doing it? The only thing that makes sense to me as far as motivation for her is that Don constantly makes her feel powerless and out of control like Greg did. But why is she saying that he keeps “costing her money” in the script and not addressing an underlying reason for her emotions where the audience can see it? She has always been more concerned with status and interpersonal power dynamics than money.

          It seems like other writers might have been responsible for her characterization, and it is not being canonically extended into this season in a logical way (did someone leave the writing staff?). Weiner’s explanation of her character motivation seems really superficial and almost echoes how many men tend to see the Joans of the world; as pretty mean girls.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            You had a million dollars realistically within reach, and because of the actions of a friend/coworker, that money is gone. That’s the analogy.

            But why is she saying that he keeps “costing her money” in the script and not addressing an underlying reason for her emotions where the audience can see it?
            Because that’s not the kind of show Mad Men is. Everything’s in the subtext.

            She has always been more concerned with status and interpersonal power dynamics than money.
            In the early seasons, she was focused on getting a husband, because that was the traditional route to financial stability for the rest of her life. That blew up in her face, so now she’s focused on getting financial stability by herself, not trusting anyone else to get it for her. And now she also has a mother and son to support. Why is this superficial character motivation?

            • Azucena

              I understand the analogy- but everyone has different ways of reacting to things and the onset of the anger didn’t coincide with that incident, as is said elsewhere in this thread.

              By “addressing an underlying reason” I didn’t mean that she should state it outright. I agree that wouldn’t be right for Mad Men or for Joan’s character. But for subtext to occur that illuminates an issue, attention has to paid to it in the script. For the audience to understand her motivations, there should have been a scene with Don or someone she talks frankly to (like Roger or pre-proposal Bob) in which the subtext could emerge. They chose not to do that.

              I said I think MW’s explanation of her motivation is superficial because it doesn’t connect her (after the fact) reaction to losing money with the way her character has been portrayed throughout the series. His phrase about Don’s “alcoholic disregard for her well-being” seems like it hits the mark better; I’m just confused about why he chose to emphasize the money angle when that’s only part of the issue.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Well, she blew up at him when he simultaneously tossed Jaguar and merged the company with CGC in order to win Chevy — and that was the collision of two major trigger points with her: getting rid of the client she sacrificed so much for (without talking to her about it beforehand), and losing the chance at the IPO. So yeah, the anger did coincide with the event.

            • Azucena

              But there was a point after the merger where she didn’t act this way towards him and seemed to have let it slide, or at least wasn’t openly hostile towards him. And then her demeanor changed again after the Hershey debacle. The anger of this season is what I’m talking about. And being that she didn’t really lose money as a result of his Hershey pitch (any more than anyone else has lost her by failing to woo a potential client), reading her motivation as only financial doesn’t make sense.

      • Cabernet7

        As for Alice Cooper (yes, I still love that!), she didn’t have a stake in SCDP or SC&P, only the original Sterling Cooper. And Roger didn’t answer Don’s question as to if she’s still alive.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          But is it possible for Bert to have left his stake of the new company to her in his will?

          • decormaven

            Interesting point. Who will inherit Bert’s estate? His cows at his Montana ranch? Remember, his sister said, “You love them so.”

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              Partnership shares aren’t usually inherited. SC&P likely has a life insurance policy on Bert whose proceeds they will use to buy back his shares.

            • greenwich_matron

              Yeah, but partnership charters don’t allow for partners to be fired, either. I have had to bitterly accept that Mad Men takes place in a parallel universe where corporate law, basic math, and economics are arbitrary. Divorce laws seem to be at the discretion of the writers as well.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              True enough, but there don’t seem to be any other owners of SC&P following the deaths of Lane Pryce and Frank Gleason.

            • greenwich_matron

              Agreed. They actually made an oblique reference to Frank Gleason’s buyback which suggested that the new firm had to absorb the cost. They never made any reference to Lane’s shares: his partner insurance went to pay for his loan. Having an actuarial background, I am disgusted at their insufficient insurance scheme.

            • Glammie

              Which divorce laws? Betty went to Reno. Roger had to pay out to Mona. I’m not sure Pete and Trudy have filed. Joan’s and Greg’s? We didn’t hear much about that one. All the NY ones would have to have a “fault”.

              I’m with you on the corporate, basic math and economics. It’s a weird gap given how picky Weiner is about other things.

            • greenwich_matron

              I am really quibbling about the divorce laws, but Don would not have had time to divorce Anna before he married Betty. Actually, I don’t mind when they play with the details as long as they aren’t plot drivers, so I can forgive a quickie divorce but I will hate it if next season hinges on Bert’s shares being willed to Ginsburg.

            • Glammie

              Ah, okay, I forgot that we were given the timeline on that one.

              And, yes, it would be unbelievable if the agency hadn’t already made arrangements to handle the death of its most senior partner. Well, that didn’t happen with Lane, so let’s assume they’ll get this one right–particularly as the world’s fastest sale of a business just happened.

            • decormaven

              Let’s all hope it follows a straightforward plan. Wills as plot devices have worn thin for me.

          • MartyBellerMask

            I think she sold them back to SCDP, but she probably will inherit them. Unless there are crazy surprises in his will. She is his only kin, as far as we know. I’d actually really love to see the reading of Bert’s will.

            • Cabernet7

              I believe she sold her shares to Putnam, Powell and Lowe.

            • Glammie

              Yep. I don’t think she has any ownership of the current agency. So, inheriting Bert’s stake, maybe, but I don’t think it would be set up that way.

            • Karen North

              Me too! A love child with Edna who suddenly becomes rich? Personally I hope he leaves it all to Rodger.

        • JulieTy

          Alice Cooper! Either that never clicked for me, or I forgot. Thanks for that! :-)

    • Salasalu

      Yes! The secretaries were marzipan Broadway treats, as we’re Berts socks. Jon Hamm’ s face & tears..the relief in Peggy’s face when he said he was ‘going back to work’
      Don might finally be on a precipice of hope…

    • JulieTy

      *sigh* Two Downton posts, and the last Mad Style for months . . . is it 2015 yet?

      • Alloy Jane

        I know, right? I’m actually probably one of the few that wishes Mad Style posts went up on Thursday so we can milk each one to the max. And here they go, giving us early Mad Style with a ton of awesome Downton Abbey costuming. What will be left for tomorrow? Where do we go from here?

        And more importantly, how on earth have they done so much in so short a time? Uncles TLo must not be sleeping to give us all these goodies so quickly.

        • not_Bridget

          “Where do we go from here?” Thinking back to musical numbers from Mostly Not Musical shows–Once More With Feeling!

          Tom & Lorenzo do their masterful number with backup supplied by The Bitter Kitten Chorus!

        • JulieTy

          We are so lucky. :-)

    • schadenfreudelicious

      Bert was a serious collector of the modern impressionists..when I saw the Pollock hanging behind him I couldn’t help but wonder who will claim that Rothko in his office…

      • Capt. Renault

        Dibs.

        • decormaven

          I want the Oriental print of the octopus and the woman.

          • Capt. Renault

            Yes, the Hokusai. You have an eye for quality!

            • decormaven

              But unfortunately not the wallet. :-)

            • VDbloom

              Are the paintings featured in the show actual Rothkos and Pollocks? If so, I would love to know what they are worth today.

            • Qitkat

              No they are not. I recall several years ago that the art department of MM was asked about the paintings in an interview, and the response was that they are intended to remind viewers of specific artists, but they are actually original paintings done for the show. The interview may have been on the Basket of Kisses blog, @DeborahLipp:disqus, would be able to corroborate or disavow this ;)

          • Mod_girl

            The guys on the “Mad Men Happy Hour Podcast” so lovingly refer to that print as “Tentacle Porn”

            • T C

              Tentacle Porn is an entire genre of Japanese art, both old wood block and modern varied media. It’s just one subset of the porn genre, much of which was very objectionable to the westerners who arrived in the 19th century, ending Japan’s isolation.

    • sojourneryouth

      It’s kind of amazing how much variety print, color, and even embellishments make in Peggy’s “uniform” of short-sleeved, crew-necked dresses. Even thought there is that consistency in silhouette, each look is pretty different. And yes, I don’t think Peggy has ever looked more pretty and sophisticated than she did in that green and blue dress for the pitch.

      So funny to see Kellie Martin playing a housewife and mother, but Janie sure did a great job of giving her period frump-frocks to wear. She was such a fixture with Life Goes On and all of the TV movies, and I remember her in all the teen magazines back in the day. Good to see her getting good work. NOT good to realize how old I’m getting!

      • MilaXX

        I remember when she joined the cast of ER and was all modern looking. A far cry from the slightly nerdy young lady on Life Goes On.

        • Alloy Jane

          Holy shit that’s Becca???? Ay-may-zing! She’s unrecognizable, more so than Neve.

      • MsKitty

        I didn’t wanna believe that was Kellie Martin, but then I realized Life Goes On premiered around 25 years ago and I did the math. Yikes.

        • andrea

          lol. My first thought was “OMG she looks old!” Then quietly noted to stay away from any mirrors for the rest of the day.

          • sojourneryouth

            Hahaha! Gravity has presents for all of us!

    • Salasalu

      First Bert’s Rothko..now the Pollack. Sigh….

    • Gillian

      Speaking of Sally always carrying Don with her even when she’s imitating Betty – I was surprised you didn’t comment about the plaid bag she carried while dressed and made up to look Betty-like… you might even say it’s an allusion to how here relationship with Don is part of her luggage.

    • MartyBellerMask

      I love that EVERYTHING is a slight, in Harry’s eyes. To Peggy: “You got TWO beers???”

      • Bower Bird

        I love how she ignored him.

        • Betty Draper

          I love how easily Roger told him he lost the partnership deal.

          • Betty Draper

            And how Joan told him “You’re not even a partner yet!”
            Actually it was the only thing Joan said this season which I liked…

      • Chris

        Poor Harry, he will always be a second class citizen with that bunch. I feel bad for him a lot even if he is a jerk at times.

        • Cabernet7

          Yeah, I still feel bad that he got screwed out of the partnership windfall. Even though he’s an asshole, and he should have just signed the agreement already!

          • Chris

            Yes, he was trying to cheat his wife out of extra money! That’s the thing about Mad Men, everyone can be horrible at times yet you still find yourself pulling for them. They’re very rich characters.

        • mad girl

          So true. I really think his character reflects his job. He may be crass and unsophisticated but he does understand the way of the future. Harry is the embodiment of TV.

      • Kathryn Sanderson

        They’re Old Style! Nice touch, given that they’re in Indianapolis and within shouting distance of Chicagoland. (If you shout *really* loud.) Also, it’s kind of a nice touch (or fun coincidence) that they’re in Indy in an episode that initially aired the day of the Indy 500.

        • FibonacciSequins

          And they used old cans with the pull tabs. Nostalgia!

          • decormaven

            And crackerjack finds on behalf of the set decorators. Mad Men’s team is best in the business.

      • abby536

        The great thing is that it WAS a slight. But mentioning it just makes it worse. Harry never seems to learn whereas Pete seems to be getting the hang of when he should and shouldn’t voice his outrage.

    • LorrainePromo

      Loved Sally’s purple top, brings back memories! Wanted one so bad, never got one. And hunky football dude wearing USC colors and OJ’s number, creepy to remember he was so loved back then.

      • Cabernet7

        Good on Sally for passing him over!

    • VicD

      Joan’s necklace for her “angry” dress looks like a gold and pearl rattlesnake rattle. Even her necklace is pissed off.

      • P M

        Wasn’t it magnificent? She needed a Cleopatra gown and Liz Taylor eyeliner to go with it :)

    • ChelleinStL

      As always, just wow. I’m always amazed at the details you guys ferret out that mere mortals like myself seem to miss.

      However, Re: Sally’s kiss. I kinda thought the kid in the plaid shirt was more like Don (in essence, not appearance) than the hunky football player. Don is a loner and a dreamer. He can still see the wonder in things and was disheartened to hear Sally sound so cynical about the moon landing. I think she chose to kiss the guy who showed her something new and would rather be alone with the stars and his own thoughts than listen to everyone else’s opinions about how he should feel.

      I’ve always thought that Don Draper is the persona Dick Whitman had to wear in order to “go places.” But Dick is the dreamer, the loner and the guy who just wants to be creative and not deal with all the other BS. I thought Sally felt more in sympatico with that kid in the plaid shirt because she has a rare window into her Dad’s soul that most don’t. The part of her father that Sally carries within herself related more easily to the plaid shirt kid than the cynical, somewhat bullying (callback to Cutlers earlier comments to Don) hunky football player.

      Just my $.02.

      • oat327

        I completely agree. Don looks the part because he’s handsome, but even Betty realized he’s not the empty suit football stud–he was “the kind of guy a teenage anthropologist would marry.” She was intrigued by him and his depth.

        • Chris

          But Betty thought he was a football star. When she found out about Dick Whitman she was stunned because she thought Don was the football star who was mad at his parents. He really sells that BMOC persona.

          • charitablearm

            Didn’t Cutler call Don a jock (“football player in a suit”) when he expected him to take a swing at him about the breach of contract letter? So at the very least, i think it’s really astute to make this comparison, whichever one you pick as mini-Don. (Of course, I think Cutler misjudges him, but of course I hate the IBM , along with my other ex post facto opinions!) For me at least, this tells me that Cutler’s misread him, and in the last half-season, whatever happens, Don comes out on top, somehow.

            • Chris

              Yes it shows how well Don projects his whole persona. People just assume he’s been on top and led a privileged and charmed life his entire existence. That’s why his whorehouse pitch was like a bomb dropped on everyone. I’m convinced that if Don had just been drunk and goofy for the Hershey’s pitch Roger would have stuck up for him with the partners. It was the poor, trashy upbringing that freaked Roger out. He needed time to come to terms with it. Don wasn’t the all American golden boy everyone wanted and expected him to be. In Roger’s favor, he decided he did still love Don anyway.

            • Glammie

              The interesting thing is that some of the silver-spoon characters–Roger, Bert, even Pete seem to have an easier time coming to terms with Don’s background than several of the other characters. Actually, I don’t know if it’s ever come up with Peggy.

              Totally off-subject: “This never happened. You’ll be amazed how much it never happened.”–is how Don coped with his sexual assault. Just sort of hit me that Don’s distancing himself from his reality started then and there. There’s a lot Don is running from–but that’s the particular “this.”

              Okay, back to current episode.

            • Chris

              I’d say Bert was 100% a pragmatist. He didn’t care that Don wasn’t even his real name so as long as Don was valuable Bert could get over it. Pete always idolized Don and he believes Don has no equal in what he does. Plus Pete is surprisingly progressive in a lot of ways and is a business pragmatist too. Trudy was “new money” and he didn’t have a problem with it. Roger the spoiled “aristocrat” likely needed a few months to come to grips with it.

              I think this is the first time in Don’s life that he isn’t using “this never happened” to cope with anything. His new mantra seems to be Freddy’s “Do the work.”

            • Glammie

              Pete tried to destroy Don with who he was once, but when Don took Bert’s advice and didn’t fire him, Pete came around. I also think Pete, though to the manner born, kind of despises his own class, given his own awful family.

              Was Roger actually that upset with it or the throwing away the client. We have to assume they were all egged on heavily by Jim Cutler, who was seeking payback for Ted Chaough. (Just what is Cutler’s private life anyway? He’s a voyeur, but what else?)

            • Chris

              Don’s background is the only way I can reconcile Roger being so upset with Don over Hershey, especially after Roger’s antics over the years. Don was “vulgar” and “déclassé”. Cutler is a mystery. I can’t remember is there a Mrs. Cutler? The first time we saw him at the awards ceremony he was creeping on Megan. That kind of set the tone for him with me.

            • Glammie

              I’d forgotten those terms, so, yes–that would be background. But he also seems to have taken it all less seriously in the end. At some point, it became a story no doubt.

              We’ve never seen a Mrs. Cutler, but then we don’t see him outside the office. He probably lives there, circling endlessly like the shark that he is.

            • Chris

              I didn’t mean to imply Roger said those thing specifically. That was just my take on what his reaction was. I think my using quotes must have mislead you- sorry! You didn’t forget anything.

            • Glammie

              I forget lots of things–that’s the problem! Roger seems to have thought the leave was temporary–very Roger to just kind of roll with things. What’s his comment post Lawn Mower–“Sometime, somewhere this has happened in the ad biz.” That’s not quite it, but I think that’s Roger’s attitude–yeah, we lost Hershey cuz Don decided become Dick mid-pitch, but he can come back when he pulls himself together. What? You’re seriously mad about this? Still? You’re kidding.

            • abby536

              Wasn’t he cruising on Meredith at some point too? I wonder if he put her up to spying on Don and she thought making out with him would help the cause?

            • Glammie

              I would never-ever trust Meredith as a spy–poor dear’s a complete blurter.

            • Azucena

              Didn’t Cutler say that a client once cupped his wife’s breast? So there was one at one point at least. In my headcanon she looks exactly like him with a flipped blonde wig.

            • greenmelinda

              Is that Shalimar?

            • SylviaFowler

              I don’t know that it started exactly then and there… he was severely physically and emotionally abused from the start by his “parents”, which is its own world of shame/hell, but the rape and its immediate aftermath were definitely the grave he packed and stomped on with the most ferocity.

            • Glammie

              What hit me is that he’s basically telling Peggy to dissociate–and that’s specifically what Dick Whitman is doing at that specific point. He just kind of goes numb. It’s very much a coping mechanism of a rape or incest victim. It’s worth noting that Peggy doesn’t really need to follow his advice. She knuckles down to work and gets on with her life, but she comes to terms with it and can talk about it when she needs to. She can tell Pete. She can tell Don that she thinks about it at parks. She can connect it to her feelings for Julio. Don doesn’t talk about it–unless you count what he said to Hershey as talking about it indirectly.

            • SylviaFowler

              Yep, that’s what he’s telling her to do, and I agree: it’s an extremely common coping mechanism for sexual abuse victims. I don’t think it’s been addressed, but I’m interested in how much about the rape (if anything) that he remembered until last season. The way the story was shot, it made it seem like he had buried the memory so deeply that it wasn’t until he was high as a kite, depressed and pulling out the soup ad that he was triggered and remembered it. However, he’s been sort of low-level aware that he has issues about feeling not in control of his sexuality (e.g. the fever dream about the woman who won’t stop trying to have sex with him even though he doesn’t want to and is sick, the secretary who takes advantage of his drunkenness the night of the Christmas party, even the defensive gut reaction to Sal being sexually harassed which was completely the opposite of the way he really felt about Sal [sympathetic]).
              The Hershey pitch was him talking about the child abuse and poverty that he’s a victim (survivor) of; he’s not talking indirectly or directly about the rape. But like I said, that’s a hell all its own.

            • Glammie

              The “this never happened” and the recollection of the abuse happen so far apart that it only occurred to me that there’s a pretty direct connection. Also explains why Don, who has always shown signs of decency and empathy, was so cruel to Adam. It actually wasn’t just having his identity revealed–after all, he actually didn’t collapse when Pete revealed who he was, though he was scared enough to want to run away with Rachel. The need to cut off Adam was also his need to really, really cut off the trauma of his past–“This never happened.”

