Mad Style: The Strategy

Posted on May 21, 2014

Once again into the fray. Our themes this week? Dads in Plaids and Pseudo-Madonnas in Blue. Keep an eye out.

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That’s a more or less perfect snapshot of the suburban mom in 1969, so masterfully rendered that you get who she is immediately even though you can only see about a quarter of her costume. She isn’t particularly important from a thematic sense. She established no motifs or participated in any themes. She’s just a mom who looks like the army of moms driving Buick station wagons around America in 1969.

We’ve never seen that dress before on Peggy. It’s kind of cute and it continues the theme of Peggy wearing these simple, short-sleeved dresses, sometimes with metallic embellishments, like chains, buttons or buckles, usually with a high collar or very demure neckline. Business-like but feminine. We’re almost ready to declare that she FINALLY figured that part of her wardrobe out. Most of her office and work wear this season has been really good. Her off-work wear tends to remain as bad or worse than it ever was, though. Doesn’t that sum up her story in costuming? She’s got it going on in work, but she’s unhappy because she has no personal life to speak of – or at least, not the personal life she keeps being told she’s supposed to have.

Also: note that she’s wearing blue. It’s establishing a motif that will play out through the rest of the episode, on virtually every female character, like the pink theme that ran through last week’s episode. There are two mothers in this scene. The one who is doing the work of being a mother isn’t wearing blue. We propose that all the blue dresses in this episode were worn by women struggling in some way with the role and concept of motherhood in a non-traditional sense; women who had given their babies away, taken a break from motherhood, wondered about where they fit in a certain child’s life or whether they should continue being a wife and stepmother.

And speaking of work and mothers:

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No blue here.

Can we talk about Chez Holloway-Harris? Because we don’t get why Joan is even living here. She’s a partner and an account rep. Male characters have supported entire families on that kind of salary. Given Peggy’s rather high salary and Joan’s own position as a partner, we doubt very much that she’d settle for a lower salary than a man in her position. She’s making bank. She was making a semi-decent salary as the Office/Personnel/Traffic Manager, indicating in conversation to Lane that she was making somewhere in the neighborhood of $12,000 a year in 1967, which would have been the equivalent of $80,000 a year today. Now that she’s moved so far up in the world, she’s got to be bringing home significantly more than that in 1969. Her wardrobe got noticeably more showy and expensive-looking this season, which had us excited to see what her home life was like. Where’s Joan living now that she’s making bank? What does her home look like? Disappointingly, it looks pretty much exactly as it did almost ten years ago, down to the wall color and draperies. It seems like a very strange art direction choice, considering how we’ve watched characters like Don, Pete, Peggy, and Betty have the changing circumstances of their lives reflected in where and how they were living. After Ossining, Don fled the suburbs completely for a Manhattan penthouse and Betty ran into the comforting arms of tradition and wealth by moving into a Victorian mansion. Pete went from a swank newlywed’s apartment to a stifling suburban rancher to a sleazy businessman’s getaway. Peggy went from a shithole in Brooklyn, to a slightly less shitty Brooklyn apartment to a decent midtown apartment to owning her own building. Joan, whose journey has been no less life-changing than any of these characters, is still living in the West Village apartment that she used to share with a roommate that had a crush on her – and hasn’t even redecorated in all that time. We’re mere months away from the seventies and this place looks pure 1950s.

We struggled with an explanation for this. You could take the uncharitable route and say that she’s just not focussed on her home at all at the moment, but that would imply that she’s not a very good mother. We can’t say anything about that because the show has largely glossed over Joan’s motherhood. We rarely ever see her interacting with Kevin and she hardly ever brings him up in her dialogue. But one thing we do know is that Joan has been very slow in accepting the changes in her life. It took her well over a year to accept the idea that she was a partner and not a secretary, and then it took her another year to realize she’s an account executive, not an office manager. She knew Greg was a loser when she married him and it took her quite a bit of time to finally face up to that fact. Joan is, unlike Peggy, slow to change. Resistant to it, at times. She also likes to keep the things around her tightly controlled. She hasn’t moved or changed her apartment because she hasn’t quite owned up to the fact that she’s far from the young, single girl who moved into that place, hoping to snag herself a doctor husband and a home in the country – and that these things are never going to happen for her, even though she built her whole life on the assumption that they would.

Don’t get us wrong; we’re not suggesting she’s still pining for that way of life, where she gets to be someone’s plaything and wife. She just hasn’t owned up the changes in her life by making that change in her living space. Having been raised by her mother to present herself to the world, she’s chosen instead to reflect the changes in her life in her clothing.

 

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Boy, she can still sashay her way through that office; especially when faced with a group of men. She still turns it on for them.

And yes, Clara’s clearly pregnant under that super-groovy dress. That’s a little odd for 1969, considering that it looks like she’s fairly far along. We didn’t even know she was married – and she’d almost have to be, working as a pregnant woman in an office in 1969. Madison Avenue was forward-thinking and sometimes glamorous, but unwed mothers working as secretaries would still have been considered too shocking for business.

We think the motif of purple and heartbreak has been long retired with Joan; just like yellow no longer seems to be Peggy’s power color. Too many changes in their lives for them to be repeating the old motifs. What we find interesting about this outfit – which she wore in the season opener, when Ken essentially promoted her to account executive, is how much it resembles the kind of dresses Peggy wears in the office:

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(Blue dress #2)

Simple, mostly unembellished dresses with short sleeves and crew necks, rendered in bright colors. That’s fascinating to us, because we can tell you, after years of documenting and writing about the costumes of these characters, the idea that Joan is taking style cues from Peggy is revolutionary. That was never the case. If anything, Peggy was the one who tried to mimic Joan every now and then, usually to disastrous results. After putting Peggy down for years for having ambitions, Joan finds herself a career woman – and she’s looking to the only other one she knows to show her how to dress the part. Of course, being Joan, she embellishes the look with tons of jewelry (not to mention that sashay). She’ll take some advice from Peggy, but she’s always going to be Joan.

Think we’re overselling this? Remember last week, when Peggy wore what we said was probably the best office dress she ever had; the blue one with the chain detail at the waist?

Well:

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That’s almost exactly the same dress. When, in the entire run of the show, has Joan ever worn “almost exactly the same dress” as Peggy? You have to look past the scarves and the jewelry and the curves, but believe it or not, Joan Holloway is deliberately dressing herself like Peggy Olson. She would die before admitting that, though.

Joan’s purple and red would play itself out in some other costumes this episode, but never to the extent that blue does:

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Bonnie was put out that she wasn’t going to be introduced to Tammy, wondering just where she fits in her life, as well as in Pete’s.

This looks pretty much exactly like something Jeannie would wear on I Dream Of Jeannie, right around this time. It calls to mind the housewifery of Betty Francis & Friends from last episode, with the diaphonaous sleeves, lacey ruffled and floral embellishments, but it couldn’t be more different from those romantic and respectable dresses. This is pure Hollywood sex appeal – and it looks more than a bit out of place, both in this office and in New York in general. That is a TON of jewelry – and a bag that doesn’t look like day wear to us. She got seriously dressed up to go to Pete’s office (this isn’t what she wore on the plane) because she’s clearly hot for Don but more generally, she’s hot for business and the idea of powerful men making money all day long. She’s putting her best, most glamorous foot forward – and then getting it filthy:

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Because this is not where she belongs. That outfit’s almost hilariously wrong for NYC in June. It looks way more appropriate for poolside in L.A.

Anyway, back to the office:

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Clearly, the IBM drone lady is affecting all the color choices of the other ladies in the story using her mind ray powers or something. Last week it was pink; this week it’s purple.

 

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Like Bonnie’s outfit, this purple macrame dress and styling is pure California chic for 1969. It’s going to make a lot of Sharon Tate conspiracy theorists unhappy to hear this, but this look, with the macrame and the long-strand necklaces and center-parted long hair is straight-up Ali MacGraw, who would become a style icon herself very shortly and have a massive effect on how women dressed in the early seventies. Even Megan’s bag has a California/’70s feel to it. Like Bonnie, she doesn’t belong in New York. Like Pete, Don can’t see what that means for him

 

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This called to mind several of the outfits she wore when they went to Hawaii. That purple, orange and pink theme was very dominant in her looks then. This played out in the dialogue later in the episode. She can’t stay here and he won’t stay with her, so she proposed a destination somewhere where they could meet up without their baggage. Hawaii was the last time they were truly happy together.

 

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Lady in blue. But unlike all the other ladies, she’s not wearing a dress here. We don’t want to oversell the motherhood theme here, but as we noted last week, Megan’s more than aware that if she announced to Don she was pregnant, all the tension would temporarily go out of their marriage. Don has expressed a desire that she get pregnant (“Let’s make a baby,” in “Signal 30″) and had a drug-fueled dream of an angelic Megan telling him she’s pregnant and that he’s free to sleep around. Her miscarriage last season was a huge wakeup call to both of them and probably something of a turning point for their marriage.

She is standing there with just her stomach exposed, after all. And barefoot.

Let’s take a break from all the mommy issues and look at the dad side of things for a moment:

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Compare and contrast:

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Two “dads” in plaid, getting vastly different welcomes. They’re both working essentially the same look, which isn’t surprising, since there was a time when everything Bob Benson wanted to be was summed up in the aristocratic figure of Pete Campbell. This is pure ’60s prep, although Pete’s version is more Cos Cob father and Bob’s is more “going courting.” A dad getup vs. a date getup.

Several readers tried to posit a rainbow flag theme in Bob’s plaid, but we’re not seeing it, and besides, Janie Bryant wouldn’t be that literal. What we are seeing is the typical Janie Bryant trick of tying families together through color. Bob, Kevin and Gail are all working heavy yellow and orange tones, looking unified. Joan is in a motherhood-blue, separate from them in color because she’s the only person in the room who doesn’t want Bob to become a literal member of the family.

Continuing his tradition for slightly inappropriate gifts (indicating how bad he is at interpersonal stuff), Bob gives Kevin a gift that’ll be a nightmare for Joan, if she ever deigns to open that box: an erector set, because “America needs engineers,” he proclaims, reading off yet another internal cue card.

 

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As we said in our Monday review of this episode, the Stonewall riots are a week away, but we find it almost impossible to believe that the show will depict them. Instead, they’re doing what they frequently do when it comes to historic events, alluding to them rather than showing them outright. The fact of the matter is, the entire world did not hear of the Stonewall riots when they happened – or even for years after they happened. It was a seminal moment in gay history, but the newspapers barely covered it and most people were largely ignorant about them.

But the riots happened because a bunch of gay, lesbian and queer people decided they’d had enough with police harassment, brutality, and entrapment. That’s what set them off. Here we are, a week earlier, watching Bob come face to face with police harassment, brutality, and entrapment. There’s your Stonewall riots storyline. This is what happens to sexually active gay men in 1969. Blood and handcuffs.

Costume-wise, Bob is as clean cut and inoffensive as always. He’s almost literally face-to-face with one of the most important gay issues and events of all time and he’s dressed as blandly as he possibly can be. Best Little Boy in the World:

“They are athletic, scholarly, friendly, and helpful to everyone around them, constantly seeking excellence and popularity in order to deflect any questions as to why they don’t date. They are always extremely clean-cut, if not downright conservative in appearance.”

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That marriage proposal rocked her on her heels, and while her focus was mainly on the business side of the conversation (letting you know that she herself is more business- than home-oriented at the moment, like Peggy), we think there was a big part of her that had her wondering just what the hell she was doing with her life. That “I want love” speech was something of a Joan mission statement; a sentiment that surprised even her.

From a costuming perspective, we suspect this’ll piss some of y’all off, but we thought she looked terrible here. The more relaxed hair looks fine; very Ginger Grant. But that dress is honestly one of the ugliest things we think we’ve ever seen on her. She’s working that highly ruffled blue that Bonnie and Trudy sported this episode, but it doesn’t suit her in the slightest. Additionally, we spend a lot of time looking at candid shots of Christina Hendricks and to be perfectly blunt, her face looks really weird here. Since Christina herself looks younger than her age, we think they’re slightly aging Joan in order to sell the point that Bob was making about her: she’s closing in on forty and unmarried. She’s in unflattering makeup and an ugly dress. Very un-Joan-like. When she showed up in the office the next morning in that Peggy-inspired red dress, she was back to her spectacular self, but for this scene, she had to look a little less confident and a lot less perfect, in order to sell that ever-so-brief nanosecond where she considered what Bob was saying.

As for Bob, people are once again reading what we would consider to be a more sinister undertone to his motivations here. With that GM exec, he got two versions of his life laid out for him: the one where he gets arrested and beat up just for trying to get a blowjob or the one where he gets to live in a mansion, free from the world’s troubles, as he put it to Joan. He’s running away from himself – or he’s trying to. And he thought that Joan wanted the same thing. He’s scared and a bit narcissistic, with no idea how to read or interact with other people. Again, from last season’s Mega-Bob Mad Style post:  “Bob is almost certainly extremely stunted emotionally and very bad at intimacy. He’s all surface because he’s spent his entire life being all surface in order to deflect questions.” And we wrote that before we knew he had a Dick Whitman-like backstory. He’s not sinister; he’s as backwards emotionally as Don is.

And speaking of emotionally stunted Dads in Plaid dealing with their ruffled blue Madonna figures…

 

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Like Joan with Bob and Bonnie with Pete, Trudy’s not having his bullshit in her life.

As much of a jerk as Pete is, it seems to us he was right and that Trudy was enjoying a little passive-aggression here. She wanted him to know that she’s moved on. That’s a date outfit if ever we saw one. “There’s no place for you in this family.”

Meanwhile…

 

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Peggy continues her tradition of looking like crap when she’s not in work. She always did have terrible taste in sleepwear. No Trudy Campbell peignoirs or Megan Draper sexy-time panties for her. Oh, we’re teasing. It’s a perfectly fine nightgown.

THIS, on the other hand:

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Good lord, that’s hideous. This is the second time she’s worn pants in the office, but once again, it’s not on a workday. She’d never wear them on a workday because that would’ve been considered too scandalous for the time. This is another fugly Peggy outfit to help illustrate the ugly mood she’s in; sitting around the office on a Saturday, wearing pants, getting drunk, and abusing subordinates. She’s Don, of course.

But when Sunday came around, she knew, because she knows him so well, that Don would show up for her and she dressed up accordingly:

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The final Dad in Plaid. He got dressed up for her too.

Bob was welcomed with open arms by his “child,” Pete was treated like a stranger, and Don?

 

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Don charmed his daughter figure, apologized to her, and ultimately, was welcomed back into her fold. That shot of him standing over her and holding out his hand to her is a reversal of this scene, when she said goodbye to him. It’s been a long road for both characters back to this moment.

 

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So, as a pouting Bonnie and a supremely self-satisfied Megan (mimicking this scene, but replacing the baby with a glass of wine) put their best California finery on and almost literally close the curtain on their New York men, an entirely new family is forming in their wake:

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And here is the art directing team’s submission for next year’s Emmy – as well it should be. This is spectacular job on their parts. Many of our readers sent in this link, showing the actual location, and what the art directing department had to do to get it to look like this.

As for the costuming, what struck us about our main trio is that Don is not wearing a plaid here, while most of the fatherly types in the background are. Many people saw this scene as a father with his two kids. And to be fair, the bit with Don indicating the ketchup on Pete’s face helps to sell that idea, but we don’t think that’s what’s going on here. He’s not Pete and Peggy’s father figure; not here in this scene. That’s the point. By the time that dance ended with Peggy, she’d become his peer, bound together with him by the sacrifices she had to make to get where she is. Pete thought “family” was too vague a concept for the ad and argued briefly that they should stick to focusing on a parent figure. Don and Peggy are saying to stop focusing on traditional figures and start accepting the real, totally nontraditional family he has in front of him. Who’s your daddy, Pete? No one. But that’s okay. Eat your fries.

 

 

 

[Stills: tomandlorenzo.com]

    • janelle

      “Given Peggy’s rather high salary and Joan’s own position as a partner, we doubt very much that she’d settle for a lower salary than a man in her position.” – While that would be very typical of Joan’s demeanor, it would be more likely that she was forced to settle for a lower salary than a man in her position. In 2014, women still work “for free” 59 days a year compared to their male counterparts; the gap was much larger in 1969. I think Joan’s place is much nicer than Peggy’s.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        “Given Peggy’s high salary and Joan’s own position as a partner,” means that SC&P already pays female executives well and Joan is part of the team of people who approves salaries.

        Peggy owns her building.

        • janelle

          I must have must have misunderstood; I read that as Joan was likely earning the same salary as a man in her position. That wouldn’t be true, would it?

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            It would be true “given Peggy’s high salary and Joan’s own position as a partner.”

            Yes, it’s true that women then and now earn less than men doing the same job. What we’re arguing is that Joan is in a unique, ahistorical position that makes that not necessarily true. She’s not just an executive, she’s a partner – at an agency that pays women executives very well, as we’ve seen with Peggy’s salary.

            • stayce

              I wouldn’t be surprised if Joan does move into a new place by the end of the series– after all the plot points this season where she’s (negatively) felt the weight of people’s judgments of her looks, her abilities, and her snapback to Bob Benson in the last episode. I totally agree with your thinking- the apartment seems to speak either to how her view of herself has been kind of stuck in the 50s (meaning valuing herself solely on her looks, the life she had then) or kind of waiting in that apartment to see if she would finally meet a man who would give her the life she thought she wanted. Wouldn’t it be great to have a finale where she’s standing like a boss in some fabulous apartment she paid for all by herself?

            • Qitkat

              Could the Stonewall Riots taking place almost literally in her back yard influence her thinking about moving to a safer, more upscale part of the city? I can’t possibly imagine Joan owning a still rundown building like Peggy does, but looking for a nicer place like Don’s seems feasible.

            • larrythesandboy

              From the point of view of the plot, I wonder whether Joan’s proximity to the events will turn out to be relevant next week if they do include anything about the riots?

            • P M

              I’ve been thinking that that would be a catalyst for her to move out. Not because of the gays, but because of rioting in her neighbourhood.

            • jen_vasm

              I keep thinking that Joan stays in that horribly painted apartment because she’s unconsciously been thinking of it as temporary until some force will come along and cause a great change. the thing is, it has come, several times: divorce, partnership, growing child but she hasn’t seen it. Bob’s proposal was certainly a force, but she has realized that it wasn’t what she wanted at all. Maybe now she’ll realize that while she waits for love, she doesn’t have to put the rest of her life on hold.

          • ktr33

            same assumption, same quibble. No way would Joan be making what the other partners are.

            • 3hares

              I think the point is not that she’s making exactly the same as a man in her position (there really aren’t any!) or what the other partners are (she has less of a share than any of them) but that she’s making a good salary.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Yes, that’s the point; that she’s making more than enough money to provide her son with a bedroom of his own.

            • O’Brien

              I’ve been wondering about this myself, and I came to this: considering how independent Joan is, and thinking about the advice she got from Lane when he told her to grab a partnership instead of the money when she slept with the guy from Jaguar (and this type of advice is the kind that she seems most likely to give credence to), I think that Joan is likely stockpiling her money for a rainy day until she feels secure. She is very good at waiting out the long game instead and delaying satisfaction. No doubt that the woman has trust issues, and you can tell in partner meetings that her top concern is the stability of the agency, which is something that I don’t think she does feel she can trust in (and not without good reason, God knows). Kevin is still a little guy, so he doesn’t care whether he has his own room or not, at the moment, nor does he even really notice, I’d guess. It might be more convenient for she or her mother, but instead, she gets to keep a dirt cheap place and keep saving money.

              Also, I’m not sure if Kevin sleeps in her room or her mother’s, but if he’s with her, it certainly gives a good reason for her not to worry about dating or entertaining a gentleman caller, if you will. It gives her an out not to worry about that, and given how her mother raised her to value the affection and affirmation of men, she may subconsciously need an excuse for it.

            • Kristen Graham

              YES! With how unstable the agency is right now I wouldn’t be in a hurry to upgrade my place either!

            • TeraBat

              I remember in the earlier seasons, there was some speculation that Joan grew up poor. If that were true, it could also explain why she would rather save her money when she has, as she sees it, a perfectly functional apartment.

            • suburbanbohemian

              Well said. Joan has a pragmatic streak and would probably want to be sure she’s in a very good place financially before she springs for new digs. Right now she’s spending her money where it shows; her wardrobe. And I did hate that fussy ruffled dress. She shoudl give it to her mother.

            • gingerella

              I agree. Joan has been scared a few times about her future, and she took those experiences to heart. I think she (wisely) sees her financial situation as uncertain. She wears the nice clothes at work because she knows that’s the job uniform, but other than that, she seems to be living a modest life. It’s important not to underestimate that although she is now making more serious forays into the account side of the business, Joan’s skill set isn’t portable the way the creative and account people’s are. She made her bones by solving problems and seeing opportunities within her organization, and unlike account director positions, there is no, “Director of Made Yourself Indispensable.” She’s the house wine, and she knows it, and it factors into her financial decision-making.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              She’s an account executive now, with a huge client on her roster: Avon.

            • gingerella

              Maybe so, but if she were to try to take her skills elsewhere as an account executive, anyone who knew how to read a resume would see that she hasn’t been doing it long. Plum client though Avon is, a senior ad exec of Joan’s age/time in the workplace would be expected to have worked for a full roster of clients for years, have some awards, and be extremely well-connected. Her account skills alone simply would not translate into partner-level salary elsewhere. I imagine if she could bring Avon with her, she could probably cut a good deal, though, but that’s no easy feat.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I don’t particularly disagree with what you’re saying here except the idea that her skills aren’t “portable” or that she wouldn’t have an impressive resume. She’s essentially been working for the same company for 16 years, with a career trajectory and outcome that most men would kill for; from clerical to high-ranking executive, with a piece of the partnership pie, to boot. There isn’t anyone in the story whose career has gone as well and as far as hers; not even Peggy.

            • http://www.spellboundbymovies.com Beth Ann

              I very much agree that she must be stockpiling her income. She’s very careful and frugal with her money.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              We’re not claiming that she’s making what the other partners are.

            • Shawn Taylor

              Does it even matter? She had, what? A 5% partnership initially? This has nothing much to do with her finances.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I’m not sure what your point is.

            • Shawn Taylor

              And actually, thinking about it, between her partners 5% share and whatever percentage from her accounts (doesn’t she have Avon? Would have been huge in that time) if she isn’t drawing salary as well. (and hey, who is paying child support here?) she’d likely be well out earning Peggy. FWIW, an old auntie of mine was in radio sales in the 60s and said now that I mentioned it, women sales reps earned a percentage and it was the same as the men, at least there. In Texas! ;)

            • Froide

              Joan has a 1% partnership; half the size of Pete’s share.

            • Shawn Taylor

              At least as of last nights episode, Pete thinks he’s a 10% partner

            • L’Anne

              But there is a distinction between making the same salary as a man and making enough money to move to a larger apartment.

          • Kayceed

            My assumption is Joan is making a great salary compared to most working women but no way is she making the same as a man in the same position.

          • radioactive badger

            She might not be earning as much as a man in her position, but that would largely be because of the fact that her change in status occurred relatively late in her career. Given that she’s had two promotions over the last two years, she’s probably gotten raises that would increase her salary by an additional $20,000 a year, at least. The agency is also doing much better than it was this time two years ago, and is more than willing to give employees big raises to keep them happy (as seen with Peggy getting a massive raise recently that likely took her around or somewhat over $30,000 a year, if not more).

            Joan is doing well. As TLo point out she’s ingrained in her habits, and. while she should be moving on and investing, she’s probably just letting it sit. It’s attitude she’s likely projecting as well, since Bob treated her as if becoming the wife of a junior exec at a GM subsidiary was an upgrade or a lateral move.

            • Shawn Taylor

              I totally agree that her shelter choices are currently questionable and have nothing to do with her finances. Do we know for sure that she that she draws a salary as an account rep? I vaguely remember Pete and maybe Harry comparing salaries many moons and seasons ago so maybe her income it isn’t commission driven like I’d probably lazily assumed.

            • TeraBat

              Joan knows how much people in the office make. As head of personnel, she would know (or have access to) the records. As a partner, she approved (or at least was present when the others approved) Peggy’s raise. She’s been there long enough, and is high-ranking enough, to have a pretty good sense of how much people are making. And I cannot see Joan being content with making significantly less than the other people on the board. She probably wouldn’t argue over single-digit percentage differences, or if Bert was making crazy money, but she’d definitely want to be in the same ballpark as the other partners. So, all told, it is reasonable to assume that Joan has the income required to live in a nicer apartment than the one she has now.

            • radioactive badger

              I don’t think it would be commissions-based since we haven’t really heard much discussion about that (reading elsewhere it seems ad agencies work more similarly to legal firms than to something like retail or insurance, since it’s a matter of representation and not execution), though I’d imagine future raises and bonuses would be tied to any increase in billable hours that she manages. I’d assume in becoming an accounts exec and a partner that she’s making somewhere around 67-75% of what Harry Crane, Ken Cosgrove and Pete are making.

              It’s not just her digs that are contradicting her new economic status, it’s also the fact that she hasn’t apparently hired anyone to do work for her–does she have a broker? or an accountant? We know that the men do.

        • vitaminC

          For a lot of people, buying a place *alone* is pretty much like crossing the Rubicon of singledom. I think she’d view it as giving up on the hope of love. Remember, Peggy bought her place with (and at the insistence of) Abe.

          • Nancy Aronson

            i remember this differently

            • katiessh

              No, vitamin c is right. Peggy wanted a place somewhere else and Abe convinced her to buy the building. Also, while Peggy owns a building it was my understanding that it’s in a pretty shitty part of town

          • Snarkmeister

            That was my assumption as well – she probably CAN buy a nice place on her own, but it would be akin to giving up on the dream of getting married.

          • ramona_flowers

            I was going to say the same thing! And would a real-estate agent at that time sell a swanky upscale place to a single mom and her mom?

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            Peggy bought and paid for her building by herself. Abe simply had input.

            • Firecat

              Yes, but they were together at the time, and it was shown to us she was hoping they’d start a family. Joan has no such prospects at the moment.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Joan actually does have a family. And her three year old son doesn’t have a bedroom. If anything, she has more reason to upgrade her living situation than Peggy ever did.

            • Firecat

              True, she does need it more than Peggy. I’m just saying, as progressive as Peggy is, she may not have done it without a steady boyfriend, and maybe that’s what’s stopping Joan.

            • vitaminC

              They talked about raising their children there, and Abe basically chose it (she’d picked a stylish midrise or highrise on the upper east side and didn’t get it, if I recall correctly). So she went in with a partner, if not a husband, which is a very different emotional situation than Joan’s. Also, today there’s a sense that everybody who possibly can should buy property, but then there wasn’t such a stigma against renting. Joan’s “waiting for love” remark cleared everything up for me; she’s waiting for Mr. Right to make a home with her.

      • ovarB

        I thought the very same thing and literally skipped the rest of the Mad Style assessment to come down to comment. It does make a little more sense after reading TLo’s thoughts and their argument that Joan is in an unique position.

      • Vanessa

        I’ve never been sure what being a partner means for Joan’s actual income. She probably has a high net worth (so long as the firm is doing well) but it isn’t clear how much she has in terms of other savings, or whether her promotion gives her enough in actual income (yet) to do more than buy nicer clothes.

        • heybethpdx

          We’ve seen that Joan is very practical – I imagine she is saving a LOT of cash (minus what she spends on jewelry and clothes) but I agree that she’s in the same apartment partly because she’s a little stuck in the past. I think we’ll see her move into new digs before the end of the show, especially since Bob highlighted the fact that she’s still living with her mother (though that’s very convenient!).

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            Joan may not love living her mother, but it is free child-care with someone she trusts.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Well, not exactly free, since Joan is paying for her mom’s room and board and so on. Still, a terrific arrangement for a working mom, especially if she’s single.

          • decormaven

            Joan’s mom is living with Joan. She moved in with Joan when Kevin came on the scene.

            • sweetlilvoice

              You know that Gail would totally move in with Joan and Bob in their Detroit mansion.

          • Heather

            And Joan isn’t exactly “living with her mother” – her mother moved in with her to help with childcare. (ie,, it’s not like she’s still living in her family home.)

            • heybethpdx

              You’re right, of course! I mis-spoke in my comment – her mom lives with her. But I think we can all agree it’s high time for Joan to move into something a bit bigger, even if her mom’s likely to continue being on the scene.

        • T C

          Partnerships leave partners vulnerable to litigation (Subchapter S does not yet exist) and to covering losses of the business, conversely they receive variable compensation proportioned to their percentage of partnership of all profits on a regular basis. Going public removes litigation liability and creates greater opportunities for receiving financing, except there is a new layer of bureaucracy, reporting to the appropriate stock exchange, and reporting to shareholders. That said, different forms of variable compensation can be created and issued as a public corporation with less individual liability provided these agreements meet certain legal standards.

      • http://gratefuldating.net/ jamy barab

        Just because this is true on average it doesn’t mean that every woman is always, necessarily, paid less than a man in the equivalent position.

      • gts109

        That statistic is garbage. When you account for things like education, chosen profession, and consecutive years worked the gap between men and women in pay is a few percent.

        Anyway, I think Joan is just saving her pennies, so when this all falls apart, something is leftover for her and her family.

        • Azucena

          The statistic isn’t “garbage” as much as it is the end result of the individual societal forces of gender inequality. There are differences in education, chosen profession and consecutive years worked *because* of differences in workplace and education discrimination, girls being encouraged to enter service oriented jobs and socialized away from leadership positions, and the lack of paid (or any!) maternity leave.

          • TeraBat

            And, frankly, when you compare how much 100 male neurosurgeons with ten years of experience earn with what 100 female neurosurgeons with ten years of experience earn, the gap is still there. The statistic is a simplified average, comparing men and women doing similar jobs and analyzing the pay discrepancies. Some industries have a narrower gap, some industries have a wider gap. But the fact is, women earn less than men for doing the same job across all fields.

            • AnnaleighBelle

              …and when large numbers of men enter a field that is traditionally female (think of nursing) the pay generally increases, but when women enter traditionally male jobs in force, frequently the pay goes down., iirc.

            • makeityourself

              You are correct.

          • P M

            I’m more bothered by people who claim that the pay gap is valid or that there isn’t one at all or that men end up paying more anyway if they are dating or married.

        • greenwich_matron

          That statistic is not garbage. It says exactly what it means. The main problem with that statistic is it allows people to argue that “a few percent” is reasonable in comparison. Saying it is “a few percent” is saying that there is still a pay gap, even after all of the adjustments to make it “fair.” Janelle’s point was that there is a pay gap and it was probably worse in 1969.

    • AC Simons

      You guys are so good. I wouldn’t have thought to connect the plaid jackets worn by Pete and Bob if you hadn’t pointed it out – what a contrast with how they interact with the children. I really love Peggy’s light blue dress, and her red outfit in the office. She doesn’t usually wear red. Joan wears it in this episode, too.

    • Vanessa

      Thanks TLo. I loved the contrast between the very traditional female sky blue madonna dresses on all the women and their individual moments staking out their new territory as women–whether it was Bonnie leaving Pete at the office, Joan declaring her search for love, Trudy telling Pete to get out, or Peggy trying to manage her authority at work.

      • jen_vasm

        I kind of looked at the blue dresses as all tied back to Megan’s blue dress that she wore to pick Don up from the airport. All these women are at points where they are expressing themselves in where they want to go or be in their lives, but the men surrounding them do not see them for who they are. Don has no clue what’s going on in Megan’s head, Peggy is constantly not being seen as the talent she is in the office (only as ‘good as any woman in the field’), Pete completely is clueless on who Bonnie is and what type of relationship she is looking for (frankly, very few men could handle her directness & personal ambition), Pete even does not realize Tammy, in her little blue hair bow doesn’t know or trust him. Pete also didn’t want to hear Trudy say she’s moved on. Dan is clueless that Joan would never agree to a relationship without love, even knowing her past with Roger and Dr Rapey.

        Then, we see Joan & Peggy in red, both in survival mode. Joan concerned about the possibility her nemesis Harry being named a partner (and also transferring intel to Roger that can change up the office direction) and Peggy melting down with Don about her life choices. She alone gets affirmation (and the winning Burger Chef strategy) and we next see her in gold, a power color, with Don, in coordinating tie, authentically backing her up. Also, almost everyone in that restaurant scene is wearing gold, too, acting as a chorus to her triumph.

        As for the purple, it seems like the women wearing it in the office were wearing it to consciously draw men to them, but in a surfacey way. Joan got the car guys in a tizzy, but 2 of them were in it for the show (and Dan threw out that bitchy married men crack after his soon to be in jail friend gave her the once over). Megan wore it to attract Don and got Stan, too. The computer lady is like a seductive windsock, flying the colors of the episode, but always a mysterious, unattainable force.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Bob, not Dan.

        • Matt

          I’m totally using “seductive windsock” in a sentence today. CHALLENGE ACCEPTED! ;)

          • jen_vasm

            Alright, I wanna know that sentence structure, sir!

        • flint

          Something I haven’t seen anywhere is that during Peggy and Don’s bonding there was a blue painting above the couch that may tie into the symbolism and meaning.

          • jen_vasm

            Don & Peggy were in Lou’s office and that blue painting is featured on the wall a lot in scenes when the creative team meets with him, usually when they are being frustrated in some way with Lou’s lack of respect for their work.

    • siriuslover

      OK, you guys made me cry again. I just relived this episode with even a more nuanced view. Man, I love this blog.

      • charlotte

        Isn’t it interesting that Joan wears a dress with a chain that essentially says “no trespassing” in a scene with Roger?