              Which makes the gist of the Carousel pitch all the more ironic–it’s all about recalling memories when Don’s life has been based on forgetting more deeply than we even realize at that point in the series. Looking back, it’s clear Weiner always knew that this was at the core of his character.

              Peggy and Don’s greatest pitches are also the most tragically ironic. A man who can’t bear his past focuses on nostalgia; a woman who gave up her child emphasizes the need for family.

            • Cabernet7

              In “The Suitcase”, Don asked her if she knew who the father of the baby was. I remember reading a post somewhere that someone thought that Don assumed he thought she was just a slut who who’d slept with so many men that she didn’t know which of the men could have been the father. I thought it was more that since she’d blocked out the pregnancy, he might have thought that she was also blocking out a rape. I also wonder how much he remembered of the rape before remembering it during “The Crash” episode. I do know that when I re-watched the episodes with Bobbie Barrett, I began to see that relationship in a new light. Their first time, in the car, Don said “I don’t want this”, and Bobbie grabbed his crotch and said something along the lines of “I can tell you do”. It was so much like the rape, it must have been like a trigger of that memory for him. It seems like the relationship with Bobbie was so different than his other affairs up to that point. I wondered if the whole Dom/sub thing was common to his relationships before Bobbie, or if that started with her.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              This makes me want to rewatch all of the Don/Bobbie scenes, to how often she initatied sexual activity, and Don’s reaction to it.

            • Glammie

              Interesting–that’s the other part–if you connect the two, then it becomes clear he thought Peggy had been raped. That’s why some part of him came and found her. He really was trying to help her in the way no one had helped him–you can survive, you can forget about this. It wasn’t really the right advice, but he was there, on her side, when no one else was.

              Bobbie/Don–wow. That also explains the BDSM aspects of the relationship–both the compulsion to be with her and the sheer anger. We don’t see that with Rachel, Midge or Suzanne. He doesn’t like being used, but he also doesn’t have a good sense how to stop it.

            • MartyBellerMask

              WHOA. You guys are really onto something. The “this” that never happened, was the assumed sexual assault, not the resulting pregnancy.

            • abby536

              I’m not certain Don assumes Peggy was raped. In the Suitcase he asks her if she knows who the father was. I saw that as assuming a certain degree of sexual freedom for Peggy. After all, she did flirt with him (poorly) the first day they met. And he wasn’t totally wrong, she did conceive that baby with a virtual stranger that very day.

              Although possibly this was a response to the fact that her Mom blames him and he is reworking his thinking right on the spot. If Peggy was assaulted she’d be less likely to keep the identity of the man a secret from her family.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Yeah, I don’t think there’s any indication that Don thinks she was raped. The fact that she talked poignantly to him about how hard it was to walk past playgrounds because she gave up her baby; that just doesn’t give the impression of being a rape victim.

            • Cabernet7

              But he didn’t know that before he asked the question.

            • abby536

              That settles it! I need to rewatch the Suitcase. And some Joan and Don interactions. And, you know, each of the past 7 episodes because the 3rd time through is the charm.

              I love that the writing lends itself to so many intelligent interpretations.

            • Alice Teeple

              Yeah, I agree. He did say something to the effect of “don’t try to give me morality lessons” right before that exchange. That came from an assumption that she’s been around the block a few times, herself.

            • Cabernet7

              That doesn’t mean he couldn’t also wonder if she had been raped. I just think that, along with the rest of the audience, Don was trying to understand how Peggy could have been pregnant and not known about it. He knows she’s an intelligent woman. What could have made her block that out? Could it be that the conception was so traumatic that she just blocked out any possible reminder of it? Sure, we all know the truth, but Don didn’t. And again, it’s not that he was convinced that was the reason, just that it might have crossed his mind, leading him to ask her if she knew who the father was.

            • Glammie

              I don’t think it’s so much that he thought she was, but that he thought it was possible and the thought came to his mind because of what had happened to him.

            • Cabernet7

              It’s not that he was certain she was raped, but thought it was a possibility. That since she blocked out the whole pregnancy, did she block out the conception too? I didn’t mean that he assumed Peggy hadn’t had a degree of sexual freedom.

            • Glammie

              I think if Don thought it were just a matter of Peggy’s sexual freedom, he’d ask if the father knew or if she wanted a shotgun marriage. This is not a period of a lot of anonymous hook-ups. I think this particularly because of what we now know about Don’s background and his advice to her, which was so much what he did during his own assault. “This never happened.” “Do you know who the father was?” is a way of subtly addressing the possibility of rape.

            • 3hares

              If it’s subtly addressing that it’s doing it in a way that’s shorthand for saying she had more than one partner. That’s how Peggy took it, which is why her answer was “Of course.” And as others have said, wasn’t the conversation leading up to that referring to Peggy not getting to lecture Don on morality?

            • abby536

              Or subtly addressing the fact that she was institutionalized over her denial? I can see him thinking that someone who denied the pregnancy might deny the incident that led to it, even if no violence was involved.

              Yet Peggy’s answer seemed so calmly matter of fact. I suppose I think if that’s what Don was getting at she would have known and maybe answered differently?

            • Glammie

              I don’t think it occurs to her because it’s so outside what actually did happen to her–Pete was pushy, but it was consensual and Pegs went back for seconds later.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Oof, that makes Megan’s recent crotch-grabbing to coax him into the threesome especially unpleasant.

            • Glammie

              Yep. And he emotionally checked out. Never brings it up the next morning. “This never happened.”

              What is it he says to Betty about sex not meaning much to him when they hook up at camp?

            • SylviaFowler

              He gloomily asks, “why is sex the definition of being close to someone?”

              The revelation of the rape has made me love Anna so much more than I already did (I thought it wasn’t possible!) because in addition to her accepting him for who he is, I don’t think she ever preyed on him like that.

            • Glammie

              Yeah, why couldn’t the whore have just fed him soup? But at the same time he has his own sexual compulsions and at the time he said it, he was still pretty tied into the Sylvia business, I think. In some sense, he never feels in control of his sexuality, but he’s also always fighting for that control–so, the creepy scene with Sylvia where it tells her not to leave her room.

              I think it’s clear Anna never preyed on him.

              Also explains some of his reactions to poor Betty–in her bikini, the total failure to arouse him in her sexy black lingerie. And why he’s married a model and an actress–women who can be posed and directed.

            • SylviaFowler

              Yeah, I mentioned that in the recap comment section here of that episode I think. That if there was ever a crossing of the Rubicon for worse in their marriage, that would probably be it. It’s not Megan’s fault because she didn’t know, and I’m sure he doesn’t hold it against her, but that “I don’t want to/Yes you do” stood out as such a big YIKES to me.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              For the purpose of clarity, he said, “I don’t want anything right now,” not “I don’t want to.” Personally, I wouldn’t have been so aggressive in the face of that stated non-desire, but. Sigh. Megan was high on something, anyway (not that that’s an excuse).

            • SylviaFowler

              I was knowingly paraphrasing a bit, but the substance of his denial is the same.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              I agree.

            • MartyBellerMask

              I forgot that particular scene, but I have always felt that Don’s “relationship” with Bobbie was not necessarily consensual. He was sleeping with her to woo the client (ironically, her husband). This is why he was so hard on Sal. Why was Sal above giving sexual favors for the good of the company, when Don had to do it?

              Your theory about Peggy holds water, but I’d never thought of it like that.

            • Glammie

              Ohhh, now that’s interesting. Bobbie wasn’t in his usual categories of mysterious brunettes or cool, elegant blondes. It was consensual in that he was agreeing to it, but, yeah, it was part of his job. Wouldn’t have happened otherwise.

            • Glammie

              Just watched the clip when Peggy picks up Don and Bobbie after the crash. He tells Peggy no one can know about what happened and adds, “It’s business.”

              Yep, he’s doing what Sal couldn’t and what Joan did, but less blatantly in terms of fees. Of course, the cost of doing business is that this affair is the one that really sets his marriage on its downward spiral.

            • Chickadeep

              “The interesting thing is that some of the silver-spoon
              characters–Roger, Bert, even Pete seem to have an easier time coming to
              terms with Don’s background than several of the other characters.” Good observation; this reaction is not uncommon, actually. The true silver spoon folks (especially Really Old Money Peter Dyckman “we used to own half of Manhattan” Cambell, whose place in society remains secure despite his parents pissing away the family fortune) often take up with bohemian types and are intrigued by people of different backgrounds and humble origins, romanticizing rustic simplicity. They don’t see t”the little people” as a threat of any kind. They ARE sometimes annoyed and threatened by the New Money types, who attempt to use their newer wealth to access their social sphere and beloved, exclusive institutions.

              Whereas people further down the social ladder, those from modest or mundane origins who don’t feel secure yet in terms of where they fit in society, often “kiss up and kick down,” meaning they flatter and ingratiate to those above them on the social ladder, and are threatened by (and dismissive or overtly hostile to) those “below” them socioeconomically speaking. So: Pete solicits marketing advice from the African American elevator operator; Bert Cooper knows he must be discreet in his request to pull Dawn off the front desk for appearance’s sake; while Joan and Paul (ambitious social climbers) make straight-up, public racist remarks or overcompensate to offset their discomfort with the people reminding them that they too are “other.”

            • Glammie

              Yep, that’s kind of what I was thinking, but more thought out and well said. The strivers aren’t direct competition until they actually make it. I bet, if it’s ever brought up, we’ll find that Jim Cutler doesn’t come from as posh a background as Roger.

              Pete’s a kind of betwixt-and-between. He has the name and the connections, but not the money he once had. So he’s been both offended by and admiring of Dick Whitman. Pete has to work for a living and has a pile of ambition himself.

            • Cabernet7

              That’s what made me fall in love with Roger again this year. I was over him by the end of season 6. I’ve loved that Roger has come back to me this season!

            • DCCaliChick

              I think the revelation of the poor, trashy upbringing is another reason Joan is angry with Don. Especially given their past attraction/flirtation, I think she is just grossed out by him now. Joan has always been a snob. On some level, she is probably ashamed of her previous attraction and it makes her angry because there is nothing she can do to change it. She does not seem to be getting over it as Roger has.

          • Cabernet7

            Yes, Betty fell out of love with him when she realized that he wasn’t really the “football hero who hated his father”. The years of his cheating and assorted bullshit ended it for her too, but the final nail in the coffin was that he wasn’t the image she fell in love with, IMO.

            • http://bidonica.wordpress.com/ Poggy

              Perhaps I have a bit of a positive bias towards Betty, but I’d argue that she would have felt betrayed by *any* version of Don’s past that wasn’t the one he sold to her, not just the one where it turns out he was shit poor and stole another man’s identity. She had three children with that man, was supposed to – ideally – spend the rest of her life with him – and it turns out it was alla lie and he was keeping an act. That’s a pretty crushing realization I think, and I think it also explains Roger having a harder time coping with it than Bert and Pete. There might be classism at play but I think it’s safe to say he’s the one person Don can genuinely call “friend” at the agency, so of course Roger is struck by the revelation he actually didn’t know him that much.

            • Cabernet7

              I basically agree with you about Betty, Poppy. But I do think Betty had an idealized image of Don in her mind when she married him, as she said in The Gypsy and the Hobo “the football hero who hated his father”, just as he had an idealized version of her in his mind of the warm, angelic mother he never had that he described in “Shoot”. Neither image had much basis in reality. Another reason (of many) that it’s a bad idea to marry virtual strangers (as Betty did Henry, and Don did Megan. I don’t know the details of how long Betty and Don knew each other before marrying).

            • Bluebell

              I always think the interpretation that ‘Betty rejected Don when she found out who he really was’ is rather harsh.

              The level of betrayal and shock for Betty in finding out that her husband was not in fact Don Draper is hard to comprehend. That would be so much worse than finding out your partner was unfaithful, and the pain of infidelity is severe. It would be deeply traumatic to found out your spouse was not who you thought.

              Betty rejected the man who betrayed her on a grand scale. She did not necessarily reject him because he was born-in-a-barn Dick Whitman.

              A couple might, just might, be able to rebuild after a betrayal of that magnitude, but Betty and Don were never that couple.

            • http://bidonica.wordpress.com/ Poggy

              Yeah, exactly. Sure, Betty is concerned about appearances and everything but Don’s betrayal goes way beyond that. As awful as it was, the cheating is probably something she was somewhat equipped to deal with, because to some degree a wife was expected to tolerate it (at what cost, though – I guess that Mona Sterling locking herself in the toilet with a bottle of gin might be a possible outcome for that scenario). But Don also lied about who he was, on top of several other occasions where he kept her in the dark about things and gaslighted her. To be honest, it’s not hard for me to imagine the outrage and the hurt at finding out you’ve basically been subject to a long con. To me, that also explains Betty’s otherwise disproportioned retort at Henry a couple of episodes ago. Contradicting his official political stance with the guests wasn’t a smart move on her part, but it’s not surprising that finding out Henry doesn’t tell her things made her see red; as they say where I’m from, “once you’ve been scalded by hot water you’re afraid of cold water as well”.

        • bawoman

          Don is a mix between the 2 brothers. Hot and handsome,like the older one, with the sense of depth and mystery of the younger one.

      • nosniveling

        Don was no football playing jock. Nix on the comparison- but it would be a riot to see Betty go for Rutgers!

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          Betty always thought he was one, though. She admitted as much when she found out the truth about him.

      • SylviaFowler

        100% agree. Don is much more the idealistic geek than the lazy football star. Remember the shy, ugly duckling dork he was at Sally’s age. And although he grew into a Ty Power-like swan, he has always been a romantic artist at heart. He’s the one who says, “what man laid on his back counting stars and thought of a number?” to the computer guy. He’s a lover not a fighter (horrified by war, not enamored of it) who most loves to read and create, to write and draw and tell stories. That’s how he gets Ted (and himself) to hang on a bit longer in this episode: “forget about business, it sucks, let’s just create art like we always wanted to do.” Even the swashbuckling, vine-to-vine part of his personality is the vein of romantic heroes like Robin Hood and Tarzan.

        • Bluebell

          The moon watching scene with the two brothers really called back to that line of Don’s; “what man laid on his back counting stars and thought of a number?”.

          One brother did – 25 billion. The other brother saw the romance of the universe.

      • carnush

        Nicely put.

        • ChelleinStL

          Thank you. My dad was a “Don Draper/Dick Whitman.” Two men cohabitating the same body. Had to be “Don” in the world to escape the tragedy of his childhood (and he struggled with many of the same demons as the fictional Draper) but longed to just be “Dick” until the day he died. Sometimes I swear I could write Sally’s life story.

          • Betty Draper

            Ditto.

          • http://www.wordydoodles.com WordyDoodles

            I’d like to read it!

      • kapalabhati

        The two boys were Don/Dick.

      • mwynn13

        I’m not sure about that kiss. The boy was much more gawky, childish and socially undeveloped than Sally is; I’m wondering how much of that kiss was her just experimenting with messing with people. They deliberately had him dressed like a little boy, and ended the scene with his mother calling to him about his bedtime, after which Sally immediately pulled out her cigarette and Betty pose. Even if he was more interesting than his older brother, I have a hard time buying that Sally’s interest in him is more than passing.

        • http://www.bicyclemeditations.org cpetersky

          Not simply, “experimenting with messing with people”, but specifically, experimenting with her sexual power over males.

          • mwynn13

            Yep. She clearly got a kick out of completely rattling him.

    • Susan Velazquez

      Can’t believe we didn’t have to wait until Wednesday for this!

    • TonyGo

      When I saw Megan’s bikini top, I immediately thought “Howard Johnson’s” . This was where Megan left Don that first time, no?

      • Chris

        Me too! I didn’t realize until the recap they were Burger Chef colors.

      • Kathryn Sanderson

        Nice catch!

    • Capt. Renault

      Thank you so much, again, kindly uncles! Both for this, and for the entire season — you’re doing yeomans’ work, and you do it so well. Bravo!

    • Susan Velazquez

      Can we comment how groovy Football Hunk’s striped pants were?

      • siriuslover

        Can I comment on how I thought that football hunk was Glen Bishop when they first arrived. His face was a bit far away and all I saw was that football jersey. I was like, I thought Glen had a sister, and that doesn’t look like Helen, and why would Betty have her over anyway?

        • Hrfe

          I can’t be the only one who hopes Glen Bishop shows up for Part II, can I?

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            How could Matt Weiner resist?

          • decormaven

            He’s a shoo-in.

      • snarkalicious

        My dad had those pants! And was a decidedly ungroovy person, so they must have been pretty mainstream.

        • Grumpy Girl

          I had those pants (from a neighbor boy, because all clothes got passed down through our neighborhood.)

      • VirginiaK

        I’ll join you on that one and add, groovy and Jumpin’Jack Flash-ish.

      • brown-eyed girl

        I squealed when I saw those. My brother had a pair that he wore in college (in 1969). Love.

      • Kathryn Sanderson

        Did anyone notice how those striped pants called back to the ones Mitchell (Arnie and Sylvia’s son) wore when Sally first noticed him? (That started a chain reaction of Sally and her friend writing the list of things they liked about him, including his butt, the friend leaving it for him to find, Sally going back to retrieve the list and catching Don and Sylvia in flagrante.) In turn, Mitchell’s striped pants called back to the ones worn by the guy who got an HJ from Peggy in the movie theater. Striped pants=sex? Horniness? Something.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        My husband had a wardrobe-full of striped bell bottoms. They were quite the thing.

    • Judy_J

      Thank you.

    • siriuslover

      WOW! A Day early, thanks guys! I loved your opening set direction explanation. It allowed me to see their offices in greater detail and get some visual explanation for Ted. I also loved the color / stripes analysis with Peggy / Julio. I’m gonna miss that little guy.

    • Bower Bird

      I love how Fred Flintstone-looking Harry is in these images.

      Also, my older sister had a shirt near-identical to Sally’s (the lace-up one), but in Pepto pink. I felt like Sally kissed that boy, in a way, to make his day. Or, at the very least, make it more about the kiss than the moon.

      • DeniseSchipani

        That telescope kid definitely had an effect on Sally. when she came out she asked if anyone else was there, because ‘she didn’t want anyone to give her shit about smoking.” And he says, “smoking causes cancer.” And she stopped. Yes, she lit up later, but still. and she giggled a little, or at least wasn’t so too-cool-for-school when she was looking through the telescope and didn’t see anything, and he asked if she could see her eyelashes. I think she was having a pure moment with this boy that she didn’t expect to have; she let her guard down (and heaven knows her guard must be up 24-7 in the Francis house), and that’s why she felt the impulse to kiss him.

        • VirginiaK

          About Sally and that boy – but I can’t tie this to their clothes! – did anybody else think she was either practice-kissing him, or kissing him out of an overflow of libido that was activated by the shirtless older brother? I saw it as a kind of kiss a girl might give somebody when she is kissing-stimulated by somebody else. It’s not mean, but it’s not ultimately meaningful to the girl, though it may be for the boy.

          • Laylalola

            I saw it as quite deliberate — he could not be more opposite from his cynical studly older brother with his all-out geek love for the stars after Don had just called her about the walk on the moon.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              Also, it shows that she listens to her father. I get the sense that if Don didn’t approve of a boy, Sally would think long and hard before dating him again, but if Betty didn’t approve, she would keep going out with him, just to make Betty mad.

          • Alloy Jane

            No, Mad Men is too deliberate for something like that. Someone in the regular post mentioned that this was Sally choosing Dick Whitman over Don Draper and I agree. Part of Sally’s dilemma is that she’s so many people but never herself, and here was this boy who was so real and unpretentious that she couldn’t help but respond to his honesty. She started off trying to impress the older brother, but in the end she was impressed by the thoughtful, passionate younger brother.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            That’s kinda how I saw it — “hell, I might as well kiss someone” — but that doesn’t invalidate the other responses to your question. I do think it’s still meaningful, and a good sign for Sally, that she ended up kissing him and not the dumb jock.

            • VirginiaK

              And – I saw it as a kiss bestowed by her, not a kiss arising out of or kindling chemistry between them. I wasn’t left feeling that something really happened in the kids, just that they had crossed a threshold and joined the ranks of the kissed.

          • http://victoriapavlova.com Victoria Pavlova

            That’s how it looked to me – she was very shy in the kitchen and very dolled up, and she parroted the words of the hunk-guy to Don and then she went outside, saw the kid, he was nice to her and she just went for it.

    • The Versatile Chef

      “You can bet those eggs were cooked in bacon grease.”

      Around my family, this is know as “The Meal That Killed My Parents”. (Yes, we do have a dark sense of humor)

      • MilaXX

        My family has unusual eating habits for one with Southern roots. My gram always cooked hers in butter. I remember being horrible the first time I slept over a friends house and they cooked the eggs in bacon greased. I’m slightly picky about food and can’t eat anything that looks ugly. Nothing looked nastier to me than those eggs getting all brown from the bacon grease.

        • PastryGoddess

          My family is from NC, and we always cooked our eggs in butter. Bacon grease was saved for frying other things

        • Alloy Jane

          When I was a teen, my pack of derelict friends used to make fun of me for once saying “eggs cook better in butter.” It may have been the delivery more than the statement but they would clown me for it all the time. For years, actually. I eventually had the opportunity to prove my point and was subjected to a very Seussian admission that eggs do cook better in butter.

          • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

            Eggs do cook better in butter. One of the best lines in Catch-22 is about fresh eggs “snapping exotically” in a pool of fresh butter.

        • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

          Our eggs were always fried in butter and the bacon was cooked separately.

      • DemmeFatale

        My mom used to “baste” the eggs (she flipped up the bacon grease over the tops). Simpler than “over-easy.”
        These eggs looked like that.

    • appliquer

      Wow.Just.Wow.

    • Meg0GayGuys6

      I squealed with glee at the early MadStyle post! Bravo, as usual!

      I was looking to see if there was a tie between all those Pollack (or Pollack-esque) paintings in the room. The old Meg would think it’s a coincidence, but the post-TLo Meg, like a good MadStyle Detective, would think nothing is a coincidence, and this is just another brilliant way to tie all the painting-having characters together (I think there were 3-4 throughout).

      I’m bummed we have to wait 11 long months, but that gives me plenty of time to rewatch all of the episodes on Netflix and reread all of the Mad Men/Mad Style posts.

      • MilaXX

        I really need to pace myself. I burned through season 1 already. Even with stops to zoom in on various things.

        • makeityourself

          Didn’t you just start an hour ago?

          • MilaXX

            No I actually started last night. I’m right in the middle of 2.1

            • Lisa_Co

              The commentaries are great, Mila. There are generally 2 per episode and Janie generally does one per season (except for S6 which had no commentaries). But those are only on the DVD/Blu Rays.

            • MilaXX

              bummer, I’m watching on netflix. I don’t think they add the dvd extra stuff.

    • jackiexx

      Hey Uncles! Thanks again for another lovely season (albeit a half-season) of Mad Style Posts. These are a join every week just like your reviews, and bring a special, complex, and thoughtful look at the episodes in way I don’t get with any other show.

      As for the episode, what a fantastic send off for Bert Cooper, and when the panned to Roger’s meeting I immediately was like oh my gosh its roger’s mistress meat place! I don’t know why the hanging sausages in the window were always so distinctive to me

      Your comments on the set direction in the scene with Ted drinking were brilliant, a cracked-open globe really says a lot about Ted’s view of the world right then.

      Until next time,

      XOXO bitterkitten(woops wrong show)

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        I don’t know why the hanging sausages in the window were always so distinctive to me
        Probably because…hanging sausages…

      • Lisa_Co

        If anyone is interested, there is an article in today’s NYT about Bert’s final scene with an extended question/answer section with Robert Morse.

        • ChelleinStL

          There’s also an interview with Morse on the Rolling Stone website. He’s astounded by the reaction to his swan song. He sounds like such a delightful man.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Vulture has a delightful interview with Allan Havey.
          FTR, I tend to avoid Vulture’s Mad Men stuff (too many “articles”, very little substance) but this was nice.

    • Violina23

      I don’t have much to add other than to say thanks for the time and effort you put into these style recaps. They make me think about the show in ways I never would have otherwise. They are engrossing and fascinating. AMC should pay you a royalty ;-)

      Thank you, Uncles!

    • Glammie

      MadStyle! Thank you darlings, I’ve been having a crappy week and Wednesdays are always overloaded. You really did perk up this Unborn Fawn.

      (And costumed signs of a Roger/Mona reconciliation–better yet. Mona makes a good partner for a guy who’s decided to be a leader after all.)

      • Betsy

        When Mona reappeared I remarked how much I like her with Roger. He doesn’t seem to fit with Joan anymore. The plaid thing is promising.

    • marlie

      I wonder if it means anything that, when Roger is watching the lunar landing with Mona, his son in law, and grandson, he’s the only one not in a mostly neutral color. The SiL practically blends into his chair, and Mona matches the couch and background, even with her plaid pattern. The grandson’s shirt has a little more color to it, and maybe that ties him to Roger somwhow. Or, it could all just not mean anything at all.

      • Kathryn Sanderson

        Looking at the still in this post, I noticed that Roger’s grandson is wearing blue plaid pants and a red-and-white striped shirt…patriotic color combo, but stripes and plaid together??? Eek! Does it signify anything (the poor kid’s ruptured family?) or is it just some little-kid thing, or not a thing at all?

        • elevan

          Those blue plaid pants are Roger’s. Kid’s sitting on his lap, so you’re seeing Roger’s knee.

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            Aha! Of course!

    • Chris

      I thought it was interesting in the final partners meeting how commanding Roger looked in his black suit with the vest- the only one mourning Bert and totally taking over that dominant color from Cutler. Don and Joan matched in the navy blue which is the first time they have had any connection at all in so long. Don is valuable to Joan again now on some level thanks to the buy out. Poor Ted looks like the odd man out. His clothes can’t be that old but something about his boots and his look just seems out of touch now.

      • MilaXX

        Ted looks as worn out and beat down as he feels.

      • Jaialaibean

        It’s funny, because those red boots seemed so hip last year, and so did his gold-colored suits.

        • Chris

          Yes exactly! Now they just seemed….sad.

      • Beth

        You could see Joan’s rage for Don dissolve and transfer directly to Ted when he was holding out. I think that might be just what it takes to make Joan and Don okay now.

    • Cassidy Olsen

      Does Bobby’s shirt say “cougars” in that first scene? Made me laugh re: Betty’s reaction to Football Hunk. Also, I was desperate for a screenshot of Sally in her red bathing suit, it looks just like mine. Great post as always, thank you!

    • Chris

      Peggy is wearing the orange dress for the announcement about Bert passing away that she wore when Ted announced Gleason’s last season. I thought it was a nice little callback. The handy man is reminding me a bit of Abe in those overalls which I do not like.

    • Glammie

      So, Sally’s outfit–totally, totally on for young teen girls at the time. I had a number of outfits that looked like that–short skirt, stretchy almost-tee with grommets. It was so familiar that it didn’t even register as sexy to me.

    • VirginiaK

      Big thanks from a late-comer to your Style recaps. My devotion to the show has always been founded in large part on my joy in all the art direction aspects of it, it is so fantastic to find these analyses and in-depth discussions. I look forward, while we wait for the final episodes, to rewatching it all and catching up with all the Uncles and their commentators have posted.

    • Ada Bohorfoush

      The young man who is visiting is wearing a USC jersey with OJ Simpson’s number on it, this is the year he won the Heisman.

      • Chris

        By the time I can first remember him he was an established big deal in the 70’s jumping over luggage in the commercials. I think there were dolls/action figures of him too.

    • brown-eyed girl

      Loved that they were in Indianapolis to do the Burger Chef pitch on the night of the moon walk. I remember that so well, lying on the floor on my stomach in the family room, chin propped in my hands. Burger Chef was the only fast food place in town, and we called it “Booger Chef.” Loved this episode, but wouldn’t love it nearly so much without your commentary. Notice that Meredith kept Don’s handkerchief; think it will resurface again?

      • T C

        Oof. I had all but forgotten that nickname until your post brought my taste buds back 40+ years in a heartbeat.

        The handkerchief is probably Meredith’s love object now, she’ll make a shrine for it.

      • MilaXX

        I don’t think Don wanted any part of her. He gave it to her when she started crying. After he rebuffed her, she attempted to give it back and he was like “nah, you keep it,”

        • asympt

          Of course he didn’t. Even at his sluttiest, Don never went for dim bulbs.

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            Except for his hook-up with the waitress during his lost weekend. Overall he wants someone smart and good-looking.

        • brown-eyed girl

          Good point.

      • ybbed

        And Roger gives Joan his handkerchief when they met at the office and she kept it too!. Was that a thing? Women cry and men hand over their handkerchief?

        • Jaialaibean

          From what I’ve read in novels, it’s a gentleman’s duty to provide a clean hankie for the lady to weep into.

          • Jaialaibean

            However, I think the lady is usually supposed to give the handkerchief back, lest the gentleman suffer an unfortunate hankie deficit when someone is swooning.

            • Jenz42

              No, no! I don’t know about the etiquette of it, but then how will the other girls know he’s yours??

            • Jaialaibean

              We presume you’ve already “marked your man” with your lipstick before smearing his handkerchief with mascara and tears.

        • Chris

          My dad (who is 84) carried a clean hanky in his pocket since before I can remember. There are many times I remember him handing it over to me as a kid. It’s something that carries me back every time I see a man on TV (or very rarely now) in real life with one. Dad’s were plain white but my Mom had a series of fancy patterned girly ones or ones with tatted, lace or crocheted trim. She would always have at least a couple in her purse.

          • Cammie

            Aww, I had forgotten about those girly hankies, and now have to go find some : )

          • makeityourself

            My parents do the same to this day. My teenage children were horrified to learns that people launder (and then iron) dirty “kleenexes.”

            Joan would return the handkerchief after she did her laundry.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Geez when I was a kid (I was about 4), my dad’s hankies were the first thing I ever ironed! (My mom adjusted the ironing board to my height and watched me like a hawk.)

            • DeniseSchipani

              Me too — though probably not that young. My father used hankies until fairly recently (he’s 78). I also had a high school boyfriend who used cloth hankies (in the early 80s). No idea why, but let’s just say i needed them from time to time. I’d throw them in the laundry at home and then return them.

          • VirginiaK

            A gentleman was supposed to have a handkerchief he could use himself AND an immaculate one to offer to a lady. I hope the green awareness might prompt a return of hankies instead of Kleenex. I found them in abundance in markets in Bombay!

          • decormaven

            Mr. DM still carries one. He learned to iron by ironing hankies.

            • Chris

              Awww Mr. DM sounds lovely. That’s how I learned too.

            • decormaven

              He’s a keeper. Marking year 35 in December.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              I very seldom iron anything, but in the 20+ years since I stopped ironing hankies, I have noticed that it seems to take ages for the iron to warm up! Doing the hankies first was always the warm up.

          • CommentsByKatie

            My husband (32) always carries a fresh handkerchief with him. It lives on!

        • brown-eyed girl

          I guess you don’t give it back covered with mascara smears and tears or, horrors!, snot. I don’t know the etiquette. I know that women used to hold onto a man’s handkerchief for sentimental reasons. My Dad used to carry a handkerchief, and my husband is one of the few men I know who still do. (I like that about him.) He hands his over to my daughter and me on occasion, but we throw it it in the wash before it goes back in the drawer.

        • greenwich_matron

          I think of handkerchiefs as being a relic from the days before antihistamines. My dad’s started the day clean…

      • Hotwheels

        He gave Meredith his pocket square, not a handkerchief.

        Come on, this is a style blog….

    • Kranepool

      I think that kid’s wearing O.J.’s USC jersey. I’ll let you guys find meaning in that.

      • Logo Girl

        That is an impressive catch!

      • Tracy M

        Yep. OJ won the Heisman in 1968, and that’s his number in USC colors.

    • snarkykitten

      Yay the Mad Style post came early!! Also, I wonder if anything deeper is meant by the geeky guy (what’s his name) wearing plaid?

    • Chris

      I think it’s funny we see Peggy in all her awkward preparation phases, dowdy robe with curlers etc. and she has no qualms about letting Don in. There is no embarrassed “oh my hair” talk. They are so comfortable with each other she just has no female vanity with him. It’s one of many reasons why I think those two will never ever be involved romantically. They just don’t spark that way. Their intellects love each other but it’s not physical. I can’t imagine Peggy imagining Don in a smoking gown with a volume of “Something” by Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Peggy in her jammies and rollers doesn’t even phase him.

      • bawoman

        Yes!They just dont have any sexual chemistry, nor, do I think they are meant too. Just try to imagine a post coital Peggy in bed lighting a cigarette and telling Don “Oh, Don, you were great!”.
        Gross……

        • Chris

          I don’t want to imagine it, LOL. And Megan is never shown in anything less than glamorous. Even in her drunken breakdown scene over her acting career she was still in kind of sexy undies. She has the most elaborate hairdos at times but we never see her in rollers or any of the work that goes into it. Sometimes she needs her dress fastened but it’s all sexy slightly disheveled stuff. Peggy is the one with lipstick on her teeth and night rollers. I wonder if it’s because we see Megan through Don’s eyes?

          • breathlss79

            Megan is just one of those girls.

        • Cammie

          Never going to happen! (I hope). Interesting that there are loads of MM fans that want a Don/Peggy hookup. I just can’t see it, as you said, their is no sexual chemistry there.

        • Cabernet7

          I just think they’re too much alike. Some people say it’d be like incest; I think it’d just be masturbation.

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            I’m one of the people who says it would be like incest, but I also see your point about them being too much alike.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          It would be like on “Mary Tyler Moore” when Mary and Lou kissed. They ended up laughing, because there was no chemistry and the idea of it was just so funny.

      • MilaXX

        THIS^^^^ a thousands time.

      • Jaialaibean

        He’s also seen her at her absolute worst, in the insane ward after her baby’s birth. There has to be some comfort in knowing someone still accepts you as a human being after that. Being seen in rollers wouldn’t even come close to being a concern.

        I believe you’re right that it also indicates a lack of romantic feeling.

        • Chris

          It’s like they really are family.

      • Glammie

        Sorry, I’m still on the crackpot end of this–I don’t think the comfort level with one another’s real selves precludes a sexual relationship. What it won’t be is a romantic fantasy–both being dreamers they’ve gone that way before and it hasn’t worked well. They do, however, meet a pretty deep need in one another. I think they’re on that bed together during the moon landing for a reason. I think there’s very much a “You complete me” vibe.

        And she does have some feminine vanity relating to him. I don’t think it’s at all accidental that she’s looking better ever since she let Don back into her life–she was radiant during the pitch and her connection with Don was part of that. She also, as TLo noted, dressed up for Don (and he for her) for the Sunday episode (it was TLo’s comment that got me on the crackpot train, actually). She was in red and they ended up dancing. Yes, he kisses her on the head–I’ll just point out that he used to do that with Betty.

        • Chris

          If they get together I’ll be shocked, but then again it would be far from the first time MM has shocked me! I will freely admit I am wrong about 90% of my Mad Men predictions, if not more. Predictable is one thing this show isn’t. Lots of people are still looking for a Peggy-Don ending.

          • Glammie

            Not on this blog, they’re not. I think there are five of us now–none of us are shippers–i.e. we’re not rooting for it. It just sort of looks like it’s being set up. Most people here kind of hate the idea–including TLo.

            Let’s see, my prediction track–not sure. I did predict Lane Price would kill himself and Pete wouldn’t. I thought the first episode of this season was hopeful because Don was still writing. I also thought that Don’s relationship with Sally was pivotal. But I haven’t predicted any of the big plot twists–well, who could predict the lawnmower?

            • Chris

              There are a bunch of people on the net including some recappers that think Peggy-Don is endgame. Others are calling for Peggy-Pete, Peggy-Ted, Don-Betty, Peggy-Stan etc. It’s all good. I think it can safely be said NO ONE saw that lawn mower coming! Also it’s been confirmed MW will fib to keep his secrets ( I don’t blame him at all) because he said no one would “die” this season on MM.

            • Glammie

              I have to say a lot of recappers and bloggers do a crappy job of predicting–all those predictions that Pete would off himself. I guess we’ve established now that Pete as well as the clients want to live. I honestly figured that they wouldn’t kill off Pete because he’s just too much damn fun to write.

              Of course, just reading TLo points one in the right direction on a number of things–Gins is schizophrenic, Bob is gay.

              Oh, I don’t think it will be Peggy-Ted or Don-Betty. I’ll rule out Peggy-Pete as well. Though I think we’ll see something go on with Peggy-Ted, but not permanently. I wish I could rule out Don-Megan, but Weiner drags that one on and on and on. That marriage has died about five times and failed to stay down.

            • MartyBellerMask

              The only coupling (of existing characters) I see happening is Roger + Mona.
              Coincidentally, it’s the only one I’d like to happen.

            • Chris

              I would still put odds on a possible Ted-Peggy pairing but at this point who knows?

            • Alice Teeple

              Let’s throw this out there: how about Peggy ending the series with a whole harem of work husbands as a parallel to Don’s string of mistresses? Don once had women throwing themselves at him for his looks and…I guess charm? and Peggy gets men throwing themselves at her for the chance to work with her. End series!

            • Glammie

              That would be entertaining, but I think Pegs wants a kid. If the show were taking place 30 years later, I’d see Peggy adopting a girl from China.

            • Chris

              I just have a bad feeling MW is going to throw some twist in there I won’t like. Like Ted comes crawling back to Peggy after settling things with his wife and kids and divorcing, and you think everything is OK, then it’s a couple months later and he’s remarried….to Moira his secretary. It’s Roger and Jane all over again. Or some other bait and switch.

            • Alice Teeple

              At this point Weiner’s done with the scripts and they’re set in stone now, so all we can do is hope no one’s foot gets chewed up by a Cub Cadet.

            • Glammie

              Roger/Mona is the couple I ship, so I’m glad there are sign that it might be going that direction. (Yay, plaid)

            • Guest

              I can live with that, though I think we’ll see more than that happening.

          • MartyBellerMask

            Gross. Gross. Gross. Do. Not. Want.
            Don + Peggy = I want my money back.