      • Matt

        My mom had that exact dress in emerald green. She said a lot of women she knew had similar styles.

      • flint

        Mad Men is bridging the gap from the time the idea of marketing products to non tradition families just started and was very revolutionary to the audience in 2014, most of which I would assume are in non traditional families somehow. Life is hard. It’s hard not to be touched by the ending. And I have a more nuanced view as well. I think my favourite thing was the callback to Peggy’s goodbye during the dance, and that this episode was really all about people not being able to come to terms with what family they should have and then making their own family.

    • lisbeth borden

      I noticed lots of red, white, & blue—Burger Chef colors, plus we’re getting close to July 4th.

      • Vanessa

        That was a very popular color combo at the time. My mother (who wasn’t patriotic AT ALL) wore it a lot.

        • Kent Roby

          My birthday is July 4th, so I actually grew up thinking that some of the red-white-and-blue in our home was done for me. Then, again, I was probably around 10 before i realized that the fireworks weren’t for me!

    • Tanya Wade

      I disagree regarding Joan in the blue dotted Swiss dress and loose hair. I thought she looked breathtaking, and also so much like my mother in 1970 that it took my breath away. While understanding that I am projecting, I thought Janie hit it out of the park in terms of nailing the time period and styling. Spot on.

      • Munchkn

        Joan’s dress reminds me a bit of the dress that Herb Alpert’s then wife, Sharon, wore on the cover of “This Guy’s in Love With You” in the spring of 1968. The collars of the dress were different and Sharon’s dress was white dotted swiss instead of blue, but they both had a flounce of some sort at the hem. Of course, Bob’s not in love with Joan and neither was Herb with Sharon by mid-1969.

        • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

          I think I love you for making that connection. :D

      • MarinaCat

        I still don’t know if Joan looks better or worse than usual, but I did notice during that scene that she just looked… different.

      • golden_valley

        The shape of the dress was fancy for the time with the sort of pleated frill that was dressy, but not too juvenile. The fabric was definitely juvenile.
        The hair was Ginger Grant…totally right!

        • SonOfSaradoc

          About this time we had sister dresses with just that color of blue Swiss dot, including a touch of chiffon. Also, smocking.

          • Nancy Aronson

            Are sister dresses still a thing? My older sisters had those. I thought it was just because they had the same birthday. But then again, I was, like, 5 yrs old at the time.

            • Eric Stott

              To me it looked less like a dress and more like a house wrap – just a few notches above a quilted bathrobe.

            • SonOfSaradoc

              The Swiss dot pair of dresses I remember was in the late ’60s. But yes, I do see families in my church now where sisters wear similar dresses (perhaps the same color and cut, but different color sashes), and also mother-daughter dresses. These are mostly worn for special occasions like Easter or Mother’s Day.

        • yllas

          Joan’s pale blue dotted Swiss dress looked about a half a size too small for her. She looked really packed in and it just looked too small. …. Bonnie’s chiffon sleeved embroidered dress at the beginning looked a LOT like my junior prom gown in 1968 (mine was long and periwinkle blue, no embroidery) so pretty, both Bonnie’s and mine! and I’ve said this before but this may be the last opportunity – I’m glad Megan is leaving and glad she isn’t going to get pregnant. (Never say never, but that’s how it looks). Don needs another kid like he needs a rubber di*k! I also thought Peggy looked lovely in her light blue dress, and her hairdo was perfect – how far she’s come!

      • geans

        I agree with you about the mom thing. My mom is technically Sally’s age in 1969, but she had a dress identical to Joan’s blue one that I was allowed to wear for dress-up in the ’80s. I gasped.

      • Firecat

        I agree, so much! Couldn’t take my eyes off Joan in that scene. To me, she looked breathtaking, and uncharacteristically natural and “herself”.

        • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

          There was nothing natural about that wig. I found it very distracting.

          • Firecat

            True, but it’s not like she ever has completely natural hair, it’s always in some complicated 60′s updo. I think she looks much more soft and breezy with her hair down, though the hair itself may not be natural.

      • Man Dala

        I agree with you, Joan looks breathtaking in this scene.

    • MartyBellerMask

      Man I love you guys. That is all.

    • P M

      I tried to picture the rainbow flag in Bob’s jacket. Trying to squint past the plaid gave me a headache.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Yeah, it’s not there. No purple and pink.

        • Vanessa

          I’ve been surprised to realize how many young’uns think that the rainbow has been a gay symbol for-evah, when it really arose in the late 70′s or early 80′s and took some time to disseminate as an acknowledged symbol.

          • Ginger Thomas

            Even the term “gay” for homosexual didn’t come into widespread use until the 70s.

            • T C

              Swish.

          • VirginiaK

            Nobody outside the referenced communities talked about or represented the idea of gay/queer etc. forthrightly in the public space until after Stonewall. So yes no rainbow, also — no nothing!!

          • TeraBat

            I never thought the rainbow jacket was something Bob chose specifically for it’s symbolic value. If anything, if the rainbow had the meaning attached to it then that we do today, Bob would have avoided it like the plague when trying to convince a straight woman to set up a companionate marriage with him. Rather, I interpreted it as a meta-commentary on the part of the writers, showing us the tensions, heartbreak and choices which faced gay men (especially ambitious gay men) in the late 60s.

            Or perhaps it’s meant to be foreshadowing – Stonewall, after all, is imminent. The rainbow is coming for men like Bob. It’s not a complete rainbow yet, but it’s almost there.

        • Kent Roby

          This discussion prompted me to look up the history of the rainbow flag as a gay symbol. It was created in 1978 by San Francisco artist Gilbert Baker. It originally had 8 colors until the next year (’79) when it went into production; at that time pink and turquoise were removed. The rainbow flag colors since then have been red/orange/yellow/green/blue/purple.

          • mixedupfiles

            Interesting. Rainbow patterns — the simpler one you describe — were huge in the late 70s, IIRC. I remember tees and pillow cases with rainbow patterns.

          • Munchkn

            I was about to post that about the Rainbow flag’s history. I first read it in Randy Shilt’s book “Conduct Unbecoming: Gays, Lesbians and the US Military. IIRC, Gilbert Bates had been kicked out of the Navy for being gay. I think he’d served in the Navy Nurse Corps.

          • Chris

            I know exactly when knowledge of this symbol trickled down to suburban America. When someone commented to me as a kid that my rainbow Mork from Ork suspenders and pin meant “gay”.

          • Javacat7

            Peter Max was a big influence on color/clothing as well as the psychedelic costumes on the cover of Sgt. Pepper. (I still have some Peter Max linens!) Rainbows were peace, love, nature, harmony, Rocky Mt. High, which was a huge hit/influence… It took a long while for rainbows meaning a gay symbol to permeate non-urban, non-coastal areas. Oh, and the annual Rainbow Gathering began in that peace-love-harmony time, still persists.

        • Nancy Aronson

          I’m with y’all, TLo. Doesn’t seem like a spectrum to me.

    • Kent Roby

      Good lord; I’m submitting your Mad Style posts for an Emmy! Brilliant, as usual.

      • P M

        We should start a petition!

      • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

        Or a Pulitzer. Definitely worthy!

      • Rhonda Shore

        When the series wraps up, “Mad Style” should be your next book, with an opening chapter that’s an analysis of style over the entire series.

        • Kent Roby

          Yes! It would be interesting after the series wraps to go back and see which early conjectures held up, and to see the episodes with hindsight to see what other visual hints of foreshadowing might have been given that were missed at the time. I would bet that our Uncles guessed correctly at least 99% of the time!

          • http://www.snoskred.org/ Snoskred

            You know what I would really love to see – a Tom and Lorenzo podcast for each episode, which can be played while watching the episode. Once the series is over, it would be a way for all of us to re-watch the episodes together, each week, like we do now with the Mad Style.

            They could talk about the fashion and perhaps they could even arrange some special guests to interview or re-watch the episode with.

            When the podcast is posted on the website, they can give us a link to the original mad style post to review as well.

            Just a thought. You know, these shows have a long, long life – people will be rewatching them for years to come, and to be able to have such a great library not just of the fashion of the show but also of us discussing it.. that is already an amazing resource but to add a podcast to it where we can hear our favourite uncles.. that would be incredible.

            • FibonacciSequins

              This is a FABULOUS idea.

            • Mismarker

              I love me a good podcast.

            • http://www.ellenciompi.com/ NurseEllen

              I hereby immediately volunteer to write you a theme song.

            • sweetlilvoice

              Especally as last season’s DVDs don’t have any commentary. The guys could do riff tracks or something like that. WTH Matt Weiner–why no commentary in the most confusing season ever?

            • aimeslee

              This is not so far-fetched. Breaking Bad had Talking Bad, why not Talking Mad Men starring T&Lo? For next spring, the final 7. One more and we are there, except for the `!@#%!#$%$% waiting! Argh!

          • Kent Roby

            I know one teensy bit of insider costume trivia about MM: Bryan Batt, who played Savatore, told me several years ago that one of his vests had tiny little fleur de lis as a nod to his being from New Orleans.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              I love that!

        • LaTrèfle

          Or a fashion-themed commentary for every episode on Mad Men DVDs??

          • dulcian

            Oooh, TLo + Janie Bryant DVD commentary would be brilliant. Get on that, AMC!

            • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

              Seriously. That NEEDS to happen. I don’t have much of a DVD collection, but Mad Men Season 7 would be a must buy if it had TLo commentary.

        • MeiraNiibori

          This is a great idea! It would also allow them to add Mad Style discussions of all the things they’ve never had time to get to in depth – undergarments, sleepwear, the extras’ & minor characters’ costumes, etc. I’d definitely buy a copy or ten!

        • yllas

          Yes, it would go with a MM box set like chocolate sauce goes with ice cream!!!!!!

        • sweetlilvoice

          I totally agree. I work in publishing, I know the rights would be a nightmare but I would love to read this book!

      • smayer

        Can we go ahead and pre-order this book on Amazon?

        • Kent Roby

          I totally would!

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          Me too, once you get the copyright stuff worked out.

          • Rhonda Shore

            Me three!

        • TeraBat

          I would buy that book. I would buy that book so hard. I would buy a copy for myself and for a costume designer I know who would love it.

    • MartyBellerMask

      Oh wait, that’s not all.
      Totally spot-on with Joan, and to back it up, remember that she almost carbon-copied Shirley’s look from earlier in the season. Again, don’t know exactly what it means, other than she is not sure who she is and where she fits in this modern world. Like you said, slow to accept change? I just know she will get herself straightened out by series’ end. Or at least be well on her way.

      • Vanessa

        Very nice observation. That syncs with TLos observation that she hasn’t changed her apartment at all. Maybe she also is not sure everything she has won’t just disappear.

        • Susan Collier

          The non-changing apartment is weird. It reminds me of a sitcom set.

          • Eric Stott

            It’s all very dated, but everything is good quality and well maintained. She might be one of those “Replace it when it wears out” types.

            • decormaven

              Remember when Joan and her mom were having the discussion in the apartment kitchen when Joan was preparing for Greg’s return home? I got the feeling that Joan’s dad had split the scene early. Maybe she watched her mom struggle as a single mom, and is being extra careful not to be too pinched.

            • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

              I really hope that Joan doesn’t tell her mother about turning Bob down. Joan’s Mom will completely flip out on her.

            • Susan Velazquez

              You know that when Joan married Greg, she expected to move into the suburbs but that was delayed since Greg turned out to be a less than stellar surgeon and it was delayed again when she got pregnant since they still didn’t have the income to buy a house together. If Joan is now making a lot of money, I too wonder why she hasn’t moved her family out to a 3 bedroom or at least redecorated.

            • yllas

              I think she would be the type to feel she needed a man, a husband, to do so. She has been living in the city a long time and would she want to commute, mow a lawn, and what about the neighbors?? They wouldn’t welcome a divorced bombshell , that is, the wives, the suburban moms!

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              It would have been very unusual for a single woman to buy a house in 1969 (yes, even if her child and her mother lived with her). Remember how Peggy’s real estate agent assumed that Abe was making the decision (and maybe doing the buying) when Peggy was looking for a place? In addition, it was harder for women to get credit (as in loans) in those days. OTOH, a woman with Joan’s income and (financial) assets probably wouldn’t have had too much trouble. I wonder how much her status as a divorcée would have effected her creditworthiness in those days. And I agree with the people who are saying that Joan is being pragmatic and building a cushion of savings before investing in a home, in addition to her aversion to change.

            • ikillplants

              Exactly. Rewind to the first season of Mad Men! Two words: Helen Bishop.

        • E M

          My cousins bought a huge place on the upper west side in the sixties and it was decorated to the nines at the time. In 50 years *nothing* has changed. Some people just don’t change up their decor especially if it was once done at the height of fashion. Better to keep a placing showing you at the top of your game then changing with the times but being less expensively au courant…

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            Wow! Sounds like it would make a fabulous article/blog post, much like that apartment in Paris that was untouched since about 1940!

          • altalinda

            Some people (like me) just don’t care enough or have the energy. I make enough money to fix up or decorate my house, but it’s not something I have the time (busy job) or energy to do. I wouldn’t have a house except that my significant other insisted.

        • aimeslee

          Wouldn’t Roger pay for Dalton?

      • decormaven

        It’s like that scene when she’s in that psychedelic mod bar with her Avon friend. Joan looked out of place. She’s not quite sure where she fits in the current scene.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Carbon-copied Shirley’s look? I don’t know what you mean.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Shirley’s eye-catching Valentine’s Day outfit. Joan wore a VERY similar look the next week. Short, red, floral dress, white Peter Pan collar, black boots.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Oh, I remember that now! Good call.

            • MartyBellerMask

              I think I might be a little obsessed with this show? ;)

          • tejaswoman

            Thank you for making that connection, because I found that dress on Joan very odd, and the connection helps that make a little more sense.

    • P M

      Is it just me, or is Peggy’s choice of knick-knacks making her bedroom look like the grown-up version of a teen’s bedroom? You know, ceramic animals in place of stuffed animals?

      • Eric Stott

        It seems that she’s avoiding making a long term commitment to living there- decorating with a lot of small portable trinkets that can be easily packed up. When I see some noticeable decorating, like curtains and some substantial furniture, then I’ll know she’s settled in.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          Yeah, she’s been wanting to leave there, said she would do it when still together with Abe. She’s probably still worried she’d have to sell it on a loss. That would probably rock her pride, but she has no time to improve the building it seems- even if she could afford a super.

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            I’m kinda surprised that she can’t, especially with the rental income and her recent raise. (But we have no idea what her mortgage payments are.) I kind of assumed that Peggy hasn’t hired a super because it simply hasn’t occurred to her…she doesn’t think of herself as a business owner who can hire people. (I’d say that owning a building and renting out apartments is being a business owner.) But of course, she has her advertising career to think about.

            • FibonacciSequins

              Have the finances of the building ever been discussed on the show? It’s possible the apartments are under rent control, which means Peggy could be just breaking even or running the building at a loss.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              True, I’d forgotten about the rent control factor. But if she’s running the building at a loss, isn’t that a tax deduction? Maybe that would allow her to pay a part-time super.

            • FibonacciSequins

              Anything’s possible. Who’s sweeping the halls and stairs? Who’s taking out the garbage? Does her brother-in law take care of that too? Maybe she is paying someone to do part-time maintenance?

            • T C

              Julio might be picking up some of the less heavy tasks in exchange for color TV access with snacks. I remember being tasked to hang off a roof in Pacific Heights to wash the gigantic picture window with Golden Gate Bridge view when I was his age. Millionaire dad (of family friends) kept expenses down as much as possible so that he could scoop up warehouses in his real estate empire. I also remember doing same at warehouses in the Mission at that age while the owner was inspecting roofs and getting bids for tar and gravel. Kids were for chores.

            • Azucena

              And who is cleaning the poop off the floor of the lobby?

            • TeraBat

              Though paying a super would be a signal that she’s putting down roots, so to speak, and I don’t think Peggy is there, yet.

            • T C

              Why hire anyone when your brother-in-law will work for free? Peggy doesn’t come from a wealthy background so hiring help is not at the top of her go-to list.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Right, having help is not something on Peggy’s go-to list. But the reason to hire a super is that her BIL has to come in all the way from Brooklyn. Not that she’d see it that way.

            • missthing77

              Oh man, that means Peggy is on a one way ticket to being Rhoda Morgenstern!

    • Vanessa

      Peggy’s dresses looked not only better to me, but very much like shirtdresses which are (as you have pointed out before) a very typical form of fieminine menswear. Fitted with a defined waist and buttons down the front.

    • Capt. Renault

      Thanks again for your hard work and insight on this, as every week, kindly uncles. It really is appreciated so very much.

      • Kathryn Sanderson

        Yes, it is. Uncles, reading your recap and “Mad Style” is a highlight of my week. Brilliant analysis of the show in general and costuming in particular. I was really impressed when you concluded that Bob was gay very early on, when other blogs, etc, were making him a huge mystery and speculating that he was a spy or an FBI agent or Don’s illegitimate son. Your explanation was the only one that made sense to me, and you totally nailed it. I love you guys!

    • http://theargiehome.blogspot.com/ Gus Casals

      PRICELESS Joan insights here, from her apartment to her Peggy-wear. Made me rethink a number of things.
      Being TLo-conditioned, I couldn’t help to notice the color matching between Peggy and Don at the office on Sunday.

      • Joy

        Me too! Before anything happened, I knew it would be good because of the red in his tie.

    • Ganoc

      I have *never* understood the appeal of Ali McGraw. At all. Zip. Nil. Nada. Can anyone illuminate?

      • AlisonHendryx

        Are you familiar with the Manic Pixie Dream Girl Trope? She’s a fairy godmother of that type.

        • Ganoc

          Ha, that probably explains why I can’t warm to her. I saw her in Love Story and my only take-away was that she was a Very Ugly Cry-er (crier?)

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Crier is correct. (Grammar nerd out.)

          • P M

            I hate that movie, and I’m not even of that generation.

        • AudreysMom

          Hmm.. yes, but with a dash more class and brains. I’d give Marlo Thomas in That Girl the fairy godmother nod for the modern day manic pixie dream girls.

      • decormaven

        She may not have been my favorite actress of that time, but that woman could wear some fashion. Her looks in the early 70s were very of the day.

      • Chris

        I think she’s beautiful. And she is a perfect example of the epitome of the early 70′s look, center part, pin straight hair and more “natural” makeup. Add some crocheted clothes and a knitted hat and there you have it.

        • EarthaKitten

          Agree! She was fabulous with Steve McQueen in The Getaway in 1972. And she still has “the look” at 75. Simply beautiful.

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            Awesome Peckinpah film that somehow had a ‘happy ending’.

      • Glammie

        I was a kid, but Ali McGraw had a very of-the-moment style and look–the long, dark hair parted down the middle, the flashing white smile. She’d worked at one of the fashion mags before becoming an actress, so her look and style showed up in her private life as well as on film . She wore her clothes well. She was very much a natural beauty–which connected to the time. She was also part of a glamour couple–Steve McQueen who was huge at the time.

        Love Story was insanely successful, sort of like Twilight, but not so tween oriented.

        That said, Ali McGraw was a crappy actress, so her moment was pretty brief. But she was the girl of the moment in the movie of the moment from the book of the moment.

        • Shawn Taylor

          If I recall correctly, she was married to Robert Evans at the time, and then wasn’t. I have to suspect it wasn’t hurting her career

          • joything

            Evans was the one who got her into “Love Story.” He was crushed when she fell for McQueen while making “The Getaway.”

        • Mairzie

          Ali McGraw was the IT girl of the time. I was in 8th grade when Love Story the movie came and all the girls tried to copy her

      • emmapeel

        ME EITHER- it’s nice to see someone else agree with me.

      • gogobooty

        She was the “natural” pretty person with center parted long dark hair & thick eyebrows & a tan with big white teeth. She looked healthy and sort of average, a not quite a hippie type, who happened to play a young woman who *cough*cough* died young & brave in a sob-fest, super popular film that put her on every magazine cover of the time. Simple as that.

        Then she hooked up with mmmmmmSteve McQueen and became long term tabloid fodder.

        Still happens all the time. Doesn’t mean a thing. See Kristen Stewart for a recent example.

    • Aroo

      There are so many similarities with the end of season 3. The plane scene with Megan mimicking Betty, Henry and baby Eugene; the involvement of McCann Erikson with Sterling Cooper and now SC&P; the newspaper with JFK’s assassination, which was the catalyst for Betty telling Don she wanted a divorce, in Megan’s possessions; Don assured Peggy in the season 3 finale that he believes in her work and respects her, we see the same thing here with Don encouraging her to do the best work possible. I’m sure there are lots of other similarities, but those are the ones that come to mind.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Ooh, I like that. Blue is cold. When she warms up to Don, she is in red. :)

        • Kristen Graham

          And when she talks to Stan she’s wearing red and blue underneath the green color that’s Stan worn a lot. Is Peggy feeling hot/cold ie conflicted about her relationship with Stan? On the phone he mentioned that she was questioning the idea because it came too easy – could that also extend to how she feels about starting a relationship with Stan?

          • quitasarah

            I really don’t feel like there will be a “thing” between Stan and Peggy. He seems to be the closest thing she has to a best friend, and I really don’t see an attraction there. They’re buds, and I don’t see anything else budding between them. Besides, he’s in New York and he’s in love! (And obviously not with Peggy.)

    • smh4748

      My thoughts:

      1. Joan’s red dress does echo Peggy’s with the chain detail–but I also saw it as still very Joan. Compare it to the iconic Joan red dress from the Belle Jolie research scene in S1. Maybe she is taking style cues from Peggy, but I’m not sure this style is such a radical departure for her. It’s almost like a return to form for her, after her recent taste in menswear-inspired dresses. In any event, she looks fab in both the red and the purple. You go, Joan.

      2. Also, I think the documentation of reasons for why Joan would be earning a nice salary is accurate, but I’ll add one more–it looks like she has a color TV. That would be pretty fancy/spendy for 1969, wouldn’t it?

      3. Is Megan the first main character we’ve seen in jeans? Certainly the first woman, right?

      4. I loved Bonnie’s black and white dress. So adorable.

      • Cabernet7

        I vaguely remember Peggy wearing jeans, on a weekend with in her apartment with Abe. I think it might have been when he talked her into looking for a place in a scarier part of town by hinting that he saw them having kids someday.

      • ItAin’tMe

        I love all of Bonnie’s clothes, and the black and white and pink dress especially. The yellow on the plane, too. And her beaded purse, I remember those! And they were definitely daywear.
        Color TV would have been spendy 5 years earlier, but by 1969 pretty much everyone had one.

        • smh4748

          Didn’t Megan throw a hissy about Don buying one for her in California?

          • ItAin’tMe

            Yes, but it was the size of that TV she objected to.

            • smh4748

              Very well. The Wonder Years has led me astray then. :)

            • MartyBellerMask

              Wonder Years was very working-class. It was a major purchase for the Arnold family.

        • EveEve

          At the beginning of 1969, one third of households (19 million) had a color TV. By 1971, it was up to 48% (29+ million). Most shows were broadcast in color by then, but not everybody converted right away.

          • ItAin’tMe

            Ok. I guess it was only my neighborhood where everyone had color tv by ’69. Which was a working/middle class area in the tri state area. And it was very much a keeping up with the Joneses thing.

          • FibonacciSequins

            We got our first color tv in 1972. I think we would have been classified as lower middle class at that point (aspiring to middle class and being in debt because of it!).

          • greenwich_matron

            I remember getting the color TV: B&W TV + basement + carpet = rec room!

      • Lisa_Co

        I think Ginsberg wore jeans when he first started work at the agency. But I think Megan is the first woman to wear jeans.

      • Chris

        Other women have worn jeans briefly but those are definitely the first “70′s” jeans. I swear Farrah Fawcett wears that exact outfit a few years later on Charlies Angels.

        • Glammie

          Yep, the fancy button fly. Props to Pare for carrying them off, cuz we’re running into some seriously ugly jean fashions in the near future.

          • sweetlilvoice

            I gasped when I saw the still photo….those jeans are horrid.I hate a button fly.

          • ybbed

            Those jeans with buttons were found at army/navy surplus stores. I used to wear those and they came in white too. Military gear from army/navy stores was quite popular in the early 70′s, it was kind of a counterculture look.

            • Munchkn

              I’ve still got a pair or two of Navy surplus white pants. I used to wear them all the time. They were the original bell bottoms. The pants had been my uncle’s back when he was in the Navy. I’ve also got his blouse and a corpsman’s too.

            • aimeslee

              I had a pair of white ones in high school (grad. 1973). They were hands-down my fave pair of pants ever. We all wore them tighter though. Megan should have been in one size smaller. They would stretch once you had them on for awhile.

          • Javacat7

            That’s right! Navy pants with the square front flap with buttons were a really stylish new look if you were a young long legged female. Worn with cork platform sandals wlith leather straps.

            It was a huge deal when girls were allowed to wear pants for the first time to school. That must’ve been around 68? 67? It took a few years for jeans to become common, and they were always bell bottom, unless, you really did wear them as work clothes on a farm.

    • luludexter

      I agree that that light blue dress does not suit Joan, but I think that’s on purpose — along with the idea of maternal figures in blue the one time she dresses in the “mom” color and is proposed to, she looks really awkward. I was also struck by the way in which Don and Peggy’s clothing in the last scene is very close color wise in the brow/gold family, while Pete stands apart in his conservative blue jacket and red tie, not realizing the paradigm has changed…

      • Wendy M. Grossman

        My own theory about that dress is that since she’s been losing weight – clearly mentioned at the beginning of the episode – she hauled something out of her closet that *used to fit* at a time when maybe her mother was choosing girly clothes for her. That fabric is, I’m pretty sure, dotted Swiss, which I don’t think of as a 1960s fabric except for little girls.

        Also, re Clara: Ken clearly said in the season premiere that one of the other accounts guys was sleeping with Clara. She may indeed be unmarried – but the point I think is that a lot of the secrecy that used to surround such office romances is gone.

        wg

        • AZU403

          If she were unmarried she wouldn’t be wearing such a cheerfully colored outfit, or expression.

        • Susan Velazquez

          Maybe Clara was in a serious relationship but Ken was too concerned with his dealings to know anything more than that they were sleeping together. Can we rewatch the episode and see if she has a ring??

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          Plus when he said that, the premiere took place in January. It’s now June and we didn’t really see Clara until then. So, maybe she got pregnant, had a marriage, was out of the office on her honeymoon, and came back with security.

        • aimeslee

          I was a freshman in high school in 1969 and all we could wear were dresses (pantsuits not approved for wear until 1971). I made my own clothes because I got a clothing allowance and it went further that way. I clearly remember sewing one or two dresses styled like that for myself. And I also remember sewing on dotted swiss. I think Joan looked lovely, just maybe a bit demure and vulnerable, which often passed for sexy in that day. I’d remind you to look up old Twiggy and Jean Shrimpton outfits — summer ones. The Baby Doll look had many forms. And again, for summer seersucker and dotted swiss were staples.

          • Javacat7

            I remember that mini dresses often had matching shorts, so if you didn’t look like Twiggy, yet weren’t Joan’s body type, you could wear a mini without worrying you were showing your underpants all the time.

    • Roz

      Aw, Tammy is in a little light blue dress with ruffles, too! She’s a mini-Trudy, for sure.

      • smh4748

        Her scene where she was scared of Pete was just heartbreaking. :(

        • Eric Stott

          I agree- Pete is an ass, but Trudy is VERY vindictive- Tammy is going to be brought up to hate him without even knowing him.

          • SEPA_Q

            Wondering what you’re basing this thought on? Did you see anything that indicates Tammy is being brought up to hate her father? Tammy hasn’t seen him for a long time and quite understandably is afraid of the (to her) stranger. I wonder if she even knows who he is? And how is Trudy “passive-aggressive”? Trudy is going about her business as a mother and upper-class suburban mom. So what if she was on a date? Why shouldn’t she be? She made it clear after discovering Pete’s (latest at the time) infidelity, that he wasn’t coming back to Cos Cob. He hasn’t been part of the family for quite some time now. He lives on the other side of the country, and brings his latest girlfriend back with him to NY! They may not be divorced yet, but no one would know it by watching his actions. If she knew Pete was coming to visit Tammy, there’s no reason why she shouldn’t be occupied outside the house when he arrives, given Tammy is well cared for in her absence.

            • EarthaKitten

              I think we can count on Trudy’s father poisoning Tammy towards Pete. In the case of small children, absence does not make the heart grow fonder…it makes the memory grow weaker. As a mother, I can’t imagine having my young child see his father after a long absence without being there to ease the process for my child. Trudy’s decision to have the maid tend to Tammy during the visit is just reprehensible to me.

              I think Trudy and Pete are both messed up and were quite perfect for one another. If Pete had been discreet with his affairs Trudy would have been fine (I believe that is what Trudy told Pete after the neighbor incident). Trudy has always been manipulative towards Pete…he didn’t want to get the fabulous apartment but she wanted it and got Daddy to help pay for it…he didn’t want to move away from the city but Trudy made that decision too. While Pete is a majorly flawed man, Trudy is likewise a majorly flawed woman.

      • AudreysMom

        At Tammy’s age her dad wouldn’t have needed to tell her what was in the box. We ALL knew the shape of the Barbie box!

        • Roz

          Although….in many parts of the country Barbie was still seen as an older girl’s doll. It was kind of scandalous to receive one if you were younger than nine or maybe eight! Not many 3 or 4 year olds were given one. Bonnie chose it of course!

          • decormaven

            I got my first Barbie probably when I was 7. By 1969, with the addition of Midge, Skipper, Ken and Alan, Barbie stuff was completely accepted as girls of all ages.

            • siriuslover

              oh how I miss the boob growing skipper!

            • makeityourself

              Ok. I desperately wanted a Barbie for my 6th birthday in 1966, but my mother would not hear of it. Many years later she told me that Barbie’s body was unrealistic, and she didn’t want to set me up for disappointment. Anyway, I received a Skipper doll instead. Even though my Skipper had bendable legs, the first of her kind, I was not happy.

              One of my younger brothers broke her leg almost immediately, so that the knee poked put backwards, through her rubber skin. Skipper looked quite grotesque with her backwards-bending knee, but I was forced to play with her if I wanted to join the neighborhood girls in their Barbie games.

              We moved to the suburbs that fall and I never did own a Barbie. When Bratz dolls came out a number of years ago, I wouldn’t buy one for my daughter because I didn’t like the attitude they projected. The apple didn’t fall far from the tree.

          • missthing77

            Yep, that was a scandalous gift for a very young girl!

          • Ginger Thomas

            I was five in 1961, and all of my kindergarten friends had Barbies. I don’t remember them being scandalous.

            • Roz

              That is really interesting, Ginger. It was all baby dolls or trolls until you were a Blue Bird or Brownie, in my world! Had to pay your dues in the doll world before you got the Barbie.

            • FibonacciSequins

              I was born in 1962, and I got my first Barbie when I was 7 or 8. I can’t speak for other girls my age, but as far as my parents were concerned it was a doll for big girls.

            • T C

              It wasn’t scandalous, it was considered inappropriate to give a younger girl a doll with adult breasts until the child reached a more mature age. I recall much discussion among my childhood peers about the entire lack of Ken’s anatomy. Among my cohort, Barbies were not gifted until one flew up from Brownies to Junior Girl Scout. Trolls weren’t in stores yet.

            • missthing77

              I guess my mom was super conservative, she thought Barbies were kind of trashy at first, before she gave in.

            • Javacat7

              I had a little business in my homeroom making and selling troll clothes out of my mother’s sewing scraps in 66 and/or 67, so they were definitely around in 69. Not many girls had Barbie’s as I recall; trolls, and Skipper, were more the thing. I dimly recall some kind of tiny doll as well. Later, Creepy Crawlies and all you make/bake with that set was The Thing.

          • ybbed

            We all had barbies as soon as they came out. 1959? I think? I’m guessing. Everybody had barbies from 3 years old and up.

            • P M

              That young?! wow

      • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

        Looking at these pictures makes me appreciate how good Trudy is at giving EPIC bitchface.

        • poodle66

          You know who she looks like in this scene? Barbara Parkins from
          Valley of the Dolls.

          Also, Joan ‘s face this season reminds me of Victoria Principal of Dallas. Both gorgeous women with large eyes and perfect features.

      • charlotte

        After “Mark Your Man” started it all for Peggy, Trudy is now marking her daughter.

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        I swear I remember Season 6/Season 5 Tammy being blonde so the brown hair threw me off. Then again, my hair was never as light as it was when I was a toddler.

    • Vanessa

      I was struck that so many of the women’s dresses at the office seemed monochromatic. Was that just ‘a thing” at the time?

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        We’ve seen a lot of floral dresses too this season.

    • JenniferA

      “Clearly, the IBM drone lady is affecting all the color choices of the other ladies in the story using her mind ray powers or something.” Ha ha ha! Love you guys.
      Also, I agree about Joan not looking her best at all in that scene with Bob. I couldn’t figure out why while I was watching, but your explanation of course makes perfect sense.

      • MartyBellerMask

        And she almost NEVER wears her hair down. Maybe some of the BK’s with better memories can point to instances where she did. They were probably significant.

        • AZU403

          On the other hand, she’s at home, where she can literally let her hair down.

          • MartyBellerMask

            True!

        • Cabernet7

          One of the very few times in the early years that Joan wore her hair down was when Joan and her roommate were preparing to go out and her roommate confessed her love.

          Another time was when Joan, Pete, and Bert were in the office on a Saturday making arrangements to take the company public.

          • vitaminC

            And in her “kept woman” 50s-ish fur coat flashback scene with Roger.

          • sweetlilvoice

            Also last season’s finale Thanksgiving episode—-she wore her hair down then too.

    • L’Anne

      Thanks, guys, for all those wonderful screencaps. Especially that last dress Megan wore on the plane. My lawd, that is one fugly frock.

      • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

        Megan’s expression is one of pure bliss is that shot.

        • L’Anne

          The face might be pure bliss. The dress is pure ass. That is a fugly print. And I love a good print.

          • AZU403

            Missoni? Or ersatz?

        • Mismarker

          Yes, I didn’t notice it during the show but, man, looking at the screenshot? She’s just pleased as punch to be heading back home to LA, isn’t she? NY isn’t home anymore for her and it never will be again. I’m calling it now. They’re over.

          • ABB

            But she doesn’t seem really “at home” in LA either. I agree they’re over but I wonder where she’ll end up. Thoughts? Predictions?

            • T C

              Her house with pool. Paid for by Don.

            • Mismarker

              Not to be a contrarian, I do think she’s at home in LA. It’s “exciting, and new, and different, and a lot quieter” as she tells Peggy. She’s made friends and has come to value her new life in California, even if the acting is not panning out. Her life is so far removed from NY that when the phone rings right before dinner she tells Don to go ahead and answer because no one would be calling for her there. And I can’t deny that look on the plane. It’s happiness. Especially when placed in contrast to Bonnie’s hangdog.

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            Yes, this. Totally. For the people who think the whole Don and Megan relationship has just reached performance levels of people who just feel the necessity to act the part of husband and wife, it was like she came back from her best acting turn she has ever given. She played the perfect part of wife for a weekend with him and convinced him to a third party destination. Her work was done. Now back to her wonderful reality in the Canyons with her fondue pot.

    • Coleen

      Why are you guys the best? Seriously. The best.

    • TheBrett

      I love the character of Trudy, and am so sad we probably won’t see much of her anymore. She was always so good at ripping about Pete Campbell’s stupid-face stupidity.

      • Glammie

        I think we will, just because the relationship is such an open wound at this point. I think we’re more likely to see Trudy now than we were before the scene and Pete’s description made it sound like things were pretty settled.

        • tejaswoman

          I, too, believe we will see Trudy. The show runners love working with Alison Brie, and with Community cancelled, she’ll presumably be more available for the latter half of season 7. I truly believe they would gladly have used her more often had she not had the other commitment; now that she doesn’t, they surely will use her at least once or twice before it’s all over.

          • Glammie

            Even with Community running, MM would still run Trudy story lines. Alison Brie and Vincent Kartheiser play off one another so well–whether they’re doing the Charleston or Trudy’s nailing Pete’s ass to the wall. One of those cases where terrific casting enhanced a minor part.

    • decormaven

      Ooh, I wish there was a screen cap of Bonnie’s dress- the one she wore when she was waiting for Pete to take her to “Oh, Calcutta!” I very much enjoyed her costuming for this episode.

      • smh4748

        Bonnie has been fun to see from a costuming perspective, I agree! Way to go, Pete. Ruining things for the rest of us!

        • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

          Did anyone else get a Veronica Corningstone vibe from Bonnie in the blue dress?

          • emmapeel

            No, as Veronica is, and dresses, like a character from the mid-late 70s.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          No kidding. She was one of the more intriguing new additions, especially as far as Pete Plus Ones go and that little snot ruined.

    • Emily Giovanni

      Damn! I interpreted the ladies in blue as such: women having their agency taken away and being told their [really unsatisfying] place by men (Joan as a beard, Peggy as a creative but without any REAL power over her accounts, Trudy and Megan as basically obedient wives). But then the women ultimately reject those places and find their own power.

      I loved this episode and I thought it was so optimistic (with the non-traditional family stuff with Peggy, Don, and Pete), with this blue interpretation being part of that optimism. But my theories about this show are usually shot right down in the next episode. Oh well! Fun to think about anyway!

      • Vanessa

        I agree–I thought the contrast was intentional.

      • inchoate

        Peggy’s light blue dress is the dress she wore the first time Ted kissed her, in “For Immediate Release.” Then, in this scene, she hears his voice coming over the speaker phone, telling her Don should do the pitch.

    • Julie

      I saw Megan’s jeans-and-button-down ensemble and Don’s towel/skirt as a dramatic reverse of their usual arrangement – generally, Don’s the one dressed, and Megan’s either…well, not, or dressed in typical “housewife” attire. Here, she’s got the control, and the pants! Also, love that Trudy (deliberately) put her daughter in a bow the exact color of her date-night dress when she knew Pete was coming to town.

      • JulieTy

        Excellent catch, fellow Julie!

        • Julie

          What can I say, I love a good, passive-aggressive hair bow.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Ooooh, both are very good catches!

      • SEPA_Q

        Maybe. Or maybe it’s just Tammy’s (or Trudy’s) favorite color. Not necessarily p/a, but nice costuming touch to tie together mother and daughter.

      • http://www.ellenciompi.com/ NurseEllen

        Nice pickup!

      • Jane

        I noticed that too, Julie. It seems particularly significant given the reversal of the (normative) gender roles that define clothing, with Don in the (brightly colored/patterned) skirt wrap, and Megan in both the jeans and the button-up shirt (menswear, even though the way she has it tied up obviously is not). TLo have talked a lot in the past about how the Don/Megan relationship is often styled with one of the wearing proper clothing and the other in some kind of undress/underwear/sleepwear, and the way it signifies their changing power dynamics. I haven’t had a chance to check the TLo archives, but I vaguely remember their discussion of this including at least one scene where Megan was in normal office clothes and Don was in white boxer shorts or a robe. This seemed to go even a step further in emasculating Don, although maybe I’m just reading too much into an already symbol-laden scene.

        • Julie

          I’m with you, Jane. And hey, half the fun of Mad Men is “reading too much into an already symbol-laden scene.”

    • Vanessa

      I was assuming to be honest, that the actress playing Clara was pregnant and they accommodated it without worrying as much about verisimilitude in this case. Gorgeous maternity wear! You could sell that today.

      • Kitten Mittons

        I noticed your comment below about all the solid colors on the ladies this episode, and Clara’s dress really struck me because it was such a noticeable print.

        Most of the other prints we saw on women this episode were florals, to the best of my recollection. Clara’s dress has some floral elements, but it’s just sooooo different from everything else we saw.

        I guess I wanted to ask if this looked true to the time? Not growing up then, I would have guessed that print was something more 70′s. I’m just curious, more than anything.

        • decormaven

          That print was of the period. I had an outfit with a similar design.

          • Kitten Mittons

            Thanks! It just stood out so much, and my mind started wandering. Also couldn’t help thinking about another commenter that mentioned previously how short skirts were, even for maternity wear. I would have constantly feared that my growing belly was lifting up that hemline…..

        • Cabernet7

          That print looked very Laugh-In to me.

          • Kitten Mittons

            That would be my impression, too. Which started in 1967, so there you go.

            I can’t remember when Clara came along in the series. I guess I had assumed she was close to Peggy’s age, but maybe she’s a bit younger. It just looked so out there compared to the rest of the office wear.

            ETA: But it’s also probably a brand new outfit, which would make sense that it would be trendy.

            • FibonacciSequins

              Her pregnancy (assuming she’s not really pregnant) might have been a visual to emphasize what Peggy says to Don later, that he’s surrounded by working mothers – as well as what she feels she missed out on.

            • 3hares

              I could swear someone mentioned that the actress really is pregnant. But if so that’s still a reason to show it now.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Yes, I think you’re right.

            • MartyBellerMask

              Probably new. She seems to have enough style (and money) to be wearing cute new maternity clothes. And this is almost certainly her first child.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Yes, I figured it must be her first, as well.

          • Javacat7

            IIRC, Laugh In was not high style. They are wearing what we were wearing and could buy in a decent dept. store.. Except Goldie Hawn the babe in the bathing suit, though her bathing suits were what was being worn, too, not high fashion. I don’t think designer sections existed then as they do now in, say, Macy’s.

            • T C

              Designer labels were generally available at the other large stores such as Lord & Taylor or I. Magnin (on the west coast). Macy’s had different areas for better dresses, better coats, etc. and these areas had nicer dressing rooms. Once “designer” jeans and the Diane von Furstenburg wrap dress (to replace the button front) became desirable to the masses through heavy advertising in the 1970s, Macy’s started adding more designers to their lines and entered more direct competition with the higher end regional stores, many of which have folded or been acquired.

      • LuluinLaLa

        She was briefly shown in the first episode of the season (I think) and she wasn’t noticeably pregnant then (5 mos in MM time), so I assume it was definitely a character choice. I actually thought to myself that it was nice that they threw that in there – we don’t need to know her full backstory to assume that she would be on the marriage and family track. If anything, it might serve as a reason we don’t see her again, if next season, Ken suddenly has a new secretary.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Love your picture. :)

    • Munchkn

      Do my eyes deceive me of do I see some polyester double knit in the women’s clothes? Peggy’s first dress and Joan’s red number particularly look like double knits.

      • decormaven

        Definitely knits.

        • Ginger Thomas

          I remember my mother’s first Butte Knit suit in about 1965. It was considered a very high-end outfit and she was very proud of it. Brown with leather lapels and cuffs.
          We were all wearing polyester doubleknit by the early 1970s. Unfortunately. It was hot and itchy in the summer and cold in the winter.

          • Munchkn

            I think my aunt had some Butte Knit suits, too. I remember passing by their plant many times headed to points north of Spartanburg, SC. I don’t know what the factory is now, but it’s still making something. I do know that one of my old high school classmates thought that might be a good place to work after she got her degree in textile chemistry. I don’t know that she ever worked for Butte Knit, but she did get a PhD in chemistry from UNC and also married one of my brother’s best friends. He was also a UNC PhD.

      • golden_valley

        A lot of Peggy’s wardrobe is double knit. Even for little kids like I was in the very late 60s and early 70s that thick fabric was used. It was so hot (as in temperature). Today’s ponte fabric has the same sort of weight and feel but stretches.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Blech! I wore a fair amount of double knit polyester as a grade-school kid in the 70s. That s*** traumatized me. To this day, I don’t like to buy anything polyester unless I can see it and feel it first (I buy most of my clothes on line these days).

      • AudreysMom

        Yes! I was going to add a note that the fuggly pantsuit Peggy wore to the office wasn’t just awful. It was polyester! You can tell by the designs in the acrylic weave. As an 8th grader in home ec, we were encouraged to use double knits because they were so easy to wash.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Easy to wash, hard to wear, hard to look good in.

          • EarthaKitten

            And very easy to melt when cigarette ash fell onto the fabric!!!

      • MilaXX

        So was that fugly outfit Peggy wore at home last week with Ginsburg and Julio.

    • JulieTy

      Until I saw the photos of Sunday in the Office with Don (above — thank you, Lo!), I hadn’t realized how much it looked like a scene of Freudian analysis: Peggy on the couch, Don standing behind her. I doubt it’s a deliberate call-back to Betty’s psychoanalysis, but the idea of Peggy being able to unload on Don as a listener and advisor seems apt.

      • smayper

        I noticed that too! Something so strange about that couch position. The person on the couch is both getting attention (the one who gets to speak), and really vulnerable (he can see you, you can’t see him, you’re lying down, he’s sitting, he has the notepad and you can’t see what he’s writing down). I’ve always found it a bit creepy. Betty seemed so much more comfortable with Dr. Edna, who sat WITH her patients, and played games with them rather than taking notes…I loved her playing “Go Fish” with Sally. But even in that vulnerable position, Peggy sorely needed the chance to lie down and let out her feelings. She’s been so horrendously uptight and unhappy all season! Don is one of the very few people she’s ever been able to be honest with.

    • DeniseSchipani

      Interesting point on Joan’s apartment. I see it this way: Yes, Joan is resistant to change. And, I think there’s a part of her, hidden away (but revealed when she made that “looking for love” speech to Bob), that is waiting for someone to rescue her, in that old-fashioned, white-horse way. It’s not stopping her from living her life in some ways — particularly at work — but it’s still holding her back at home. She COULD ditch the post-college, post-roommate apartment and get a larger, uptown place that would be more comfortable for her mom and son and herself, but then she wouldn’t still be the “old” Joan, hoping that a Roger type will finally leave his wife and marry her. If Peggy was the same way (which she’s not) she’d still be in her shithole apartment in Brooklyn, but she forged ahead. I feel for them both.

      • Frostypup

        Joan has always been a voice for conventionality, even though her actual choices are anything but. She tells Peggy at the very beginning of the series to put a bag over her head, and that the new typewriters are “easy enough for a woman to use.” She clearly views her marriage to a doctor as a big trophy, even though it’s all surface and everything underneath is horrible. I think the apartment is one more example of that mindset. And good heavens, her mother’s get-up! My grandmother used to sleep in those fluffy hair things!

      • Kayceed

        I buy the resistance to change, and do wonder if she’s waiting for a man to make it worth her while to upgrade her surroundings…to feather to conjugal nest. Also, on a practical note, interior design projects were typically the domain of stay-at-home-wives – would Joan as a single mom and busy executive really have the time?

        • Kitten Mittons

          Yes, I feel like it may be a mix of all these things. I think part of why we see so little of Kevin and her home in general is to underline that Joan sees less of him (and her home) as well, when compared to the traditional family/ stay-at-home-mom of the time. She’s resistant to change, reluctant to move on, she hopes that her next apartment change might be for marital/love reasons, and maybe she just doesn’t have the time/energy to deal with such a large project. As a working mom, that just rings true to me. I dread projects like that, and avoid them like the plague.

        • MarinaCat

          That’s kind of what I was thinking. “Why pick and move when it’s only a matter of time before I meet someone and start a home with him?” Sometimes there’s a push/pull with people who are disappointed with their personal lives while still having faith that the right person is just around the corner.

          • Lilah

            This was my take exactly. Joan sees buying a house with getting married. Why move until then?

            • ybbed

              agree

        • T C

          And would she want her live-in mother’s opinions and interference or have the time and energy for that too?

      • golden_valley

        I think Joan and Peggy, for that matter, are focused on work. They don’t have the energy it takes to redecorate or to move.

        • 3hares

          But Joan, especially, has always been very focused on aesthetics. It fits with Peggy’s character to say she just doesn’t have the visual style but Joan puts such care into her dressing, even wearing special little things for holidays and presumably being the one to arrange decorations around the office–that I can’t believe the motivation behind this is the same for both of them. At the very least I’d expect Joan to move things around even if she sticks with the same style.

          • missthing77

            Visual style can be very specific. Sometime people have more trendiness/ willingness to change in their homes not their clothes
            and vice versa. I see Joan’s home as 1. Once the house is ‘set up’she doesn’t have to think about it again, since she is a busy
            woman. 2. YES as T and L say thinking about her home in a serious way would mean she has to face that she is divorced and a single mom, which is not the most comfortable thing for her. As the ONLY working divorced single mom in the show she really has no role models and she is in a lonely spot – and in 1969-70, there really is no cultural conversation that includes her in a positive light . In those days single moms who worked were seen as a ‘ cultural problem ‘ not one of the cool single women. There was a stigma to her situation, and the divorce and child besmirched her with with the burden of another man’s kid for
            any man who would marry her. ( I know, my parents were divorced and out dating then, and they told me all about it, my mom is Betty Draper but that’s a story for another day) The closest to Joan on TV is ” One Day at a Time” in the 70′s, and that vulgar overheated show is the furthest thing from Joan’s sensibilities. This divorcee stigma – worse for women at the time – is also why
            I think Betty jumped at Henry’s marriage offer, and partly why Trudy is so angry at Pete.

            Speaking ( generally, or course ) from my experience, I would say that before ‘Kramer versus Kramer’ humanized divorce, divorcees of both sexes were seen as deeply flawed, and single moms were seen as quite damaged goods. So I think Joan has internalized some of that judgement as shame there about how she has failed. She says as much during ” Christmas Waltz” when she talks about how men don’t want a divorcee with a baby. 2. Joan is the showpiece not her home, as she says ” my mother raised me to be admired”. Joan goes out for dates where she can see and be seen. As for her home, she never had a man living there , didn’t even live with her husband when she was married, so in some ways has never moved on from ‘single gal digs’ way of living. The home is the prep area, outside the home is the stage she struts on, Backstage doesn’t need to be updated , it is more utilitarian. I knew many beautiful women like that – gorgeous outside, slobs behind closed doors (not that Joan is a slob)

            Just stuck me how alone Joan is in her circumstance, no wonder she is bonding with Peggy, Joan too must be wondering how she went wrong. Or maybe its buried so deep she doesn’t let herself want it any more, and Bob’s proposal will be a wakeup call.

            • Kayceed

              These are great points. And I had another thought – Joan is beautiful, successful, smart and knows how to handle men. I wonder if another reason she keeps her modest digs is to not intimidate potential suitors. A lot of guys could be uncomfortable with a woman like her earning big bucks all by herself – a swank apartment might be a bridge too far. Doesn’t give the white knight enough to rescue her from…much easier on the ego to marry someone earning a secretary’s salary.

            • FibonacciSequins

              You’re right, being a divorcee was a stigma at the time. I think “One Day At A Time” started in ’76 or ’77. There was a show with a single mother on television in 1969 – “Julia”. As I recall, Julia was originally to be a divorcee, but was changed to be a widow because it was felt a divorcee wouldn’t be sympathetic enough to viewers.

            • tejaswoman

              Remind me of the fact that the reason Mary Richards was fleeing a broken engagement was because the network execs worried that if she were divorced, people would think Laura Petrie had left Rob!

            • Munchkn

              Mike and Carol Brady were originally supposed to be divorcees, but the network thought that wouldn’t fly so they were both widowed.

            • missthing77

              The last evidence I have of ‘ women not redecorating post divorce ‘ is the fact that that MM’s only other single female divorcee with kids – Trudy – has also not redecorated or moved, even though Trudy has enough family money to live and decorate how she likes. InTrudy’s case I think she for sure plans to get remarried, so she wouldn’t bother with the time and energy of redoing a home she’s likely leaving anyways.

            • EarthaKitten

              Trudy chose her Cos Cob house on her own — Pete just lived there and helped pay for it (I assume Daddy helped pay for this house as he did the apartment). Why remodel something you decorated to your specific taste? Just remove whatever knick-knacks remind you of Pete and your redecorating is finished.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I don’t think you can compare them, really. Trudy’s house was bought and decorated only a few years ago, and it has enough space for her needs. Joan’s apartment hasn’t changed in a decade and it’s bursting at the seams.

          • urbantravels

            Joan’s apartment *did* used to be a showplace, although of a very different kind – when she and Dr. Greg were young marrieds and had that dinner party at the apartment for Greg’s boss and other doctors and wives – S3 Ep 3, “My Old Kentucky Home.” The style on display is “young and broke but ambitious, now-ish and creative on a shoestring.” She’s redecorated the place herself since her roommate days. It’s meant to show off her talents and resourcefulness — Joan has LOTS of both — but it’s also meant to be temporary. (We learn in an earlier exchange with the new Mrs. Jane Sterling that Joan and Greg are “still in the same old place” but definitely looking to move up ASAP.)

            At that party, Joan pulled out all the stops (and her accordion) to get everything just right and charm her guests and was SOOO desperately trying to be a social asset to her new-doctor husband, which is what she understood as her job. But at that party she learns that although she did her part very well (the guests really were charmed by the party and by her, and the other wives compliment the apartment specifically) Dr. Greg is letting her down by failing at *his* job – he’s a screw-up at surgery and he’s not in line for Chief Resident after all. I believe it’s soon after that episode that he gets a vase to the noggin.

            I think the current state of Joan’s apartment reflects the point at which she stopped trying to pour her creativity into her home decor, perhaps because she now associates that with her attempt to be Mrs. Young Doctor Just Starting Out and how that just turned out to be an abject failure all around. She still cares intensely about her self-presentation with clothes, hair and makeup – it’s for and about _her_ , not about being a supportive partner to a dud husband – but she no longer has any particular reason to throw cute little theme parties. That’s simply not in her lifestyle. Only her family and intimate inner circle (Bob and well…Bob) ever sees her home any more. She’s actually very protective about her space – she gets mad at her mom for hanging out with the repairman/super; Roger gets the cold shoulder whenever he tries to show up and be dadlike; and perhaps it’s significant that Don came into her home on the terrible night when she prostituted herself and he was too late to try and stop her. I think that might be when Don and Joan’s relationship really turned. Don witnessed her humiliation, and maybe she resents that Don somehow thought he could or should “save” her.

            I recognize this “young supportive housewife decorating creatively on a shoestring (with suppressed anger)” thing because my own mom was trying to do it for a while, though in slightly later years (70s rather than 60s). She refinished chairs, painted, sewed cute outfits for the kids, etc. It’s hard to say how much she was kidding herself into it at the time or whether she really did like doing it, but in later life (post-divorce, when she had her own career and did not look back kindly on the whole “supportive housewife” role) she completely rejected anything to do with housekeeping, decorating, cooking — having had a similar feeling that her husband was “letting her down” by not handling his career right, and that her efforts to back him up and do HER job right had been wasted. Of course at its heart it was really about pouring so much energy into the second-fiddle role when you really want to have your own thing. I had to learn cooking and any DIY thing on my own, from other sources, and I think it’s fun and creative to decorate, cook, etc. – but then I’ve never associated it with trying to be the perfect resourceful housewife.

        • ybbed

          some women aren’t into decorating, whether they have the energy and money or not. and maybe she likes her apartment the way it is.

          • missthing77

            Yeah and in that era there also wasn’t the home decorating obsession in that era that we have now. Yes, inspired by Jackie Kennedy redoing the White House, some people were into it but it wasn’t like now, with craft and home blogs galore, and CB2 and West Elm and Ikea bringing constant and relatively affordable design to the masses. Clothes and furniture cost more, were offered in less variation, and were expected to last longer than now , and in some intellectual and artsy circles it was considered materialistic to care about those things. In the 70′s many people lived a much more garish, outdated, modest and hodgepodge decorating style than we are used to today. Megan, and Pete are outliers in that respect with them each changing decor styles to match their changing self images. I credit Don’s chic new apartment 100% to Megan’s taste, since boy did his rental apartments look crappy when he was alone. He let her have her way with the apartment to please his bride, the same way he let Betty redecorate the living room when she was unhappy. But the basic design illiteracy/indifference of Trudy, Joan, Betty, (who just takes what she inherits in Henry’s house) and Peggy is more how I recall most people living then.

      • vitaminC

        Also, for a lot of people, buying a place *alone* is pretty much like crossing the Rubicon of singledom. I think she’d view it as giving up on the hope of love. Remember, Peggy bought her place with (and at the insistence of) Abe.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Well, Peggy bought her place while she was with Abe, and the location was at his insistence (I want our kids to grow up where there are different kinds of people”). But IIRC, she paid for it on her own. I remember them looking at the apartment she didn’t buy, and him saying something about how it wasn’t his decision (he may have said something about how it wasn’t his money, too).

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

      • not_Bridget

        I’ve always liked Joan’s place–it’s charmingly retro by today’s standards. But by 1969 standards, she needs to upgrade Bob’s proposal might well give her the impetus to move. The apartment is sending the message that she’s waiting for some man to rescue her–which I do not think she had realized.

        Nope, she’s doing well financially. Not as well as a man at her level, but far beyond her secretary/office manager years. Now is the time for her to get a place with more room for her kid & mom. (Her mother can be difficult, even though she’s convenient. But I think she was a single mother for some time–so Joan feels an obligation to give her a place.)

        I look forward to Joan expressing her style & taste in a new place. Not a Generic Modern apartment like Don & Megan’s. Not a VIctorian monstrosity like Betty’s–that place would be lovely lightened up a bit, but Betty isn’t up to it And certainly not some suburban hellhole.

    • NMMagpie

      What a relief: I thought the same thing about Joan’s blue dress. Concerning her apartment, her choice to not upgrade may be simply not choosing to change anything until the man and the marriage shows up. I know this is a thing because I did it and after I got tired of waiting, I went and bought my own home, moving from my small apartment.

      I kind of winced through this episode because I forgot how much the filmy, ruffled dresses of this period bugged me as a kid. And they still do.

      But MAN… props to that Burger Chef set! I just squealed because I remember those! Those cups! Those colors!

      • lulubella

        I totally agree. No matter what a compelling force Joan can be, I think she still operates under the dominant paradigm that she feels ultimately subordinate to the men around her … until she feels she is forced to dominate a situation (ie, the way she artfully controls situations/discussions). Buying a house solo is not something many women up and did at that time. Peggy is a not implausible exception; she is a person at the forefront who pushes and moves over boundaries. Joan works more within the system. Plus Peggy had Abe spurring her on and at her side, despite that she was the breadwinner. I think Joan has more things to think about (her shape shifting career, a child, a live in mother) that disrupt what is probably to her and the times a common living arrangement. I *might* do the same thing – bank that money! Or I might have at least moved into a two or three bedroom apt by now now. I will say that my mother shared a bed with her sister until her sister got married, and my father shared a bed with his uncle, so this seems standard fare to my parents.

        • NMMagpie

          I could not agree more. Several years ago, while I was living and working in a city I did not grow up in, I was blown away to find out that my living on my own was considered odd. As incredible as it seems, there are pockets of our society that do not encourage women to be empowered to live or achieve alone. If it’s happening now, you can be dang sure it was happening then.

          • lulubella

            Curious – I replied to you but it has been deleted …

            • NMMagpie

              I saw that. It happens.

    • Jessica

      I love you guys for all the hard work you put into these. I seriously think you could publish all of this as a book someday.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Hope they do, if it won’t infringe on any kind of AMC copyright…

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          They could get permission from AMC. AMC would be glad to make more money from the show.

      • FibonacciSequins

        I have a little dream that T&Lo will team up with Janie Bryant and the Mad Men production team to present their analysis in book or DVD form after the series is finished. A girl can hope!

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          A book would work better, because then you can spend more time looking at the images without having to hit pause.

          • MartyBellerMask

            I would so buy that coffee table book!!!!

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            i agree that a book would work better…but how about a book *with* a DVD?

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              That works for me. I’ve seen a few coffee table books that come with a DVD.

        • Alice Teeple

          I would totally buy that book!

    • ovarB

      Seeing Clara reminded me of my Mom working as a substitute teacher in 1969. She was pregnant with my brother and was told to wear a coat to hide her pregnancy.

      • Frostypup

        I was born in 1969; my mother was a teacher, and once she was pregnant, that was it. She was out of a job (and there was no maternity leave) until I arrived. She also remembers it being a big deal around that time when female teachers were “allowed” to wear pantsuits. And that they had to be pantSUITS, not just separates.

        • Susan Collier

          OMG! My mom too! (Though I never asked about pantsuits on teachers.)

        • AZU403

          Yeah, at my junior and senior high schools in the Sixties pregnant teachers had to leave after 5 months (for that matter, so did the pregnant students!), which was fairly ridiculous since no secret was made about their being pregnant, in fact most of us girls were excited about it.
          In the early 70s Glamour did a feature on one of their editors who courageously was working right up to her due date, with fashion tips on how to conceal your growing shape.

      • ktr33

        I was surprised to see a heavily pregnant Clara still working. I feel like if she were married, which I assumed she would be, she would’ve quit work when she got pregnant, unless there were financial reasons why she couldn’t.

        • Kate Andrews

          Maybe she’s trying to save money? Yeah, that totally threw me too, and it even distracted me from Bob!

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          I’m going to guess financial reasons. Didn’t Harry’s wife work through part of her pregnancy?

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          I think for the show, if she had to go, the audience would’ve been bewildered if we weren’t given a hint of why.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          Joan was talked about how she continued to work in the office, still then a secretary/quasi-office manager (thanks to Lane), when she was up to 8 months in the pregnancy. Given Clara’s seniority and the fact she is probably respected because of who she has had to work for/tolerate over the years, she is probably making good money for a secretary. Plus, if the father is the same accounts guy, she should be fine.

    • http://instagram.com/gioioio gioioio

      Megan dressed and Don in a towel – reminds me of all the times they’ve shown them in different stages of dress/undress. She’s taking her things back to California with her, she’s got the power in that scene and she’s wearing the pants to show it. I think the fact that they are both barefoot shows that they are a little vulnerable and uncertain of when (because it’s only a matter of time now) their marriage is going to end.

      I noticed the chain detail on Joan’s dress right away and thought, “Hmm, someone’s taking cues from Peggy.” It’s nice to see both Joan and Don looking up to Peggy in their own ways, Joan with her clothing and Don in treating her like an equal.

      I cried when I watched Peggy and Don’s scene in his old office (as well as the first time when she was in the purple dress) and teared up again just looking at the pictures. This show is beautiful and your style recaps really serve justice to how much thought goes in to every little detail. Thank you!

      • Mismarker

        I just realized my parents have those same exact “Don” towels in the linen closet of their lake vacation home. Nearly all the furnishings there are castoffs from years past!

      • Kristen Graham

        Megan’s bare stomach and jeans also reminded me of Stan’s bare stomach and jeans. Both vulnerable people trying to move on from their feelings.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          The lack of Stan screen shots for this is shocking. We even got a Moshe Dayan poster redux.

      • Lorinne

        Megan wearing denim on denim to me meant I’m here to work. And not on our marriage.

        • Alice Teeple

          Canadian Tuxedo time.

      • Alice Teeple

        In addition to the shared dress style, Peggy and Joan had a shared moment with Don, vulnerability and dancing. In S5E10, Joan tells Don about her crumbling home life and her weaknesses. He offers to dance with her to some outdated music, but she refuses. He still demonstrates an earnest recognition of her struggles and her value, even if it’s more shallow than his similar gesture to Peggy. I thought it was a beautiful callback.

    • Eric Stott

      No mention of Lou’s Tiki Bar? That was at the same time one of the most hideous and the most wonderful things I’ve seen in the office.

    • dixie pomeroy

      I also thought that as soon as Joan became a partner she’d be living somewhere else, but I think there’s another element to it. Almost every other parent on the show has made the decision to primarily raise their kids in the suburbs, reflecting the overall trend at the time of upper middle class white people clearing out of ever more dangerous cities. Joan is resisting that, even though she has probably watched New York get seedier from her own window. There’s something keeping her there, and I think it’s her innate sense of feeling at home among outcasts. She’s raising her kid in a gay neighborhood and knows that the closest thing he has to a father figure is gay, which would have been really open minded at the time. So I don’t think it’s so much a desire to convince herself that one day she might marry a doctor and move to the suburbs, it’s more an acceptance that her and her son’s lives are going to be unconventional, and she’s ok with that.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Very nice insight! I love that.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Before this episode aired, I always thought that if the show dealt with Stonewall, it would be through Joan, because she lived close by. I figured Joan probably had gay friends (before Bob) and that during the riots, she would take care of one of them. This was before I got a better sense of what kind of show “Mad Men” was, and that it wasn’t the kind of thing they would do.

      • annejumps

        Didn’t she once say about Manhattan/New York “This city is everything”?

        • dixie pomeroy

          Ha, I can’t remember but it sounds like her. Do we know where she’s from originally?

          • Charly

            The Pacific Northwest.

            • Cabernet7

              Spokane, I think.

        • ybbed

          The move to the suburbs would be too confining socially for someone like Joan. Remember Betty’s neighbor that was divorced and a single mother and how they all gossiped about her?

          • lulubella

            Good point! I think Joan is a rebel AND bound by many social paradigms. She’s very political at the office and that extends to her personal life/understanding of society. It’s almost as if she CAN’T move there … yet.

      • MilaXX

        Good point, I never thought about that

      • Sobaika

        This is an interesting insight, mostly because it goes against my view of Joan. I don’t think she embraces being unconventional at all – she toys with it (like at the party her cousin brought her to) but it’s never been her bag. I’m reminded of the way she dismissed Paul Kinsey and his NJ girlfriend once upon a time, or the shewd way she eyed Sal after kissing him. She’s clearly evolved over the years but TLo’s take rings much truer for me – she once had a very specific lifeplan and now that she’s deviated from it, she doesn’t quite know where to go next.

        • dixie pomeroy

          I hear you, and certainly agree that being bitchy about Paul’s girlfriend wasn’t Joan’s finest hour. But I think for all the talk of Mad Men being a show about characters who never truly change, Joan has changed quite a lot in the last decade. Even back when she kissed Sal, she didn’t react with disgust, just understanding. She and Betty are roughly the same age, but I can’t imagine Betty (or really any of the main characters) being as comfortable with her kids around gay people as Joan is.

        • TeraBat

          For what it’s worth, I always thought the scene between Joan and Paul’s girlfriend was more about Joan getting a swipe in at Paul and using his girlfriend’s race as the tool to do it. She picked race because she knew it was a vulnerability and would get the strongest reaction.

          • Sobaika

            Sure. But it spoke to an ambivalence about social movements and relating to othered communities. In fact, she’s rarely been portrayed as anything but. I like Joan but this was one of the first times I’ve seen an interpretation of her embracing atypical lifestyles. More than most things, the quest for the right husband and home has driven her – even now her conversation with Bob Benson came back to finding love.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Joan is driven by the quest for the right husband/love…but she also says that Bob shouldn’t be with a woman and should (like her) hold out for love, and it’s pretty clear that she means the right man for Bob, too. She accepts Bob’s being gay. We don’t see much of it on the show, other than her kissing Sal and acting the way she does with Bob, but I think the Uncles are onto something when they say that Joan makes a great “fruit fly.” She’s gotta have some gay friends, maybe now, or maybe in the past.