          • Katelorelai

            I don’t think Don and Peggy will end up together. My predictions for end of show couples would be:, Don + Stephanie, Roger + Joanie and possibly Peggy + Stan.

            • Chris

              Stephanie and Don, I never considered that pairing. I think he is way too old and square for her. He’s too square for Megan.

        • Kim

          I’m not sure if it’s Peggy making herself look better of MM styling/makeup/lighting making her look better…for some reason

          • Glammie

            Well, it’s always the crew in story like this, but Peggy’s now wearing the right shade of lipstick. She’s showing her arms more and sleeveless is a flattering look on Elisabeth Moss. She still has Peggy-drab moments, but she’s coming into her own and wearing clothes that suit her. She’s more at home with who she is and showing who she is. And this latest uptick in style seems to tie into Don.

        • procrastinatrice

          Yep, I am also with you, as I was on Monday. So Megan always looked glamorous and sexually appealing, as Chris mentioned, even when she is having a breakdown. Yes, but so what? What did that relationship have going for it other than “spark,” and what happened to it? I wouldn’t be surprised if Weiner intends to go didactic on asses and end with real love being about more than sexual attraction and glamour, but about completing one another, and frequently imperfect–as Peggy was in her rollers and robe.

          And that look she gives to Don in the final still above from the pitch, full of the thrill they share, the thrill of having people eat off the palm of their hand as they do what they are so good at doing…perhaps that’s the kind of “hot” that can be sustained in the long run.

          I might be wrong of course, but I feel pretty confident we are headed in this direction. If this is indeed the case, I also think the build up to it would be subtle, and we wouldn’t see much of a sexual relationship unfold on screen…maybe the series ending with them holding hands, facing ahead…or something (not by Emerson!). I might just be saying that because I don’t think I can handle seeing them have sex. Yeah, I find their connection really cute and all that, but I am also still at a stage where that would make me cringe.

          • abby536

            Based just on their histories they have some potential. Peggy went for Duck and Ted both older men with various traits that Don shares (right now that just makes me think she likes older alcoholics but Don fits there too). Don desperately wanted Megan to have the kind of connection to their work that Peggy and he naturally share. At the time it seemed clear he was marrying Megan with his eyes and trying to turn her into Peggy.

            Whether there is any sexual attraction there is hard to read. They definitely have chemistry though. And history. And love. And we know they both like sex for it’s own sake, Peggy more so than Don at times. I wonder if some of the anti Peggy and Don reasoning is based on the fact that Peggy isn’t drop dead gorgeous. What did he call her? Cute as hell? It’s no real surprise that a man whose good looks have enabled his life of crime would be highly impressed by good looks. Betty and Megan married Don. Peggy is far more likely to marry Dick Whitman. Her occasional awkward furtiveness or bluntness must scream Dick Whitman to Don. I’ve always thought that’s why he is so hard on her when she fumbles something.

            I can also imagine Peggy getting involved with Pete if he learns the same lessons that Don is learning/needs to learn. Meanwhile Stan is standing right there, seemingly perfect for her and her life and cute as hell and she just doesn’t see him. In that sense Peggy is just as fucked up as Don, always picking the wrong people.

          • Glammie

            First, I love the idea of Weiner going didactic on our asses (I’m friends with some philosophers, so this totally works.) More, seriously, yes–exactly. I’ve been married for rather a long time–and what makes a marriage endure isn’t glamour or looking just right, even if that’s part of the initial attraction. Sexual attraction is a quirky thing–both Don and Peggy are played by good-looking people. Neither is physically repulsive–if they start to click on the emotional level, I think the physical will take care of itself. And a lot of that seems to me about allowing themselves to see one another that way–now that they’re being nice to one another and allowing their natural connection to happen.

        • Joy

          I have never been on the Don/Peggy train until this week when they were sitting on the bed together watching the moon landing. Then I thought about how Don and Megan lately had one person sitting on the bed another standing. They were rarely together! Don and Peggy were sitting so close and look so connected that I thought, I don’t mind this at all. They are good for each other. Maybe it will end with us seeing them reading the paper together at breakfast at home or Don fixing stuff in her building like he used to do for Anna Draper. Something subtle that let’s us know they are with each other.

          • Glammie

            Interesting way to look at it. I think it’s possible that there’s such a history of misdirection that Weiner’s made us not want something that actually is a pretty good match. The bed connection (disconnection) is interesting. And we were meant to notice that they were on the bed together–TLo commented on how it was the most important shot of the moon watchers.

          • ramona_flowers

            I think they’re bro’s, like Tina Fey and Alec Baldwin on 30Rock.

      • ramona_flowers

        The biggest problem was “we don’t have any liquor!”

    • Sofia

      the $terling$ ordered caviar from room $ervice. yowza! he might not be a very good leader, as bert said, but i do love roger’s breezy attitude as he sails through life. i think it must come from the old money, combined with his very hedonistic nature.

      • P M

        It must be nice to be completely confident that you’ll always be financially secure like that.

        • Sofia

          right?! it’s really hard to imagine that there are people with so much endless money that most problems will never touch them. of course, roger is not insulated from heartbreak but he gets to lick his wounds while elegantly ensconced at a five star hotel.

      • Chris

        Remember when he ordered lobster in for the guys working on the Jaguar pitch and poor Peggy was left licking her lips on the other side of the window? You’ll never catch Roger at Burger Chef.

        • Aunt Tabby

          Yeah, but there was a burger and a milkshake on that coffee table… I love the TiLo gift of screen caps! So many precious, thoughtfully staged details we would otherwise miss. Great set design!

          • T C

            Kids don’t like caviar, especially when they’re in astronaut helmets. ;)

        • Sofia

          you just made me remember the time he and joan were in a hotel room for the afternoon, and he ordered a bunch of expensive dishes (beef wellington was one) from room service. joan wasn’t hungry but he was trying to get her to stay /eat so he rattled off all the names of the dishes and then said, “if we leave this lunch alone it’ll conquer europe!” i LOVE that roger joke!!!

          • Chris

            Ha ha, yes beef Wellington and lobster Napoleon? Something like that. Roger really gets the best lines and his delivery is perfect.

      • AnneElliot

        I didn’t even realize they were in a hotel until TLo pointed it out. Is Roger still living in his hotel room? Does anyone know why? So much going on in Mad Men, if it was ever explained I’ve missed it completely.

        • T C

          Some monied New Yorkers preferred living in hotel suites (or entire floors) because it absolved them of responsibility in the hiring, discipline and termination of various household staff as well as other domestic and social responsibilities. There are a series of children’s books (and a 1998 Movie) featuring Madeline that describe this lifestyle.

          • Cabernet7

            When he broke up with Jane, he said he’d go to a hotel for a while. I imagine he just stayed there.

            • T C

              Yes, he’s still in a suite at the Algonquin.

          • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

            Eloise – Madeline is the French orphan!

            • T C

              Thanks for catching that; it’s been many decades since I read both.

            • gogobooty

              Madeline has a father who brings her presents when she has appendecitis.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              I did not know that! And I realised that I was actually thinking of The Happy Orpheline anyway.

          • Chris

            Roger is like Hugh Grant in ‘Two Weeks Notice”. “I live in a hotel, my life is very much like Monopoly”.

    • Chris

      In that scene in the Francis’s living room, of all her kids only Gene connects color wise with Betty because he is the only one who still connects with her. I love how Sally is in that vibrant purple that no one else is wearing. Your eye goes to her immediately in that crowd of people.

      • MartyBellerMask

        And they can never recast Gene, because he is physically so similar to Betty. Remember Betty’s brother? Gene is his clone.

      • carnush

        I was happy to see baby Gene again…although I think she should be older than he looks. He was born in ’63 I think.

    • Emily S

      The minute Peggy appeared on screen in the Burger Chef pitch, I immediately said, “That’s the prettiest she’s ever looked”. Prettiest, best, most chic. Hair and makeup are best ever, for sure.

      • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

        She was always pretty, she’s just more sure of herself and also a world’s away from the shirtwaists and full skirts and brocades of her sister and Mom : )

      • makeityourself

        I thought so too. Then I realized she was wearing a sleeveless dress, which seemed very daring to me. I wouldn’t want my arms exposed to a room full of six guys while they were watching my every move. It was always a jacket (or at least long sleeves) for me on presentation days. Perhaps this is a sign of her continually growing professional confidence.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Also a reminder that people didn’t work out in those days…no one expected toned arms with a sleeveless dress or blouse.

        • Aunt Tabby

          I don’t recall a that short sleeved dress was viewed as unprofessional or scandalous in 1969. Besides, Peggy’s pitch was to conjure the “voice of the Mom”, not a business person. Peggy was as modestly dressed as a 1969 school teacher.

          • charitablearm

            it was july… lots of sleeveless dresses in the whole episode.

          • Jaialaibean

            More so … at least she had a bra on underneath all that, unlike Bobby’s teacher!

      • Cammie

        Yes!

    • MavisJarvis

      What’s up with the sour look on Harry’s face during the moon landing? He looks like he just bit into a bad onion.

      • breathlss79

        He’s almost crying.

        • Kim

          And remember when Pete asked him what he thought of when seeing shots of the earth from space? “I think it’s majestic!” I think Harry just really gets into this space stuff.

          • breathlss79

            Great catch!

      • MilaXX

        Harry’s very emotional. Remember he was brought to tears bu Don’s carousel pitch. I think he’s ready to cry.

        • gogobooty

          He also stood like he was about to salute the flag and recite the pledge of allegiance.

      • asympt

        Also, no one brought him a beer.

        • decormaven

          I’d cry, too. :-)

        • Karen North

          Or made him partner. I always think of him as the field goal kicker for the team. He is on the team, he has value, he even saves the day occasionally. And yet no-one really thinks of him as a real football player.

    • bawoman

      Re: Betty and her going for the football jock, remember the first guy she kissed? A “quiet, jewish boy who was very good looking, but was somehow gloomy”
      She even endured the mocking and the laughs for kissing a *gasp* jewish boy.
      So I wouldnt say she would have gone for the jock, because she didnt. In fact, based on her description, the guy she first kissed seemed more similar to the cute nerd, than the jock, at least personality wise.
      Betty isnt as superficial as people would like to believe.

      • Chris

        Great memory! I never would have remembered that.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        True, but “very good looking” makes him sound a bit different from Sally’s pick.

        • Alice Teeple

          Don indirectly sends Sally into the path of Previously-Overlooked Poetic Nerd Sean; Don’s been giving some meaningful glances at Previously-Overlooked Poetic Nerd Peggy. I’m a little concerned now that the final closeout song of Mad Men is going to be Todd Rundgren’s “I Saw The Light.”

    • MilaXX

      Well done. That dance scene at the end was unexpected, but I found myself going back to rewatch this episode more than once. I think my TLo trained eye picked up most of the cues your mentioned. Today I started rewatching season 1 on Netflix. Even though it saved Don’s job, I’m curious as to how this takeover by McCann will truly shake out. I also hope the writers flesh out the reasons for Joan’s anger towards Don a bit more. My only other wish would be for Sterling and Mona to come full circle and reconcile.

      • Cammie

        Yes, Roger and Mona together again would make me very happy. They look great together this season, even when bickering about Magaret. : )

        • Jaialaibean

          I kind of want Roger and Mona to be together, because she knows and can deal with all his nonsense, but how sad and ironic it would be for Joan (not that there aren’t other choices out there for her besides old Rog, but certainly she’s had no action lately) if she were the only one of the bunch to end up alone, after putting all that effort into being desired by one and all!

          • Glammie

            Joan spent too much trying to marry status. There’s hope for her, but she tends to be a bit of a slow learner. She needs a hunky repairman.

            • Alice Teeple

              Yeah, exactly! Remember the refrigerator repairman her mother was flirting with? The one whose wife wouldn’t let him come to her apartment anymore?

            • Glammie

              Yep I was reminded–so now, Joan gets the money. Mom moves to in-law apartment and Joan gets together with hunky contractor during remodel or, better yet, new apt.

            • Alice Teeple

              This is shaping up to be a super spinoff. Let’s call him “Schneider!”

            • Glammie

              And it sounds so much like a 70s sitcom–and could be filmed on one set. “Joanie!”

    • Parisinmydreams

      Speaking of the hunky handyman in Peggy’s apartment, did anyone else see him as a callback to the young Dick Whitman? Overalls, plaid shirt, dark lanky hair over his forehead? It’s been a while since we’ve been there but Nick sure looked like a slightly older version of the kid on the farm. And the names…Dick, Nick…

      • Chris

        It wasn’t until the Mad Style picture did I notice that. It’s a very farm like look. It also reminded me of Abe with the shirtless overalls, yuck.

        • Alice Teeple

          Yeah, at first I was worried that she might get sentimental because she and Abe had a “meet cute” moment where he went on about women and their pesky rights – but honestly, after he made the crack about a single woman owning a building, and the cutaway shot to the literal ceiling he was installing, it might not ever happen. Then again, she’s kind of dumb in the dude category.

      • Jaialaibean

        Sheesh, you’re right! I would never have noticed that. He is very Whitman-esque, though he looks a little more like Dick’s terrible father. Probably T.Lo are right and he would be much better in the sack than Peggy’s former lovers, but maybe that kind of fella wouldn’t be such a good idea for the long term.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          He doesn’t need to be long term. He just needs to stick around long enough for Stan to get jealous, dump his girlfriend, and marry Peggy.

      • kburnell

        Plus, the timing of this is interesting after we finally saw Pegs make some progress in her personal life by mending her relationship with Don. Don gets randomly hit on to signal his professional mojo, and the same week Peggy delivers her very Don-like pitch, handymen are all of a sudden hitting on her and children are coming to her for hugs. I’m not sure Handyman Nick will resurface (just like I’m not sure Neve Campbell or any other ladies who hit on Don this season will resurface), but his presence does seem to suggest that Peggy is on an upward trajectory.

      • mixedupfiles

        I was surprised by the shirt, in that heat. Was that period? Would it have been improper for him to have been in a t-shirt?

        • MartyBellerMask

          Maybe not in the home of a lady you’ve never met.

        • Chris

          I think in those days T-shirts on men were still considered “underwear” not outer wear. My Mom insists my dad would go off to work (construction, demolition) in those days in a freshly starched and ironed collared shirt every day. She hates and often bemoans the sloppy look of T-shirts on men nowadays. I think you would have to be family or on pretty intimate terms with someone in those days to be working in your T-shirt. Especially older or more conservatively raised people. Like Don wouldn’t show up at Peggy’s hotel door in his undershirt/T-shirt even if she is in her robe.

          • Alice Teeple

            That’s true. My dad was in construction/demolition for 30 years, and he went to work every day in a long button-down sleeve shirt and either carpenter pants with the loops for hammers, or overalls. For my dad, it was a means of working outside without getting sunburnt. Same with my carpenter grandfather. They might wear plaid flannel button downs, or regular white/pale blue work shirts, but never t-shirts. My grandfather always wore a white v-neck undershirt, but never by itself. But you brought up a good point with Don and Peggy: it may seem intimate that he sees her in her robe and curlers, but he doesn’t see her in her nightie, and she doesn’t see him in a t-shirt. It’s intimate without being TOO intimate.

    • Jean Beaton Leavitt

      Don release Megan like he released Burger Chef, same colors.
      thanks so much for all your stellar Mad Men Posts…you are awesome.

    • Orange Girl

      After getting the unflattering lighting and make-up treatment for most of the season (like Joan during the Bob Benson proposal), I’m happy to see Peggy looking so radiant during not only the Burger Chef presentation, but while watching the moon landing as well. Very encouraging also to see Don Draper actually changing. He’s sits on a hotel bed with a woman (Peggy) twice in this episode and it has nothing to do with sex.

    • VDbloom

      Does anyone know what percentage of the company Don owns?

      • asympt

        Well, must be more than the 10% Pete owns.

      • PastryGoddess

        Let’s think about this. Pete and Joan account for 15% of the company. I’m guessing Bert and Roger own(ed) equal shares and had the largest stakes.

        Bert 20%
        Roger 20%
        Don 18%
        Ted 18%
        Jim 18%
        Pete 10%
        Joan 5%

        Someone check my math

        • makeityourself

          You’re close. Don’t, Ted and Jim are probably at 15 percent each. Then with the others it equals 100 percent.

          • Chris

            I think they said Ted has 20%. He and Cutler likely have larger shares because they were the only two to come from CGC when they merged. SCDP had a lot more partners and the shares were divvied up more.

            • Aunt Tabby

              Thank you. So, might Roger be heir to Bert’s shares?

            • Chris

              You’re very welcome. It’s been bothering me what happened to Bert’s shares. I would have guessed the partners would have to wait to see who inherits before they could vote, but someone said the agency must carry insurance on the partners to buy out their shares. In that case, what are the percentage of shares now held by the living partners?

            • kapalabhati

              I doubt Bert’s shares will go to an heir; they will probably be reacquired by the company through a key man insurance policy.

            • T C

              Bert has a sister and she had some involvement in the original Sterling Cooper. Don mentioned her to Roger when he called to advise Don of Bert’s passing. My initial take on this was as a suggestion on how Roger could get the votes to block Cutler’s agenda. It’s possible she might refuse cash for Bert’s shares and/or the McCann deal.

              Most partnerships carry life insurance policies [many large corporations hold life insurance policies on current and former employees without their knowledge, but that's an entirely separate morbid fiscal topic] to cover the cost of repurchasing a deceased partner’s interest in the business.

              We will have to wait eleven long months to see if Bert’s will is in the script and if there will be any derailing of the McCann acquisition.

        • Mr Mybug

          There’s an article addressing that very question on AV Club today….

          • E M

            Can you add the link?

          • MartyBellerMask

            Off to read that!

          • PastryGoddess

            Really,

            I was on there today and didn’t see it

        • oat327

          Here’s my logic on the percentages of the company, starting at the beginning:

          At SCDP, Don, Bert, and Roger were all senior partners and Pete and Lane were junior partners. Don, Bert, and Roger each held 25% of the company, and Lane and Pete (who I think only had to pay half of the emergency funding) had 12.5%, for a total of 100%. Joan was given a partnership of 5%, diluting the senior partners’ stake by ~1.5 percentage points, and the juniors’ by ~.75. Lane died, and his partnership was reabsorbed, after a payout to Rebecca via his company life insurance, increasing everyones’ percentage stake. The day of the merger, Don, Bert, and Roger would have about 27% of the company, Pete would have 13.5%, Joan would have 6%, give or take.

          At CGC, Ted, Cutler, and Gleason each had 33%. Gleason died, and Cutler and Ted’s share increased to 50%.

          When the companies merged, CGC was significantly smaller–they’d burned through a whole year of capital on Honda, they didn’t have prestige projects like a car or an airline (Jaguar and Mohawk), Don frequently referred to them as someone who “decided they were the competition,” and they presumably had smaller offices, since they moved into SCDP’s. So, say, it was a 60-40 split, with SCDP being the stronger partner.

          That would put Cutler and Ted each holding 20% of the combined company, Don, Bert, and Roger each with 16.2%, Pete at 8%, Joan at 4%, on the day of the moon landing.