            • Sobaika

              I’m not saying she isn’t the perfect fruit fly. I’m saying that little about Joan says she’s ‘at home among outcasts.’

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I agree with you on that.

      • MartyBellerMask

        And maybe she’s realizing the suburbs are overrated. Look how well it worked for Don, Pete, Harry and their families.

        • ABB

          Also, the commute would be horrendous for her as a single mom coming in from the suburbs every day. She’s on the west side so that puts her, what, 20 minutes on the subway to get to work? Plus, spending hours on the train in a girdle? No thank you!

      • EveEve

        As a single mom, and an executive, commuting into the city every day, she’d be a real fish out of water in the NY ‘burbs in the ’60s. Plus, the West Village is where she’s comfortable. But I agree with TLo that her character would have at least updated something in the apartment the last 10 years, even if home decorating isn’t her “thing” and she perfers to focus on her career and/or finding the right man. That apartment set is so outdated and stale, it doesn’t ring true to her character. Not when the 60′s was exploding all around her in one of the grooviest neighborhoods in NYC.

        • Lorinne

          I see Joan’s mom as being responsible for the upkeep of the home. She obviously has no authority from Joan to change it and perhaps it doesn’t occur to her to change it. Joan’s focus is on work and her appearance.

      • dixie pomeroy

        Ha, and I just remembered that little Kevin was conceived as a direct result of the criminal deterioration of New York! Maybe Joan can tell him the story over Thanksgiving dinner when he’s old enough

    • http://www.dinnerisserved1972.com DinnerIsServed1972

      I would have a hard time turning down Bob. A mansion in Detroit!!!

      • Susan Collier

        In 12 years they could have been the Butler family in Mr Mom.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Michael Keaton is *almost* as pretty as James Wolk. He’d definitely get hit on by the neighborhood moms.

      • Kathryn Sanderson

        For a lot of New Yorkers, a mansion in Detroit can’t hold a candle to an apartment in the Village. Someone above quoted Joan as saying, “This city (NYC) is everything.”

    • laurs

      I wonder if Joan’s apartment reflects that in some way Greg is still alive, maybe still overseas, or even missing and Joan for whatever real estate/legal hold up makes her unable to sell that place (if they owned).

      • Mismarker

        I don’t know. She’s been living there since at least 1960 (with a roommate during season 1) and well before Greg. I’ve always assumed she was renting all the while (though, rental agreements would maybe not have allowed pink walls??), or purchased it on her own before Greg. It is perplexing to me why she is still there!

    • Mismarker

      Unrelated to costuming, but I think we can confirm Trudy has a male friend. Maybe? She’s doesn’t strike me as beer drinker and probably wouldn’t purchase and chill beers for a visiting Pete! I wouldn’t.

      • Kate Andrews

        Yep. You’re right!

        • DeniseSchipani

          That and the cake. Clearly Pete was annoyed by its presence and trying to figure out what it was for. When he smashed the bottle into the cake, my husband said, “you could still salvage that!”

          • Mismarker

            Totally salvageable! I would have eaten around the bottle. But, then again, cake is to me as donuts are to Homer Simpson.

            • Kitten Mittons

              He didn’t say this in reference to donuts, but all I can hear in my head is “It’s just a little airborn, it’s still good! It’s still good!”

            • P M

              That was one of the best endings ever; the eternal flying pig :D

            • Kitten Mittons

              <3

            • MartyBellerMask

              Homer Simpson would love a cake with a beer in the middle. :)

            • Mismarker

              It wasn’t Duff beer, though. I’m sure Homer’s choosy about his brew! ;)

          • quitasarah

            Did I mis-read something? I thought it was pretty clear that it was Tammy’s birthday and that’s why Pete was visiting. Did I dream that?

            • MarinaCat

              There was no mention of her birthday. I assumed the trip was mostly business with visiting Tammy thrown in since it was convenient. If it was her birthday, it was a pretty shitty celebration!

            • melisaurus

              Her birthday is nearer to the end of summer.

      • ipsa

        I saw that as a very aggressive, even sexually violent, image.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          It was so gross. Part of why the final scene at the diner didn’t work for me as much as it seemed to for others, is that I don’t wish Pete on either Don or Peggy for a makeshift family.

          • MilaXX

            I think quite the contrary Peggy & Don are two of the few people who can handle Pete. He needs them to balance him out.

            • P M

              I agree. Pete has always needed people that can keep him under control. Remember his speech to Trudy about how he needed her to be around – after that horrendous incident with the au pair? (That poor girl :( )

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            He seems the furthest away from a breakthrough of the three, sure. But those are the only two he feels comfortable enough to be open with.

        • Mismarker

          To smash the white cake with the beer bottle? Yes.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Also a perfect metaphor for how he takes out his anger at his wife on his daughter.

            • Lady Bug

              When did he take his anger out on Tammy? He didn’t seem happy that she didn’t recognize him, but I didn’t see him being aggressive towards her

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              I thought initially that was Tammy’s birthday cake, but then again, Pete probably arrived after the actual date, so maybe I’m wrong.

            • Mismarker

              It wasn’t Tammy’s birthday which means it was a cake made for no apparent reason. Cue Pete’s thought: “Who is Trudy baking a cake for?” I was certain he would grab a fork and just start spitefully eating it straight out of the pan. Smashing the beer bottle into it was an even more abhorrent move.

            • MartyBellerMask

              Trudy may not have even made the cake. Quite possibly, the housekeeper did. And left it out for Trudy to see when she got home.

            • Mismarker

              Hadn’t thought of that. In any case, Pete took the presence of the cake and absence of Trudy personal affronts.

            • MartyBellerMask

              He sure did!

            • Jackie

              I also wondered if it might be a metaphor for Pete’s expectations and hypocrisy?

              I think Peter expected to return to NYC the conquering hero with Bonnie on his arm, and imagined Trudy to be pining for him. Instead, quite the opposite is happening and he is calling her out on dating “as a MOTHER!” All the while Bonnie is waiting for him back in the hotel room, while Pete conceals her very existence from Trudy. (MASSIVE hypocrite!)

              In the end, both women reject him:
              He can’t “have his cake and eat it, too.”

            • P M

              All this cake talk is making me hungry…..

          • Julie

            What’s with Pete and ruining perfectly delicious food? First that roast chicken goes out the window, now destroying a cake. Is nothing sacred?!

            • charlotte

              Only the chip and dip… and the rifle.

        • MissKimP

          There was an air of sexual violence about that scene, for sure. I was so worried that Pete, in his possessive anger, was going to “mark his territory” by trying to rape Trudy. So glad it was just the cake he took it out on!

          • MartyBellerMask

            It shows that he’s grown at least a teeny bit that he did not.
            That’s a pretty low bar, to say “hey, at least he didn’t rape her”, but we are talking about Pete.

            • 3hares

              Since he’d never raped her before she probably didn’t consider that growth.

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            I thought he might hit her when she came in and he was drunk.

        • makeityourself

          Which would be right in Pete’s wheelhouse.

        • flint

          How is slamming a beer bottle on a cake sexually violent? It’s a beer bottle and cake, not a dick and a vagina.

      • EarthaKitten

        Maybe her daddy likes to drink beer?

        • Mismarker

          Maybe, but I’m going Occam’s razor on this. Trudy was gone when Pete arrived, getting her hair done. Pete took Tammy somewhere and sometime in the interim Trudy came back to the house (Pete noted her car was in the drive) and then left again in someone else’s car. Trudy returned at night, after Tammy had been put to bed, dolled up (as TLo mentioned above) in a very date-worthy ensemble. The simplest explanation that fits the facts? She was on a date. Probably not with Charlie Fiddich, as Pete posits, but Trudy’s got a man. And I’m guessing it’s serious. Trudy wouldn’t waste time with a man who wasn’t interested in being a father figure to her daughter.

    • Damien W

      Another theory to explain Peggy’s blue Burger Chef dress: She bought it specifically to wear during the parking lot surveys. Her usual business attire is too urban and standoffish for station wagon moms. So she suburbanized herself for a day. I doubt we’ll ever see her in that dress again.

    • Vanessa

      I really enjoy the discussion after your mad style posts. I feel like everyone has had more time to digest and raise new and interesting ideas–both style and substance related.

    • Heartful Dodger

      I’m surprised you haven’t said anything about Megan’s use of hair extensions — or, in 1969, a fall — in the last two episodes. The shoulder length is her home style, the longer is for the public. I noticed she wore her big Texas hair for her party last week, and was still wearing it, with her raccoon-y walk-of-shame eyes, the morning after their threesome.

      • Robyn Garrett

        I was totally distracted by Megan’s long and short hair in this episode. In the scene at the SC&P office it’s so long, greasy, and limp looking. Almost like it’s still leftover from the party. Maybe she just threw the extensions in on her way to the office? The part is pretty messy, so I doubt it’s a full-on wig. I just sense that she wants to look all jazzed up, but she doesn’t really have a “day” version of her super amped-up version of her Priscilla Presley hair. Comparing her “visting the office” look to Bonie’s is almost alarming. Bonnie looks picture perfect and Megan looks like a greasy, overdone mess.

        • Heartful Dodger

          I agree with T-Lo that the office look was deliberate — hair was flat, long and center-parted a la Ali McGraw at that time. I’m just wondering how robust that three-way must have been, for him to keep the Priscilla Presley look all night.

          • missthing77

            Ha ha ha! That is a hilarious observation!

        • Qitkat

          Extensions is a more late 20th- 21st century concept. Many of us, like Megan, had wig type hairpieces called falls, back then, to create the instant long hair. Much easier than extensions, they clipped into your own hair with an attached comb.

        • Mismarker

          I thought the abrupt change to shorter hairstyle and her gauzy robe lent a certain dream-like quality to that balcony scene. Especially since we first see her from Don’s perspective. The shorter hairstyle harkens back to the way she wore it when she was living full-time in NY. I don’t remember seeing her in falls before this season. Though we’ve never seen it played out onscreen before, this balcony breakfast scenario was, perhaps, a Saturday morning (when the weather allowed) ritual. A call back to happier times.

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            I agree. The balcony hairdo, it was as if the events of latter Season 5 through Season 6 never happened.

          • lulubella

            To me she looked more beautiful and natural on the balcony. Her hair/outfit at the offices looked “try to hard” and contrived. Like she was attempting to show how she had become a west coast actress and lives in an artsy community. Her mention that where she is in LA is quieter than Manhattan, while true, stung me a bit, and reminded me that she lives in a semi-remote house in a canyon, and made me think about something that might befall her there (not Manson related).

    • BarniClaw

      Thank you guys so much for taking the time to write these. If feel like I learn so much about what this time period was like: socially, economically, racially, politically, gender…ally. Thank you, thank you.

    • Kate Andrews

      Nice. I did notice the light blues, but Joan dressing like Peggy! Well, I never! Totally hilarious and spot-on.

    • Erica

      I wonder if Joan stayng in the same apartment is supposed to be an indication that she’s in a holding pattern in her personal life. Even decades later, it’s a big decision that you’re going to make decisions about buying a home without yet having a partner–for women anyway. When I bought my first house at age 30, I told myself that of course I would do this as a single woman, as men do it all the time. But it was a specific and deliberate decision that I wouldn’t wait for a partner (6 years later my future husband moved into a house I owned). But Joan is living in 1969. And she still wants love, as she should. So she waits in the same apartment. Even Peggy only bought a place because she moved in with her boyfriend.

      • JMWilder

        I was wondering the same thing re: a single woman buying a house. Was there any social stigmas about single women buying houses? Or getting loans? I’m thinking of my sister-in-law who is very well off getting told point-blank at a car dealership to come back with her husband. And this was in 2014. How much worse was it in the 60s? I know Joan can be assertive about getting what she wants–she could probably buy a house if she wanted, prejudices and social hurdles be damned–so this might be only part of the story. I’m not sure what else it could be! Unless she’s thinking about being in love with the doctor, and trying to stay in a place where she used to be loved?

        • DeniseSchipani

          Well, Peggy bought a building. Sure, Abe was “there”, but she’s the one who bought it, and could have bought the upper east side place, too.

          • JMWilder

            That’s true! But Peggy’s building is in a “bad” side of town, isn’t it? So folks would probably be more willing to just take her money without concern for her marital status. Joan would be buying in a more upscale area where marital status and “respectability” might be more scrutinized. Actually, now that I’m thinking about it, there was the divorced mom who bought a house down the street from the Drapers. Glen’s mom. And that was the talk of the neighborhood.

            • MilaXX

              But the Realtor also show her that Upper East side place as well. I doubt the realtor would have show it to her if she couldn’t afford it.

            • JMWilder

              Dang, you’re right. My memory is selective. This whole line of speculation might be way off track.

            • T C

              I have not re-watched the episode but I believe the realtor had jumped to conclusions about Peggy’s marital status and then gave her the run-around.

            • MilaXX

              Not exactly. The Realtor assumed she and her boyfriend were married, but she didn’t give her the run around. It was the boyfriend who talked her into buying o the other side of town.

            • lulubella

              But the realtor was appalled at Peggy, and I believe was only partially relieved by Abe’s presence, as he was not financing the deal. Didn’t the realtor tank that deal in the end? Or try to? I still agree with Denise’s observation. Every realtor is different and I’m thinking Joan might run into one who would not be as accommodating.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Joan’s a partner in a successful Madison Avenue agency, receiving an Account Executive’s salary, with both a young child and a mother to take care of. I really don’t think a Manhattan real estate agent in 1969 would be so scandalized by all that that they’d turn her down as a client. If Helen Bishop can buy a house in Ossining in 1960, Joan really shouldn’t have that much of a problem in 1969.

              And Peggy’s realtor initially assumed Abe was buying the place with her, but once she found out Peggy was in charge, she dealt directly with her. There wasn’t any indication that she deliberately tanked the first deal.

            • Glammie

              Peggy, as a single woman, would have her own credit rating. It’s married women who had the big credit issue since they didn’t have their own credit ratings.

        • Munchkn

          Typically women could not get credit in their own names. That was changing a bit then, but there are still difficulties with that. It’s one of the things we fought for as feminists back in the 70s.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            True. I remember an older coworker telling me last year that women couldn’t even get their own bank accounts…until the ’70s? I think that’s what he said. And it may have just been a regional thing (we’re in Texas).

            • MilaXX

              No that’s not true. We had bank accounts as kids, It was part some little savers program connected with my elementary school. Every week we brought out bank books to school along with out deposit. The teacher taught us how to fill them out deposit slips so we could make out deposits.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Glad to know it wasn’t true. Maybe it was some other money-related practice I’m thinking of.

            • siriuslover

              And in I Love Lucy, Lucy has her own bank account (it’s mentioned in the classic candy episode). Ethel says something about never having enough money at one point to open an account. And that was what, 1952? Granted, Ricky did get a call from the bank, but still, it was Lucy’s account.

            • MeiraNiibori

              I’m pretty sure it was credit / credit cards. I can’t remember the exact year, but not too long ago my mom told me about how exciting it was to be able to get her first credit card in the late 70s.

            • FibonacciSequins

              Yes, especially for a woman, having a credit card was unusual in the late 70s/early 80s! My parents were divorced by then and my mother didn’t even have a bank account. She had to do her banking at the local check-cashing place.

            • Ginger Thomas

              My aunt couldn’t get the electricity at her apartment in 1967 in her own name. Her father had to co-sign.

            • http://www.ellenciompi.com/ NurseEllen

              I remember that, too. And Christmas Clubs!

            • Glammie

              Married women couldn’t establish their own credit ratings. They weren’t considered separate from their husbands in those matters. So, they couldn’t qualify for a loan on their own.

            • MilaXX

              That might be true of someone like Betty who married young, but Joan already had established credit since she’s been single AND renting for quite some time.

            • Glammie

              Agreed that Joan could probably buy something of her own, given that she’s divorced. However, my mother had worked for years as a lawyer and couldn’t get her own credit card until the mid 70s. She had had her own salary and her own checking account and, with my father, owned multiple pieces of property, but she still couldn’t get a credit card.

              It wasn’t simply housewives like Betty who faced the credit issue–it was married women, period.

            • MilaXX

              My point is Betty has never really lived independently with the exception of her brief modeling career. She hasn’t ever had an entity outside of being someone’s wife. On the other hand someone who has established credit BEFORE getting married has credit in her name name, married or not.

            • Glammie

              Now. Not then. That’s my point.

            • T C

              That was not my experience back then. Women were actively discriminated against and their prior credit history disappeared once they married.

            • T C

              Those were savings accounts and a parent/guardian form was included in the sign-up paperwork. Could you go to the bank on your own to make withdrawals or did a parent accompany you?

            • MilaXX

              My sibling and I were fairly independent at a young age because my mother was a single parent.I remember making a withdrawal to buy my one and only Barbie. (actually Skipper). We also later had credit cards in our name when I was 12 (1976 ish or so) to a department store here in town called Lerners. We could only use it with permission, and of course mother had final approval but if we needed a blouse or something for school we cold go get it on our own.

            • T C

              Store cards were not subject to the same standards as major credit cards (then BankAmericard, Master Charge, Diners Club and American Express). I had no problem shopping I. Magnin and City of Paris even without my mother’s Charge-A-Plate (looked like a military dog tag with notches cut in the edges corresponding to the local department store issuing credit such that the card would not lay flat in the embossing device if no credit line) in the days before major credit cards. The store’s Credit Department would have prior notification as to how many dresses I was allowed to purchase or would phone my mother for approval. The Charge-A-Plate was actually in my father’s name and read Mrs. F. M. Lastname. Store cards and installment payment (never to be confused with layaway) for purchases such as a small stereo or a television were where an individual developed a credit rating so they could then apply for the very hard to get Sears card and major credit cards run by bank consortiums. Bank of America and Wells Fargo eventually spun off their credit card subsidiaries into separate corporations, Visa and MasterCard. I had been using ATMs at savings and loans for several years by the time you received your Lerner Shops card.

            • MilaXX

              mmmKay

            • Azucena

              Jane Curtin gave an interview once saying that she couldn’t get a credit card in her name in the (early?) 70s even when she was starring on SNL. The inability to establish a line of credit would affect a whole host of other issues. And this was just what white women were facing.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Yes! Maybe it was a line of credit in order to buy a house.

            • P M

              A good point; I’d love to see how women of other ethnicities fared.

            • Glammie

              Nope, wasn’t regional–it took ’til the 70s.

            • T C

              Back then there were no interstate or national banks. Each bank was state chartered. Some states allowed branch banking, while others required each bank location to have its own charter. Each state charter was unique to the state and so were credit laws including consumer interest rates. Redlining in all levels of consumer credit was rampant.

              There is a huge difference between savings accounts and checking accounts from a legal standpoint. Women (and others) were held back from accessing any account type which exposed a bank to liability that exceeded a deposited amount. In my state, any account opened for a minor required approval from an adult guardian (usually a form a parent would sign at account opening). This approval was likely included in any packet used in elementary school math programs that involved savings accounts, usually co-developed with the school district and the bank. Most school board members were men back then and there were many cross-promotions to businesses they were associated with.

            • VirginiaK

              If you had an income, as I did in the 60s in NYC, you could have a bank account. At that time the only person I knew who had a credit card was a very rich person who had an American Express card.

          • belucca

            Since its very first episodes Mad Men made me rethink the idea of things having been always in every respect so much better in the “rotten West”, but for heaven’s sake, after seeing your comment I had my skin crawl. Quick Wiki suggests there were states then where women couldn’t have property without her husband?! For the first time in my life I actually got an inkling why somebody ever used word “progressive” for left/red/socialist/communist. There might have been nothing or little for anyone to have in Eastern Europe then, cars, houses and bank accounts included, that’s true, but the idea of not having a right to possess/buy something because you were a woman was already left behind in the past centuries where it belonged. It seems sometimes it might alllmost have been better to be a girl on the tractor in the east block, brrr, what a thought!

            • P M

              Ah, you’re not from North America originally. I really should ask my grandmother what it would have been like in India in the 50s. And my mum re: the 70s. My dad was shocked by his in-laws and fully expected that my mother would work. Not to bring in money, but so that she would be doing something useful with herself.

          • Glammie

            Yep, I remember when my mother was able to get her first credit card with her own credit rating in the 1970s–she’d been working as a lawyer for years. But the banks wouldn’t give married women their own credit rating.

            Appalling really.

          • E M

            My mother went to law school in the late 1970s as a response to being told she could get a credit card without her husbands signature because she had no credit of her own. She was determined to never be reliant on anyone (btw, next week is their 50th Anniversary).

          • T C

            I remember to this day my rejection for a BankAmeriCard, even though I had previously had a college plan checking account with them. They addressed it to Mister and claimed I had no credit history.

          • Alice Teeple

            My grandmother never wrote a check in her life. The bank account she had was in my grandfather’s name only, and it stayed that way until he died. She had no idea how banks worked.

        • Shug

          Wait, WUT? Someone, this year, actually refused to sell an adult woman a car without her husband? How did she react?

          • JMWilder

            Bewilderment and then, later, righteous anger. Personally, I’m still struggling to accept it as a thing that still happens.

            • Kitten Mittons

              I’ve had similar encounters, on a decidedly smaller scale. In fact, I’ve found it quite common to get at least some sort of comment regarding my gender when getting insurance quotes or estimates for home/car repairs, purchasing cars, purchasing homes, etc. For our home purchase, both the bank and the insurance company listed my husband as the buyer, even though they had not talked to him once about even the tiniest detail. One of them ( I forget which) even assumed he was the only buyer, and didn’t list me at all.

              In the most trivial cases, I chalk it up to the person being more traditionally minded, or maybe clumsily suggesting that spouses should discuss large cash outlays.

              In other, more egregious, cases, I’ve spoken up and told them that because I handle all the finances for our family, my husband trusts me to make the right decision. That decision being, of course, to take my business elsewhere.

              We had a new roof put on due to a hail storm last year, and one of the roofing companies that came canvassing the neighborhood was unbelievably condescending. He must have said three times, “Well, have your husband call me when you’re ready to move forward,” even AFTER my husband had answered the door and said, “Oh, you need to talk to my wife.”

              We didn’t use them, obviously, but I did report them to the Better Business Bureau for other reasons (another story altogether). It was satisfying.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              I went to a bank a couple years ago (so I was in my early 20s) to see about opening an account, and I’d already done all my research on their website and was asking questions to confirm what I’d learned, and the bank manager kept calling me “spunky.” Just. What.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Spunky. Cuz it’s cute when we think.

            • tejaswoman

              It wasn’t that long ago that I went to shop for a car as a single woman and was asked “what can I sell you today?” ( Pardon the punctuation and capitalization issues, as they are too tiresome to manage on my phone.) When I replied that I wasn’t buying any car the same day I saw it, he queried coyly, “Oh, but haven’t you ever seen a dress you just had to have!?” “Not for $22,000, no. … Come to think of it, in my entire closet I have only two dresses that cost $300, and I didn’t buy THEM the first day I saw them!”

            • lulubella

              What state is this in? Is this not illegal?! Sounds like gender discrimination to me!

          • Danielle

            In 2008 I went to test drive a car on my own, with no intentions to buy that day (I went just to compare – if anything the test drive made me decide to buy something else). The salesman and his manager tried so many high pressure tactics after a while it was hard to not laugh. Eventually they even said, “So, is there someone else that you need to talk to who will let you buy this car?” I said, “No, my daddy and my boyfriend told me it’s ok for me to buy my own car all by myself, and all by myself, I just don’t want yours.”

            • melisaurus

              Went to a dealership this year and the sales woman highballed me so much that I didn’t know what to do for 10 minutes stunned. Then I walked out and never went back. She should be on my team!!

            • Munchkn

              I went in about a year ago to have the air conditioning on my ’03 Mini Cooper serviced. It cost way more than I expected and then the dealership proceeded to tell me that they’d checked the car out (which I didn’t ask for) and it needed about $7 grand worth of work done on it on top of the AC work. It was just small stuff, but it needed to be done! My car is probably not worth $7000! I still haven’t taken the car in and won’t go back to that dealership either. Not for service and not for a new car when I need it. I think they just saw a woman that they thought they could take advantage of.

        • CatLady

          There was definitely a stigma against selling houses to single women at the time. There’s more information about it towards the top of the comment section.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          It was very unusual for single women to buy houses, and it was harder for women to get credit. OTOH, with Joan’s salary and assets, it might have been easier for her to get a loan than most women. Peggy went ahead and bought a building, but she’s not as conventional as Joan, and she was with Abe when she bought it.

        • Qitkat

          In 1969 I bought a car in my own name (single), in northern Virginia. Granted, it turned out to be somewhat of a bad bargain, and they probably took advantage of my naïveté, but I still got my own financing without a co-signer. I had only had the job I was in for a few months too.

      • P M

        The Uncles once commented that that apartment is beginning to look like a gilded cage. I hope she at least re-decorates it, instead of risking having it look like a place where she waits for a man to ‘rescue’ her from.

        • Supernumerary

          Which is both sad and concerning, when one thinks back to Roger having given Joan a caged bird so long ago.

      • Ginger Thomas

        I think you’re exactly right. I bought a condo when I turned 30 (in 1996), and my mother thought it was admitting that I was an old maid and had given up on ever marrying. Why would I do that without a husband? What would people think?

    • NotTheRealSteveEyl

      I wan’t Bob’s plaid coat. So cool.

      I remember Burger Chef- I was born in 1970. Hoping SCP invent Jeff. It was a Burger King thing, y’all.

    • Damien W

      Things to look out for next week: If it’s during the Stonewall riots, it is also the week of Judy Garland’s death and funeral in NYC. Will Janie plant some fashion nods to Judy in the episode?

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I think the show is more likely to reference Judy Garland than Stonewall. I could see Roger mentioning Judy Garland, but I don’t know why.

        • P M

          How passe/ over the hill was Judy considered? How much of a cultural marker? Her voice was amazing, but how was she considered compared to Ava Gardner, for example?

          • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

            Her life was kind of a mess towards the end, wasn’t it?

            • P M

              Majorly. I always feel so sad when I see what she looked like in the 60s. That mother of hers… Grrrr

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            She was passe/over the hill, but she was still a big star.

          • Glammie

            It was a big deal when she died. I was a kid and remembered hearing it on the news. Her career was passe, but The Wizard of Oz was still shown every Thanksgiving, so everyone knew who she was.

            So, a bit like Elvis dying, maybe?

            • P M

              Ah – that is big.

            • Logo Girl

              I remember being devastated because Wizard of Oz was my favorite movie. It was a big deal, there was a flurry of articles as I recall.

          • Javacat7

            She was such a mess from her drug use, people were embarrassed and sad for her. She was basically compartmentalized as a different person from who she’d been making Wizard. In my world, it was nt remotely like Elvis, who was was relevant to rock n roll even he was having his own problems. (Anyone else read “Gulp” by Mary Roach? Killer megacolon, poor guy.) Judy was irrelevant.

      • Cabernet7

        The episodes are usually a month to 6 weeks apart, so they’ll probably miss it.

      • Chris

        I’m predicting there will be a flashback sometime in the next episode and that Lane Pryce will feature in it.

    • Dr. Faye Menken

      How does Megan pin up her hair so expertly, or would it have been commonplace (for at least rich ladies) to wear extensions at the time? I was about to say, getting a haircut is a major indicator, but remembered she’d had long and short hair in the last episode too.

      • ipsa

        It was a fall, or a half-wig. My (middle-class) mom used to wear them back then.

        • Munchkn

          Yep, it was a fall. Extensions came later.

    • NonaWA

      Joan was making a lot more than $45-50k in 2014 dollars! According to the BLS inflation calculator, $12,000 in 1967 was worth more than $85k today. Which makes it even weirder than Joan has stayed there–she could have moved on up years ago.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Thanks for that. Updating the post.

      • Mismarker

        She deserves a deluxe apartment in the sky!

    • MichelleRafter

      The jeans Megan wears in the scene back in their Manhattan apartment — what were they called? Everybody wore them. Thanks for the flash back.

      • Munchkn

        Hip-huggers? Bell-bottoms? I think I still have a pair from the early 70s somewhere.

      • Gatto Nero

        I think Landlubber made jeans like that.

        • decormaven

          Also Seafarer. Patch pockets, button fly.

          • Cheryl

            Yes, the Seafarers! The denim was much more light weight than regular Levis and Lees. A few years later, all the girls were wearing Star jeans, with a big star stitched on the back pocket. Of course this might have been a completely regional thing.

    • http://www.lindamerrill.com/ Linda Merrill

      I’m not sure if it means anything and I’m sure your comments about Joan’s apartment are correct re: her exterior focus, but to my decorator’s eye, her apartment is the least dated, most actually classic of all the homes featured. The bold single colors, color blocking, single colors, gold accents – nearly Hollywood Regency in style with a Dorothy Draper feel in the color. Not unlike a Joan dress. It would be a hit on the young girl blogger sites today with a little tweaking – say a zebra rug or something graphic thrown in.

      • Eric Stott

        It looks great to us now, but in the late 60′s it would have been pretty passe. It’s like the big mansion Henry & Betty Francis live in- we see it as opulent, but back then it was an out of style white elephant- the furniture and decor ignore the architecture completely.

        • Glammie

          Oh, it never looks opulent to me. It’s that damn curtain in front of the sink in the kitchen. It’s the one set that makes me itch for a do-over.

          • Eric Stott

            well, potentially opulent. Today we’d see magnificent spaces and splendid woodwork. I’d bet that in Betty’s eyes it’s “Uggghhhhh……this place costs a fortune to heat- and since we’re stuck with that awful woodwork we’ll have to paint it eggshell white”. That is the biggest flaw in period decorating I’ve seen – in the 1960′s that interior would have all been painted. I guarantee.

      • P M

        But that’s with the ‘retro’ trend and the ‘diy’/ ‘re-discovering’ thing that’s going on now.

      • not_Bridget

        I love her apartment. But it was “dated”–in 1969. (Now, I’m thinking of those idiots on HGTV, rejecting perfectly fine houses because the kitchens lack stainless steel & granite; I hate calling things dated!)

        I don’t think Joan realized the message her place was sending. It was convenient & her new money was going to her work clothes. (And her savings, no doubt.) She surprised herself by saying she still hoped for love. Not for a man to whisk her away from that “dump.” I want to see her use her designer’s eye (or hire a designer) on a new place. Where she can live the fabulous life of a beautiful, successful executive with an adorable blonde tyke–and a flaky mother to help. (Almost a sitcom.) She doesn’t NEED a man but she’d surely LIKE one–if he’s good enough….

        • Munchkn

          I saw a episode of Property Brothers today where one house had this “horrible” blue bathroom which just had to go. I thought the bathroom was gorgeous! I can’t remember now if that’s the house the couple chose, but I hope not. That blue bathroom needed someone to love it for all its blue glory.

          Speaking of Property Brothers, I don’t understand why Jonathan does’t get the water out of the toilet before dismantling it either. I just saw Richard Tretheway, on This Old House, take the water out of a toilet before working on it recently. It’s not hard!

    • Paula Pertile

      Being an art geek, I love seeing the Burger Chef storyboards here, where I can linger over them a bit.

      Glad I’m not the only one who thought Joan’s blue dress was awful – it didn’t ‘look like her’ at all, let alone something she would wear at home?

      Great insights about her apartment – I’d never given it any thought, except that that color is nauseating, as it always has been. And it doesn’t look fresh and bright anymore – just tired and heavy.

      I half wondered if that plane with Bonnie and Megan would crash. Of course it won’t, and I don’t want it to, but that would certainly throw a curve in the plot line.

      Ooo, ooo, just noticed Peggy’s sheets are blue and green stripes … that must mean something, right? (haha)

      Thanks for this.

      • Kitten Mittons

        So was Don’s towel when Megan is in jeans! I couldn’t help trying to find meaning in that. It’s a sickness, at this point.

        • Susan Collier

          We had towels very similar to Don’s. The reversible avocado/peacock blue towels were very big back in the day.

          • Kitten Mittons

            Yes, my mom had some that were similar.

          • MartyBellerMask

            Avocado Peacock. Hipster band name of the week!

      • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

        I so thought the plane was going to crash!

    • ginnee

      Re: Clara working while pregnant. Though we didn’t get to see her in the later stages, I assumed Joan worked through most of her pregnancy.

      If I remember correctly, by the end of the 60s we definitely had young female teachers at my school who were married and a few taught while they were pregnant with their first children, at least.

      • Mismarker

        I don’t think there is an issue with Clara being pregnant and working. The question here is whether she is married. I haven’t re-watched to see if you can catch a glimpse of sparkle on her left hand. Joan was married to Greg at the time of her pregnancy. Though Kevin is Roger’s, it was, of course, assumed the child was her husband’s.

      • Susan Collier

        My mom was a school teacher in Weehawken. I was born during summer break 1969, but when she announced earlier in the year that she would need time off in the fall of the 1969-70 school year, she was essentially fired.

        • Munchkn

          Two of my elementary teachers were pregnant during the school year and they didn’t get fired. This was a bit earlier in the 60s. I can’t recall of either of the women returned to work the following year. At least, one of them may have moved on though.

          Who would have guessed that South Carolina would be more progressive about this than New Jersey?

        • Kitten Mittons

          Interestingly enough, I have a friend from high school who was just fired from her teaching job for getting pregnant while not married. Though, it seems that our society in general sees a difference regarding “office work” and “teaching” in terms of pregnancy. Something about being around kids, and they might ask *gasp* questions. My office wouldn’t have even flinched if I’d been unmarried during my pregnancy.

          I assumed Clara was married, but didn’t think on the subject too much. I was too entranced by her dress.

          • P M

            By ‘just fired’, do you mean in the year 2014? Wow.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Yes, about two months ago. Private school, they claim it’s within their rights to do so.

          • Janice Bartels

            Was this in a private school with a religious affiliation? I can’t imagine any other way that could be allowed.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Yes, it was.

            • MartyBellerMask

              Still BS though. :( Sorry about your friend, Mittons. I’m sure the father was fired from his job too, right? No? Huh.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Yeah, she still lives back where I grew up, and when I found out, I was pretty floored. It is a private religious school, so there’s that aspect. She already has a new job, though, and she is an amazing teacher, so it is indeed their loss. Plus, she’s due any day now. Yay babies!

            • T C

              A private religious school in my area recently demanded all faculty to sign a Moral Codes Agreement. Failure to do so will result in termination. I expect this matter to go to SCOTUS just as Hobby Lobby’s demand for exemption from ACA has.

            • Kitten Mittons

              An interesting case to watch, certainly.

          • barbarasingleterry

            At my Episcopalian boarding school in High School, our spanish teacher was (unexpectedly) married over Christmas break and almost immediately started showing a baby bump. She finished out the year, however, she was not asked back for the next year. This was in 1973 and my school had just transitioned from all girls to coed (30 boys to 300 girls). I think the administration thought it was a little too racy for us. Then again, the headmaster that year was forced to resign because of an affair with a young woman who worked in the cafeteria. She had graduated from another school he had been the head of so it was started when she was a student. Major scandal….Since she followed him to my school and she was of age, there were no molestation charges.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Goodness, that’s nearly TV levels of drama.

        • MilaXX

          But she wasn’t fired for wanting to work while pregnant, she was fired for daring to ask for maternity leave.

          • Susan Collier

            Well, school would have started 2 weeks after my birth (and doctors worked with estimates back then), so she would have definitely needed time off. But, if I recall correctly, she was not allowed to finish out the school year in her “delicate state.”

        • ginnee

          I went to school in Toronto, Canada. I’m sure it was more progressive than a lot of places.

          In ’70, I met a new friend whose mom was married and had a day job by choice. Her dad was a professor. Times were just beginning to change from the old thinking that married women had to leave work when they got pregnant, if not when they got married.

    • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

      WONDERFUL JOB AGAIN, GENTLEMEN. I’ve saved quite a few quotes to tumble on tumblr!

      My favorite part of this was your thoughts on why Joan has that same damn apartment. Very insightful! It’s probably not a high priority for the show, but I do wish we at least get a mention of her planning or even considering moving somewhere else, before it all wraps up.

      As ever, I also loved your insights on Bob’s motivation in proposing to Joan, and the cultural context. Yes, this was absolutely the show’s acknowledgement of Stonewall, with just that scene.

      Beautiful closing, too.

      A couple quibbles:

      Her miscarriage last season was a huge wakeup call to both of them and probably something of a turning point for their marriage.
      Did Don ever learn about it, though? I thought she only told Sylvia.

      As much of a jerk as Pete is, it seems to us he was right and that Trudy was enjoying a little passive-aggression here. She wanted him to know that she’s moved on. That’s a date outfit if ever we saw one.

      Really? It seemed to have an awfully high collar to scream as a date outfit.

      • Cabernet7

        Megan did tell Don about the miscarriage. They then had an awkward conversation about if they did want to have kids, and Don gave his best non-committal “I want what you want” answer to it.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Ah, right. Thanks!

      • MilaXX

        For Trudy, yes. She would be the type to wear a high collar on a date.

        • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

          I actually thought that Trudy and her new man probably had dinner at his country club that evening.

    • dmkava

      We have seen the other characters’ moves to their respective digs written into the story, but strangely not Joan. I find it odd how little screen time Joan has sometimes, she’s in episodes as a supporting character, but isn’t this the first true story line and substantial screen time that Joan has had this season? If there was ever a character in this series who’s home life I would like to see in a spinoff-it’s Joan. For f’s sake she lives in the Village during a very exciting time, she’s juggling a career, a nagging mother, and a child. What could be more interesting than that?

      • Fay Dearing

        The only thing I can think of is that maybe Joan owns the place and she enjoys putting the money in the bank. To me it seems fiscally responsible to live below your means and if Joan likes the neighborhood and her place there’s no need to move to a more expensive one. Considering she’s a single mom she might be more careful with creating a large nest egg as well as we don’t know if her hubby is paying any child support. I mean, new clothes and jewelry isn’t that much money and could be considered an investment for work compared to a buying a new place (if she already owns her current one).

        All I can think of when I see anyone’s place is that I hope like hell that these fictional people hold on to them. Especially Peggy. She may be in a bad neighborhood now, but she owns her own brownstone. If she manages to hold onto it it’s going to be worth a fortune on today’s housing market.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          I’m so with you on Peggy’s place. Although if Joan owns her place, she’s going to be in a situation similiar to Peggy as well.

        • dmkava

          I wonder if women encountered discrimination on the housing front in those days, like would someone look down on Joan because she is a divorced single mother buying her own place-that kind of thing

          • MilaXX

            I think she would get more of that from her mother than any external sources. I also think subconsciously Joan felt that buying a home meant she was ruling out the idea of getting married again for good. She may have moved up career wise, but I think she secretly still dreams of a husband and the house with the white picket fence.

          • CatLady

            Someone posted more information about this earlier in the discussions, but yeah, she probably would have faced a ton of trouble trying to buy a house without a man. It was almost unheard of until the mid-to-late 70s.

            • Chris

              This came up as recently as Sex In The City where Miranda was getting a hard time from the bank (as a high earning lawyer) buying her place on her own without a husband. Also backwards Charlotte didn’t think women should buy a place on their own because it looked to self sufficient and like they didn’t want to get married- *major eyeroll*

        • Gatto Nero

          This was my impression, too: that Joan is socking money away for Kevin’s future.
          Still, it wouldn’t hurt to paint or redecorate a bit …

          • Gatto Nero

            @CJHogan mentioned above that it was thematically important to the proposal scene that Joan had not physically moved on. I think this is an important point.

          • T C

            Painting and redecorating were not heavily marketed to the masses back then. Furniture was built to last and be passed on to the children. The lead based paints used could survive many annual washings before requiring re-painting. There weren’t a half dozen cable channels insisting around the clock that your home environment is outdated and you must spend now, especially on credit.

            Joan will redecorate when she moves, her childhood was during the Great Depression so some of her economizing has been hammered in deep into her subconscious. Her mother’s presence and shared bedrooms emphasizes this. We shall see if this changes due to her awareness of new possibilities (credit availability to divorced women notwithstanding), the desire for a separate bedroom for her son, where he might attend school once he reaches kindergarten age (not many preschools back then and why pay when mother is there), how changes in her neighborhood affect her opinion of the area, etc.

            Speaking of mother, is she afraid of neighborhood change and not taking the kid out, or is she a pennypincher?

            • missthing77

              I completely agree with your assessment of decorating standards at the time, well said – and I just thought mom didn’t go out because she was lazy!

            • T C

              I only saw re-dos when we moved, and the kids rooms *always* included something the grownups no longer desired. The art in the public areas was regularly updated as my non-working mother collected but us youngsters never got any of her nice art in our rooms, that’s what the bedroom used as her storage area and darkroom were for.

            • EarthaKitten

              While folks back in the late 60′s were not brainwashed by HGTV, there was a tremendous surge to modernize. So many exquisite homes were destroyed as people redecorated with formica, paneling, wall to wall carpeting, and other “must haves”.

          • EarthaKitten

            When I first saw the screen shots I thought Joan’s apartment had been repainted. Previously the walls appeared to be a coral or salmon color whereas in this episode they looked downright pink. I thought Joan had gone totally girly with the color and then she appeared in the frilly blue dress…maybe I’m color blind but the color sure seemed different to me.

            Anyone notice the Japanese styled art in Joan’s apartment? It has a Bert touch to it. : )

        • P M

          She is a child of the 30s, so that would make sense.

        • ybbed

          I wonder if it wasn’t painted that hideous color of “pink”? we would all be talking about it? It’s a weird color for sure, but I can totally see why Joan is staying put. Shes too old fashioned to buy a house without a man. Maybe she’ll eventually get the apartment next door and expand her space.

          • EarthaKitten

            Roger could transform that place to look fabulous!

    • Shawn EH

      Bob was almost literally “scared straight” by what happened to the GM exec, who was another fish out of water in New York this week. It does explain why he layed it on so thick with sexy Joan in the office. I loved Joan saying that Bob should also be looking for love, even though he couldn’t hear it.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Not so much that he “couldn’t hear it” — his “I’m just being realistic” response was really accurate (though not an excuse for what he said to her!). He had JUST gotten up close and personal with the consequences for “looking for love” (as there were no respectable gay places that weren’t being hounded by the cops at the time), in a way that Joan likely hasn’t, even living in Queens.

        • ybbed

          And I disagree that Joan even thought about it for a “nano” second. She wasn’t agreeable from the moment she understood what Bob was doing.

          • Mismarker

            She gave him a sideways glance the *minute* he scooched over on the sofa. I think she knew right then what was going down, and she wasn’t having any of it.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            “Did I miss my window of opportunity?”

            “No! I don’t know…”

            • Matt

              You’re right. She hesitated…just for that moment. But she’s true to her heart. I can’t ever fault Joan for that.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              It was just a split second of her wondering if she’d misread Bob all this time.

            • Matt

              Agreed!

      • MilaXX

        Yep. I think seeing that guy all beat up & hearing about the possible Buick offer made him decide he needed a beard for his image and for some reason decided Joan would be willing to settle for a sham marriage.

        • Shawn EH

          Calling out her age wasn’t super nice, really. But he was feeling desparate.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          Heck, even ‘I’m not of your stripe!!!!’ in the cab was the most defensive remark to a whole lot of passive innuendo the Chevy exec may or may not have been making. It only confirmed the Chevy execs suspicions on why he chose him to bail him out.

    • Karen North

      “He got dressed up for her too.” …. and thats where I choked up AGAIN! Love the way their faces soften when they interact with each other. (Thank god she finally thawed out.)

      And the way Bob looks at Kevin: I know Bob is anything but genuine but I choose to believe those looks were pure I love you and I would love spending a lifetime being your Dad. (In plaid)

      My Dad always wore plaid; jackets in the 70′s and shorts since forever. Along with the black socks that we always ridiculed I didn’t realise he was wearing his “Dad uniform”. He worked a million hours a week to become highly successful and was never home. Maybe the plaid was a subconscious way of saying I might not be home much but at least I’m Dad when I’m here.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I think that Bob really does like Kevin. He sees them as the perfect family. Bob’s problem is that he doesn’t understand what Joan wants. Joan thinks about what she wants, and tries to balence that with what would be good for Kevin.

        • P M

          I’m such a sentimental slob. I melted when Kevin said ‘Thank You’ to Bob. AWWWWW…. (yes, I’m a soft touch).

      • siriuslover

        I think her thaw began when he said his routine, something to the effect of “I abuse the people I need help from, then I take a nap.” I think that little bit of self recognition was all she ever asked for. Don never openly admitted he was an asshole to her when they used to work together, so this was really a defining moment.

        • Gatto Nero

          Yes — that comment made her smile. A little opening on both sides, and beautifully played.

      • Gatto Nero

        I think that Bob genuinely loves both Joan and Kevin. And after the scare with the GM exec, he was feeling a little desperate. The proposal seemed to me to be perfectly genuine, but misguided. He thought Joan might be willing to “settle” for comfort and security, as he appears to be, but he was wrong.

        • not_Bridget

          Bob just can’t offer Joan the kind of love she needs. Even if she hadn’t verbalized her hope for love–eventually. He was awkward but certainly didn’t mean to be insulting.

          Positive note: Joan will realize “hey, I’ve been in this apartment for years. Nobody’s going to rescue me–but I can afford to move on!”

    • Lee

      Woooo Mad Style!

    • Denise Rambo

      No comment about Megan’s hair being about a foot shorter in the balcony scene than in the office scene?

      • Mismarker

        That longer hairstyle was achieved with a “fall”.

        • Denise Rambo

          That was my thought also, since falls were very big back then. In fact, I wore a few myself. But I’m just surprised there was no comment about it.

      • DeniseSchipani

        it’s been discussed in past posts! She’s apparently a big proponent of falls and hairpieces.

        • MarinaCat

          As did many women of the time. Aren’t we about due for a post challenging Janie Bryant’s choice to keep the older male characters in hats in 1969? ;)

          • Cabernet7

            A lot of older men wore hats in 1969. For some reason, it makes me remember Barney Miller, from the mid-70s. Many of the older, out of touch men in that show still wore hats. I have trouble picturing Don Draper as one of them (he’s old, but not that old), but it’s not so far out of the realm of possibility to be unbelievable to me.

            • MarinaCat

              Yes, that was my point, albeit snarky. The question about men wearing hats post-Kennedy comes up frequently. Megan’s hair and falls are the new men-wearing-hats. The crew at MM know what they’re doing.

            • Cabernet7

              Sorry about that, my snark detector is broken again!

            • T C

              Hats become like wallets after many years. Without one, many men felt like they were missing their security blanket. My father was one of the hatless after WWII, they reminded him too much of what got him into POW camp in the Philippines and later Japan in 1942. Now that I think about it, the only men who were interred with him who wore hats only did so when required in their occupation as officers on merchant marine vessels. They never wore hats ashore.

    • Malia C.

      “The Strategy” is up for this year’s Emmys. It is what we haven’t seen that we are being fucked with….

    • Bert_Bauer

      Definite props to the art directing team. I worked at a Burger Chef in Mishawaka, Indiana in the early 80s, so they had done away with all this coolness by that time but before the 70s earthy remodel, the one I worked at looked just like this. Even the two lighting fixtures flanking the counter are authentic.

    • StillGary

      I loved Don’s pronouncement to Megan: “I’m going to take you shopping!” I can’t see Don having the patience to shop with anyone so wow, he REALLY HATES the California influence on her (although hey, it did get him a three-way). unrelated question: Is Joan divorced yet?

      • Ganoc

        One assumes. She was served with papers in late season 5.

        • ashtangajunkie

          “Surprise! There’s an airplane here to see you!”

          • Ganoc

            I was just typing that!

          • tejaswoman

            I literally cannot say that line without cracking up.

      • Susan Collier

        Pete also said he wanted to take Bonnie shopping. I suppose that’s the canned male suggestion for what to do with female visitors to the big city.

      • MissKimP

        Lots of men trying to influence/control/hold onto their women with presents or offers to go shopping in this episode. The women weren’t “buying it,” however. Another subtle reference to the changing items.

    • Valerie Dunbar Jones

      Pete’s wearing blue in that last scene … maybe he’s the “mom” now. lol

      • P M

        That’s a terrifying thought.

      • Valerie Dunbar Jones

        I jest, but I can totally see the 3 of them forming a new agency, and taking Harry Crane and Stan Rizzo with them. And if you ask me who brings the most feminine energy to that mix … I’d have to say Pete.;0

    • LaTrèfle

      Sunglasses on the head = California woman who doesn’t belong in NYC.

      • Danielle

        I want those sunglasses.

        • leighanne

          and her red beads.

          • Cheryl

            But not her horrid pink lipstick!

            • EveEve

              Wasn’t this just about when “frosted” lipsticks were all the rage?

            • Cheryl

              I think so. It does look awful on her, though.

      • Charly

        I’m in Utah but I’ve busted out the sunglasses qua headband. My head feels naked without them!

    • SFree

      I was struck by the scene with Joan and Bob for several reasons. Thanks for verifying for me that Joan’s face looked weird. I thought it was just me or that it was because we seldom see her with her hair down. Also, I think there was an effort to make her look super girly (as opposed to her usual powerful woman persona) – hair down, pastel ruffly dress. Finally, I know that dress was ugly, but there was also something “off” about it. If we compare her blue dress to Tammy’s, it has the same elements. Pastel blue, ruffly, sheer. But it also looks a lot more matronly and certainly not hip at all. It felt sad. As you said, Joan doesn’t like change and she certainly does not go with the fads of her time. Which is usually a good thing, but I had to wonder how different this scene would have been had she worn something more of the times.

      • Lilah

        I noticed it too. Her face seemed more angular than usual. I think it was the lighting.

      • SFree

        Oops, I meant Bonnie, not Tammy.

      • Cabernet7

        Joan’s blue dress looked like something out of Hee Haw to me. Not Joan-like at all.

        • EarthaKitten

          Naomi Judd wants her dress back!

        • Alice Teeple

          Coincidentally, Hee Haw debuted on June 15, 1969….so you’re right on target. :)

    • Hermione

      In the last scene, I think Don and Peggy are the parental figures (“dad” “mom” ) and Pete’s the kid. As a result of their discussion, reconciliation and resolve to go forward as allies, they are equals; Pete’s still working on who he is and he still has a ways to go

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Don is the dad, but I think of Pete and Peggy as siblings. However you’ve made the best case for Peggy as mom that I’ve read so far.

      • 3hares

        Yes regardless of whether or not Dad’s truly a father figure to either of them at this point, Don and Peggy had just reconciled and laid a lot of their issues out on the table. Pete spent the whole episode denying the very fears Don and Peggy confessed to each other–he didn’t have anybody to confess to or reconcile with, so it made sense for Don and Peggy to not only face him as the two creatives pitching to Accounts but to be sort of “together” in a better emotional place with Pete alone across the table still at 6′s and 7′s. Though interestingly Pete was instrumental in getting them there by pushing Don into the meeting and asking him to state his opinion. The casual heads-up about ketchup on his face was probably the most non-loaded, friendly interaction he had the whole episode.

      • Cabernet7

        I hadn’t thought of Peggy as a parental figure in that scene, but maybe you’re right. I initially really liked Peggy’s dress in that scene, but then it hit me that it looks just like the kind of thing Edith Bunker used to wear. (Same neckline, short sleeves, similar color and pattern). Peggy looked much better in it, and it’s probably of much better quality than Edith Bunker’s clothing, but I couldn’t reconcile Peggy looking good in something Edith Bunker-ish. Maybe that subtly plays into the parental thing.

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        The whole gesture of joking around that Pete had something on his face with Peggy giving him the napkin, totally thought Pete was the kid.

    • therealkuri

      I love reading these, so I hate to pick nits but as a craft nerd I still have to: Megan’s dress is crochet, not macrame. It’s a fine thread, so maybe hard to see, but it’s basically a bunch of crocheted doilies as motifs joined together to form a dress. Macrame is made of knots and would be much stiffer with little to no drape, which is why you rarely see it in clothing.

      • ballerinawithagun

        I agree that it is crocheted. Many high end designers are currently calling pieces macramé and there isn’t a knot to be seen. I understand that crochet sounds very old fashioned now but back in the 60s crochet was very trendy.

        • P M

          That’s how it goes; nobody seems to know what the terminology actually means. Our lack of education :(

        • VastAmphibians

          Crochet is making quite the comeback, actually! Not in the fashion sense, thank goodness, but in the crafting sense. More people are learning to crochet and expressing respect for it as a standalone form, whereas in the past it’s been relegated to the status of knitting’s little brother.

          • ballerinawithagun

            I completely agree with you that crochet is making a comeback in the fiber and textile art world, yay! But for some reason every time I see crochet in a high end garment, they call it macramé, weird.

            • T C

              I just chalk it up with the modern failure to use apostrophes appropriately.

      • ybbed

        thank you for that. craft nerd here too

    • Kit Jackson 1967

      I’m not sure I understand the connection between Joan not being focussed on her home, and not being a good mother. Unless there’s something that she knew was dangerous and would harm Kevin, but kept it anyway, what does it matter what color the walls are? As long as the neighborhood and building are reasonably safe, why does decorating matter? Since when does stylish/modern decor equal being a good mother? I’m super confused.

      Looking at the picture of Ken, I know this makes me sound like a horrible person, but he looks kind of dashing with the eye-patch.

      I love Peggy’s blue dress.

      Bob’s jacket looks like crayons threw up. I hope Joan still lets Bob be a part of Kevin’s life, even if it’s just phone calls and birthday or Christmas presents.

      I’m so glad the writers wrote the scene at the police station instead of doing a Stonewall episode.

      I love the colors of Peggy’s bedsheets.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        We mean that in the sense of someone who doesn’t care about her home life; that the choice – by the art director of the television show in which she appears as a fictional character – to not change the decor of the set that serves as her home for almost ten years of story (even though most of the other characters’ homes have changed in that time) was a choice made to reflect that part of her character.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          Thanks for explaining it. Now it makes more sense.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          Thanks for explaining that. It makes sense now.

      • Fjasmine

        Bob will move on,

    • Lisa Petrison

      I keep thinking that Joan’s apartment is similar to the Burger Chef colors. Maybe it’s just the lighting and Burger Chef is red though.

      I did a search for “Burger Chef Images” and some of the pictures looked pretty much exactly like Joan’s apartment.

    • LaTrèfle

      “She is standing there with just her stomach exposed, after all. And barefoot.”

      And I didn’t notice it until seeing these stills, but Megan is wearing the pants and Don is wearing a towel-skirt. I wonder if that means something?

      • Lee

        That made me think of the times when Megan was in pjs and Don was dressed. This was the opposite of that.

    • leighanne

      Peggy’s hair seemed darker to me in this episode, and it was particularly noticeable in the dance scene with Don. She looked a bit like Megan in that scene. I thought it was a nice contrast between Don & Megan on the balcony and Don & Peggy in the office together. I don’t see it as a romantic connection between Peggy and Don, but more of a sign that Don connects with Peggy more so than he has with Megan in some time.

      • DeniseSchipani

        Interesting, especially when you consider that in the balcony scene, Don hugs Megan from behind, and she seems startled more than pleased. Whereas Don and Peggy’s dance is by nature more intimate, even though it’s not at all sexual. Don has a more intimate relationship with Peggy than with Megan and always has. (Megan knows this, too)

    • Serenity

      I had Bonnie’s exact Blue dress in the 70′s when I was 6 years old. I have a picture with the pigtails and everything

    • French_Swede

      Just a couple of observations and thoughts:

      ~ Joan may be thinking that even though she is a partner, there may come a time when she’s not financially stable (Cutler dissolving the company, for instance) and she doesn’t want to commit financially to a more expensive apartment and lifestyle.

      ~ Megan’s purple crochet dress is knee-length! Of course, Peggy, Joan and the other New York woman are also wearing knee-length skirts and dresses, but LA Bonnie is still rocking the miniskirt. So it the stewardess. Is it a NY/LA difference? Bonnie is a professional, so I wouldn’t see that being the difference. Megan must have purchased that purple dress in Los Angeles, but besides the conservative look of the dress she’s all Miss Glamor 1969 … hair extensions, heavy makeup, lots of jewelry … that almost screams for a miniskirt.

      ~ Trudy still has the white sofa with the colorful flowers. How in the world does she keep it that clean after so many years?

      • SFree

        I agree with your first comment. I think the apartment shows her feelings of financial insecurity. Because she is a woman, she is aware that she would be the first they would dump.

        • Cheryl

          Isn’t Joan’s piece of the partner pie, quite small? I thought this was the main reason that she didn’t want to see Harry as a partner, as I was under the assumption everyone would have to give up a fraction of their partnership to bring Harry in. I realize Joan doesn’t like Harry, but I thought her concern was more financial than personal. Although we certainly have seen Joan bring pettiness and vindictiveness into her business decisions, so of course there is that too. I do agree the apartment puzzle has an element of financial insecurity along with the theme of Joan being a woman of the past.

          • Chris

            I think it’s both- she really hates Harry but you also brought up a great point about the shares. It would also be a reason why she was so hungry to try to get Don’s reabsorbed by the agency. Maybe she thought she would get a bigger share out of it. And yes, It was my understanding she is by far the smallest shareholder. I wonder how much Harry will get?

      • Ginger Thomas

        I think Megan’s purple crochet dress would be described as “midi” length and would be quite fashion forward for 1969.

        • anotherEloise

          “Midi” means at the middle of one’s calf or even below it. Megan’s crochet dress just covered her knees – a matronly look for 1969. My grandmother wore her hems knee-length in this era, and she was in her 80s. I found that a rare costuming error for this show. In 1972-3, the knee-length could have seemed fashion-forward, but 1969: frumpy.

          • Ginger Thomas

            In the original “mini, midi, maxi” descriptions, midi meant covering the knee. By 1969, pretty much all women with any pretensions to fashion were wearing their skirts above their knees. Some were very short minis, but lots were only an inch or so above the knee. Therefore, deliberately going from mini to covering your knee was fashion forward.

            • VirginiaK

              I was around at the time and never heard midi used that way, though maybe it was somewhere. As AnotherEloise said, I remember midi being at least mid-calf length, similar to what has also gotten called tea length. It wasn’t related to the knee the way previous lengths were — also never totally took over.

            • T C

              I purchased several skirts in the early 1970s that were tagged “midi” in the store and were barely below my kneecap.

          • lulubella

            Megan was on top of the trend with her midi …

            “After this breath of freedom (the mini), however, came the fated year of 1970, and with it, John Burr Fairchild’s decree that 1970 would be the year of the midi. “The head of Fairchild Publications and the boss of Women’s Wear Daily…he did not guess that hems would dive this year; he decided.”

      • MissKimP

        Janie Bryant discusses Megan’s dress and its hemline on the AMC website. She explains that Megan is California fashion forward with this hemline.

      • Jaialaibean

        Yes! I’ve been wondering about that sofa. With a small child in the house, it should be in tatters by now, and not-so-squeaky-clean. But probably Trudy’s one of those people for whom actually sitting on the living room couch is a no-no, except during formal functions when guests are being entertained.

        • E M

          My sister and I were not allowed anywhere near the fabric living room sofa until our early teens (early 80s). We always joke that the cat was allowed on it before we were (because he never felt a need to listen to our mother).

        • T C

          Which is why the family room/den was a new creation during the migration to suburbia.

      • elevan

        It’s always floored me how that crazy couch has a huge wall-sized window of matching curtains. It’s a bit much, even for me.

      • lulubella

        Megan was on top of the trend with her midi …

        “After this breath of freedom (the mini), however, came the fated year of 1970, and with it, John Burr Fairchild’s decree that 1970 would be the year of the midi. “The head of Fairchild Publications and the boss of Women’s Wear Daily…he did not guess that hems would dive this year; he decided.”

    • 3hares

      The notes about apartments made me think about Bonnie. Everytime Joan’s apartment shows up I’m surprised that it looks the same because as you say, other people have moved around so much and it’s not like Joan’s living situation hasn’t changed. That has to be a clear choice because they must have put a lot of thought into that apartment when they first created it as perfect for 1960s Joan.

      It made me think of Bonnie because she’s a real estate agent. I know on one hand that’s just a profession women were often in (even Francine attempted it), but it also seems significant that during Pete’s time in LA he’s with a real estate agent, and one of the first things he tells Don is that he’s living “out by the tar pits” but Bonnie seemed to be trying to get him into something permanent and better–I think she specifically said he shouldn’t be renting. In this ep she wants to stay in a friend’s place and he wants a hotel. For all the impression he made as LA Pete we actually saw very little of him there–some eps not at all, some just a quick scene or two early on. Anyway, my point is I felt like this ep was sort of showing his whole LA life as a bit of an illusion/escape from his actual feelings–one that came at a heavy price because his family moved on. There’s no reason for him to be back in NYC forever now, but there still was that impression that he belonged there. Sort of like reverse Megan–she said she wanted to be with Don but was taking her stuff, Pete says he wants to be with Bonnie but would rather stew in Cos Cob. And of course one of the first things Don said about Megan was that he liked the seashore and she wanted the canyons, where she still lives, resenting the TV he brought to it. Now she’s suggesting they should spend all their time in some unspecified place that has nothing to do with their permanent lives.

      So basically there’s always been a lot of importance on where people live and currently there’s a lot of people resisting places that aren’t for them either passively or actively–from Marigold running to the commune to Peggy grudgingly accepting her brownstone etc to the “bi-coastal” relationships that boil down to separate lives.

      • greenmelinda

        Joan probably owns, hence why she’s still there. And her mother who spends the majority of her time there is probably quite content with the Pepto Bismo motif.

        • Cabernet7

          I have a hard time believing Joan could have bought her apartment in the late 50s early 60s, back when she was just a secretary. Single women had a very hard time getting loans without a man, and I’m sure even Peggy had a hard time overcoming that hurdle when she bought her place. Maybe the place went co-op while Joan was living there and she’s bought it since then, but was that as common back in that time? (It seems like something that happened more in the seventies than the sixties, but I could be completely misguided about that).

          • DeniseSchipani

            I dont’ get the sense that joan owns that place. She’s had it forever, I’m sure she was a renter with that roommate.

          • P M

            Roger could have loaned some money, though it seems very unlikely.

          • VirginiaK

            And in general, people did not own apartments to the extent that they have come to do in NYC.

        • FibonacciSequins

          As someone up above pointed out, she’s likely still there because it’s rent-controlled.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I thought Francine was a travel agent. Real Estate and Travel Agent were both jobs that women typically had in that era.

        • 3hares

          She was definitely a travel agent but I think Betty mentioned her having taken the course to be a real estate agent and presumably flunking–it was a bit of a catty comment on Betty’s part iirc.

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            I didn’t remember that part of the conversation, but it sounds like Betty.

    • Jacqueline Wessel

      Thanks for mentioning Joan’s apartment, because I couldn’t believe it still looked so much the same. It is true that New Yorkers become attached to their neighborhoods and the neighborhood becomes and extension of home. They know all the neighbors and vendors and are reluctant to find new one, so I can see why she’s in the same location. But that wall color, those drapes, that ugly salmon chair, I cannot figure out why she hasn’t changed them, and your theory works for me. One day she’ll come home from work and won’t be able to stand it anymore. I find it interesting how she and Peggy have influenced each other and that they have switched roles in that regard. I always enjoy looking at the screen shots in this post…the reflection of Don and Peggy dancing in the office is something I hadn’t noticed before. And those pictures of the Burger Chef set make me wish I could go there.

      • Not applicable

        Makes me think: rent control. You don’t give those up! :)

        • http://www.snoskred.org/ Snoskred

          Of course. DOH!

    • CJHogan

      RE: Joan’s Apartmnt
      While it might not be totally realistic for Joan to be in the same place, I think it worked well thematically for the proposal scene. Bob’s plan was driven by his panic, but he wasn’t totally wrong in thinking Joan was stuck in her personal life because she literally in the very same place he left her. He was just way, way off-base on how she should move on. I hope his proposal was a wake up call for Joan. If the series ever shows her home life again, I wonder if she’ll have moved.

      • Kitten Mittons

        That’s a really excellent point.

      • Glammie

        Hmmm, wake-up call–waking up was kind of the theme of the episode, which was full of people literally waking up and symbolically as well.

        • P M

          A wake-up call; very timely considering Stonewall. How do we know the date of this episode’s timeline, again?

    • Not applicable

      our family doctor’s office was done in the same colors as Joan’s apartment. Pepto pink and toothpaste blue. They had those hard plastic chairs in alternating pink and blue lined up along with wall in the waiting room. Just realized that MadMen set got the colors exactly right!

    • Michele Anne Lenni

      I really love these! You two do such amazing work. Keep it up!

    • Fred Vaughn

      Namechecked “The Best Little Boy in the World” (again) – BRILLIANT!! I totally LOVE the literary (and other) knowledge TLo applies to everything they can!!!

      • Kristen Graham

        And when he was playing with that lighter and Joan made the comment about little boys loving to play with it :)

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          Yeah, we half-wondered, in a feverish moment, if that wasn’t deliberately calling back to “Best Little Boy.”

    • rayleighburd

      Can we talk about Megan’s hair? I don’t know how extensively clip-in hair or extensions were used in this period, but her hair wildly changes length throughout this episode and the previous one. Any insight to that? She seems to rock almost a long, blunt bob in her day-to-day and then ramps up the volume/drama whenever she’s out and about.

      • P M

        They are wigs and falls – see the discussion from a couple episodes ago.

      • CatLady

        People didn’t really wear extensions then, but they did wear wigs, wiglets, and falls a lot of the time.

    • Wendy M. Grossman

      I don’t actually find it difficult to understand why Joan doesn’t move. She is a single mother with the responsibility for supporting three people at a time when very few women had such a role. It is scary at any time, and at *this* it’s still very new to her. I think it’s entirely logical that she’d want to build up some savings and not take on added commitments until or unless she has to. Personally, in her situation I’d be more inclined to hire help for Kevin and send my mother home than to move. On top of that, she may well like her neighborhood and her apartment as they are. Hell, *I* like her apartment. And a lot of people really hate moving at any time.

      Has it ever been actually established how many bedrooms the apartment has?

      wg

      • P M

        2 at the most. Though I’m inclined to believe it’s 1.5 at best.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Yeah, she originally had it with a roommate, which would suggest two bedrooms. And Bob said so as well.

      • Vegas Girl

        When Bob is giving her his speech and comparing it to a mansion he says it’s 2 bedrooms.

      • dixie pomeroy

        It was interesting to see Trudy’s home life as a single mother compared to Joan’s. Joan is a person who so strongly desired a life of pampered convention only to find out that it wasn’t all it was cracked up to be. Trudy is younger than Joan, but is much more conventional and more similar to Betty, with her big suburban house and a black nanny taking care of her kid. Joan doesn’t want that life anymore, although I’m sure she’s really sick of her mother by now.

        • suzq

          I just realized….hey Bob, Trudy is available! She’d love to live in a mansion outside of Detroit and be married to a GM Executive!

          • P M

            Can you imagine Pete’s bitchface if that were to happen?

            • tejaswoman

              NOT GREAT, BOB!

          • Ginger Thomas

            OMG! That’s perfect! Wish you could introduce them.