          Then Bert died. With Bert dead (and his shares reabsorbed), Cutler and Ted’s shares would increase by about 3.5 to 23.5%, Don and Roger’s by about 3 to 19.2%, Pete’s by 2 to 10%, and Joan’s by 1 to 5%. That would also explain why Cutler, with Ted’s proxy and with Joan, finally has the majority votes–52%–he needs to oust Don.

          • MartyBellerMask

            Didn’t Don sacrifice some of his shares to Pete, as a buy-in? Is this accounting for that? Do I even remember that correctly?

            • 3hares

              No, he just paid Pete’s share of the buy-in.

          • VDbloom

            Great analysis!

          • E M

            Thanks!!! That was so bugging me

          • greenwich_matron

            I agree with your analysis, except I think that Gleason’s share was reabsorbed by the new, merged company. I am basing this on the fact that Roger (I think) complained that they were not made aware of Gleason’s illness before the merger. I assumed that Roger was complaining because the shares had to be bought out by the merged company (why else would they care?). I also assumed that it was a 50-50 split (mostly because no one referred to it as a takeover), but what your point about the capital and offices makes sense.

    • MK03

      I had a terrible day today. You have no idea how thrilled I was to see Mad Style up early. Thank you; this was exactly what I needed.

      • Karen North

        I hope you are having a better day. Remember, “the best things in life are free”.

    • KellyT

      Sean is dressed very Greg Brady in the TV watching scene!

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Thank you! I knew the look was familiar, but I couldn’t place it.

    • asympt

      While Harry’s distinguished by his plain (and ugly) tie, all the men (and Joan) in the last meeting have patterned ties, but not all stripes. Roger is set apart by the dots on his.

    • Salasalu

      The most incredible long game in the history of television. Breathtaking.

    • ybbed

      What does Don mean when he says, “Pete’s pregnant!” to Peggy in the hotel. Is he implying an irrational thought process is in effect? What?

      • charitablearm

        I was confused by that as well. the closest I can figure is he is pregnant in the sense that he is carrying someone else’s baby – in the sense that (aside from his shares) he is dependent on don (clearly, given his fawning) and/or Ted for business/relevance.

      • judybrowni

        I wondered the same thing.

      • Mr Mybug

        I assumed it was to do with an account man about to “give birth” to an account with a new client… Why that means Peggy shouldn’t be concerned about Pete’s opinion beats me though… Perhaps Don was implying Pete’s hysteric intensity around Burger Chef (revealed in his comment about not rattling the Don horseflesh) meant his emotional reactions (to Peggy delivering the pitch instead) shouldn’t be taken too seriously?

        If anyone can provide a better answer that would be appreciated!

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        Pete is the “father” of the Burger Chef presentation since he brought the prospective business to the agency. The presentation is the pregnancy. Getting the business will be the successful delivery. Pete’s heightened nervousness is to be excused because he is “pregnant.”

      • Laylalola

        I just thought he was commenting on Pete’s extra weight around the middle and thought it was hilarious, but then I’m not good on catching Mad Men’s subtle stuff.

      • Violaine

        I thought the meaning was that Pete has to go along with whatever they (Don & Peggy) chose to do because he’s all-in at this point.

      • Tonicman

        I took it to mean, he can’t abandon Peggy and Don if they change their pitch strategy. He’s tied to them. He must go along with what they want.

      • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

        I took it to mean that Pete was an emotional wreck and would go along with whatever they wanted to do anyway.

    • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

      I’m getting verklempt. There are things that bond me with TLo: the joy of the HTSIBWRT ref (wha??? I can’t believe they are doing this – I love Robert Morse – OMG!). Things I get only because of their tutelage: Joan’s angry red and even Peggy’s horizontal stripes. But….how in god’s name do you remember that it was THAT cafe where Roger brought Joan? Per usual, I have to watch the whole episode again to enjoy these subtleties that only you two can point out. 11 months is too long to wait for another Mad Men. But it gives us a clue about what forever will feel like when there are no more Mad Men Style posts.

    • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

      WHOA! What a surprise! I was full of anticipation for Wednesday morning, and now Wednesday means nothing. :P

      Excellent job, gentlemen! I can’t help but suspect you’re grateful for the year-long break — what with the episode review, Mad Style, and ever-vigilant comment moderation, the past seven weeks must have been exhausting for you. But the quality hasn’t dropped!

      Point of insight I particularly appreciated:

      Sally’s hair seems to be pretty clearly modeled on Betty’s. We saw this as an example of a fumbling teen girl with a crush taking her cues from her movie-star pretty mother instead of following the trends.

      And this:

      Roger’s in mourning, wearing the most sober outfit we’ve seen on him all year. All the men have striped ties except Harry, who’s not a partner and doesn’t belong there.”

      But Roger’s isn’t striped, is it?

      • ybbed

        roger’s tie has a pattern, it kind of looks polka dot like but it is hard to see.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Yeah, but TLo specifically said they all have striped ties.

      • Jaialaibean

        I think Roger is dressed differently to show that he’s the leader. Black is the color of mourning, but it’s also the most official and professional color there is.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Good catch on the ties.

    • dancho

      “…attached pseudo-nipples, for the pseudo-mom on the go!” Hands-down, the best — and funniest — observation. I almost peed my pants.

      • your face

        Love that orange and white dress, but seriously- why on Earth would the designer put buttons right there?

      • AnneElliot

        Those buttons are so awful, they’re HYSTERICAL. I saw a face on her blouse — the buttons are the eyes, and one of the stripes across the chest curved like a smile. I can’t unsee it.

        • T C

          These aren’t Peggy’s first pseudo-nipples. Both times their alignment has not been level within the stripe, a true sign of off-the-rack clothing.

          • MartyBellerMask

            That, plus her womb-chains in Ginsberg’s nipple scene. They are pushing this mama image hard!

    • andi56

      Great job; I felt the season finally came together after a few sour and poorly executed episodes. I think one of the problems is trying to portray the angst of the age without succumbing to letting it set the tone, and about five episodes were just swamped with it. I loved the scene with Bert, and Don’s wonderment at watching it was priceless. I think this was a real breakthrough from the usual dead people he has seen, except for Anna. This was a beautiful send-off. And for people that may have been too young for “How to Succeed,” it’s on video, as is “Tru.”

    • NMMagpie

      This episode just made me miss my Dad. We watched the moon landing on a console TV, much like the one in Bert’s home and said “Booger Chef” all the time.

      Bravo to Janie Bryant and the whole MadMen art direction team; they get it right over and over again.

      And thank you TLO, for appreciating it and helping others to appreciate it too.

    • ShaoLinKitten

      A pleasant Tuesday surprise! Excellent rundown.

      So do we think Don has finally changed? Has he turned it around, learning what’s of value, and how to value it? I went into this season finished with him, but the redemption arc has been pretty convincing.

      Once you pointed out Peggy’s pseudo-nipples, God I can’t unsee them.

      • Kim

        At least she had a pair and not just one.

    • Tricia

      YES, I knew that diner Roger did his meeting at looked familiar.

      Sad to wait another year for more of this fantastic season– and your fantastic reviews. I wish I’d known about these much earlier in the series. Once Mad Men’s finished I’m going to rewatch it all, and follow along with your Mad Styles.

    • Jaialaibean

      Loved your analysis, and I was so pleased to see it posted unexpectedly early. It came at exactly the time when I needed something to pick up my spirits.

      As always, I’m intrigued by how much more you can see in the still shots than you can when everything is flashing by at lightning speed. Of course Cutler would have a menacing lion on his shelf in front of what look to be two gazelles. And zowie, that juxtaposition of Cutler’s telescope with Ted’s globe o’ liquor really pops out. And I felt the tension telegraphed in the Draper-Francis-guest family clothes without being able to notice anything except Sally’s stunning lavender. Those subtle effects are to Mad Men what a musical soundtrack is to a great movie.

      I did notice the callback to Julio’s green and blue shirt in Peggy’s Burger Chef pitch dress, but only because I’ve been reading this column for a while … it was all masterfully done, and so was this recap!

      • T C

        I noticed a rhino on the shelf behind him. That set was fully fleshed and gamed out.

    • GeoDiva

      Bravo! What a great post!

    • katiessh

      Although sally’s choice isn’t much like Betty now, remember when she talks about how she kissed a Jewish kid at some dance? Betty has always had somewhat of a rebellious side, just like sally, but sally’s is more pronounced now. Plus, the last satisfied puff on the cigarette was pure Betty.

      And as always, Peggy might have been stuck with so – so lovers in the past but I think we all know you would be an amazing lover…

    • Melissa Mendes

      I loved in the final meeting scene, how everyone who is important to the company and the show–Rodger, Don, Joan–are wearing appropriately dark colors ( Joan and Don both in navy–meaning she supports him again?) , and Ted sort of blends into the couch in his depressed state, and Pete just seems obsolete in gray. And then poor Harry awkwardly pops in with a loud combo of yellow and light blue, which Jim’s jacket sort of echoes. (See what you’ve done to me TLO? My bf asked me if I ‘just watch the clothes’ now.)

      I LOL every time Harry Crane appears onscreen. He is Charlie Brown.

      • 3hares

        Why is Joan important to the company–and the show–while Pete is obsolete?

        • Melissa Mendes

          I just don’t think anyone takes Pete seriously.

          • Jaialaibean

            So Pete’s gray is about being — not exactly obsolete, but invisible: He’s Casper, the occasionally apoplectic ghost. He can be heard but not seen, so nobody pays attention to what he says.

        • Gatto Nero

          Joan is the organizational genius (and now an accounts exec). In terms of her importance to the show itself, she (and Peggy) illustrated the rise of women from marginal to important roles in business.
          Pete was very forward-thinking in the agency’s pursuit of new markets (African American consumers, women, etc.) very early on. I wouldn’t say he’s obsolete at all.

          • 3hares

            Right–this season alone I think Pete’s been responsible for all new business we’ve seen. And show-wise he’s always been central as a character. He predicted Cutler’s takeover and worked to get Don back into power, leading to Don’s reconciliation with Peggy.

      • Jaialaibean

        Yes! I, too, noticed how Ted completely blended into the couch. Those color choices are ingenious!

      • smh4748

        I would say that Pete is quite important to the company. I don’t think he’s ever been portrayed as dead weight professionally, or at least not for long.

        • Melissa Mendes

          Maybe it’s foreshadowing? The grey jacket might not mean anything. I just felt like he was set apart from Joan and Don and Rodger.

          • not_Bridget

            I think he was wearing gray because he wants to return to being New York Pete–not California Pete. He tried the sportier style out there but he might be happier Back Home. Well, as happy as he can be. Trudy has moved on but he might want to see his kid a bit more…..

            Harry went “California”–and we see where that got him…..

      • MilaXX

        you can almost hear the “wah wah” sound effect.

        • sisterb67

          Or the “wah wah wah…” comedy sad trombone sound – at least in this episode, where Harry once again manages to miss out on a partnership : )

          • MartyBellerMask

            He’ll kick that football someday.

    • VioletFem

      The recaps and the Mad Style truly enrich my enjoyment of Mad Men. Love you guys for putting this together!

    • Ray Ray

      Was that Ida Blankenship’s desk that Don sat on in the very last scene?

      • Cabernet7

        Yes it was!

        • breathlss79

          It was also Megan’s desk.

      • Sherilyne Cox

        It is a very sad desk. Needs extra blotters.

    • Jacqueline Wessel

      Bravo! These Mad Style posts are so great. And now I won’t have to sneak-read it at work. Thanks for enhancing my viewing pleasure.

    • teensmom99

      Love this. One question: would Peggy really have worn sleeveless to such an important meeting?

      • Kim

        I think so. It was July in Indiana. Prob very humid.

        • teensmom99

          I just don’t think that would have seemed professional then. I think sleeveless was still seen as sexy. But I was 7 in 1969 so I don’t know about office standards.

        • Violaine

          When she was choosing her outfits, Peggy told Julio that she expects to be sweating at the presentation, and not just because of the heat.

      • decormaven

        It was not out of the ordinary for professional women to wear sleeveless in office settings. While there was air conditioning in many buildings, there were still many places that were not. For example, when Betty and her friend are shown in the kitchen scene, you can see the window is open in the kitchen. The female version of “Dress for Success” wasn’t printed until 1977. The concept of “power dressing” had not yet come into vogue.

        • teensmom99

          Thanks!

        • Gatto Nero

          True. And she was also trying to project a more “feminine” image than in her usual pitches. She was conscious ot “speaking for moms” in this meeting, and the pretty blue and green dress and red lipstick reinforced that womanly vibe (as opposed to the grey suit she showed Julio earlier). I also think the fact that it was sleeveless reinforced the idea of her vulnerability in that moment.

        • Glammie

          Advertising was always a little less formal and more fashion-forward than other businesses. My mother would never have gone sleeveless in court at the time (She usually wore a suit.) The women I knew in advertising tended to be dressed nicely, but not as seriously. Only the secretaries, though, would wear minis.

          • decormaven

            I can see court room as sleeves environment. Was she an attorney, paralegal, or transcriptionist?

            • Glammie

              Lawyer. Paralegal, as a profession, wasn’t around yet. The court reporters, when they weren’t men, were not as formally dressed, though they didn’t dress flashily.

            • decormaven

              Kudos. That was a tough environment, and still carries vestiges of what I call “Old White Man Syndrome” to this day.

      • greenwich_matron

        I am an outlier here, but I am still a little shocked when I see sleeveless women on the morning news shows. I think it’s entirely inappropriate, especially when the guy next to you is wearing a suit.

    • Dave

      So many great Peggy moments these last two episodes that made up for her grumpiness at the start of the season. One of the things I loved about her “which outfit?” conversation with Julio is that she said something like “Which outfit for my presentation with Burger Chef?” rather than “I need to make a presentation at my job to an important company”. In other words, she’s clearly had conversations with Julio about her work and even Burger Chef before, which was a nice touch that showed us how close they really were.

      Another nice moment was covered in the article about how Peggy looked around for a moment to see how the men were reacting to the moon landing. The lovely part about this, which the screenshot just catches the end of, is that she first glances at Pete and Harry’s stunned glances, and then looks at Don to see him smiling unreservedly. She then seems to mirror his excitement as if it was reassurance to her that it was OK to be joyous about it.

      Such a great episode, these last 2 have really raised the bar for the next season.

      • breathlss79

        It’s also a little sad that she’s sharing her professional life with a ten year old boy who just wants to watch TV. Their friendship is sweet, but he is not an adult. She’s obsessed with her work.

        • Betty Draper

          It’s like Betty having no one to confide in but a very young Glenn.

          • breathlss79

            Yes, the women are alone. Both dark-haired chubby boys are probably just stand-ins for young Matt Weiner.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I wouldn’t be surprised if Peggy had asked had asked Julio about fast food, and other products. If she’s anything like Don, she may use social interactions for market research. She may work while Julio watches TV.

    • katiessh

      I was reading over old mad styles, and now that we have eleven months, maybe you guys should look at revisiting the lingerie/party girls/men etc posts you considered.

      • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

        YES. I second this, in part because it adds material for what I hope is an inevitable book to put on my shelf and pore through.

    • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

      I want all of Peggy’s dresses this episode. Need more work dresses. Look at Peggy, having an enviable wardrobe. You’ve come a long way, baby.

    • SylviaFowler

      Joan looks like the Red Bull from The Last Unicorn.

      • emmapeel

        My favorite animated film. Props.

    • Kathryn Sanderson

      Thanks for a great season, TLo! Your posts are better than (some of) the episodes. :D

    • Vanessa

      OK TLo, I just noticed in your screencaps that Cutler and Roger reverse suit colors between the scene where Don pulls them all together to discuss Jim’s termination letter (Jim in Black and Roger in Blue) and the scene where Roger presents the McCann deal (Roger in black and Jim in Blue). That Janie–she’s good!

      Apologies if it was mentioned elsewhere (I couldn’t read all the comments!)

    • smh4748

      This short season has given me the intense desire to re-watch the whole series. I love seeing how different things look (and are) in the early seasons. There are a lot of people who complain that “nothing ever happens” in this show, but when you look at it from season to season, you can see how substantially things have changed. This is perhaps what the show does best–I think it accurately captures the real-life phenomenon of change. Day to day, you don’t see it, but when you look back over months or years, you see how profoundly things have shifted. It’s pretty amazing to be able to capture that quality in a television show.

      I also love how complex the feelings are that are elicited about each character. There is almost no one on the show about whom you feel unmitigated affection (maybe Sally, although even she has had her bitchy moments!) We’re all “Hooray for Peggy!” this week, but three or four weeks ago, we all hated her for being a crazy woman about Shirley’s flowers. Even the characters who evoke the strongest feeling of dislike (for me, Don and Pete), win me over at times. It’s very true to life.

      What a beautifully done show. I will miss it so much when it is over!

      Thoughts from this episode:

      1. Is Mona wearing a wedding ring? Or was a divorce from her second husband mentioned at some point previously and I missed it?

      2. I adore Peggy’s dress during the moon landing. I would wear that today.

      3. On the other hand, her pseudo-nipple buttons are one (two?) of the worst things EVER.

      4. Betty and her friend are wearing almost exactly the same dress in the moon landing viewing scene (in cut) only one is in warm colors, and the other in cool. What a vivid depiction of the competition T&Lo mention!

      5. Sally is looking SO grown up! And Shipka is a stunner–I hope she’ll have the presence of mind and opportunities to showcase herself as a great actress, and not just a pretty face (though she certainly is that too) as she continues her career.

      • Glammie

        1. Mona didn’t remarry–yeah, I thought she had too.

        • Gatto Nero

          I think she brought a date somewhere — to Margaret’s wedding? But she never remarried.

          • Molly Hirschfeld

            Bruce Pike. We haven’t seen or heard of him since he showed up at the memorial for Roger’s mother and Roger screamed at him to leave. Mona either stopped dragging him along to family events or dropped him altogether.

          • Not applicable

            Mona doesn’t need to remarry- she likely has a nice alimony settlement.

        • smh4748

          Ah, thanks! All the Roger and Mona shipping had me wondering. I thought she brought a guy to Roger’s mother’s funeral and Rog had some choice words for her about it. But it must have just been a gentleman friend, and I assumed he was a husband.

    • Truedesigngirl

      I thought that Don’s white shirt without a tie, both in the scene with Peggy in the hotel when he tells her she should give the pitch, as well when he’s talking to Megan, signaled a ‘surrender’ or sorts. He surrenders the power to give the presentation to Peggy, and he surrenders the power of making decisions about his marriage to Megan.

    • Sweetvegan

      Excellent! And amazing that you noticed that it was the same coffee shop!

      • Sherilyne Cox

        I couldn’t help notice the sausages displayed in the shop window and dangling above Jim and Roger. Makes me giggle.

    • aquamarine17

      Thanks, TLo!!! You guys knock me out with your two Mad Men blogs! Brilliant and spectacular and so funny at times (I love the humor in this one). I am so happy and dazzled to read them and the comments. xoxox

    • judybrowni

      I thought Don’s tears at the end, were in mourning for the father in his real (work) family.
      “Don, my boy” indeed.

      • Gatto Nero

        I thought so, too.
        “Don, my boy” brought tears to my own eyes.