          • P M

            Oh, if that could happen, if only to see the dialogue that could fly between Pete and Trudy!

          • Trist

            Ha! And considering Trudy was okay with Pete’s having a little action on the side (as long as it wasn’t in their own neighborhood), she’d likely turn a blind eye to Bob’s extramarital activities.

            • 3hares

              I don’t think she actually was okay with them. She just wouldn’t say that. I don’t think she’d be even nearly so forgiving about her husband being with a man.

      • Fjasmine

        I think Joan and her mother just have a sharp relationship but love eachother. Joan could have sent her home. There have been a few AMC extras with the prop masters showing Joan’s apartment. There are 2 bedrooms, there weren’t originally but they needed to have a place for Gail to sleep.

    • Rachel Cox O’Connor

      Pardon my ignorance, maybe I wasn’t paying close enough attention, but why was Megan self satisfied? Why was she smiling on the plane?

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Just happy to be returning to LA, I suppose.

        • Azucena

          She was taking back all her stuff, too. She no longer had any physical objects tying her to NYC, unless you count Don, which she really doesn’t seem to anymore.

      • Cabernet7

        Possibly happy to have gotten her stuff and gone back to LA without Don suspecting (as far as she knows) that she’s planning to end it. Relieved that there wasn’t a nasty scene.

      • Javacat7

        All of the above ( or below) and also maybe she enjoyed herself, good sleep, good sex, maybe.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QFW22QV426LUOEPGASPZJWJMDE MishaFoomin

      Sorry if this has already been asked, but so many comments!

      Has anyone ever eaten at a Burger Chef? How was it?

      • MsKitty

        There were a few in my neck of the woods. From what I remember it was the typical fast food fare, interchangeable with McDonald’s, Burger King or Geno’s (a popular East Coast burger chain around the same time).

        • Logo Girl

          Speaking of advertising and Geno’s, Geno’s used to have these gorgeous animated commercials during kids programming in 1971, that were a little bit like The Point. You could see them during the kid’a variety show, Wonderama (which you’d also only know from the East Coast. I was firmly West Coast but we lived with my Mrs. Holloway-ish grandmother in New Jersey one year.) I wonder if anyone remembers those?

      • MartyBellerMask

        My dad worked at one probably around 1979? All I can remember is the little paper hats. They would let the kids wear them (much like Burger King and their crowns). Or maybe this was just a perk of being an employee’s daughter. Hah.
        My mom was actually just talking about it the other day. She said the burgers were very fresh.

    • Mailbtch

      Knocked it out of the park as usual! I was surprised to see Don in a plaid coat and didn’t make the connection to the other two dads in plaid. I thought Megan looked as out of place as Bonnie in New York–her heavy eye make-up and hairstyle aged her somewhat, no? And notable lack of sexy times while she was visiting, even though Don was on his best and most loving behavior.

      Peggy really put up with a LOT this week. I’m glad to see she and Don are getting back to their mentor relationship, which has always been my favorite part of the show.

      • Cabernet7

        Megan looked about a decade younger in the scene on the balcony, without the hair falls and make-up.

        • Mismarker

          And she looked even younger than that in the kitchen making the spaghetti.

          • LaTrèfle

            Does she know how to make anything else?

            • Ginger Thomas

              She made coq au vin for Don in LA.

            • Mismarker

              She’s made beouf bourguignon, filet of sole, and some other things I probably don’t remember. Spaghetti seems to be a favorite, though!

            • Gatto Nero

              A season or two ago, she mentioned her mother making spaghetti for her when she was a kid. It seems to be a fond memory of an otherwise unsettling childhood.

            • Mismarker

              Yes, that story is how they came up with the pitch for Heinz beans!

            • Jaialaibean

              She also made Don a blueberry bread pudding earlier this season, and I’ve wanted to try that out for myself ever since.

        • ybbed

          She looked really beautiful there I thought.

      • Mismarker

        I assumed Don and Megan were intimate the night before the balcony breakfast. Don woke up all disoriented when Megan wasn’t in bed with him and said, “Tell me it wasn’t a dream. Tell me you don’t miss this.” It is pretty telling that no actual screen time was devoted to Don/Megan sex. I’m guessing the sex isn’t all that great anymore. Someone else noted that Megan’s fall was still in place after last week’s threesome. Must not have been that, uh, stimulating.

    • enchanted216

      Can you imagine being trapped on an airplane with that cigarette smoke today? Blech.

      • decormaven

        Ha ha! Try flying crosscountry- that was a real experience.

      • FibonacciSequins

        Cigarette smoke was everywhere back then. Everyone was used to it, non-smokers and children included. The difference between then and now is astonishing.

      • Ginger Thomas

        But we only smoked in the “smoking section” of the airplane :)

        • Glammie

          And, boy, did it travel. Also, sometimes you ended up in the smoking section because there were no other seats. Hack, hack.

          So, after no-smoking on U.S. flights became the norm, I flew from Aruba to Venezuela–not only was there smoking on the plane, the flight attendants gave everyone small packages of cigarettes. Only cigarettes I’ve ever smoked . . .

          • tejaswoman

            My dad smoked (not anymore — hurrah!) and when we flew from Texas to Hawaii in 1985, Mom got us seats on the first row of the smoking section so we could be together for the eight-hour flight. Technical difficulties made it a 13-hour flight; I coughed for 3 days and she coughed for 2 weeks. We never did that again!

    • Frank_821

      I know there has been some disagreement about Trudy in this episode but I am glad TLo described her as being passive aggressive. It took me a bit to figure out why Trudy was bugging me this episode. I think her character is slid back to being a somewhat spoiled daddy’s girl.

      Trudy didn’t start out all strong and wonderful. She evolved and she figured Pete out and adapted to try and make him a success and try to make their marriage work. I keep thinking about their last conversation at the S6 finale. She stood her ground about divorce but she was sympathetic and kind. She told him what she felt he needed to hear to help get his life back on track. She made a point of taking the high ground. They left on cordial terms at that point.

      This Trudy came across like “I am not obligated to give a shit about you even for our daughter’s sake, so I’m not even going to try”. Her comment about his annual visit seemed very unkind considering, it’s been shown he loves his daughter very much and not afriad to spend time with her. And Trudy knows he was exiled to California. I feel like she’s regressed. As far as I can recall, the Campbells never had a maid or at least not full time like Carla. You know Trudy’s dad is footing that bill and throwing about any extra funds so he gets princess back.

      I’m not trying to defend Pete in any way. It bothers me that the Trudy from last year would not have tolerated any of Pete’s childish nonsense or hypocrisy, but she would have made an effort to keep things as civil and amenable as possible. She would have helped maintained some kind of connection to his child.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Pete wasn’t exiled to California, he was jumping up and down to go.

        And I do believe the Campbells had maids, they were very upper class.

        • 3hares

          We never saw Pete and Trudy with a maid. Pete’s parents would have had one–that’s pretty much who Pete spent most of his time with as a kid I believe. In that fight over the neighbor Pete asks where Tammy is and Trudy tells him somebody took her to the park which indicated somebody worked for them, but we never saw anybody like this.

          I would say re: exile he was eager to go, but also had good reasons to need to go business-wise. But he seems to have been hiding out there on his own accord, and is now facing the results of that with is daughter.

          • Fjasmine

            they’ve mentioned a maid a few times, one of them was when Trudy went on vacation and Pete attacked the au pair.

            • 3hares

              That’s weird we’ve never seen any. I’d completely forgotten. Is it just a housekeeper who came once a week or something?

        • Frank_821

          actually he was sent after the fiasco in Detroit engineered by Bob in retaliation

      • French_Swede

        Trudy’s father died of a heart attack. Pete was informed of this when he was having dinner with Bonnie and ran into an old agency acquaintance. I think Pete even mentioned it to Trudy in this episode.

        • Ginger Thomas

          Did he die? He had a heart attack, but I don’t remember hearing that he died.

          • Cabernet7

            I think the man who told Pete about the heart attack said that Trudy’s father survived.

          • ybbed

            The guy said, ” oh he’s okay” or something like that.

        • DeniseSchipani

          I don’t think he’s dead.

        • 3hares

          Trudy’s father did not die. He had a heart attack and recovered.

      • Lady Bug

        I also noted that their housekeeper/nanny was dressed in full uniform, unlike Carla, but much like Henry & Betty’s housekeeper. IIRC, they even had on a similar uniform-grey with a white apron.

      • greenwich_matron

        I think I’m alone here, but Trudy has always been a character that I love to hate. I love her because Alison Brie is so perfect, but from the moment I heard her aggressively cheerful voice adopt Pete’s DAR background as her own, I knew that she was the type of woman I spend my life avoiding. She’s the most agreeable person in the world, as long as you are giving her everything she wants.

        • Glammie

          I like her because she can handle Pete and he’s too much of an ass to be married to anyone truly nice. I also found her moving when she was trying to have a baby or adopt and Pete was shutting her down and I liked the way she tried to make the best of it afterwards.

          Which doesn’t mean you’re not right about the rest. She’s all you say that she is.

        • EarthaKitten

          I share your take on Trudy. She’s someone born to new money who wants to be taken for old money.

      • Fjasmine

        The Campbells always had a housekeeper and they even discussed having a live-in when they got their first apartment in New York

      • MartyBellerMask

        Such good insights on Trudy. You are right. Maybe she needed him as much as he needed her?
        If her father dies, boy will she be a wreck. :(

        • P M

          He just had a heart atta….. oh never mind, he didn’t die a couple eps back. My bad!

          • Glammie

            He had a heart attack, don’t think anyone said he died.

            • P M

              That’s what I said.

            • Glammie

              You wrote “I think her dad just died actually.” I mean I don’t think anyone’s said he died on the show.
              Wonder if MM is setting up his death though?

      • Glammie

        Yeah, I had the same reaction. Pete in his crass way was reading signals right. Trudy’s always had a passive-aggressive thing going, though I always liked her and Pete together partly because Pete shouldn’t be married to anyone too nice–he’d walk all over them.

        You know a character’s behaving badly when *Betty* behaved better. When the divorce went through, she told Don “You’ll always be their father.” Very different than “You have no place in this family.” Betty and Don don’t really use their kids in their divorce battles and both of them picked partners who treat their children pretty well.

        • 3hares

          Trudy has a pattern of dealing with difficult things by pretending they don’t exist–she’s been doing that with more and more of Pete since Season 5. There’s a lot of great things about the character but she does seem to have a frightening ability to just shut out anything unpleasant even if that thing is a person–you can’t get past that pleasant, breezy dismissal–it seems like Pete’s the only person who ever actually ruffles her. I can’t help but imagine what a future would be like where Tammy takes more after her father and doesn’t fit the picture either.

          • Glammie

            Yeah, it’s interesting that what really destroyed the marriage was Pete telling Trudy about her father being at a brothel–that her father was really no better than Pete. She was pretty much willing to deal with everything else.

            In his awful way, Pete’s not bad for Trudy simply because he is honest in this weird way. I know there have been Peggy/Pete shippers–and her revealing the baby to him was an astonishing scene–but Peggy’s way too good for Pete.

            • 3hares

              Yeah, I know we don’t see enough of Trudy to really know her but he really seems to challenge her in ways she needs to be challenged. It’s just way to easy for her to make everything the way she wants, and the way she wants isn’t that great. One of the funny things about her ending the marriage over the news about her father was that it was in the same season as Pete was dealing with his mother’s inappropriate talk about Manolo and Sally was walking in on Don and Don was having flashbacks to watching his stepmother with his Uncle. Part of being an adult is having to deal with your parents on that level. There just seemed something really off about having that swift and brutal a response to something that should not have been so upsetting to a grown woman–or maybe it was just that personally I would want to know if my father was taking professional shots and my husband and why, just because I prefer to know what’s going on.

            • Glammie

              I agree. Pete was not nice about how he used it with Trudy, but Trudy was childish in how she responded. Trudy pretended that she was okay with Pete’s fooling around as long as he did it in the city, but her open-mindedness didn’t extend to really looking at who her father was.

              Sally handled her much more traumatic revelations about Don with more maturity. But, then Sally’s the character with whom I connect the most.

            • suzq

              She was not fond of him having an affair with a neighbor, either. “Not in our neighborhood!”

        • EarthaKitten

          Brings back memories of baby Gene’s birthday party where Don was told to come and get his stuff out of the garage by Henry (right after he rammed the stuff with his car). Don’s shows up at the party with a stuffed animal (if my memory serves me right) and then Betty picks up baby Gene and hands him to Don. I said it before but feel strongly that a mother just wouldn’t (or shouldn’t) leave her child to face an absent father on its own. Trudy should have been there when Pete visited for the sake of the child. Trudy’s absence speaks volumes to her passive/aggressive personality. TLo is right on.

        • Chris

          I also think Trudy is really dressing much older than her age. Look at Betty who is older than her and dressed very conservatively but still looks amazing. Trudy’s outfit looked like something your grandmother would have worn to a wedding in 1975 (if it were longer). I think Trudy still wants to be a “success” so she is out looking for a replacement husband. She wants Pete out of the picture because she wants to just “restart” with a new husband and Tammy and doesn’t want and residuals or reminders from her first failed marriage. “I refuse to be a failure”.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            I have to disagree. Trudy’s outfit was more youthfully stylish in 1969 than any of the mature-woman getups Betty’s been wearing.

            • Chris

              I can agree to disagree. I think the outfit Betty wore to the event at her house was mature looking but the dress she had lunch out in and even the suit she wore to Bobby’s outing seemed much more sleek and youthful to me than what Trudy was wearing. Trudy is in a covered up drop waist dress with long, albeit sheer sleeves and a scarf up to the neck for evening wear. I can imagine the younger women on the show wearing some things Betty has worn but I really cannot imagine any of them wearing that dress of Trudy’s. Betty’s a bit behind in that her dress and jacket for the field trip resembled sets Megan was wearing a year or so ago but I could see women from 20′s to 60′s wearing it. I freely admit my opinion is tainted by seeing a couple of decades where older women wore a Trudy like ensemble for formal events.

          • Glammie

            That makes sense–Trudy wants to swap someone else in and put on a bright face. In some ways, her outfit’s reasonably young–the length and the color (that aqua blue was everywhere.), but it’s all fussy and covered up, so it reads older–and, like Betty, she was wearing pearls, which were outmoded at that time. So maybe she’s out with an older guy.

    • Glammie

      It is curious that Joan hasn’t looked for a new apartment–that she just moved Greg into it, right? And then moved him out? But she’s always been conflicted–supposedly looking for a husband, but actually always being at her happiest on the job. I think the only time we’ve really seen her break down is when she told Lane how much she missed her job. I think Joan is maternal, but actually less domestic than Peggy. Peggy’s kind of domestic despite herself–getting out the pretzels for Julio, kind of making friends with him, putting herself out for her loser boyfriend Abe. Joan, on the other hand, seems to have her mind elsewhere. Bob’s offer of a mansion seems to have no impact on her. She doesn’t want to leave the city, even if she’s never admitted it to herself. Interesting.

      Thanks for the fascinating insights as always, guys. Oh, and when I saw Bonnie’s blue dress, I immediately thought Barbie! She’s very much dressed the way Barbies were–pretty, pretty, overly dressed-up for day and brightly colored.

      • LaTrèfle

        I hadn’t thought about that before, but it IS interesting that Greg, insecure man pile that he was, would have moved into his woman’s apartment rather than vise versa. Although, he was also a deadbeat, so who knows what hole he crawled out of?

        • Susan Collier

          I think Greg moved in for practicality. He had to finish his internship and then when he became a doctor he could afford to purchase a proper home. The entire relationship went kablooey when he couldn’t fulfill his job as man/breadwinner/doctor.

          I suppose all of this comes down to practicality. Joan’s a practical woman. Why fix what isn’t broke?

          • Glammie

            Well, she could use a third bedroom. In some ways, she’s got a set up that keeps men out. No one’s spending the night there. Kind of sounds like she’d be sharing her room with Kevin.

            • not_Bridget

              I don’t see her sharing even a larger apartment with a man—outside of marriage. Greg stayed with her often–but his official address was probably some grim residence hall. They weren’t married long enough fo get a new place. She had no desire to move into dependent housing somewhere…..

            • P M

              Which brings up a good time for when she might move: Kevin won’t enjoy sharing space come the next few years!

            • Glammie

              Well, she might kick out her mother then–or her mother might flee.

      • ShaoLinKitten

        I also was so tickled by the Peggy/Julio relationship. So cute that he grumpily entered and plopped down last week, and she silently provided the pretzels. They are TV watching buddies. Adorable. I hope that Peggy gets the chance to be a mother if that’s what she wants. I think she does, deep down, and that’s why she takes in stray (cats and neighbor children). Or maybe she diverts those maternal urges to beings that won’t distract her from work. I sure did that for years until finally got married and had my kid. If anything, I hope Peggy finds a nurturing relationship so that she doesn’t end up like Don, believing she did nothing and has no one.

        • Glammie

          Yeah, Pegs has had bad taste in men–her insecurity about her attractiveness. Ted was on her level, but deeply not available.

          But she’s a lonely woman and she doesn’t want to be alone the rest of her life. So, I don’t think she wanted kids fives years ago, not sure she wants them now, but I think she’s headed in that direction. Partly, it’s that she’s so matter-of-fact about hanging with Julio. Interesting contrast between her treatment of Julio and Betty’s treatment of Bobby–they’re about the same age. Peggy would never ream out a kid for giving away a sandwich by accident.

          • P M

            Who’s the same age? The boys or the women?

            • Glammie

              The boys. Peggy’s younger than Betty, though older than Megan.

          • Jaialaibean

            She might ream him out for putting a sandwich on top of her work, though. Different people care about different things.

          • ybbed

            I have feeling Peggy won’t have anymore kids. Just a feeling.

            • Glammie

              My own experience with the Peggys of the world is that they have one kid late. I’m more inclined to think Megan won’t have kids.

              But we’ll probably never know.

          • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

            Love this : )
            Plus my lil bro said he thinks she’ll have two at the most kids if she wants to or maybe one

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        I keep thinking the fact her husband went into the Army then she became pregnant, decided to not terminate the pregnancy, and then Greg decided he liked being a respected Army Doctor and maybe that dampened whatever plans she had in reconciling with him in civilian life, that may have included her living in Fort Dix, IIRC.

        But maybe the fact she moved up an office, to finally be treated like both a partner and somebody for accounts this season will also inspire her to finally make the move from the West Village.

    • Gimlet

      Peggy’s work dresses make me happy – they are classic and timeless. I love the MadStyle posts more than words can say and look forward to reading every week. Have been watching Mad Men since the first preview commercials featuring “You Know I’m No Good” sung by the late great Amy Winehouse. Then it was icing on the cake when TLo started writing about Mad Men. So sad that next week is the “mid-season” finale. To help this sadness — TLo are you open to suggestions for reviewing other movie and shows (I’m sure you are booked solid with ideas and projects but it’s just a wish list…) What about a short or long TLo style take on “Bright Star” in which Abbie Cornish is a young woman obsessed with poet John Keats played by Ben Whishaw, and-or “W.E” in which Abbie Cornish is a young woman obsessed with Wallace Simpson, and Oscar Isaac has an adorable role. Possibly mid 20th cent BBC shows: The Hour, The Bletchley Circle, or Call the Midwife – perhaps to compare and contrast what Janie Bryant has done with MM. BTW, do you think those BBC shows set in mid 20th century would have been made if not for success of MM?

      • ItAin’tMe

        I think the success of the BBC shows is more likely secondary to the success of Downton Abbey, rather than Mad Men.

        • not_Bridget

          The BBC has been doing costume drama for eons. Some of us remember the original Upstairs/Downstairs. Besides, ITV does Downton…

          I think BBC’s midcentury shows may have a bit to do with Mad Men–but each is an original. Darn, I still mourn The Hour’s premature end….

          • ItAin’tMe

            Personally, I mourn the end of Ab Fab.

      • Jaialaibean

        Some of those dresses are nice, but others look so thick and fat and scratchy. I’ve owned that grade of polyester (choir dress — ugh!), and I’m glad it’s no longer in wide circulation!

        • Gimlet

          You are right – the polyester is not so timeless and classy. I think what I like about her work dresses are how crisp and pert she looks in them. I am rooting for Peggy to be happy and I like when she finds her look. Remember when Don told her that she is “cute as hell” so she needs to work that. The dresses actually remind me of the habits that nuns started wearing at that time – A-line polyester dresses, very crisp and feminine. When the nuns started wearing the polyester pantsuits it was sad, just like when Peggy wears those awful pants and vests.

          • Jaialaibean

            I do like the cut of some of those suits. One of my favorites is the navy blue one with green trim she wore last season. It looked good on her, and it seemed like it was high-quality. And the A-line suits her. It’s not so easy even now to find professional clothes that fit a feminine form — most of them seem boxy and stiff.

    • Frankie Carter

      Is no one going to hail the return of Pete Campbell’s bitchface?? Epic one right before he killed the cake. I’ve missed it– California had him putting it in mothballs for a while.

      • MsKitty

        When I caught myself saying “f*** you Pete” a couple of times during the episode I knew he was back to form.

        • verve

          No kidding! Bonnie was on to something: Pete in New York isn’t as likable as Pete in California.

      • elevan

        I’m sad that that tumblr isn’t updating again.

    • ShaoLinKitten

      This post always makes Wednesdays worth getting out of bed for.

      Some comments: the mom in the station wagon was wearing plaid. Does that indicate the slippage between parental roles that are becoming more and more prominent?

      Peggy’s pink nightgown gave me a serious pang. My mother wore exactly those nightgowns, the poly satin ones that were so soft and shapeless. My mother was only 7 years older than Peggy and was a secretary and working woman. Sigh.

      Agree that Peggy’s outfit was fugly. Whenever she wears those hideous turtlenecks under a vest, I cringe.

      • Sonny

        When that green vest thing showed up I involuntarily yelled “What are you WEARING?” It’s always two style steps forward, one step back with Peggy.

        • Ginger Thomas

          OTOH, I yelled “pantsuit” — which was a very specific thing at that time.

        • Alice Teeple

          I love that pantsuit! I’d totally wear it. I ADMIT IT. I HAVE NO SHAME!

    • Janet M Perry

      Your comment about Bonnie’s bag in the scene is Don’s office “not being daywear” is incorrect. While white may be too California, those macrame and crochet bags with the plastic beads heavily crocheted in were very big around this time and came in many shapes and colors.

    • Walburga

      Great post as always – these are the best online reading all week every time. Your insight and ability to pick out details is really amazing and fun to read and think about. I am particularly interested in your assessment of Bob Benson – I would LOVE to see a spin-off about him and glbt people in NYC in that era. And not just because his face pleases me – it seems like this is a story that we haven’t really heard before in this way and it is fascinating and infuriating and I want more. Your comments about Joan’s look during her scene with Bob were also interesting – I think you are totally correct about them trying to make her look worse than usual, but I guess the makeup team just have a hard time making Christina H look bad in a closeup. That face! Plus, her acting in that scene was some of the best I think she has done in the series. There was so much going on in her head and you could see it without her telling it. Amazing. Thanks TLo – you are the best!

    • ItAin’tMe

      As much as I appreciate the work that’s gone into the period fashion for the women, and how accurate it is (to my memory), the guys fashion bothers me. Shouldn’t they all have longer hair, bigger lapels and collars? And bell bottoms?

      I’ve come to love these Mad Style posts so much, I’m already dreading the Wednesday after next.

      • siriuslover

        I think it would depend on the man’s age. My father had just turned 40 when I was born in 1969 and he wore none of those things. Maybe a bigger lapel here and there, but his dress clothes looked just like Don’s, only a working-class version. He did have a pair of Bob Benson swim shorts, though!

        • FibonacciSequins

          My dad was 38 in 1969, and I could say the exact same about how he dressed then. From what I recall, Mad Men’s wardrobe is spot-on for 1969. I think the wide lapels and ties, along with bell bottoms, came into style for office wear in the early 70s, maybe even 1970.

          • not_Bridget

            When Matthew Weiner appeared on The Daily Show (last night?), Jon accused him of ending things in 1969 because of the horror of 70′s fashions.

            Yes, the “old guys” still dressed like that in 1969….

        • Susan Collier

          When I think of how the “established” guy, Lou Grant, dressed in the first season of the Mary Tyler Moore Show, I think that Mad Men got it really right.

      • Cabernet7

        The only thing that seems a little off to me is that I would think more men would have crew cuts. It wasn’t all just military types as I recall, although I was far from NYC. The longer hair/bigger lapels seems much more early 70s to me.

    • Fjasmine

      Bonnie should have stayed in the dress she wore for their date in the Mile High Club. That was a beautiful pattern and a more flattering cut than the baby doll look.

    • Fordzo a.k.a. Fancy Mukluks

      I’m hoping that Joan buys her own fucking mansion next week, just because she can.

      • Mismarker

        And her own diamond ring to wear on her right hand! “Your left hand says, ‘we’. Your right hand says, ‘me’.”

        • Fordzo a.k.a. Fancy Mukluks

          On the middle finger of her right hand. Because that one says…well, you know.

    • Sweetvegan

      Beautiful!
      My own take on Joan’s apartment: We don’t know how much, if anything, she’s getting in alimony and child support. As a single mom, she’s probably being super-conservative with her money. Remember when Lane talked her into asking for a partnership, and how he emphasized providing for the baby’s future? She’s probably saving every penny, and doesn’t want to waste it on redecorating her apartment. She does spend her money on clothes, because that’s necessary for the image of a partner/executive.

      • kowskey

        Yeah, I was about to say that Joan strikes me as someone who knows the value of every penny she spends.

      • Fordzo a.k.a. Fancy Mukluks

        That’s what I think, too. Joan’s a smart woman and I think she spends her money wisely.

      • VastAmphibians

        Yes, and she doesn’t know when the next big change is coming. What if the agency folds, or she needs to buy Don out of his shares after all, or some other tragedy happens? I see Joan at this point in her life as the type who won’t ever assume that things will stay the same forever. She probably doesn’t move because her apartment suits her just fine, and she doesn’t need to spent a penny more on housing than she does right now. She’s rather save her money to ensure that she’ll be able to continue paying for housing later.

      • seventeenwest

        Very true. I also think it offers her a level of comfort, being “home” and being consistent. It’s also uber-feminine. Though I also think that environment, and having her mother around, ages her when she’s in it. I never think of her actual age except when she’s in that apartment.

      • MaggieMae

        I was thinking along those lines too. Joan isn’t confident this good thing is going to last. Can she really count on Roger to provide for her son? Can she really count on her partnership and her agency? Is she employable as an account exec by another agency? I imagine Joan squirreling it all away (except for her work wardrobe) because she feels insecure about her future.

        • Cabernet7

          Is Roger providing anything for her son? It was less than a year ago that she allowed Roger to spend any significant time with him, and I know she refused to take any money from him before that.

          • MaggieMae

            I’m not sure if he is actually providing financial support regulary or whether Roger just said to Joan that she doesn’t have to worry about her son being taken care of (because he will). I don’t remember now. Good question.

    • Katie

      Some thoughts:

      I love the reflection of Burger Chef on the car and how it calls back to the ad pitch.

      There were a bunch of shots of people getting out of bed this episode, is there some deeper thematic meaning to this?

      I’m dreading my Sunday nights and Monday/Wednesday mornings when Mad Men is over.

      • Glammie

        They’re finally waking up?

        • Katie

          *face palm* Yes! That makes sense, thanks! =)

          • Glammie

            Eh, I didn’t even notice the wake-up shots all over the place ’til other people pointed out. But the whole episode is essentially a series of people waking up to things.

    • HeyGirlHey683

      Thank you and ditto on saying that Joan’s blue dress looked awful on her! It was so frumpy, yet also really over-worked in my opinion. The belt + the fabric-covered buckle + the collar + the long sleeves + the DOUBLE (triple?) row of pleats = frumptastic fugliness with waaay too much going on.

      I think you guys have an older post somewhere comparing Joan and Jane Siegel/Stirling back when Jane was kind of “Joan 2.0″ and you talk about how Joan’s figure is much better suited to tight, structured 1950′s styles that require a lot of strong undergarments, but she’s not very well suited to the looser, more flowy fashions that were coming into style in the late 1960′s/early 1970′s. I think this blue dress is a perfect example of Joan trying to adapt to the new styles but failing to realize that those loose, unstructured styles don’t work very well on her. It looks like she tried to pick something that was kind of in-between her style and the new trends, but ended up with this overwrought monstrosity that is terribly unflattering on her (and looks a little bit pioneer-ish with the double pleats IMO).

      I would also disagree on your assessment of her hair in that scene–I think it looks turrrible on her. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but her hair is just SO unflattering when it’s worn down and curled in these 60′s/70′s styles. Maybe it’s just because that style looks so dated to my eyes, but I really hate it. Christina Hendrick’s has a beautiful face but this hairstyle makes her look…older or pudgier or something. Her face is kind of…round? Heart-shaped?** I’m not sure, but this hairstyle makes her lovely face look weird and unflattering, which is quite a feat for such a beautiful woman! I’d love to see her with semi-straight natural(?) hair because I think that would be much more flattering to her face.

      **Despite many years of reading “What’s the best hairstyle for your face shape?” quizzes, I’m not very good at judging face shapes lol.

    • Benjamin Franz

      I like reading all the theories on Joan’s apartment, but I think that she just likes the style as well as the environment. I can see Joan going to a furniture store in 1969, seeing what is in style and deciding to keep her apartment the way it is. (She should be safe to redecorate in about 30 years.) I hope that Joan never leaves the West Village. I see her becoming a mother type to younger gay men. It suits her.

      That being said, it is probably just budget constraints at AMC. They spent too much on Megan’s hippie shack so now Joan can’t move.

      Speaking of Megan, comparing her on the plane to Betty on the plane hit me like a ton of bricks. Fingers crossed that she is gone for good.

      • Glammie

        But they could just paint it and swap out a few knick-knacks and artwork to update it. They do that with SCP. It’s a deliberate choice. The apartment’s not even getting run down the way Don’s is. Joan’s keeping it mostly frozen in time. Ah, well, it’s better than Roger’s mess of a life. His apartment looks like a hotel. Maybe it is a hotel.

        • P M

          It’s a suite at the Algonquin, I believe.

          • Glammie

            Is it? I’ve not been sure. Anyway, Roger’s home is his office as much as he has a home. Roger’s one of those men who thinks he likes free love, but actually functions better with a wife. I know there are people rooting for Joan and Roger, but I miss Mona.

            • P M

              I never rooted for Joan and Roger. He said it best himself: ‘You’re the best piece of ass I ever had’. That’s not what you say to the supposed love of your life.

            • Jaialaibean

              That’s just Roger being an ass, as usual, and deliberately not saying what he actually feels. I’m pretty sure he has deeper feelings for her, but whether he’ll admit them to himself or anyone else is part of what will determine whether he ever gains entry to heaven or hell, or their earthly equivalents.

            • Glammie

              Yeah, I like Roger, but I thought his childishness made him a bad fit for Joan. Plus, he dumped Mona for Jane, but not Joan. Joan indulged him too much during their affair. I don’t think it was that good for her.

              They could be together, after all, but Joan’s put limits on that and Roger seems unwilling to be the kind of man Joan would now allow into her life. I preferred Mona’s more straightforward way of dealing with him.

            • Cabernet7

              Yeah, I think much of Roger’s affection for Joan is based on the fact that she expects nothing from him. If she asked him for anything he didn’t want to give her, he’d be over her in a flash.

    • Cheryl

      A lot of bare stomachs in this episode. Megan’s, of course mentioned, but also Don, Stan and even little Kevin is shirtless under his adorable short overalls. Interesting that even though Megan is not fat at all, she’s not lean and cut and instead looks soft, as if her figure is kept by dieting, but she doesn’t do any core/ab work. She’s not a gym rat. I’m sure a deliberate aesthetic choice, to delineate the difference between a struggling young female actor now, and then.

      • DeniseSchipani

        no one was really a gym rat back then. “Core” was for apples, not abs. My mother was always an exerciser as a way (besides watching her diet, but not ‘dieting”) that my mom kept in shape; she used to watch Jack LaLanne on TV in the 70s. But even so, that was about “calisthenics” (remember those?!), not the kind of muscle-defining work that’s popular now.

        • Glammie

          Yeah, calisthenics followed by aerobics and running in the 1970s.

          Of course, the irony is that people were thinner and more fit in aggregate. Less junk food, more walking. I walked to school, almost everybody did. Now the only kids I know who walk to school live very close to it.

          • ItAin’tMe

            Thinner, yes. But were they more fit? Everyone was still smoking and drinking. Fast food hadn’t yet taken hold and portions were smaller, but the American diet was based on red meat, starches, sugar, and fried foods.

            • Glammie

              Everyone wasn’t smoking–a lot of people were, but not everyone. Meat was around, but because it was still relatively expensive, it wasn’t a case of red meat every night. Cooking oil was also expensive, I remember having relatively fried food–fried chicken and very, very occasionally fried potatoes. I grew up with a lot of vegetables, but that’s a bit of a regional thing. So not an ideal diet, but not anywhere nearly as horrible as fast-food/food desert diets too many people have nowadays. You would never ever, for example, have a soft drink as a matter of course at dinner. Soft drinks were a small, occasional treat. Scoops of ice cream were smaller and this was another occasional treat. My family usually didn’t do dessert, though I knew plenty of families that did.

            • ItAin’tMe

              Well, I didn’t mean literally everyone was smoking. But smoking was very prevalent, and was pretty much allowed everywhere. And the red meat could be hamburger. We ate a lot of hamburger, in spaghetti sauce, lasagna, as patties on a plate with gravy and mashed potatoes. Crisco, or Spry, solid vegetable shortening, was pretty cheap and was used for the fried foods. I agree that sodas were not a dinner choice, though Kool-Aid was popular in some of my friends’ homes. Children were still encouraged to drink milk. Whole milk. At every meal, in my house. We had canned fruit for desserts.

            • T C

              Ground chuck and ground round were both significantly cheaper than chicken. Lesser beef cuts such as roasts requiring braising and swiss steak were also cheaper than poultry. That has been upended with consolidated factory farming and using cuts of beef formerly used for canned pet food in the homogenized ground beef (of mystery origin) sold today.

            • Alice Teeple

              I still drink whole milk! My grandmother swore by it and drank a glass every day until she died at 93. Ground round was used to stretch out meals: lots of casseroles. (When budgets got tight in the 70s, that idea really took off.) Sodas were definitely a sometimes treat, Kool Aid was forbidden. Yes, people fried stuff in Crisco – including my grandmother’s hamburgers. Ugh.

            • ItAin’tMe

              Casseroles! There were thousands of recipes for them. And Hamburger Helper came out around 1970. More mothers were working outside the home and needed one dish dinners.

            • Alice Teeple

              Yep! My grandparents rationed their meats by day. Sunday was roast beef day. Most of the week was leftovers, or chicken or ground beef. Very occasionally fish. We drank either milk, water or coffee with dinner. Vegetables were limited to corn, potatoes, peas, green beans or succotash. Sometimes carrots, but boiled. My family did dessert, which was usually a small bowl of ice cream or a piece of cake.

            • T C

              Unless canned or frozen, the only fresh fruit or vegetables available back then were what was in season within a geographic region. Perishables were not shipped all over the place as air freight was prohibitively expensive and refrigeration was not as reliable as it is now. We enjoy immense variety today because much is imported out of season and has been engineered to stay fresher longer. There were no spray on coatings on most produce unlike today.

            • Alice Teeple

              Haha! “Back then” sounds funny, because that was like that even when I was a kid in the early 80s. Getting fresh peaches was a special thing we waited for every year. Same with corn on the cob and watermelon. Exotic foods like tropical fruits were really only available dried or canned. Throughout the year, we ate mostly from our garden and what my mom canned or froze.

            • T C

              I witnessed significant changes to the food supply and its marketing between the 1950s and the 1980s. Once microwaves were priced for the masses, the changes started an acceleration that hasn’t slowed.

          • Alice Teeple

            I have quite a few books on diet and exercise records from the 50s and 60s, and “diet foods” were often suggested to be a pile of cottage cheese scooped out on half a peach and an iceberg lettuce leaf. Calorie counting became a fad by the mid-60s. Women were also encouraged to take amphetamine pills or diet candies like Ayds to reduce, but very little mention of exercise. Regular meals were mostly red meat, potatoes, glopped together casserole foods, loads of butter (or trans-fat laden margarine). The amount of movement people did overall was different: maybe not so much walking, but definitely more housework and chores; less sitting down. People who sat all the time were considered ill. The actual physical makeup of people’s bodies was much different. Gym exercise is much different than physical exercise. I think today’s women look sinewy.

            • Glammie

              Oh, boy, cottage cheese–yep, that was my mother’s diet food. Also hard-boiled eggs. And Ayds candy–boy, did those taste vile. Not much in them. I don’t think most women took diet pills, though, of course, it happened. But cottage cheese (and then yogurt) were all over the place.

              Not loads of butter and not huge chunks of red meat. Red meat was too expensive for that. I did know families who had casseroles, we usually didn’t. But if you look at older cookbooks, they just don’t put the same amounts of butter and sugar into things. Butter, like meat, was relatively expensive. For that matter, an older cookbook will serve six with the same amount of food that now serves four. Vintage dinner plates are physically smaller. So portion sizes and much less fast food. Oh, and people walked more because a lot more families had one car. So one wasn’t walking for exercise, but just to do things. My grandmother went on daily walks because it was something to do.

              Definitely a lot of potatoes though.

          • FibonacciSequins

            Aerobics was the 80s. Jane Fonda’s first exercise tape came out in ’81 or ’82, which popularized it as an exercise. The 70s was running, calisthenics, and yoga gained a foothold. My hip social studies teacher taught us 7th grade girls yoga after school in the library in 1975.

            • Eric Stott

              As a kid in the 60′s-70′s I recall that the exercise programs were on early in the morning. Lack La Lanne was on there, bit I remember “Exercise with Julia”- a peppy young woman in a leotard who did brisk calisthenics to the sound of an electric organ.

            • Logo Girl

              My parents (who were unusually into fitness back in the day) had maybe the first mass publication aerobics book back in 1976 or so.

      • greenmelinda

        Weiner has always been a huge stickler about how the cast’s bodies appear so they are more congruent to body shapes of the era.

        I actually started watching the second half of season 4 again last night—you can really see as if they may have been a plan for how the show was going to evolve/end for quite some time. But besides that, I had totally forgotten that as far as built male bodies go, damn that Henry Francis (who knew?).

      • Mismarker

        I remember reading an interview with Jessica Pare wherein she touched on the fact that she was asked to avoid the gym (or something to that effect) because they wanted her body to reflect bodies of the time. Bodies that didn’t necessarily spend hours at the gym doing cardio and strengthening. She said it was difficult to film lingerie and swimsuit scenes because she didn’t feel that confident with her body. I think women of the time did tend to focus solely on diet when looking to reduce.

        • https://twitter.com/KlooKloo Todd Simmons

          The girl (played by Collette Wolfe) that Pete hooked up with in his crappy New York Apartment last year had a distractedly 2010′s body. It was strange to notice how out-of-place it seemed.

          • Alice Teeple

            I thought her face seemed out of time, too. Women’s face shapes have changed quite a bit. I think a lot of modern women have rat-like faces.

            • VirginiaK

              An odd observation that I actually can’t dismiss!!

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              I don’t really know any rat like faced women

          • Chris

            I think Bonnie looks a little too modernly toned for an authentic 60′s look. I like how they make her so tanned all the time you know she is going to be having dermatological issues in about 10 years or so. Those were the years of tanning yourself with baby oil.

      • Andrea

        Short of an Olympic athlete you’d be hard pressed to find a highly “cut” woman photographed in 1969.

      • FibonacciSequins

        Women didn’t go to the gym in 1969. Gyms were basically places for guys to box or lift weights.

        • suzq

          However, Bonnie is toned nicely.

          • FibonacciSequins

            People in California definitely led the pack in fitness. Bonnie was probably up early every morning doing exercises with Jack LaLanne on his tv show.

    • http://www.franticbutfabulous.com/ Heidi/FranticButFab

      I was born in 1970, so this season, the clothes feel more like nostalgia to me than “history.” I have photos of my mom wearing things very similar to the suburban mom in the station wagon (and we had the big ol’ station wagon, too), especially the sleeveless plaid shirt.

    • CKMia

      You guys totally overthink this shit AND I LOVE EVERY MINUTE OF IT.

    • poodle66

      I loove the dresses In this episode, especially Bonnie and Megan’s.

    • Chris

      I think it’s nice by the en Don, Peggy and Pete are back in their old “signature” colors. Peggy is in her golden/mustard dress, Pete is in his blue and Don is in grey. When I think of their personal colors all the way back to season one, these are what I think of.

      • siriuslover

        Very nice recognition! I knew there was something going on there, but couldn’t place it. This is why I like trolling your comments. They’re always enlightening.

        • Chris

          Thank you very much. It was a lousy day at work and your kind comment is much appreciated!

          • siriuslover

            I hope your tomorrow goes much better than today!

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        And Pete has a yellow cup, which ties him to Peggy.

    • Angelfood

      “Don charmed his daughter figure, apologized to her, and ultimately, was welcomed back into her fold. That shot of him standing over her and holding out his hand to her is a reversal of this scene, when she said goodbye to him. It’s been a long road for both characters back to this moment.” Brilliant. Didn’t even think about the link back to arguably the best scene to the second best scene of the entire series.

    • Andrea

      If marriage was (and is) the endgame for Joan’s personal life, it stands to reason that she would hit the pause button on her home environment rather than cement her new reality by moving into a new place that better suits her current needs. I take the position that staying in her apartment is not so much a financial decision as a passive decision made by someone who never completely let go of the idea that a man was going to come along one day and move her out of the city. So, you know, what the uncles said.

    • Michelle Gennari

      Speaking of family…. whatever happened to the kid that Peggy had with Pete??

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        He was adopted, and based on the way adoptions worked in that era (closed, and by closed I mean super tight you are not opening it under any circumstances) we are in all likelihood never going to see the child. It’s “Mad Men,” not one of the soap operas Megan was on.

        • TeraBat

          And may never even find out that he was adopted.

          • Cabernet7

            Matt Weiner has confirmed that the child was adopted.

            • TeraBat

              Oh, sure. I didn’t mean that I think the kid died before he knew he was adopted. Just that it was kind of a thing back then to not let children know they were adopted if their parents got them as infants.

            • Cabernet7

              Oh, you mean THE KID may never know he was adopted. I’m sorry, I misunderstood you!

            • TeraBat

              No worries, I see how my first comment was ambiguous!

        • Musicologie

          Yup. I’ve never expected the show to follow-up on that child–he’s out of the story. Besides, there’s really no way to show him and let the characters know who he is.

    • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

      I loved seeing Don support Harry. Harry may be annoying but her really came through for Don. I hope this doesn’t mean a Bonnie and Don hookup. Pete is not likeable in NY, he needs to go back to CA. How much longer is Ted going to be a mess?

      • SunDevilWitch

        I pray for Ted.

    • Tracy Alexander

      I think Peggy’s blues and reds also help tie her to Burger Chef. The primary colors worn in the last scene match those of the restaurant.

    • MaggieMae

      I remember a picture of my dad wearing a plaid sports coat just like Pete wore on his visit with Tammy! Complete with thinning hair and side burns! And the mom in the station wagon? Sleeveless shirt and bandana? Memories!

    • Jaialaibean

      My take on Joan’s apartment is that she hasn’t quite grasped that it doesn’t fit her current self. Mentally, she’s still stuck in the world her mother taught her to expect. The funny thing is that in the at-home scenes in this episode, everyone else fits into that color scheme and antiquated style perfectly except Joan herself. Her mother, little Kevin, even Bob Benson are perfectly in harmony with the apartment’s colors, but Joan’s bright purple and later her pale blue scream of discord with her surroundings. Bob’s right about one thing: It’s time Joan moved on, and pretty soon, she will. She’s just not going to do so with him.

    • DeniseSchipani

      What I want to know is, what’s in Stan’s bag? It’s too small to be a briefcase or art portfolio and you know he’s not going to the gym! Man purse? Staying over his lover’s house? I love Stan. I love that he visited Ginsberg.

      • Alice Teeple

        I like to think of that as a bitchin’ munchie tote.

      • Laura Carney

        A bong, maybe?

    • http://www.youtube.com/user/TheOctocornNetwork International Model

      I think what was danced around in this episode is that the Burger Chef initial pitch of “mom has everything under control” with the pitch. With Peggy questioning it, it devolved into showing a mother that didn’t have it together but that Burger Chef could be a place where she still looks perfect in the eyes of her husband. That dynamic played out with other couples, but where it resonates strongly is Peggy, Pete and Don – which is how this show really began. I think T.Lo hit it when they said “Don and Peggy are peers” – and Don and Pete can connect on a different level from where they were initially. Peggy and Pete went through their own feelings about Don and no longer is he a father figure for either of them to look up to, he’s a peer to both, with Peggy taking on a slightly superior role.

      I didn’t get father with kids at the end. I saw three people who were ready to re-write what to sell as the American dream of a family after failing so badly at their attempt.

      (I also love that Peggy’s outfit in the office echoes the terrible pants outfit when Ginsberg came over to her apartment previously.)

    • Dagonet

      I wouldn’t say Hawaii was the last time Don & Megan were happy. By that point, he was already having the affair with Sylvia (he was reading her book the entire time), and the episode focused on how Don could barely contain his contempt for Megan– her new life as an actress, being recognized by fellow vacationers, etc. He had to escape to the bar just to get away from it all.

      • Cabernet7

        True. It might have been the last time Megan was happy with him. She seemed oblivious to how disconnected he was. It wasn’t until the next episode that she seemed to catch on that something was wrong.

        • Gatto Nero

          She also appeared to be stoned for most of their Hawaiian vacation. He was barely speaking, and she was escaping in her own way.

      • Mismarker

        I agree. I think the last time they were happy together was the day before she left SCDP to pursue her acting career. A significant part of their relationship died that day.

    • ItAin’tMe

      I surprised to realize the the Barbie box has become iconic. I mean, didn’t everyone know what was in it before Pete said so?

      • marishka1

        I knew because girlfriend reminded him she helped “pick out Tammy’s Barbie” :-) But appropos of nothing, my sister had that Barbie and I vividly remember the gold/silver metallic bathing suit and the orange mesh beach coat.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        When he said “I brought you a Barbie from California,” I thought that he meant Bonnie.

        • SunDevilWitch

          I just bwahahaa’d in the waiting room at my daughter’s dance class.

    • Yvonne M

      Lovely. Thank you for this.

    • Laura Carney

      Maybe Joan is just saving up for her own place because she’s at an age where she’s tired of renting, but she isn’t capable of buying her own place yet because she’s not married. Didn’t Peggy have to have Abe’s name on the lease in order to buy the building? I thought that was the case back then for unmarried women. Usually they couldn’t get a mortgage on their own.

      • TeraBat

        I don’t remember Peggy needing Abe to co-sign with her; and if she didn’t need him, then I doubt Joan would, either. I think TLo is right – she’s resistant to change. I also think they’re right that Joan grew up without a lot of money, which would make her more inclined to save rather than drop a huge chunk of cash on a new place.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Peggy did not need Abe’s name on the lease to buy her building. It’s entirely in her name.

        • http://fashionandgrammargripes.blogspot.com Laura Carney

          Thanks, I knew I needed to check that!

      • Miss Disco

        how much is a tin of paint though? That colour must be getting seriously tiring!

    • Molly Hirschfeld

      “Hawaii was the last time they were truly happy together.”

      Actually, I think the happiness was pretty one-sided on the Hawaii trip. Don was completely silent in all of his scenes with Megan, pensively reading Dante’s Inferno (given to him by his mistress) on the beach as she chirped away obliviously and soaked in the sun, looking depleted and almost confused on the bed as she coquettishly smoked a joint and climbed on top of him…this was not a happy couple. There was already a gigantic gulf between them, Megan was just blind to it.

      Her diaphanous, flowery outfit on the balcony called back to Hawaii for me as well, but I saw it as a role reversal: now it’s Megan who’s removed and resigned, communicating in very few words and not understanding what she’s doing in this relationship. And damn, does Jessica Pare do some gorgeous, delicate acting in that scene. Don’s hot-and-cold act has ultimately left her disillusioned and worn out from trying, and her sad disbelief in his sudden affection combined with a wistful longing for the old days is all there in her face. Beautiful scene.

      • Nas

        I really don’t see her as “longing for the old days”. I think she is happy and living a full life in LA, but just not ready or willing to let Don go yet. When he suggested he could bring her things with him later, he reaction seemed to be one of surprise and fear (that he would find out she’s with someone else?). And when he said something like “don’t tell me you didn’t miss this”, and she responds with “I missed you”, the past tense was pretty indicative that she’s moved on and is perhaps thinking of a way to break it to him.

        • Molly Hirschfeld

          Yeah, I completely agree. I knew I didn’t quite word it correctly as soon as I posted. :) She wasn’t “longing”, per se, but there was something in that “I missed you” that indicated how sad she is about their relationship crumbling. It’s totally possible she’s with someone else, and it’s obvious she’s living a life that increasingly has NOTHING to do with him (and is likely growing happier and more comfortable with that), but despite being in the process of moving on, in that moment she was allowing herself to grieve. She “missed” him; he slipped through her fingers. He’s gone.

          • ybbed

            That was perfectly said. She is very wistful. And that patio scene was acted beautifully by Pare.

        • Molly Hirschfeld

          Yeah, I completely agree. I knew I didn’t quite word it right as soon as I posted. :) She’s not “longing”, per se, but there’s something in that “I missed you” that indicates a sadness about the crumbling of their relationship. It’s totally possible she’s seeing someone else, and she’s clearly living a life in LA that increasingly has NOTHING to do with Don (and growing more comfortable with that and seeking happiness elsewhere), but in that moment, she’s allowing herself to grieve. She “missed” him; he slipped through her fingers. He’s gone.

      • Molly Hirschfeld

        Also interesting that she was rummaging through the closet specifically for her fondue pot, which we last saw her use in the season 6 premiere (the Hawaii episode!) when she was entertaining Don’s mistress and her husband on New Year’s Eve.

    • suzq

      I TOTALLY got that reference. “Breaking bread.” She’s Catholic, through and through. Forever it will be a primary cultural reference regardless of what she believes in. Trust me on this. She’s smart enough to keep those references too overt in a business setting.

      • P M

        It’s the same for people raised Hindu and steeped in its mythology; the stories and the rituals can be all-encompassing. Won’t give an opinion of Islam, but I suspect it may be much the same.

    • Elizabeth Jeanes

      Peggy’s terrible polyester pants and tops were the go-to daily uniform for my two spinster great-aunts. Aunt Virginia and Aunt Pat worked as a cook and a tractor salesman, respectively, and those matching slacks-and-vest outfits were worn at work, at home, on bowling night, at holidays, gardening, camping, everything. So durable!

      • P M

        Oh god, that’s bad news on the Peggy style front.

      • Eric Stott

        Of course she’ll wear them a log time – that’s the curse and the blessing of Polyester doubleknit….durability.

      • smh4748

        For some reason, it delights me that your great aunt sold tractors. I can’t explain it. Maybe it’s because I imagined Peggy at a John Deere dealership, trying to pitch an expensive tractor to a farmer in her Peggy cadence, and it’s cracking me up.

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        I was much too blinded by the badass iconic cigarette moment to really not only think the pantsuit was not good, but too much clashing of colors. She matched both Ken’s green suit and Burger Chef all at once. Ken has one eye, Pegs, what is your excuse?

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Aunt Virginia and Aunt Pat sound like fun.

    • Man Dala

      I have just retrieved a photo of my mother taken in 1972 where she’s sporting exactly the same hair style as Megan in the scene where she arrives in Don’s office. My father on the other hand is dressed like Stan. My parents are from Argentina, so I guess that a 3-year gap in non-Internet times across continents was not too bad.

    • Gatto Nero

      But Joan (Mrs. Harris) isn’t exactly single. She’s a divorced mother of a young child, the ex-wife of a Vietnam vet. Somehow I think her age, family situation, salary and job title would militate against her being perceived as a “single woman” looking to buy, even in 1969.
      She has stayed in the same apartment in the same neighborhood because she’s comfortable there, for whatever reasons.

      • Laura Carney

        Good point, but regardless of whether she’s never married, divorced or widowed, I doubt she would have felt like facing that social scrutiny. When Peggy bought the house she moved into with Abe, she likely believed she’d be marrying him.

    • Alice Teeple

      This is brilliant. Also, I hope this means she doesn’t have to take a vow of chastity, not after she and Stan wore matching pink plaid shirts!

    • http://www.paolathomas.com/ PaolaT

      Oh I DO hate to keep banging on about this, particularly as T & Lo obviously don’t buy into it, but the ‘colours and meanings’ thing I’ve mentioned before really works in this episode.

      Blue has always meant establishment, power, authority, tradition in the Mad Men universe and all those women in blue hold the power in their various situations.

      Pink means traditional femininity and purple means executive femininity and both Joan and Megan brought their feminine wiles to the office.

      Green has been the colour of independent thinking and breaking down barriers (which is why blue and green together has so often signified adultery) and has often been worn by Don’s women when he is most attracted to them.

      Peggy hardly ever wears green, though it suits her, but the hideous pants suit is green and in the scenes immediately after it (not shown by TLo) Don is wearing nothing but a green towel. Barriers are about to fall.

      Red is the colour of sexual power (Peggy is wearing both red and pink in the office when Don starts to notice her) and yellow is the colour of uncomplicated happiness (with mustard as its executive equivalent) and guess what both Peggy and Don are wearing in the final scene.

      I know it’s not popular but I think they are going to get together in the end after a slow and careful wooing by Don. He’s always been happiest when he’s creating, needs a creative soulmate, thought he had that initially in Megan, but has just woken up to the fact that his soulmate has been there under his nose all along..,

      • nosniveling

        nonono no. Don & Peggy only work because they’re NOT lovers.

      • Glammie

        I don’t know that I agree with all the color analysis, but I do think Peggy’s red was striking and I’m also thinking Peggy/Don might be an end game.

        • P M

          An end game in what way?

          • Glammie

            Where the characters end up at the end of the series. I think Matt Weiner’s got a tender-hearted streak–Peggy will definitely be okay, but I’m beginning to think Don will be as well–he’s now been to hell and back. Oh and I think Sally will be solid. No guarantees about the well-being of anyone else.

        • Mismarker

          An eventual Peggy/Don romantic pairing (if this is what you mean by “end game”) is an unpopular theory but I’m beginning to buy into it. I wouldn’t say I’m shipping them but it wouldn’t surprise or anger me if things went that way. Especially after reading the character of Don Draper is based partly on real life ad man Draper Daniels. Mr. Daniels married his Peggy.

          • Glammie

            Yeah, I just wrote a longer comment on why I’m thinking that way. (But I tied it to the clothes!)

        • http://www.paolathomas.com/ PaolaT

          I’ve written a longer response to you up thread but I totally agree.

      • P M

        Ah, but let’s not forget that in MM world, to Don, red and pink don’t necessarily mean those things. Remember last season and this one, when those colours have meant prostitution.

        • http://www.paolathomas.com/ PaolaT

          Which in Don’s world is a specific sort of sexual power.

          I’ve been noticing the use of these colours for about four seasons now and again and again they fit in with the interpretations above…

      • TeraBat

        Though i don’t think the character challenge for Don is to find a woman who compliments him – if that’s what he really wanted, he would have stayed with Faye. The challenge for Don is to learn how to have a satisfying, fulfilling relationship with a woman he can accept as his equal, without sex. I think Don gained a new respect for Peggy this episode, and that he will learn how to work with her as his equal, within a purely platonic power dynamic.

        • http://www.paolathomas.com/ PaolaT

          No woman has ever been CREATIVELY compatible with him before and it’s been shown this season that that’s really his lifeblood – the thing he has to keep on doing even when he’s hit rock bottom. He thought Megan was and was head over heels for her at that point but it was a sham on her part. He’s known deep down that Peggy was but never looked at her before as a grown woman – until that dance…

    • Terri Terri

      Are Peggy, Don, and Pete in their way-back traditional colors in the last photos here? Or am I nuts. Sort of gold-yellow, grey, and Pete-blue. Y’all got me thinking too hard about the colors now.

    • Eric Stott

      A detail I like: Pete is probably staying a a pretty upscale hotel which provides a color TV – BUT – he’s probably paying extra for it – that little TV is on a cart that was probably wheeled into the room while he was checking in. It would be a little while before hotels had TV in every room, let alone Color.

      • Lady Bug

        Good thing he has an expense account ;)

      • T C

        I recall TVs on carts in the Waldorf-Astoria a few years later; not all of them worked and a lot of payola was necessary to get an operating unit.

    • in a pickle

      Yes, that’s my understanding. It was very, very difficult for women to get mortgages without a man to at least cosign. A wife’s wages were also not worked into the family income to figure out how much a bank was willing to lend. Once banks started working in wives incomes in the late 70s, housing prices started going up- total unintended consequence.

    • Lucy Polk

      What about the dress on Peggy’s door in the last episode and the empty dry cleaner bag in this one? Puzzle!!!!

      • judybrowni

        Always have something spiffy extra to wear for a client meeting.

      • Chris

        Joan always kept an extra dress on hand in case of emergencies. Peggy had to borrow it in season one when she ripped her skirt. It’s a smart move for a woman in business in case your outfit gets ripped, stained etc. Especially in Peggy’s job where she might have to pitch to clients etc. Don used to keep clean shirts in his desk drawer in previous seasons. If he got too sloppy or napped too much on his couch he could freshen up before meeting clients.

    • sweetlilvoice

      God what a recap! Thank you. The bit with Megan on the plane home/Betty and Baby Gene is brilliant. I’m ashamed to I didn’t know more about Stonewall, although I have heard it on Drag Race. But I know more now….thank you! I also have friends who painted their living room in Joan’s living room’s colors.

    • KC

      I didn’t even realize that Peggy owned the building, but duh! When did that happen?

      • Mismarker

        Beginning of season 6 Peggy and Abe were looking for a new place. Peggy could afford an apartment in a much nicer neighborhood but Abe didn’t want Peggy pulling all the financial weight. IIRC, he convinced her to buy this building and much of the season 6 Peggy story was how shitty of a decision this was.

        • judybrowni

          Abe also didn’t want to live in the upper eastside Waspy-ness: white people upon white people.

          He wanted a more integrated neighborhood, where he and Peggy could raise a family, among all colors of the rainbow people.

          “Move into this not particularly safe neighborhood with me, and we’ll married and have kids.”

          Glad to see Peggy isn’t still afraid of her neighbors, kinda nice her and Julio watching TV together.

        • KC

          I guess I missed the part where she bought the whole building! I remember them looking for a new place but I didn’t realize she owned the whole building, that’s pretty awesome despite her hating it there.

    • girlsaturday

      Re: Joan’s apartment – on a more realistic level one could say that she hasn’t moved because it’s a royal pain in the ass, even without having to manage a fairly demanding career and a very young child. I also kind of get the sense that Joan enjoys living in the village. At some point we’ll probably get a scene where Joan’s mother asks her why she hasn’t moved – I imagine that will be the catalyst if Joan ever does get a different place.

      As for Joan echoing Peggy’s style of dress – considering the circumstances of her promotion and the fact that no one in the office (as far as Joan knows) has or has ever really wanted to sleep with Peggy, that’s a pretty understandable move on her part. Except Joan does everything a little more fabulously, of course.

      • SunDevilWitch

        I wondered if Peggy wasn’t dressing like Joan. How do we know it’s the other way around? I wondered about that.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          Because Peggy’s been wearing dresses like this for a while and Joan just started to this season.

          • SunDevilWitch

            Ah, got it. Note to self: don’t question TLo’s fantastically detailed viewing of this program ;)

    • SunDevilWitch

      My parents had the exact same blue & green towel Don is wearing around his waist. Does anyone else think Joan was trying for a motherly look and not sure how to work it in that awful dotted Swiss? She knows how to kill it dressing for men, but dressing as Mommy presents a bit of a problem…? And I’m sure it’s been mentioned, but Glen. Gulia.

    • Ilana

      The only thing that doesn’t fit about Peggy, Pete and Don as a new kind of family, in Burger Chef is that there is no connection at all between any of their clothes – it seems to be intentional since the colors are SO different – and if there’s anything I’ve learned from reading these mad style posts, it’s that families usually wear colors tying them to eachother, unless they are deliberately being set apart. That’s got to be significant, no?

      • Lady Bug

        As another poster astutely pointed out down thread, Pete, Don and Peggy are all in their signature colors-blue, gray and gold/yellow. This might be my eyes, but the stripes in Don’s tie seem gold in color. Pete’s red tie has stripes of gold & blue in as well. Pete is drinking from a yellow cup-Peggy’s signature color, while Don & Peggy are drinking from blue cups-Pete’s signature color.

        • Kristen Graham

          Nice catch!

    • MissusBee

      I thought Bob’s very busy plaid underscored that his intentions and his true self were confused. A jarring effect. Whereas Joan looked more serene in that calm blue. Pete’s plaid was loud ‘trying too hard’ to assume the Daddy role and not fooling anyone. Don’s with Peggy was calm. He was there for her, not himself.

      I adored the elliptical phone conversation between Peggy and Don while Megan was making dinner. She was confrontational and he was nonchalant in a kind of sibling dynamic. They don’t exactly finish each other’s sentences, but they can communicate deeply using half-phrases that other people wouldn’t understand.

    • katiessh

      I don’t think Joan looks necessarily bad in the blue, but I do think that the more she indulges in the 70s aesthetic the worse she will look- the silhouette is just not forgiving. I can’t begin to imagine her in flares.
      The lack of movement in joan’s apartment could just be that production was unwilling to spring for a new set when they already had to do at least 2 new california locations.

      • judybrowni

        Not extensions: falls.

        Very popular in the ’60s: a fall is sort of a demi wig, usually just the long part of the hair.

        And not as firmly held to the head as extensions, just a built in comb at the top of the fall.

        • MarionDee

          Agreed. And at least where I lived in those years (Chicago, Detroit) women wore falls to the supermarket just as often as to cocktail parties. We had fun with them–anywhere, anytime. So to me, no “dressing up” on Megan’s part was implied.

        • katiessh

          wow I had no idea that existed.

      • P M

        I think she did. She surprised him at the office – and got a surprise herself ‘He’s married?!’. Ah, Megan, SC & P has moved on….

        Oh God, I can’t even imagine Joan in those wild, bold psychedelic prints (BLECH).

        I’m really surprised that there are no crayon marks on the walls in Joan’s apartment!

    • GeoDiva

      Nice post!

    • Glammie

      So, my mind’s still on the dance scene and Don’s puzzled look when Peggy leans into him. I’m afraid I’m going toward the unpopular view that Don and Peggy are a romance in the making. And, yes, the clothes tie into it.

      As TLo point out they do dress up for one another, but Don’s out of his scary Don Draper grey and into something softer and more low-key. Peggy’s outfit is still very Peggy with its high neck, but it has a genuine casual sexiness to it and, more to the point, it’s a grown-up look. I wonder if part of the reason Joan and Peggy now have similar dress styles is, in part, a sign that Peggy really *is* a grown-up now. She looks noticeably different than she did in the first episode with her knee socks.

      Part of the reason we don’t think of Peggy and Don together is they haven’t seen themselves as potential romantic partners. Peggy was too young and unsophisticated for Don. Don was way too fucked up for anyone and incapable of having a genuinely intimate romantic relationship with a woman.

      So, the dance scene is interesting in that it has a romantic/sexual aspect–Peggy’s head on Don’s shoulder is intimate and relaxed. I think Don recognizes it for what it is–perhaps more than Peggy does and he doesn’t know what he feels about it. The kiss on her head is like a kiss he would give a child. But it’s still a kiss and Peggy isn’t a child. She’s older than Megan in a number of ways. And she’s dressing like a woman–TLo’s pointed out that Peggy has no sense of style–but in that scene she does.

      I’d also say that red is the color of Don’s heart–both good and bad. This season, the most earlier prominent use of red was Sally’s hat–Don’s first real Valentine–or rather Dick’s. It was the turning point of the season–when Don’s daughter, whom he knew had cause to hate him, told him, instead, that she loved him.

      So, I don’t see it as an immediate romance–neither is quite ready to see it–but it’s there. I’ll just add that, previously, Don was happiest with Megan when she was pretending to be a Peggy. Peggy was happiest when she was in love with a man who seemed like a kinder, gentler version of Don.

      • Gatto Nero

        If Matt Weiner goes there, I will put my foot through the TV.
        But he won’t go there.

        • Glammie

          Sigh, I knew my post wasn’t going to be popular. I don’t know how I feel about a Don/Peggy coupling myself–all depends on how it’s handled.

          • http://www.paolathomas.com/ PaolaT

            Glammie, for what it’s worth, I totally agree with you on all points. Apart from anything else I think they’re going to want to hint at some sort of romantic closure for Don; it’s too late to bring in someone new; they’ve already ensured that we know he’s not compatible with his other women; I too saw a hint of something awakening during that dance; one of the inspirations for Don’s character – Draper Daniels – married HIS Peggy; and Matthew Weiner has apparently known endgame since the beginning which would explain the emphasis on the development of both characters over the run to a place where they can conceivably be together…

            • Glammie

              Yeah, now that it looks like Don isn’t in a permanent downward spiral, they do have to offer some sort of closure and I don’t think he’ll be left alone. I’ve known about the Draper Daniels inspiration for a while–so there’s that, but I also think there’s been some game-piece moving over time that’s been used to make us think it wouldn’t happen–but, really, if you move the lovers and wives out of the way and Don is overcoming his tortured past why wouldn’t they be attracted to one another? Why would it stay platonic?

              Oh well, we’re a small minority here–I saw one other poster who thinks it might be heading this way. So that’s three of us.

            • http://www.paolathomas.com/ PaolaT

              The fact that there’s a ton of resistance makes total sense. If it were obvious there would be no drama in it. I also think there’s going to be a ton of resistance from both Don and Peggy themselves – he won’t want to fuck her up and she won’t want to BE fucked up.

              But they have 6 eppies to take things to at least a tentative conclusion in that direction. And I’m expecting lots of thoughtful glances and the wearing of similar colours next week – either gold or green..,

              Oh and I predict we won’t ever see Peggy in knee socks again… we (and Don) will finally start seeing her as a potential love interest and she’ll be dressed accordingly…

            • Glammie

              That could actually be kind of interesting–Don not putting his big moves on a woman. And Peggy doesn’t know all of Don’s past, but she knows he can be a total SOB.

              Really more a case of feelings they don’t want to have, but are also genuine.

            • breathlss79

              Everyone’s right about the father/daughter dynamic, and Peggy did lose a father. That doesn’t mean she’s not attracted to Don. In fact, without squicking anyone out, she may have always been a little in love with him precisely because she lost her father. She put the moves on him on Day 1. And she was into Ted, the Don substitute. I think it will be a mess, if it ever happens. But Weiner will probably go the Liz Lemon/Jack Donague route and keep it platonic.