        • Linlighthouse

          Me too. Lucky Don didn’t know Bert’s last reference to him was “he’s a pain in the ass.”

          • kapalabhati

            Parents often refer to the children they blindly adore as pains in the ass. Er, or so I’m told.

    • Karen North

      “Can’t help noticing that they’re both wearing plaids. Possible reconciliation?”

      One of my favorite Rodger lines was when he found out that Lucy and Desi were getting re-married after their previous divorce. something like..did they just wake up and forget they hated each other?!
      After that, I always believed he and Mono would do the same.

      • Gatto Nero

        Yes. I would never buy a Don-Peggy pairing. But a Roger-Mona reconciliation? Maybe.
        He respects her, and she’s the only one who can stand up to him. And there’s still a spark between those two.

        • Shawn EH

          Maybe he’s actually sown (sowed?) his wild oats at this point. And realized he just ended up covered in mud.

      • http://bedmadeofflowers.tumblr.com/ Mama_Z

        Man, I hope so. In fact, I think this half-season has been laying the groundwork for a middle-aged, sober, romantic rekindling starring Mona and Roger to pick up the second half of the final episodes.

        • Shawn EH

          I think her style when they went to visit the cult made him realize new respect for her.

        • Karen North

          Agreed. He seems to have been lost his entire life with too much money and too little respect. His best moment was after his heart attack when he knew who he was, he was sorry for it, and his family still protected and adored him in spite of it. (It was only a brief moment) He has always been so brilliant behind those jokes. I think his dad cast him in the role of the “shoe-shine” boy for Lucky Strike and until this week He always/naturally took the subservient role. Falling on his rear in the mud, losing his daughter, gaining his grandson are huge steps for him. He just made the coup of a lifetime and is only now in a place where he can be a real husband. He desperately needs Mona, I hope she still loves him.

    • deltabronze

      Sally wasn’t wearing the necklace Don gave her that she’s had in most of the episodes since she got it. Distance from Dad? Independence?

      • decormaven

        She’s wearing it in the first scene when she helps with the luggage. She is not wearing it when she is wearing the bathing suit, but I assume she didn’t want to wear it while lifeguarding. She has it on with the purple shirt/skirt outfit- it’s hard to see due to the lacing on the shirt.

        • Shawn EH

          Sally has accepted Dad (once he started telling her the truth) and drawn a truce with Mom (who wouldn’t be happy they looked like Betty?). I love the idea that Betty saw what Sally was doing and liked it.

    • Jason1920

      How did you guys miss the painting of Betty’s mom looming over the Francis household? Nobody’s ever brought it up, and that irks me a little.

    • fnarf

      All I can say is, Bert must have had iron self-control if he never, ever, ever got tired and laid his head back and got hair grease all over that Pollock. How do you fit an antimacassar to a painting?

      • Gatto Nero

        I wondered about that, too! The painting is a little too close to the top of the couch for comfort. Yikes.

        • Shawn EH

          It’s a Pollock, painted with housepaint and glue and cigarette butts: pretty indestructible.

          • Gatto Nero

            I suppose so. Still, I don’t think that Brylcreem would be a good addition.

            • Shawn EH

              It’s got nothing on the mayonnaise and olive oil the Abstract Expressionists sometimes used.

      • Sofia

        “antimacassar” – you just taught me a new word, thank you! i had *no* idea that those things have a name. i continue to learn so much on this blog.

      • Miss Disco

        meh, he’d buy another!

    • ChelleinStL

      Did anyone else get a “Skipper” (Barbie, Jr.) vibe from Sally when she walked into the kitchen in her bathing suit? I don’t remember what year Skipper was introduced, but I swear Sally was a dead-ringer. (At least from what I remember).

      • DeniseSchipani

        YES! I had a Skipper doll. There was a vibe when she came into the kitchen with the bathing suit and shorts and that’s it, exactly. Skipper.

        • ChelleinStL

          I had one too!

      • Laylalola

        Twist Skipper’s arm and suddenly she fills out her swimsuit.

        • Fjasmine

          I remember that! Sally looked tiny in that grownup outfit.

        • Chris

          I had the brunette friend “Growing Up Ginger” doll. I loved her because she had brown hair and eyes like me.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Skipper was my reaction, too!

      • Chris

        Because Sally is being a mini-Betty like Skipper was a mini-Barbie.
        Although I think I might go with Francie instead of Skipper, she was the
        young teen cousin doll of Barbie and my absolute favorite. I did love Skipper and Barbie too though. Plus the heyday of Barbie was 1959 through the 60’s.

      • Not applicable

        yes- my Skipper had a red swim suit too… :)

    • eb1966

      I was thinking Betty’s first dress looks a lot like the one she wore to her first “date” with Henry at the coffee shop in Tarrytown in season 3.

      • decormaven

        They both have a floral motif, but the dress in Seven Twenty Three has a tan background, with the dress in Waterloo a white background. I do love Janie Bryant’s choices for Betty- so true to the character.

    • flamingoNW

      Surprised there’s no mention of the OJ Simpson football jersey

    • laggr

      Sally’s kissing for little, scrawny, arriving-at-the-whorehouse Don.

    • Miss Molly Mac

      Megan’s bikini is Howard Johnson’s colors. Remember Plattsburgh? Their first major fight, where Megan also abandoned Don (after he abandoned her).

    • Frostypup

      Thanks for these posts. They add so much to my enjoyment of Mad Men.

    • decormaven

      Wonder if that is a St. Christopher that the football jock son is wearing? That definitely would have been appropriate for the times. And love that Sally continues to wear her SBD necklace! Again, thank you, dear uncles, for making the first half of S7 such a sweet ride for the BKs.

    • veriance

      When Don and Peggy are on the bed watching moon landing, Don’s tie is in Peggy’s power colors. Also, Elisabeth Moss knocked it right out of the park this episode. Get that Emmy girl!

      • Laylalola

        I was just thinking how much I love the Julio character, and realized that really only can be because of Elisabeth Moss’s acting — I mean he’s a great kid but to feel so strongly about him? That can only be because of her.

    • kapalabhati

      Someone pointed out that Megan was wearing Don’s glasses in the break up. Would you please confirm?

      • decormaven

        They could be- they’re wire rims. She wears them on the top of her head during the entire scene on the balcony, so it is hard to get a good look at them.

    • greenmelinda

      It amazes me how many people still get caught up erroneously in the symbolism & foreshadowing of “Mad Men.” They payoffs are in the often seemingly throwaway things the characters say. Seriously, am I the only one who groans audibly upon reading another recap or comment pegging Megan as Sharon Tate? Look how Martha Moxley the whole Sally and the 2 brothers scenario was painted, a few years off, yes, but one could make that same asinine interpretation of impending doom for a character.

      I began watching from the second half of season 4 again last week and noted how in the Season 5 premiere, when Lane was on the phone to the girl who’s photo was in the wallet he found. He says something like, “I’ll be at the office for the rest of my life.” With Bert’s death, you immediately think of his sendoff to Ida Blankenship, likening her to an astronaut; when he “implied” Don off himself by pointing out “a dead man’s name was also on that door” several weeks back, it was a subtle nod to his own impending demise.

      Death happens literally, but as we’ve seen with Ted and Don, its also more of a figurative construct. People need their work to give them life. It’s the work that brings these characters back to life—Don, Ted, Peggy and Roger (oh, how I adored Roger this episode). Viewers look too deeply into Draper as the falling man in the credits, all the obvious cues we’re taught to look for on TV. That’s why this show remains so damn great. It teaches us time and time again that we have to look a helluva lot deeper than what’s on the surface.

    • Sadiqeh

      In the final meeting where all the men have striped ties, the stripes on Don’s tie go in the opposite direction of everyone else’s ties. Also, everyone that wears stripes in the episode has issues with their family or is at odds with someone and very aware of it where as the floral prints are all worn by people that are focused on themselves.

    • Sherilyne Cox

      Me, too KateTdid. And my first job was at a Burger Chef. The series has been not just nostalgic, but carthartic in very positive ways. Sally was the kind of girl I wanted to be. Back then, anyway. Happy she opted for the skinny star-gazer instead of the brawny baller.

      • Alice Teeple

        I loved that. I feel like that scene was a really pivotal point – usually Don’s influence results in some disaster. In this episode, we see his influence resulting in Peggy’s confidence burst, and Sally rethinking her cynicism and trying something different. If you’re going to be cynical, you could say that Sally is just experimenting or going for the boy who won’t reject her, but I saw it as a show of Sally’s introspection. I thought that scene was sweet.

    • ChaquitaPhilly

      Thanks guys! Wonderful as usual and the pictures of the dance number were great.

    • leighanne

      Love Ted’s ankle boots, a very mod choice. He doesn’t look like he belongs with the rest of the group and if he could disappear into that couch he would.
      I was struck by Roger, Joan, and Jim all in whites and tans and Joan’s shiny coat material, three figures appearing together just after the moon landing. Perhaps a throwback to the figures forging new ground they just saw on TV. The first three to arrive in the office and forge into new territory without Bert.

    • Patrick Cleary

      How I wish striped pants for men would come back in style. That was a really brief trend and I’m just old enough to remember how much I loved wearing them as a kid.

    • Redlanta

      The whole reason Don went for Roger’s pitch is Family- Peggy, Stan, Ginsberg etc. When Roger told him Cutler would disassemble the company with nothing left but Harry and a computer- that is what made up his mind. He also promised Megan he would always take care of her-Family (much more Father-Daughter than sexual)

    • Angela_the_Librarian

      I want love to own most of the dresses Peggy wore in this episode (especially the presentation dress)! Thank you for the wonderful fashion/set design commentary all season long!

    • lillyvonschtupp

      I LOVE Peggy’s Burger Chef dress. I want to buy it, I want to wear it. Is JB having a tag sale anytime soon?

      • Alice Teeple

        Seriously. Come on, Janie. Get a deal with Modcloth going, or something. I’ll be your biggest customer. I want all of Peggy’s clothes, even her terrible mock turtleneck vest numbers.

        • MilaXX

          She probably makes more from her collab with Banana Republic. I have to double check, but I could swear I read something about her acting as a judge or mentor on some type of fashion realty show as well.

          • Alice Teeple

            Yeah, but Banana Republic was pushing the glam-y early 60s foo-foo stuff when everyone was trying to wear fedoras and bow ties. Banana Republic probably won’t extend its line to Peggy’s current poly power wear, but I’m down. We are your adoring fans, Janie! xo

        • Jaialaibean

          “… even her terrible mock turtleneck vest numbers” — yeah, me too!

      • Fjasmine

        She rents a lot of the costumes from shops in LA

    • smayper

      Did anyone else have a response to Cutler’s enormous collar and (looks like oversized) buttons? It looked godawful to me, and a big departure from his usual office wear. I’ve always thought the character was gay, which may be because Harry Hamlin plays a wonderful gay businessman on Shameless. Also: Harry’s eternal too-short ties make me laugh. I noticed that he is wearing a paisley in a scene when every other man is wearing stripes. He will wear leisure suits in the future, and continue to be a giant mess of bad fashion.

      • veriance

        really impressed with Hamlin, I’ve never thought much of him as an actor before MM.

        • Geoff Dankert

          Agreed. Harry Hamlin is doing some of the best work of his career on this show, and late-60s executive drag suits him extremely well.

        • MilaXX

          The only other time I like his acting was when he was on LA Law

        • not_Bridget

          When he was young, he was so pretty it was hard to concentrate on his acting…

      • Shawn EH

        In the blue suit he was dressed for his anti-Don coup, with no idea that Roger (in “meet me at sunset” sober black) was staging one of his own.

    • Therese Bohn

      I laughed out LOUD at the ‘Cougar’ reference that didn’t click when I saw it in the episode. So many brilliant touches here by Janie, but no surprise there! Bravo Boys! Thank you so much for your ever-brilliant fashion recaps. I’ll miss this when it has it’s curtain call! Is it next April yet?

    • http://www.lippsisters.com/ Deborah Lipp

      Wonderful work. I think that Sally is inserting herself into the guest family–she’s dressed exactly like the dad in the first scene.

      And Megan actually isn’t doing nothing (for once); she’s got a pile of scripts.

      • Shawn EH

        That poor nerdy child Sally chose: “What do I do now?” And then almost literally saved by the bell!

    • yllas

      One of my favorite episodes, to be sure! I loved the outfits in Betty’s house, I remember the flowery print little shifts well and have worn them myself. LOVE Sally’s madras plaid shirt and tan shorts, a look I have in my closet at this very moment. I’ve searched out madras plaid, hard to find, but I wanted it badly! and Peggy looks SO good lately, I hope her handyman becomes important to her, she’s losing poor little Julio….

    • http://www.snoskred.org/ Snoskred

      Whoa, reading through this post there was so much going on but it didn’t feel like that when watching the episode. For the first time this season it just seemed perfectly paced to me.

      It was that moment where the shot changed to show Bert in his socks which was so in character, that is when the loss of Bert became a real thing and also, showed me how much I will miss him and how much I have missed the character in past years when he was not around as much as he was in previous seasons.

    • RussellH88

      I think that with the whole “We’re not buying Joan being angry” argument, I think that she’s put a lot more focus on money since she prostituted herself to get the position. So I think that anything that comes in the way between her and the pay off from that (Like Don) is going to bother her because she sacrificed more than any of the partners so her stake in it is more personal.

      • KateWo

        I’m also wondering if maybe she’s more comfortable voicing her opinion now that she’s more of an equal? Back on the day she could be pretty cruel to the secretaries but not with her superiors. Now she’s a partner alongside those former superiors, and since Cutler suggested her promotion to accounts she’s been this way with Don.

    • Judy_J

      I thought “cheerleader hair” when I saw Sally’s new hairdo. Several cheerleaders at my high school in 1969 wore their hair just like Sally’s. Perfect.

      • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

        Is it part of that Miss Pert ‘n’ Pretty ‘n’ Perfect role?

    • colorjunky

      I predict Don and Peggy get together. Why don’t we ever see Peggy interacting with your biological son? He’s her “nephew” isn’t he?

      • 3hares

        No, Peggy’s child was adopted by strangers. Her nephew is her actual nephew.

      • French_Swede

        I thought so too for a while. I kind of remember a scene at Peggy’s mothers home where a baby is crying in one of the bedrooms and Peggy starts to go in, but doesn’t. I’ll have to go back and watch again.

    • Fjasmine

      Joan and Roger at the coffee shop, you guys are incredable.

    • 123Mimi

      For some reason, the handyman in Peggy’s living room looks like an adult version of Dick Whitman to me. He has the same dark features, prominent nose with eyes too close together. He’s what Dick Whitman would have grown up to look like if he hadn’t become Don Draper. His clothing reminds me of the kinds of clothes the adults in young Dick’s world used to wear.

      • Alice Teeple

        That is such a great point! I thought it was just a callback to Abe and his overalls working on the electrical outlet, but you’re right – he looks more like Dick Whitman’s hillbilly dad than Abe.

        • 123Mimi

          Thanks, and now that I think about it some more, I wonder if it is a kind of foreshadowing of Peggy and Don’s eventual union–that this scene of attraction between Peggy and the handyman shows that, unlike the other women in Don’s life who fall for him because they are only attracted to the persona of Don Draper, Peggy sees through Don and is attracted to the Dick Whitman in Don. Obviously this interpretation is also a projection of my own desires for them to get together. :)

    • bigeasybridget

      Wow! I really thought there’d be at least a moment that you’d devote to handsome high school kid’s 1. football jersey being the same colors as tween Glenn’s and 2. FanTAStic striped pants. Also, I thought Peggy’s presentation dress also connected with the moon landing, because it was very Judy Jetson to me.

    • ocean

      I think the daisy jewelry along with all the white flowers in this episode,
      symbolised (Bert’s upcoming) death just like Pete say they did on “the
      chrysanthemum and the sword”. After all, Bert was known to be a great
      supporter of the Japanese culture.

    • Johnny Neill

      Everything pops in Megan’s bikini.

    • Katelorelai

      I have so much to say about this episode I apologize inadvance for the freakishly long post. So here goes:
      When Peggy is hugging Julio there is just a little bit of mother blue peeking out from under her housecoat, which is totally appropriate in a scene where she is feeling for thefirst time like the mothers she is supposed to speak for.
      When we see Don on the plane to Indiana he’s wearing his “Team Peggy” tie that ties together his signature grey with her signature mustard yellow. It’s the same tie we see on him when he is on the elevator with her at the beginning of the episode after he decides to accept her being the leader and just do the work. A subtle foreshadowing that she will take the leadership role and that Don will give it to her willingly. I really don’t think Bert would be all that surprised that Don is finally learning loyalty. Although he is really not the man to lead the agency and he doesn’t want to. He is a creative man and the few actions we see him take are all about working on a solid creative team. He knows where he fits now which is something he has never known before and so it’s not really surprising, in an episode all about office politics that he really does so little.
      What is surprising is Roger. I have never been so proud of that man, he has truly inherited Bert’s balls (metaphorically speaking). I couldn’t help but notice that once he got the call about Bert that customary smirk was completely gone from his voice and it didn’t come back and he wasn’t wearing his usual vest, which has always read a little boyish to me, when he met with Mcann. He has always seen himself as junior to someone else, mostly Bert and now that his last father figure has gone he doesn’t see himself the same way anymore. Roger has finally grown up. Which brings me to… calling it that Joanie and Roger are gonna get back together. Roger has always been too weak and childish for Joan but that is not the man we saw this episode. There were so
      many tiny moments with these two from the repeat of the “you knew and you didn’t tell me” moment they keep having, to how Joan seem chastened by the way Roger handled Bert’s death. I don’t think that Joan really thought about whether it was appropriate to immediately think about client impact before Bert was even cold, she was just acting the way Bert did when Roger had his heart attack. But it seemed wrong to Roger and I think she felt it too when Roger said “is this what would happen when I die”. That seemed to really upset Joan and the look on her face when Roger walked away and Cutler closed Bert’s door, leaving her on the outside, on team Cutler, just the two of them while everyone else she respects and loves is on the other team, was
      really telling. I think that given what Joan said about wanting love and the impact on Roger of losing both Bert and Margaret
      and how that might make him want to be really there for his other kid, not to mention that they are both actually single at the same time for once, that all signs point to endgame.
      The partners meeting was one of the funniest moments I have ever seen on this how. Joan and Pete sitting next to each other and just acting like two little kids, so excited about all the lovely presents they are gonna get and then so disgusted that someone
      might take there shiny new toys away. Then Cutler raising his hand at the end. Bert was right leaders do vote with the team, Cutler’s just on the wrong team and now he knows that.
      If the previous scene was one of the funniest, than the last scene was one of the most touching. There was more parental affection in Bert’s “Don, my boy” than Don has probably ever felt in his life. And the song and dance called back nicely to Rogers last words to Bert being song lyrics and Don’s conversation with Sally about the monetary value of the moon. So many lovely little father and child moments. I don’t think that Don’s tears and slump were about anything negative I think he was just exhausted and
      relived and a little sad about everything that happened. Don isn’t living a lie anymore and that allows him to trust and to be loyal and it really paid off for him. This episode was so good I’ve been in the best mood ever since I saw it. But that’s what good art does it lifts you out of yourself, quite literally in Bert’s case and like him all I have left to say is Bravo!

      • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

        yes, so much! When Bert said, “Don, my boy…” I just choked up. It was really a glimpse into Don’s mind and how he’s made his work his real family.
        I also saw the shot of Roger sitting on the couch with his Grandson as one of those, “is Roger wanting to connect with family more” scenes. I wonder if since he lost his daughter, he’s feeling the desire to connect with his Grandson & maybe mulling over trying to figure out how to have a relationship with his son with Joan. I know he & Joan made steps last season, but so fat they haven’t had a chance to revisit that.

    • MsKitty

      I feel like I got the dates mixed up on the party invitation and arrived just in time to see the cleaning staff clear everything out LOL.

      In those screenshots of Megan I love that she has a bottle of Johnson’s Baby Oil on the table. Back in the pre-skin cancer awareness days J&J used to promote their baby oil as a way to get the deepest, darkest tan. As kids we would slather that stuff all over ourselves, plus it was cheaper than Coppertone.

      I know it’s been said a kazillion times already, but thanks uncles for spoiling us with these detailed analyses. It has really added another dimension to my enjoyment of the show, and I have no idea how I will get thru these next 11 months. I don’t even wanna think about the very last Mad Style, it will be a sad day.

      • BobStPaul

        And some people put iodine in the baby oil to get an even darker tan – hard as that is to believe these days.

      • decormaven

        Yes! I laughed hard when I saw the baby oil. That was a staple at the beach.

      • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

        Here’s something totally gross- my mother and aunts would sometimes use butter on their skin to tan XP

    • John G. Hill

      Bert must have had a will. Usually a cheap dramatic plot device, I can’t imagine MM going that route, but it might change everything. However, I can just as see all of his money going to an obscure organization along the lines of his life’s interests.

      • Alice Teeple

        The Objectivist Club? The Squid Eroticism of 1600s Japan? The possibilities are endless!

    • MannahattaMamma

      I swear to god these essays (cuz that’s what they are) should become the text in a media studies class, or a set design class….they are so good & smart & interesting.

      • leighanne

        I always think of this as my favorite Wednesday class : )

    • DeniseSchipani

      I have to say, with all the Pete-isms I want on my Pete T-shirt, I’m gonna need a bigger shirt. Everything from “Not good,Bob!” to “Sensitive piece of horseflesh” to “the clients don’t want to die!” I love Pete. Anyone notice how terrible his hair looked in a couple of scenes? The back of his hair is collar-length and kind of sticks out. Looks like a bad rug.

      • grahamcracker3

        This is brilliant. His mug should be rendered 2-tone like the Bill Murray Chive shirts or BHO ‘Hope.’

      • FranklyMyDear

        Don’t forget “Marriage is a racket” :)

      • Qdahling

        hahaha I would so buy a “Not good, Bob” shirt!

      • snarkykitten

        All I could think of when I saw Pete was “fuck, my hair has gotten that long. Ughhh”

      • MadMenMurphy

        Hells bells, Trudy!

    • Jacquelyn

      I think I could watch that final Bert Cooper scene over and over.
      Uncles, please don’t go away for 11 months! We’ll take anything Mad Style related from here ’till then! :)

    • CatherineRhodes

      TLO, you are geniuses. Thank you for your wonderful and amazing MM analysis. I always rewatch each episode after reading the Mon and Wed posts, and get so much more from the writing and costuming than I did the first time through. Enjoy your sabbatical, gents!

    • andrea

      I’m so sad to not have Mad Style to read for 11 months!! :( Of the few show reviews I read, this one just….there aren’t even words. Your blog is such a fabulous compliment to the show. I too thought Peggy looked her absolute best at the pitch, and was still wondering “what the…” about the orange stripe outfit as my eyes glanced over your line about the “pseudo nipples” lmao!!!

      Thank you for your wonderful insight this season.

    • Alex

      Since I’m looking for any excuse to prolong this series (especially with the end so near) I’m going to suggest a “Mad Hair” post. How did these women go to work/out in public with their hair looking like Joan’s (or Megan’s, when she was employed) or Mona’s? Did they all just know how to do elaborate bouffants themselves, go to the hairdresser once a week, put a big weave on it and call it a day?

      • French_Swede

        Great idea! I was wondering how Sally managed that perfect coif on her way to the pool.

      • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

        Yes, they all learned how to do their own hair. They went to the hairdresser once a week for a wash and set. Sometimes in between they would wash and set their own hair. The shampoos weren’t as gentle as they are now, so if you washed your hair every day or every other day your hair would get very dry, prone to breakage, and lose its shine. I grew up doing this for my Grandma when she wouldn’t feel well enough to go to the hairdressers. By “set,” I mean take the wet hair, put some sort of gel in it, it was often called “setting lotion,” rolling the hair in curlers, & then either letting them air dry or putting a hairdryer on. the hairdryer was a box with a hose attaching it to a thick plastic shower cap.

        There were countless patterns to set your curlers in to achieve different looks. And at night you often slept in a scarf, a nightcap, or sometimes curlers. Hair care was incredibly time consuming & as a result was a mark of personal hygiene, status, & wealth. Having overly long, flowing hair was considered lazy and dirty. It was scandalous when grown people did it (beatniks, hippies), but gained traction with children as a sort of innocent, beachy, back to nature look, which filtered back up into mainstream society through teens and eventually adults when it began to be associated with health & a carefree lifestyle.

        • decormaven

          Thank the heavens intricate do’s are no longer in style. Try sleeping in rollers- even foam rollers were uncomfortable to me. And the shampoo? Old school Prell would strip the color right out of the hair.

          • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

            lol! You’re right. Rollers are so uncomfortable & the shampoos were awful. As a child I had very long hair, so she would just wash the roots in the sink bc the ends would dry out.

            I did hair a few years ago during the flat iron craze. And the washing, drying, and ironing was pretty tough on hair too.

      • MilaXX

        A lot of women learned to do their own hair, but many also had weekly appointments and then had that hair set and sprayed to death. It would have taken a sand blaster to undo some of the bouffants.

    • French_Swede

      Awesome job, as usual.

      I noticed in the partners meeting that everyone has their legs crossed … except Jim Cutler. His legs are apart with his hands on his knees. It seems adversarial, like he’s an animal ready to pounce on anyone and everyone. But in the end, he’s just the bully who backs down and follows the crowd.

    • Terri Terri

      Well, my mom (who was born the same year as Miss Joan Holloway) just told me that she and my stepdad saw Robert Morse in “How to Succeed in Business….” when it came to San Francisco back in the 1960’s. And that the show was fantastic . I never knew that — I’m so jealous! But I mostly think it’s cool. She said she loved hearing him sing “the moon belongs to everyone” at the end of this moon landing episode. It’s so fun watching Mad Men along with mom!

      • 28judy

        I saw the broadway production and it was fantastic. But no need to be jealous. The movie is great, too. And you can watch it over and over.

    • Qdahling

      I am so sad I have to wait so long for a new Mad Style post! It’s my weekly internet highlight! Thank you for the education you’ve given me. I noticed Roger’s black mourning suit right away, for example.

      I was also hoping you would comment on the eggs!! “Here, have some cigarette-and-resentment-scented overcooked eggs. Mommy’s done for the day. “

    • Janet M Perry

      I’m sorry that you failed to mention in talking about the first partners meeting, Don’s tie. It’s striped and, except for the green, has the colors the others are wearing — red, blue, white, and black. And his suit is grey. So he has in his outfit all but one of the colors in the other outfits. Possibly reflecting that Don and his fate are central to the future of the agency?

    • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

      I think that Joan’s big thing has always been a desire for stability. She wanted a Doctor and the country life. She has, despite the uneven treatment over the years, stayed with the Agency in some form. She hasn’t redecorated her apartment. She’s incredibly angry at Don for costing her the public offering. I really think she doesn’t like change. I even think that’s the main reason she will never enter into a formal romantic relationship with Roger. Obviously, she’s not keen on public humiliation, which Roger’s promiscuity would no doubt bring, but while he has the money, I also just don’t feel that he’s emotionally stable enough to ever allow her to relax. And I think that carries over to her refusal of Bob Benson’s clumsy proposal. Again, she would have gotten money, but she also would have gotten a lifetime of waiting for the other shoe to drop, for the stability to disappear if Bob was ever arrested.

      • Glammie

        Yep, despite the chemistry, I don’t think Roger and Joan are that good for one another. Mona, for whatever reason, seems more able to have rolled with the punches. Roger’s charming, but he’s a rotten husband.

        • ItAin’tMe

          One of Roger’s most tender moments with Joan, “You’re the best piece of ass I’ve ever had. “

          • Glammie

            I think in a way, Joan wasn’t sincere in her relationship with Roger–she played the expected role of cooing sex kitten. There’s real affection between them, but also quite a bit of antagonism. They don’t actually share the same values–Roger does value loyalty (after all) and Joan really can cut people off when they cross a line. I’m not sure who Joan should be with, but I don’t think she and Roger would make one another happy. They’ve had a real chance to get back together and haven’t done so.

            • Gatto Nero

              Whoever pursues Joan might have a tough road to travel in winning her trust.

            • ItAin’tMe

              Yes, I think that Joan cares for Roger, perhaps was in love with him early on, but has no illusions about who he is, and doesn’t hanker for him. She knows that Roger’s value for loyalty extends to his buddies, but not to his women.

            • Glammie

              Well, I think Roger’s big on his version of loyalty, but fidelity’s a whole ‘nother matter. He’s a hedonist–check out his ruffly pocket squares. Though he seems to be finally settling down. Or maybe sobering up.

            • ItAin’tMe

              The dissipated lifestyle is no longer working for him.

            • Glammie

              Or he finally figured out he’d actually paid a hell of a price for it. Both he and Don got wake-up calls through their daughters.

        • MilaXX

          Agreed and after all they have gone through together, Mona is better able to deal with Roger and all his BS.

          • 3hares

            What did they go through “together?” Roger slept with tons of women their entire marriage, staying out at all hours. Apparently Mona often locked herself in the bathroom with gin while she was at home. Roger mostly clung to her when he had a heart attack while in the arms of another woman. Then he publicly umped her for his secretary and brought her into Mona’s life. Then he got divorced. Seems to me dealing with Roger and her BS just got Mona humiliated and abandoned. Getting back together with her would just be more rewarding of Little Lord Roger that nobody can stay mad at. (I feel similarly about the idea that Don having a few eps in a row where he’s a good guy means he and Peggy should come together as soulmates–as soon as he divorces the young woman he’s still married to). Neither of these guys seems to have actually suffered for want of this woman.

            • Jaialaibean

              Good points. Maybe Roger and Mona are better off as exes and friends. The fact that she can deal with him on a friendly level at this point is miraculous, and something not a lot of people would be able to do. And yeah, I really don’t think Don’s a great catch for any woman at this point, least of all someone considerably younger and with a lot less mileage than himself. Older woman who’s been there, done that? Maybe. Peggy? No — she may be imperfect, but surely she deserves better. As one of my friends used to say, “You don’t know where it’s been” … except that we do, mostly. Ugh.

            • MilaXX

              I agree Roger was cheating jerk, but Mona herself seemed checked out early on as well. So she was a drunk and he was cheater. Together they raised a spoiled, entitled child who put them through the ringer. I blame that on both of them. Unlike Betty and Don, I always had a feeling that Mona and Roger still had affection for each other. I’m hoping that Margaret’s abandonment and Bert’s parting words & death have enough of an impact on Roger that he gives up his bed hopping ways. I hope Mona has developed better coping skills than booze & pills. Perhaps it’s just the natural chemistry between the 2 actors, but I could see a reconciliation between Mona & Roger.
              As for Don & Peggy. There I completely agree. I have never seen their relationship as romantic or potentially romantic. That’s not the dynamic these two have and I have no desire to see them as a romantic couple.

      • MilaXX

        I think Joan got over looking for Mr Right, when the one who was supposed to be just that, her doctor husband turned out to be Mr. Wrong. So no, she’s not gonna settle for Roger, and she’s certainly not going to settle for Bob.

    • http://batman-news.com JLawGirl

      The thoughts that popped into my head as I watched:
      1. I knew Bert would die as soon as they opened with him watching the shuttle taking off. It just seemed “right” somehow that he would die after seeing something as momumental as that.
      2. As soon as Peggy came home to the handiman I thought — Blue Collar Don. Plaid shirt and rumpled slicked back hair and all.
      3. The hotel scene between Don and Peggy. I think one of the last times we saw Don in a hotel room with a woman it was Sylvia and it was ugly. In this scene Don is basically seeing Peggy in a very intimate position. She’s in rollers, a robe and pajamas. But there is nothing sexual here. They are equals. He respects her and puts the weight of the world on her shoulders because he knows she’s ready for it. It’s as though “they’ve arrived.”
      4. As soon as Sally kissed Neil I thought, she’s going to be ok. Because we all know it could go either way.
      5. The big hair! I want Sally, Joan and Peggy’s hair in this episode.

    • Virginia Lee

      I got to the end of this review, and got just as sad as I did when the actual Mad Men episode ended. T&Lo, you guys are amazing, thank you for changing the way we talk about TV, and for reprogramming my brain in general.

    • greenwich_matron

      I think Joan’s angry-red dresses are whore-red dresses. They established whore-red last season, and Joan has worn red every time she has been confronting Don or conniving with the partners. I looked through the Mad Style posts, and the only other time she wore red this season was when she was talking to the business school professor.

      • Glammie

        Red’s not just for whores–Sally wore a red hat throughout the Valentine’s episode. Peggy wore red last week. Actually Sally wore a red swimsuit as well.

        Red’s what Joan seems to wear when she’s playing up her “I was raised to be admired.” aspect–she wears it during the Belle Jolie episode and during the Conga episode, where she’s dressed like a present. But the red and white is angry–fragmented–Joan’s conflict about her “roles” being played out in her clothing maybe? She’s one pissed-off Valentine.

        • greenwich_matron

          But no one else has worn red in every episode this season. She wore red in every scene she was in with Don (albeit only a little red in the final scene where she realizes that she is getting her payday). She wore red when she ascended to the upstairs office, and she wore red when she complained about the legitimacy (!?) of Harry Crane getting partnership. She wore an brownish red when she went to receive her business tutorial from the professor. She did not wear red at home with her son.

          • Glammie

            Fair enough–so a marking as a scarlett woman at work, though in madonna blue at home. Brownish red when it turned out that she wasn’t being asked for sex by the professor.

    • French_Swede

      Are all of the telescopes in this episode simply related to the moon landing? Or is there another, deeper meaning to them?

      • MilaXX

        I think it’s in part related to the moon landing, but also what it represents in a the sky’s the limit, look to the future type of way. Notice the only one without a telescope, is the one who feels like the future is bleak, Ted.

        • Violaine

          Ted has something (a lamp?) on his desk that looks almost like an itty-bitty telescope. It’s brass and the same shape. If you look at the photo of Ted that’s just below the photo of Cutler, you’ll see it.

          • MilaXX

            I’m not sure it could be. I’ve zoomed in as much as I could. I almost reminds me of one of those balance, whirly things. Still if it is a telescope it’s a pitifully small on in comparison to everyone else inn the episode.

            • Violaine

              I think it’s a magnifying glass (look at the picture below that one). The profile just reminded me of a sad little telescope for poor Ted who has lost his mojo.

    • bigeasybridget

      Betty’s friend has the “harried mom” kerchief on her hair, like the Burger Chef mom when they first arrive. Moms in cars wear kerchiefs. Noted.

    • Susan Collier

      Bert Cooper with the cutting edge color TV. Everybody else has B&W. My parents went to their next door neighbors’ house to watch because they had color.

      • ItAin’tMe

        The moon landing footage was in black and white.

        • Susan Collier

          Pwned. Right you are. Most of those TVs are probably color by this time.
          My parents did go next door though. Their TV was about the size of the hotel one and it was B&W. And I had to suffer with it until 1982.

        • Gatto Nero

          The liftoff was in color.

          • ItAin’tMe

            Yes.

    • thinkzinc

      Before this episode aired I was talking to my father on the phone about how the new season was split in half. He expressed his frustration somewhat perfectly considered Bert’s fate in this episode by exclaiming, “Why are they doing that! Some of us might not be alive in 11 months!”

    • Candigirl1968

      Another masterful Mad Style.
      The Julio/Peggy stripes connection was amazing. I don’t even want to know how much re-watching you two have to do to catch everything.
      I want to go back and watch each Mad Men episode again, now armed with what I know from Mad Style.

    • Qitkat

      I don’t know if anyone else has posted this:
      The Spring 2014 online issue of The Paris Review has a fascinating interview with Matthew Weiner.

      • decormaven

        Thank you! What a treat. I am in awe of MW’s writing skills. I agree with him- television is where the art will land.

        • Qitkat

          That interview is bloody brilliant, isn’t it?
          It gave me more insight into his writing than anything else I’ve read; I actually feel bad about some of the things I’ve tossed out over the years about him, being more of an ignorant ass than having the slightest idea of where he is coming from, it’s truly enlightening.

          • MilaXX

            I’m doing a rewatch. I did it with both Breaking Bad and The Wire. It’s interesting to see how your opinion of certain characters change and how much background information you notice that you may have previously overlooked.

            • Qitkat

              I can imagine.
              I’ve resisted the rewatch, but I am thinking I will want/need to do so before the second half of season 7 comes along. Did you get the DVD’s? or is it going to stay on Netflix perhaps? I binge-watched all of Breaking Bad last fall so I’m not ready to do that yet again, lol. I keep seeing The Wire on so many folks’ best list, but I can’t summon up the will to watch it, I’ve never seen a single episode. Actually I’ve never seen all of The Sopranos either. Some day Six Feet Under and Lost will get a rewatch.

            • MilaXX

              I’m watching on Netflix. Not sure how long it will stay on there. I only rewatch shows I love so my list is short. Breaking Bad I rewatched and watched in real time. I loved the The Wire & Six Feet Under so I rewatched those as well. Mad Men makes the fourth show I have been in love with enough to sit through it again. I’ve been considering LOST, but I’m not sure if I want to.

          • Glammie

            Thanks for the link. Interview was quite interesting–the poetry background was striking. Not at all surpised that he’s big on short stories, particularly Cheever. The first thing I ever noticed about Mad Men is that many episodes had a short-story feel.

      • Gatto Nero

        Great interview! Thanks so much for the link.

    • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

      A style like that would have most likely been a french twist topped with a hair piece. There used to be both ads in magazines for them as well as entire catalogs :) You could also back comb sections and then comb the top layer of hair into a smooth appearance before spraying with hairspray. I went through a “Jackie Kennedy” hair phase when I was a teen in the late 80s. My Gram showed me how to get “the bubble.”

    • Synnae

      Confession time: I don’t actually watch Mad Men. But I have read every single TLo Mad Style write up. I just love the very precise analysis!

    • Yolanda

      Spot on, as usual Uncles! I’m going to miss Mad Style. Sigh…until 2015…

    • Lattis

      Man I love these posts. I love them more than the recaps – and that is saying something. I love how it gives time to look closely at all the choices made to create these scenes. It is fascinating. When watching Robert Morse’s final song and dance, I was aware of the brightness around him, but to really see it brings tears to my eyes. The secretaries are like bright easter eggs – and the contrast between that and the context punches my heart.

      You guys are so fucking brilliant that I sometimes hate you but always love you.

    • Damien W

      Thanks for another great season of Mad Style. And it’s nice to see even Matt Weiner apparently giving you a momentary nod in the show! Ha!

      My one addiditonal observation re: Megan’s bikini — it is orange and blue, but I think those shades aren’t not so much Burger Chef as they are Howard Johnson’s, the scene of one of their more bizarre fights, complete with fleeing and long-distance chasing. She will never eat the orange sherbet.

      • DawnMarie76

        That was my take too, didn’t see your post before I posted mine. Howard Johnson’s, where Don’s family starts to fall apart…Burger Chef with the same color scheme where he puts a new one together. I bet Pete would eat the sherbet!

        • snarkykitten

          I get the feeling that Pete would eat shit if Don told him to.

    • JennyTea

      Sally’s purple-on-purple kissing outfit reminds me so much of Joan’s outfit when her husband raped her. I’m glad nothing else reminded me of that scene!

    • Linlighthouse

      Re the eggs: I wondered if there wasn’t a subtle ovulation reference there. And funny catch on the Cougars shirt.
      Re Sally: Our little girl is growing up. Boobs!
      Re the Julio/Peggy matching outfits. Amazing to catch that!
      Peggy’s nipple dress. We keep coming back to mothers, and that Don wishes he’d had a good one.
      I love Joan’s hair loosened at the sides. Wish she’d wear a pony tail, but that will never happen.
      Wow at Morse’s performance. It was perfectly staged, sung, danced, and acted. Bert, and the secretaries, are beaming at Don. I hope Don picks up that “love can come to everyone” and realizes that he already has love. His friends, coworkers, even his family. Even Megan, despite all.

      • MarinaCat

        Ovulation reference regarding who?

        • Linlighthouse

          I just meant women, in general.

      • ItAin’tMe

        Sally’s “boobs” look more like falsies and are askew in the first pic of her in the backyard.

    • MilaXX

      Here’s today’s odd Mad Men casting. The actress who plays Sal’s wife Kitty is the same actress who currently plays April Kepner on Grey’s Anatomy. That makes 2 Shonda Rhimes employees. I wonder if they share casting agents.

      • decormaven

        There has been a lot of GA/MM crossover. Elisabeth Moss, the actor who played Jimmy Barrett, the actor who played the LeaseTech techie, the actress who played Anna Draper, the actress who played Rachel Menken – these are the ones off the top of my head.

    • DesertDweller79

      In this episode Sally reminded me so much of my mother in all the pictures of her when she was younger. The retro Betty-style hair looks so different on her! My mother is about 10 years older than Sally, and a blonde just like her. This hair Sally is wearing comes right out of my mother’s senior year yearbook.

      • Columbinia

        Long straight hair was the thing for teenage and college girls in 1969. Think Ali McGraw in “Love Story” (1970).

        • T C

          The Mod Squad, 1968.

    • snarkykitten

      I think it’s fascinating how everyone was glued to their TVs to watch the moon landing. My mom was 14 at the time and according to her, it was terribly boring!

      • Columbinia

        I think the show’s producers have a nostalgia for a time when the country had collective experiences.

        • Linlighthouse

          Good point. Like the Kennedy assassination. I’m sensing a theme of “family” throughout the series.

        • http://twitter.com/lauriekalmanson laurie kalmanson

          three networks and a few uhf channels

        • Gatto Nero

          The Burger Chef pitch was about collective experiences, too — so it all tied in.

        • snarkykitten

          oh I understand completely. It’s way more compelling to have the shared experience than my mom’s!

      • Logo Girl

        I was five… The whole week leading up to it was very “hurry up and wait” but when the moment they landed got closer, it felt more exciting

    • verve

      Just noticed the painting behind Ted’s desk in his LA office is different. It used to be a trumpeter (felt kind of like one of Peggy’s craft-kit living room mosaics), now it’s blue and green abstract…

    • Fred Vaughn

      I hate to go there on a site run by Philly people, but sometime in 7.1 orange and blue MIGHT return, in calling out the 1969 World Series (The trajectory of this season’s timeline seems to be rarin’ to meet the ashy-to-classy Mets – bastard children of Giant *Orange* and Dodger *Blue* – sometime later that summer, as they rode to a World Series that many would say they lucked out getting NEAR… and may have led to this commenter’s conception a little ;))

      • breathlss79

        Oh no, will the Draper marriage make a comeback?

        • Columbinia

          Please, no. I’m betting that Betty drops her “bad boyfriend” line and takes a new look at Don once Megan is gone. The marriage to Megan infuriated her more than anything else about Don. I’ll take another encounter with the Neve Campbell character, but no more Megan is my prayer.

    • DawnMarie76

      I thought the orange and turquoise-blue in Megan’s bikini and elsewhere were also a bit of a callback to the Howard Johnson’s episode last season, the scene of her first big fight with Don. The Burger Chef scene last week also mirrored that scene with Megan in the HoJos – in that case Don trying to force a family situation. Admittedly Howard Johnson’s played a big role in my childhood in the Mad Men era, so maybe I glom on to it easily.

      • http://twitter.com/lauriekalmanson laurie kalmanson

        fried clams

        • judybrowni

          HoJo fried scallops in my case made me so ill, I didn’t attempt them again for about 30 years.

    • BigWhiteGrannyPanties

      I love it that Roger called her “Benedict Joan.” Made me spit out my iced tea!

    • Black Doug

      This post has helped with two things.

      1. It cleared up where Bert was at the beginning of the episode. I didn’t realize that was his house… I thought it was his office!

      2. It allowed me to play “Where Are Sally’s Eyes?” during her scenes after the reveal that she likes the shy one. Some nice redirection there.

    • Columbinia

      Was there that much plaid in 1969? Okay, Madras plaid was a thing, I guess. But where’s the paisley? The hodge-podge of clothes and styles is beginning to bother me. About the only places I enjoy looking at are Bert’s office and apartment. The summer of 1969 was Woodstock and I keep wondering where that flower child style element is.

      The thing that really upset me in the episode was Peggy putting that drop ceiling in her apartment. Here she has these high ceilings in a pre-WWII building and she’s dropping the height with those ugly, utilitarian tiles that someone with taste is going to have to rip out 20 years later in a renovation that respects the original design and undoes the remuddling of the 1960s and 1970s. Those tiles are probably asbestos.

      That Francis mansion is unrelentingly formal, empty, archaic and dark. How is it they don’t have enough guest rooms and have to double up on bedrooms
      Anyway, the idea of eggs is sending me to the kitchen — not that a cold platter of eggs seems like anything good.

      • Glammie

        What Bert and his maid reminded me of was Betty and Carla sitting down together to watch the Kennedy assassination footage.

        • Columbinia

          Unlike Betty and Carla, some of those employer-domestic relationships lasted for decades until one party died.

          • Glammie

            Yeah, Betty broke the whole noblesse-oblige thing when she canned Carla. Bert’s racism, I suspect, was of the know-your-place, but treat the underlings well as long as they don’t “misbehave” and expect to be treated as equals. I doubt her getting to sit on the couch to watch TV was a nightly occurrence.

      • Sally

        As someone pointed out to me about those ceilings;apparently they were the thing at the time. And that tenants would have liked them Keeping down costs of heating and cooling. At the time, they were considered an improvement. So, it’s good to see Peggy putting money into the building.

        • Susan Collier

          Yes! I meant to comment on the ceilings. This is when they went up and new owners would be tearing them down in the early ’90s wondering whatever possessed someone to do such a thing. Maybe she’ll fork over the money to install those glass shower doors next!

          • Columbinia

            Bad paneling, sheet vinyl flooring (Solarian) and wall-to-wall carpeting over tile and wood floors, ll sorts of quick and cheap cover ups were done rather than good restorations. This sort of remodeling has been labeled remuddling by Old House Journal.

        • Columbinia

          The drop ceilings were sold as a quick and inexpensive fix to avoid re-plastering and restoring a ceiling or to avoid repairing a vintage tin ceiling. The tiles quickly became shabby, stained and ugly. Often sold as “acoustic” tile, they were usually asbestos.

    • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

      That’s the one I got too!

    • Juvenile Sinephile

      I knew when Peggy gave the summations of her clothing options to Julio that TLo would note how Mad Style it was, because it TOTALLY was.

      I guess the significance of Don having Lane’s Mets pennant is that the orange and blue pointed to him being on Team Burger Chef for the rest of the season. But I hope October 1969 still makes it into the final seven episodes. If Matthew Weiner skipped over August 1969 and went into October, I will love him forever. I will forgive him for pairing up Peggy and Duck, that scene with Pete and the Au Pair, and Paul Kinsey, Hare Krishna.

      The length of Sally’s hair just in that new ‘do, I’m wondering if, since Megan seemed to be the only one who let down long hair (albeit with help), that Sally’s character will grow her’s long and go for a Mod Squad-Peggy Lipton look.

      Glad I was not the only one getting Mrs. Robinson vibes from Betty and the football player. Not saying she’ll go down that road but girl loves that she still has it.

      • ItAin’tMe

        I loved Kinsey being a Krishna devotee! It was perfect!

    • GayhawkAZ

      I love that you pick out some amazing screencaps to scatter among the analysis, but perhaps my favorite of them all is the screencap of Peggy, her eyes slightly teary, hugging Julio. A brilliant catch by you, Uncles — and of course Elizabeth Moss’ amazingly subtle expressions so full of emotion. (I’ve got goosebumps as I write this!)

    • ashley

      You guys caught so many things I would never see and I’m obsessed with you for it

      But isn’t Sally pulling a Betty with the kiss? Wasn’t bettys first at camp or a bat mitzvah and the jewish boy had to remove his glasses to kiss her? This is only coming to me because when i rewatched I noticed Neil sheepishly putting his glasses back on (removed to look into the tele) before he went back inside

      Also remembering ‘you don’t kiss boys. they kiss you’ oh Birdy.

    • AutumnInNY

      As always TLo nails it. Brilliant recap. And major kudos to Janie Bryant. Sally Draper’s madras sleeveless blouse and lace up shirt are so on point I get nostalgic just seeing them.
      I’m a few years younger than Sally would be in MM years but remember every teenage girl in my suburban Philly neighborhood dressing like this come summer. Also Meredith and her daisy pin and earrings, priceless.

      • DawnMarie76

        Yes, her outfits really hit me too. I am a couple of years younger than she would be, and that lace up shirt sent me into a nostalgic loop. I know I had one around that age and as with Sally it was one of the first things I had that showed off my new figure.

        As someone else mentioned, I was not into the moon landing either. I do remember being outside that night, not glued to the TV. Probably trying to see the actual men on the moon.

      • ThaliaMenninger

        The lace-up shirt hit me, too. I was 13 in 1969 and you better believe I had that shirt. I also had a shift dress with the laceup front. And I had striped pants a la the hunky boy on the floor. I didn’t have either Sally’s curves (although the fact that she doesn’t seem to have them in the madras blouse makes me wonder whether it was a padded bra in the lavender shirt) or the hunky boy’s thighs. I didn’t get curves till the 70s.

    • MissusBee

      I feel like Joan was relatively ignored in this half-season, given how interesting her storylines have been previously.

      I mean, we were all dying to see her as this new account person, and while she got a new office and had one badass phone call with Travis Cougartown (which was more bitchy than professional anyway), we never saw her sell the work, lead a client meeting, tell the creatives they’re working all weekend, or any of that stuff that we’ve seen other account people like Pete do so dramatically. It’s like her promotion is just a cipher. We’re supposed to accept it without seeing how it affects her or her office relationships (in the way Peggy’s did). Disappointing.

      • greenwich_matron

        I was really hoping to see Joan prove herself as an account person. I found that Travis episode so promising. I loved the idea of her being able to transfer her skills and how she saw she had to provide value beyond being a glorified drinking buddy and pimp. I am very perturbed by the entire “Joan sleeps her way to millions” story line and I wanted her to prove that the male power structure had been making a mistake by overlooking her all this time. I think that is one of the reasons I resent her character jonesing so hard for the easy pay off.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          That’s part of the problem I have with her character turn too. We watched Peggy struggle and fight her way to where she is now, over years. Joan dismissed and belittled the very idea of ambition, then she slept her way into a partnership and is now shown to be vindictive, power-hungry and somewhat narrow in her business sense – but she just became a millionaire.

          Peggy and Betty are telling the stories of millions of women in their struggles. Joan just became a night time soap opera character. Very disappointing.

        • Gatto Nero

          I’m hoping Weiner will readdress Joan’s trajectory in the final episodes — though he won’t have much time, given all the other plot threads and character arcs to resolve.
          For now, he is insisting in interviews that Joan’s vindictiveness is due entirely to the money Don cost her, and we’re unlikely to get any other official explanation for it. And the buyout seems to have resolved this for her, given how giddy she was over her share.
          I was hopeful about her promotion to accounts manager, but that plot development went nowhere. The Joan we knew in previous seasons was business savvy and appreciated Don’s talent; they were even office allies. But she has been almost urecognizable for much of the past several episodes. I agree that the character deserved better.

          • MissusBee

            There are a lot of arcs, but the show is quite economical in its storytelling, so a soupcon of Joan-of-Accounts would have gone a long way.
            Basically, the SCDP characters are not rounded if we don’t see where they are professionally. It would actually be very interesting if Joan was a terrible account manager, or was mentally checked out and waiting for the big payday, but unless we see it, there’s no depth there. I suppose you could say that MW is showing that despite her success, she is still defining herself in relation to the men around her, but unless you see how that relates to her job – holding meetings, tearing creatives a new one and so forth, it’s weak.
            I’ll just have to imagine that she sits in her office all day, muttering ‘Curse you, Don Draper!’ and sharpening pencils.
            Question: if Dr Rapist shows up, is he entitled to any of Joan’s money?

            • greenwich_matron

              I think Christina Hendricks could rock a maniacal laugh as she throws her newly sharpened pencils at her Don Draper dart board.

            • Gatto Nero

              Joan and Dr. Rapist are divorced. He’s entitled to nothing.

            • MissusBee

              Duh. Of course – I forgot. For some reason, in my head they were separated but not actually divorced. I guess it was eclipsed in my mind by the prostitution story.

            • Columbinia

              I thought Dr. Rapist was going to end up a casualty in Viet Nam as the series’ nod to the war.

            • Gatto Nero

              I guess that could happen, as a sort of footnote. But he hasn’t been mentioned at all since he decided to be redeployed when Kevin was still an infant.

            • snarkykitten

              I thought it was decided that he wasn’t going to be written off in that way? With Joan’s pointed remark to Roger(?) about how Dr. Rapist’s death would not solve anything.

    • VeryCrunchyFrog

      Every breakfast table had Welch’s grape jelly. Great touch!

    • Mary Ann

      Dear T and Lo, thank you so much for your brilliant insights into Mad Men. I am a new-ish fan, so maybe someone else has already suggested this, but how about a contest for the last half of the season wherein one lucky winner gets to meet you somewhere and watch an episode with you? And then also what if that lucky winner could be me?

    • ThaliaMenninger

      Wonderful. THANK YOU!!

    • Jenn

      I thought Peggy holding up the two ugly choices was a bit meta. Definitely acknowledging the limits for women in the office to appear professional but also acknowledging what you guys et al say about her outfits!!

    • NeenaJ

      That last screen cap of Bert has me tearing up. The emotion and joy in his eyes…

      • DawnMarie76

        Yes, and the girls look like they are having a great time too. If the DVD set has a feature of the filming of that number I will definitely buy it. Oh who am I kidding, I will buy the DVD set anyway.

        • Lady Bug

          I hope they have the cast give commentaries for the Season 7 DVD, I would love to hear Robert Morse’s thoughts on this episode. :)

          • Gatto Nero

            If you search for “Robert Morse” on the NY Times website, you’ll find a short interview with him about it.
            I’m sure there are others elsewhere.

    • Pete

      I thought it was strange that a kid would wear a football jersey in July, especially back when they were made from thick, hot material; not like the lighter mesh ones that would come later. Also, that striking gold number 32 in the center of the scene was a focus-puller. The jersey appears to be a replica of the one O.J. Simpson wore at USC when he won the Heisman in 1968, which would make him the current Heisman winner in July ’69. I have know idea what to conclude from this, but having read the entertaining and always insightful T and L for awhile now , I can’t imagine that anything so visually jolting would be insignificant. Any thoughts?

      • T C

        Betty’s conversation with his mother mentioned he had a football scholarship to Rutgers. Betty’s description of Don in same conversation. Cutler’s description of Don. Some teenage males like to flout their BMOC status, especially at girls. It certainly is a sharp contrast to his plaid-clad brother and Sally’s frequent choice of plaids.

    • emmapeel

      Do we know when Peggy’s birthday is? She comes off as SUCH a Capricorn.

      • Emily S

        May 25. they revealed it on an episode.

        • ChaCha

          Hmmm…Gemini. That explains a lot!

    • Kelly

      OMG, is that Kellie Martin as Telescope Boy’s and Football Boy’s mom? I was just recently wondering what had happened to her. . .

    • buddy100

      Okay. I swear to the glorious pantheon of MM writers that I didn’t want to jump on the Don/Peggy as a couple train. But even more than the dance scene last week, these stills make me wonder. Look at how much they’re touching as they sit side by side. Don is very much leaning into her, which is a subconscious sign of trust. Then there’s that expression of caring and adoration on Peggy’s face as she watches him. Finally, the many many inside jokes, the subtle references, the world that they alone inhabit together.

      Intense platonic love? Possibly. Probably. And absolutely beautiful that way. It’s not a conventional relationship: it goes deeper than sex. But damn does there seem to be some sexuality in there. Their knees are practically intertwined!

      Or am I just looking at a pink imaginary elephant?

      • therainexploded

        I had never even considered it…until last week. I suddenly have the sense that they may “discover” each other before the final credit rolls. If Don finally finds true love with someone who shares his passions…well, that’s alright with me.

    • John G. Hill

      Just a little thing, but I noticed that after her Hollywood agent embarrassed her with the remark about having her teeth fixed, it seems like the real Jessica Pare, also has become a little self-conscious about her own teeth. I’ve noticed she’s has a tendency to close her mouth on close-ups. That would be a shame, because she has always come off as a natural actor.

    • Winston Smith

      The football player is more Don as he is now and Neil is more Dick Whitman

    • Still Anonymous

      Great analysis, but I’m surprised you let it unremarked upon that Harry’s seem to be the first and only appearance of wide 70s-style ties.

    • Jilane Rodgers

      Not sure if someone else has already mentioned this, but after Peggy’s packing scene (where she explains her gray-suit-like-the-boys vs. blue-and-orange-striped-more-feminine-choice to Julio), we see Don pack a gray suit while passing by a very similarly orange and blue striped tie. It seemed to be too specific to be unintentional.

    • Frankly

      Oh, my heartstrings… But I just now realized that Betty’s friend is the girl from The Face on the Milk Carton! Major nostalgia.