            • Alice Teeple

              I’d honestly prefer it if they resumed a loving Dick/Anna type of relationship. Those are the best sorts of people to work with…I know from experience. I think all of us have someone in their lives that we look up to in that regard, and yes maybe even feel puppy love for a little, but acting on it would ruin that dynamic. I feel like the example with Ted shows what happens when you allow that: when it goes south, it’s terrible and you start questioning everything about that relationship. With Stan, he has attempted multiple times to get with Peggy, and the circumstances have always been wrong. Stan might be in love with “Baby” now, but don’t people find it odd that all of a sudden this usual lone wolf who spends major holidays gossiping with Peggy on the phone has a prominent love life, and he’s calling this woman the same pet name he’s called Peggy since Day One? Not to mention the matching pink and blue plaid. I thought it was interesting that Peggy initially tried to do to Stan what Don did to her in “The Suitcase”: keep Stan at work with her so she wasn’t alone. She had the power to insist he come in, but instead, she let him go have his social life. That’s something no one’s really mentioned, but I think it’s a real milestone for her maturity.

            • Chris

              Yes, Peggy letting Stan have his weekend reminded me of when Ted chastised her for keeping people at CGC after she found the idea on New Year’s Eve. Say what you like about Ted, I think he had some positive influences on Peggy business-wise that have hopefully lasted. The only other examples of leadership she has had has been Don (mostly) and now Lou, who likes to use the extra time as punishment, not even because he cares about creative. I think Peggy and Stan will be work husband and wife, probably for the rest of their lives, but I’m not sure the writers will go there with them personally. I certainly wouldn’t be sad if they did though.

            • Alice Teeple

              I like Ted! And I agree. I think Ted gave her solid examples of leading a functional workplace, and those lessons have seemed to stick. I can definitely see the “work husband” direction being possible, Moss herself even mentioned it recently. I could certainly see them pairing Stan romantically off with some other perfectly functional chick (like they did with Ken and Cynthia, for instance). Fairly sure the ‘there’s always a better idea’ line was about her always choosing someone/something else over him. I don’t know. It seems that there’s a sacrifice involved – this is the second time Peggy’s let Stan have his weekend away from her, and each time he’s gotten further away from her romantically. The first was Valentine’s Day, the second was a weekend with “Baby.” Maybe that realization that no matter what she does, whether she’s kind or unkind, she pushes people away, and I think that partly led to her “I’m a 30 year old spinster” feeling later with Don.

            • Gatto Nero

              Peggy put her hand on Don’s on Day 1 because Joan led her to believe that this behavior was not only accepted but expected in these circumstances. She was naive and confused. And Don set her straight.

            • Gatto Nero

              I just think it would be fitting (and satisfying) if, for once, a writer didn’t resolve a conflicted male-female relationship by having them get romantically involved. (Full disclosure: This particular rom-com plot device drives me up the wall.)
              Don’s relationship with Anna was so compelling, in part, because they weren’t sexual partners, yet she knew him better than anyone else did and loved him for who he was.
              These two are perfect business partners. Why does either Peggy or Don — together or separately — have to end this story with a romance?? Why ruin the particular chemistry that they have, which has nothing to do with sex?

            • Glammie

              Well, for one thing, Mad Men is a long narrative and I think there’s some expectation of closure. Megan’s on her way out and Don and Peggy (and all the other main characters, except Betty) are looking pretty alone. I don’t think this is going to end like Mary Tyler Moore where the ending is just one big work family. It wouldn’t read as an ending for these characters. They, like most people, want love. And, since there’s an end-date, Weiner can go there without the show falling flat.

              Depending on how it was handled, I don’t think it has to be a rom-com situation. If nothing else, the rapport between the characters is deeper than that. I think the big thing is that both of them keep trying partners who are versions of one another. Particularly Ted and Megan-as-copywriter. Hell, *they’re* probably afraid of wrecking their particular chemistry together. :)

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I truly hope this is not how the show ends. It would turn the entire series into “How I Met Your Mother” retroactively. I can’t imagine this is how Weiner wants to wrap things up.

            • Glammie

              I know, but Weiner’s pulled off other tricks. Don does seem like he’s on a genuine redemption arc and that sure wasn’t happening for several seasons. Loneliness and the desire for love has been moving up as a theme this season–most recently with Joan saying she wanted love–so I don’t think the characters will end up alone outside of work. Well, not all of them.

              All I ask is that Weiner not do a Battlestar Galactica–an ending that undermines the rest of the show retroactively. I don’t think a Peggy/Don match-up has to do that, though it could if it’s written badly.

              Also, I think Weiner kind of loves his characters–he’s surprisingly gentle with them at times–Don turning out to have an Anna, whom he really does treat honorably and lovingly. He’s not David Chase, who was impressively ruthless (or George R.R. Martin for that matter). So I could see him giving Peggy and Don a happy ending of some sort–just what a happy ending would be is the question.

            • Gatto Nero

              I think a Don-Peggy romantic pairing would in itself be bad writing.

            • Glammie

              I think it could be, but I don’t think it has to be. (I hope not for the sake of your television set!) I mean we hate a lot of rom-coms because the happy ending doesn’t seem real or earned) or because it’s just so convenient and pat.

              Here we have two people who have a deep connection and have had real obstacles that have stood in the way of any romance–including how they view themselves and their personal needs. We’re seeing shifts on that front and a reconnection that looks as powerful as ever–contrast it with the lack of movement between Joan and Roger. It’s always possible Roger and Joan will get back together, but there’s no indication Joan wants Roger back. Or that Peggy wants Pete. Those ships have sailed.

              Okay, sorry. I know most people (including TLo) really don’t like the idea.

            • elevan

              I don’t think a Don/Peggy romance is the endgame. Don will be the one to give Peggy an equal standing & respect she deserves professionally. I don’t know if they’re heading that way, but I think Don’s conclusion should involve his acceptance of being able to be alone.

              Unless it’s a MW fakeout, I think they’ve been slowly laying the groundwork for Stan to be Peggy’s dark horse with things coming to fruition finally in season 7b. I want that to happen for them, so hopefully I’m not just reading things that are nonexistent clues. However I didn’t jump aboard the Stan/Peggy train without there being something to give me that hope.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I’m surprised so many of the theories about the end of this show revolve around romances. I just don’t think that’s going to be the focus. After everything we’ve watched Peggy overcome and accomplish, I’d really hate for her to get the “Sex and the City” ending, where her happiness is bound up in a man. In fact, this episode’s focus on Peggy’s choices and the idea of making your own, non-traditional family, seem to contradict any idea that Peggy is going to choose a man to be with (Don or Stan) at the story’s end.

            • kburnell

              I definitely understand what you’re saying here, and I agree that any sort of romantic “reward” feels like a disservice to Peggy and all that she’s accomplished: I certainly think any “happy ending” will have to be imagined in terms of Peggy’s professional success. But on the other hand, I wouldn’t be surprised if they end with a 1970s variation on “women CAN have it all.” With the way they’ve played the Peggy storyline this season, I’m not sure I’d be against the “reward” of having a fulfilling life outside of work (in whatever form that takes), especially when she seems to want–and lack–that so badly.

            • Glammie

              I agree with that in a lot of ways. On the other hand, Peggy clearly doesn’t like being alone. And why should she? I don’t like the idea of being rewarded with a man as a happy ending, but I also don’t like the idea that career women end up married to their careers and don’t have a personal life. Personally, I’ve always resented having that dichotomy pushed on women. Yes, a number of women have given their priority to their careers and choose not to have kids. But some of the most successful ones–Meg Whitman, Marissa Meyer, Sheryl Sandberg–are not only married, but have kids or a kid.

              I think the focus on romance is because that’s where the show’s been focused–or, rather, on the loneliness of most of the main characters–Peggy, Don, Roger, Pete, Joan. I think we’ll see a lot of other things–the fate of the agency is going to take a lot of plot, but the emotional lives of the main characters are mostly up in the air.

            • elevan

              Well to be fair, romances are a part of these people’s stories, not just plot lines involving the business of the agency. Where we get to see multiple relationships bud & grow, & many ultimately fail, it’s true that many of us would like to see the end with at least something working out.

              By the nature of the Peggy character herself, I don’t think her end involving a thriving romance could be simply labeled the “S&TC ending.” If she ends up happy & with a man doesn’t mean that her happiness is bound up in a man. That would only be true if it were her primary goal, if she quit her work to be a wife, wrapping her total existence around her man. She absolutely would not; her work makes her happiest. They’ve held her up as the convention-defying woman of her time, while showing how many women who chose the traditional path are consequently still ending up as unsatisfied as well. Perhaps I’m an optimist on Peggy’s behalf, but I think (& hope) she shall be the female character that could end up having success in both realms. I guess the key to this is her finding someone who loves & respects her, who isn’t threatened by her professional success. I don’t want her to have be utterly alone in payment for a rewarding career just because she’s a woman.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              “Part” of their stories, yes. The culmination of their stories? I sure hope not.

            • P M

              Honestly, I think they may just end up going into business together, and that’s it.

            • Gatto Nero

              “Closure” doesn’t have to mean “romance.”

            • Glammie

              No, but given the emphasis on how alone the main characters feel, I don’t think we’re looking at a workplace-only conclusion. Nor, for that matter, do I think it’s going to be all about romance–I actually am with TLo on that one–making Don a reward for Peggy would be a mistake.

            • kburnell

              I also agree from a narrative standpoint that it’s not all that unlikely. I know it’s totally unpopular and while I’m not so sure that I’d put money on it, I think it’s the easiest way to give both characters much needed redemption: Don’s problem is that he has all sorts of personal commitment issues and an unhealthy relationship to sex, mainly due to feeling unloved. Peggy is successful at work, but yearns for the kind of love and affection that she’s frankly sucked at. I can easily see (not that I personally want this), a second half of the season that wants to turn Don into the kind of self-accepting human being that can in turn accept the love of a mature, successful woman, and that wants to turn Peggy into the mature, successful woman who doesn’t have to die alone with cats.

              And we’ve seen this as a BIG thing this season already. Don is finally trying to be a better husband (we’ve seen him turn down/ignore several offers–in fact, the only extramarital sex he’s had this season has been at Megan’s prompting), but the Draper marriage is toast. We’ve seen Peggy struggling with the shittiness of her personal life. I don’t think it’s a surprise Valentine’s Day played such a prominent role this season and that Don and Peggy feel pretty unloved right now. Megan is pretty much gone. As is Ted. Stan seems happy with his girlfriend.

              Again, not saying that I’m shipping it (although I guess I’m slightly more receptive to it than others), but I think it may make sense as far as giving closure to the series. Both Don and Peggy are deeply flawed people (and last season, the affair with Ted really confirmed that while Peggy is in no way as bad as Don, she’s no angel either), and this pairing would allow both of them to find professional and personal happiness.

            • Glammie

              Yep. I’m not shipping them. (I ship Roger and Mona, and, yes, I know I’m quirky.) It’s just how the arc looks and I can see it making sense–and their personalities have the potential to fit together.

              I think I might bet a cup of coffee on it . . .

            • kburnell

              Haha, no, I totally ship Roger and Mona! It helps that they’re married in real life, I guess.

              But yeah, if Don and Peggy end up together, count me among the unsurprised.

            • Glammie

              I think the thing that got me on the Roger and Mona train is wayyyy back when he had his heart attack and he called for Mona and she was right there holding him together. I suspect the real-life marriage did give the acting some added force. He needed her strength and she was right there with it. There was something very real about how marriage works–the “for worse” part.

            • Gatto Nero

              When Roger had his heart attack he called someone else’s name, and Draper said to him, firmly, “Mona! Your wife’s name is Mona.”

            • MDubz

              Roger and Mona SHOULD get back together, for reals.

      • TeraBat

        I don’t think they’re moving towards a romance. That dance seemed more father/daughter than people who are attracted to each other.

        Don’s huge problem is that he has a hard time relating to women as equals. Every time we’ve encountered a powerful woman (Rachel Menken, Bobbie Barret), Don has wanted to seduce her. He had a thing going on with Faye, a professional woman in her own right, but that ended because Don decided he’d rather go for the Coca-Cola ad which he thought life with Megan represented. Don needs to learn how to maintain a completely non-sexual relationship with a woman who is his peer.

        • Glammie

          Faye was not a good match for Don–I know she’s popular here, but she was too data oriented, not a particularly creative type. She also didn’t connect to his kids and, IMO, Don was right to want someone who liked kids and Megan seemed that way at the time he married her.

          I agree it has been a father/daughterly relationship–sort of–but I think it’s just beginning to move away from it.

          Don has maintained long-term nonsexual relationships with women–admittedly with some serious ups and downs–he’s known Peggy for nine years and Joan for even longer. But, in some ways, he doesn’t need a work daughter anymore–he’s actually developing a genuine relationship with his real daughter. And Peggy’s a grown-up now. She doesn’t need to play Don’s daughter.

          It will be very interesting if we see Peggy with Don’s kids–that will be a tell in one direction or the other.

          • TeraBat

            Though he hasn’t related to the women he’s had long-term relationships as equals. Peggy worked for him, she was a subordinate. Joan was also technically a subordinate – though she didn’t answer to him as part of her job, as a partner, Don still outranked her. Now Peggy is, on paper, his boss; and his challenge is to learn how to relate to her and interact with her without trying to seduce her.

            When I mentioned that the dance looked father/daughter, the vibe I was getting was more ‘father of the bride dances with his daughter’ than ‘little girl on daddy’s shoes.’ A wedding is a rite of passage, marking a solid line between childhood immaturity and adult responsibility. If Weiner meant to invoke the bridal imagery, then I think what we’re supposed to get from this is Don now sees Peggy as her own, fully adult, fully capable person. She’s not his protege anymore, she’s his colleague.

            • Glammie

              Joan’s been a partner for a while now and Don doesn’t seem to have had an issue with that.

              I don’t think Don will try to seduce Peggy–anything that happens won’t be with Don Draper, per se, but with Dick Whitman. I think we’re looking at a redemption story for Don, a validation growing-up story for Peggy. I think the part where Don acknowledges that Peggy isn’t just an underling already happened–when she left to join CGC.

              ETA: Don had a long equal-seeming relationship with Anna Draper. In some ways, it was his best marriage.

            • Alice Teeple

              Unless the rug is yanked out on Sunday, I can see Don and Peggy eventually getting along just fine and having a close friendship in the Anna-Dick capacity. At this point, however, their friendship is still pretty conditional.

            • Glammie

              Well, if Don hooks up with another woman and tries to recreate Peggy (again), then all bets are off. But of the men currently available–I don’t see anything else in the making (sorry Stan/Peggy shippers–Stan’s not interested. Peg’s is too uptight for him.) Ted’s playing with model planes in CA. Peg’s outgrown Pete–outgrew him years ago. Peggy’s not content to be alone with her cat. Honestly, I think Joan’s more likely to end up on her own and at peace with it–she has her son and work that matters to her. Interestingly, Joan said she wants “love”–not necessarily marriage.

            • Trist

              Maybe Ted’s playing with model planes and always looking so depressed is a hint that he isn’t making things work with his wife and that relationship will soon be over… leaving him free for Peggy. Then she will get her decision to make, to take him back or not.

            • Glammie

              He might come back, but Peggy won’t take him. He broke her little heart, but she’s put it back together and she’s not going to go back–he’ll still be a guy with tremendous guilt about hurting his family who ran away from her.

            • Chris

              I don’t know about that. I think it could go either way depending on what the writers want. Either way I could see Peggy making the choice to eventually forgive him or reject him if he came back. I think she is still in love with him now. He’s the first guy to embody all the qualities she really likes. He had some of the “nice guy” vibe of Abe combined with business acumen and a love of creative (which he seems to have lost for now). Plus we all know Pegs loves those older father figure type men.

            • Glammie

              Yep, Peggy loves those older father figure type men. She’s pretty much dated men who have something similar to Don–the more they’re like him, the more she likes them. I’d blocked Duck Phillips out of my mind, but now that I’ve been reminded, I think we’re looking at Don/Peggy–not necessarily a happily-ever-after, but I don’t think it’s going to be soulmates-but-only-in-the-office either. Don, meanwhile, did try to create the glam version of Peggy in Megan and lost interest when she changed careers.

              But I don’t see Peggy and Ted because MM isn’t doing a darn thing to make us forgive him if he leaves his wife and kids. Ted’s portrayed as kind of childish (not in a bad way). I think Peggy’s outgrown him–Ted’s in California, totally checked and literally playing with toy planes. I think we’ll see more of Ted in the next half season, but it won’t be Ted and Peggy together.

            • P M

              Speaking of which, where is Cat anyway?

            • Glammie

              Maybe Julio’s feeding the cat.

            • Kim

              Also did anyone else notice how Stan was on cloud nine this episode totally in love? When Megan asked how how was, he answered with a huge smile and said “in love” or something along that line. Also Peggy recognized that he just wanted to be with “his baby” not rework the campaign.

              Stan’s def not interested and neither is Peggy.

            • Glammie

              I think if they were together on a deserted island, Stan and Peggy would happily get it on, but I think in NYC they do better as friends. She’s a lot more driven than he is and I think they would drive one another nuts in a romantic relationship.

              Theirs may be the great work/friend relationship.

            • elevan

              Yes, I could be projecting, but here is where I think MW is pulling a misdirect/adding tension. Why would he bother showing these hints of Stan’s private life when he never did before unless it is plot-relevant?

              I agree with you about Joan. She’s had both sides of the coin & she’s better equipped than anyone to choose what’s best for her path than whatever anyone else is trying to sell her.

            • Glammie

              I think we’re not seeing enough of Stan for him to be Peggy’s guy. He’s had very few storylines–only one I remember was his wanting to go to California and getting screwed over by Don. Mostly he’s there to react to the other characters. I think we’re seeing glimpses of Stan’s apartment and such because he’s kind of in contrast to Peggy–he’s got a personal life. Peggy doesn’t and feels that much worse.

              That said, while I don’t see it, Pegs could do worse than Stan.

            • MDubz

              Yes to father of the bride dance. I was trying to put my finger on what exactly the vibe was here, and it’s exactly that “my little girl is all grown up and a real person now.” I didn’t see anything romantic in it.

              And even if it were, I firmly believe that Don’s damage when it comes to romantic relationships is too deep to ever be properly repaired. It would destroy the beautiful thing they’ve built if he and Peggy were to get together.

            • P M

              If Peggy has any brains, she’ll keep away from Don as a romantic partner. She’s seen his extensive womanizing; I wonder if she’d really like to be part of that long list.

            • Glammie

              Well, does Don want to be on a list that includes Pete Campbell and Duck Phillips? Peggy has her own past. They’re both old enough to know that they have pasts. Also, Peggy’s never shown great judgment in men. Don is definitely an improvement over Pete Campbell.

            • 3hares

              I don’t think Don’s record stands as much of an improvement over Pete’s.

            • Glammie

              Don hasn’t raped an au pair because he was bored one weekend.

            • 3hares

              I know he hasn’t. His record still sucks hard–particularly as it would apply to a woman he’s dating. Don’s treated many women terribly.

            • P M

              “Peggy’s never shown great judgment in men”. That’s certainly true.

              I feel sorry for Pete, sob that he is.

            • Glammie

              Yeah, so do I. I give a ton of credit to VK–he cares about Pete and makes us care about him. There’s a May interview with Vincent Kartheiser in the Hollywood Reporter that’s worth checking out. More Trudy looks possible (if they wanted to swap out all future Megan scenes for Trudy scenes, I am down with that.).

            • elevan

              Kartheiser is absolutely fantastic as Pete. He was one of my favorite characters in the earlier seasons. Although such a shit-heel a lot of the times, his terrible upbringing, correct intuition about the coming times, & fumbling over his own emotions made such a complex character that I still really wanted to root for his redemption from shit-heelness. However, my favor for Pete was really waning after his role in the Joan/Jaguar affair, I am really looking forward to see if my initial hopefulness for him is still possible in the end.

            • P M

              Ah! will do :)

      • Logo Girl

        I sort of agree and here is why: when they were dancing, even though it is glaringly obvious they are not each other’s romantic/sexual “type” in any way. Don goes for this dark “Mommy/Whore” archetype. Peggy…. Well she seems to go for whomever shows interest but that certainly isn’t the role she plays. Plus I think she is a rare woman who is not secretly or overtly in love with and/or hot for him. However, they are soul mates. And it became clear in the moment that they were dancing that they are each other’s missing piece in most romances they had since they met. Ted was a Don 2.0 who thought Peggy was sexy. Megan was a hot Peggy. Abe was also a writer. Faye was also a strong career woman, and so on. Though there is no romantic chemistry, they are each the most important person in each other’s life outside of Don with his kids.

        • Glammie

          Yep. I only sort of agree with me–Don has gone for women who are glamorous and fit into whatever drama is playing in his head. However, that hasn’t worked out too well for him, so maybe he’s finally ready to dig a little deeper.

          So are they attracted to one another? Could they be attracted to one another? I think Peggy’s always been attracted to Don–from that early hand touch where she tacitly offered herself because she thought she should. She’s never laid a hand on Freddy Rumsen. But most of the time, Don’s been too old for her and seemed “out of her league”. Don’s been fixated on using women to fit his fantasy/needs. He did describe her as “a cute little thing”–which is dismissive (and goes with his paternal attitude toward her)–but that’s not zero either. And given how badly he reacted to the romance between Peggy and Ted, I’d say he has feelings about her that he hasn’t acknowledged. After all, she’s not his daughter. They are both heterosexual; they’re both about to be available and they’re emotionally bonded pretty strongly, despite themselves.

          • Alice Teeple

            Maybe. But the same could be said about Anna – she wasn’t interested in him romantically, but still loved him in a sisterly way and recognized he was handsome and charming. I think Peggy’s always been attracted to the idea of success, but has come to learn the prices he’s paid for it. Now that she’s acknowledged the prices she’s paid for her own success, she can understand and love him more. But that’s not always translatable to romantic love.
            Pete and Ted have more of a parallel story to Peggy, I think. Both were attached men who wanted something out of her to fulfill what was lacking in their own romantic lives. Both invaded her home space and both declared their love for her. Don has always kept it about their work.
            Honestly, I think what both of them need in each other’s lives is a trusted friend more than a lover or a spouse or a mentor-protegee relationship.

            • Glammie

              Don was very young and Anna several years older when they met. Don was young and unformed, Anna childless. So Anna did slip into a maternal role and Don tried to marry a younger version of Anna with Betty. The young Don/Dick had a dream life he wished to create and thought he could by finding a storybook princess. Anna didn’t fit that mold and had the maturity to recognize that young Dick Whitman was far too young for anything more adult.

              When Peggy came on board, Don did mentor her and did consider her too young for anything–and she was. But this is no longer the case. They’ve become peers. And Peggy really flipped from being really angry with him to being, literally, in his arms. In red.

            • elevan

              Anna & Betty were absolutely nothing alike other than both being blonde.

            • Glammie

              Nope, but young Don wasn’t the most perceptive of men about women. Betty fit into his picture of what his life should look like. Betty’s personality wasn’t like Anna’s, but she looked like a younger, more beautiful version of her.

            • VirginiaK

              Has anybody ever speculated about Don and Betty reconnecting in some way (not a resumption of their conventional marriage)? If her relationship with Henry deteriorates she might either separate from him or, based on past moments, feel entitled to operate in a secretive or disloyal way.

            • Glammie

              There’s always been a smattering of people who want Betty and Don get back together somehow. But I think their camp hook-up was probably it–kind of coming to terms why they couldn’t be married. Betty seemed to recognize that her new life was better for her. Though she seems to have brought back the unhappiness this season.

              Don and Betty aren’t very good for one another.

            • Chris

              Yes to all of this.

          • elevan

            I don’t think Peggy’s been attracted to Don. You say it yourself- she offered herself because she thought she should. Her naivete & ambition for her new job led her to believe that’s how things went in the office setting. If there’s anything about him she’s attracted to is his talent & the desire to reach the heights he’s reached.

            • Glammie

              Again, she never made a pass at Freddy Rumsen. She was also upset enough when Don married Megan that she and Joan had a talk about it. And, again, her strongest feelings have been for a good-looking creative director who valued her. Don, early on, discouraged any romance between them, but that’s different from there being no feelings.

              Also, just to flip things–if Peggy were Paul Olsen and a talented copywriter–how would Don’s speech about always regretting letting Paul go and spending the rest of his life to get him back come off? It would be the speech Bob Benson wishes he could give. It is one of the most romantic speeches ever given by Don–yes, we all take it to be idealized and platonic–but people cross from friendship to love all the time. And, yes, when Peggy left, Don literally turned his agency and hers upside-down to get her back. On one level, Peggy’s anger about it can be read as someone who had moved on (to Ted) and resented her old (non)lover pulling her back.

            • kburnell

              Glammie, I really agree re: the speech (I guess there’s, what, now 4 people on the entire internet who think that it will end this way). But the show has done so much telegraphing of Don-as-genuinely-romantic with Peggy. The speech he gave, defending Peggy’s honor against Duck, the hand kiss, the dance, the kiss on the head. Even Peggy had a barb last episode about Don showing up on his white steed. These aren’t exactly things we can chalk up as normal mentor/mentee stuff. Sure, there’s nothing lusty in these moments (as we are used to seeing Don’s interactions with women he wants to bang), but they are deeply romantic.

              I get why people don’t want this to happen and I sympathize–it’d be nice to see a professional relationship that stays professional. But, all things considered, Mad Men *is* pretty soap opera-y. The fact that Peggy got impregnated by Pete on her first day of work, the fact that Don faked his identity, the fact that Don and Roger both married their secretaries, the fact that Ginsburg cut off his nipple–these are all pretty ridiculous. A reformed man slowly falling in love with a woman he works closely with, who he professionally respects, and has a real history with that hasn’t already been tainted by sexual passes? Not that crazy. And that’s why people don’t want it to happen, fine.

            • Glammie

              Four of us–so we’re either really, really early adopters or crackpots. But, yes, there are actually lots of moments when you start to look for them. We don’t see them as such because I think, maybe, we’ve been deliberately misdirected.(Don’s not falling out of the window in the opening credits, he’s falling in love . . . oh dear, I wish people wouldn’t throw their computers at me.)

              But Weiner’s all about changing the conversation. As you point out, a reformed man slowly falling in love with a woman he respects isn’t that crazy. Not when you put it that way. Weiner’s been very good at flipping outlooks and making us change our minds about people. The more I think about it, the more I think he’ll do this and make us like it.

            • kburnell

              I’ve long held the suspicion that the show might go this way since “The Suitcase,” so it may be a crackpot thing. Although I just watched the commentary online on “The Suitcase” and Matt Weiner says “Are Don and Peggy in love with each other? I think it’s very complicated, the way it is in those situations…” In Matt Weiner speak, that may be the closest thing to “it’s a possibility” we’ll ever hear.

            • Glammie

              Yeah, that sounds like he was definitely leaving the possibility open. I think a lot of the barriers that were there before–his self-destructive compulsiveness and her immaturity–seem to be eroding. She’s grown into her looks and he’s no longer as astonishingly good-looking–they even match up better physically.

            • elevan

              Why are earth would she make a pass at Freddy? She was Don’s secretary, not his.

              I thought she was taken aback by his marriage to Megan- so sudden & out of the blue. Remember he had been crashing all season after his divorce.

              And I can imagine Don saying “I’ll spend the rest of my life trying to hire you” to a male protege considering parting ways, except with a more macho veneer to it rather than how he speaks to women.

            • Glammie

              Freddie’s a higher-up who showed interest in her. Yes, it’s laughable to think of Peggy making a pass at Freddy. My point is that there’s zero sexual chemistry between Peggy and Freddy, even though Peggy is fond of Freddy and upset when he’s fired. She does sleep with Pete, who isn’t her boss.

              Roger’s marriage to Jane was sudden–Peggy couldn’t have cared less, though Joan sure wasn’t happy. Don’s marriage to Megan happened after the intimacy of The Suitcase–when he was pulling out of the divorce and was using poor Dr. Faye as a rebound relationship.

              Macho veneer–fact is, we *hear* Don’s pitch to both Roger and Pete and it has nothing of that sort of longing to it. It’s also worth noting that Don hasn’t ever had a male protege–he was competitive with Ginsberg, who was talented. He’s not interested in men. He’s not a man’s man.

            • elevan

              The assumption of the secretary making herself available to her boss would apply only to Don; Freddy is totally irrelevant. She slept with Pete because on a personal level he flattered & impressed her.

              I don’t think Roger’s sudden marriage is a good parallel at all- Peggy does not exist within Roger’s close proximity at all, so why should she care, & Joan actually was Roger’s mistress, so she cannot really be a stand-in for Peggy in this analogy.

              True, we don’t see Don with a male protege, but I was considering if we merely gender-reversed the same situation, would his “…trying to hire you…” be out of line. I don’t think so. You compare with his pitches to Roger & Pete, but I think you have to keep in perspective to whom he’s speaking & when. He goes to Peggy early on in the ordeal because he assumes she was a given; he was rather irreverent & subsequently surprised. And during his pitches to Roger & Pete, there’s a lack of distinctly maudlin Don, however he ultimately has to make concessions to them in the form of something personal with a slice of humble pie: he tells Roger “I value my relationship with you” & Pete “we need you to keep us looking forward. I do, anyway.” Peggy was the only one to turn him down on his first try. After all, she is his protege & the best of his Creative underlings, so with a dose of humility he tries again- which leads us to his altered (2nd) pitch to her.

              I didn’t have the intention of this becoming quite so elaborate, but I really don’t see what you’re seeing.

            • Glammie

              I don’t think Peggy would put out her hand for an unattractive boss or one to whom she had zero attraction. And Don Draper is an attractive man at that point. It would be strange if she didn’t think he was attractive at that point.

              And, yes, my point is that Peggy feels close to Don. There are various reasons why she and Don have never viewed one another as potential romantic partners, but I don’t think it has anything to do with no sexual attraction.

              The second pitch works because Don means it–indeed, he does pursue her when she leaves to the point of merging his agency. *All* of Don’s best pitches work because on some level he’s expressing an emotional truth. Peggy knows he’s telling her the truth when he says it.

              If you don’t see it that way, that’s fine–the majority here (including TLo) is with you. Weiner will do his thing and he’s good at misdirection and plot twists, so we’ll see. I’m still waiting to see if Neve Campbell reappears.

            • Alice Teeple

              That whole episode revolved around people around the office implying that Don was into secretaries (Joan mentions one leaving because Don “wasn’t interested”) and that the only way to get ahead was to please men with their looks. I took it as Peggy was trying to keep her new job by doing what people were suggesting. I didn’t see it as her really wanting to do it. I think the tears she had in that office were more about her being embarrassed that people had set her up for certain expectations and they crashed.

              Peggy’s loyalty to Don sprang initially out of wanting to keep her job, then Don’s acceptance of whatever talent she showed (thanks to Freddie), to him being the only person at the office worried enough about her to track her down in the sanitarium after having the baby, and trusting him to keep her secret. It’s been a very overbearing gratitude on Peggy’s part over the years, but as Don took advantage of that, she started breaking away toward real independence. You can’t have a real friendship based on gratitude, but they’re moving more toward equality now.

            • Gatto Nero

              Peggy was upset when Don announced his engagement to Megan because it eclipsed her own news about landing a major account — not because she was jealous in a romantic sense.

            • Trist

              I am so horrified by the thought that Don and Peggy will end up together. I think it would do such a disservice to what has been such a thoughtful, deeply insightful journey the writers have set these characters on, as if the whole show were just an extended rom-com-tragi-comedy. Please, no.

            • Glammie

              Horrified? Why? People in real life meet at work and do end up together. The two of them understand one another and Don shows signs of no longer being a total womanizing asshole. They’ve known each other for 10 years–and they’re still not bored with one another.

              I don’t think love has to trivialize things.

            • 3hares

              Don often shows signs of no longer being a womanizing asshole. Doesn’t mean he’s particularly changed on that front.

            • Glammie

              I think it does. We’ve seen him turn down a hook-up with his “type” (Neve Campbell) and show zero interest in Bonnie (who, yes, was sending him signals). He has the perfect excuse to cheat–his wife’s in L.A., his marriage is on the rocks, and he hasn’t. He said to Sylvia “I don’t want to do this before.” and we saw him in his most self-destructive affair. When he blew up the Hershey account, we saw him hitting bottom. Since then, we actually have seen a different Don in many ways. Most notably, he’s more honest. “I’m a terrible husband.” He quit lying to Sally.

            • 3hares

              I just don’t think a few months of good behavior is any way to tell that he’s transformed so much that he’s a different guy. He’s had months of good behavior before.

            • Glammie

              Yes, but he’s more honest now. During previous good periods–while Betty’s pregnant with Gene and during the early part of his marriage to Megan–there was an element of playacting. He continued to lie. The thing that stood out to me during the Megan period is that he wasn’t doing well creatively. He was investing too much energy, in a sense, in creating a perfect-looking life, but he wasn’t connecting to that gut sense of his that allowed him to create great copy.

              He playacts less now–he’s not as pretty or glossy. He’s Dick Whitman more now–and he’s told his partners that he grew up in a whorehouse.

            • 3hares

              I do see the difference. It just seems too easy for him to get a clue about doing the work and being somewhat more honest to having lost all the old patterns. Many people on this show go through periods where they’re being better and then fall back. if the show ended with Don and Peggy together I don’t think I’d ever feel like it should last. It would probably play to me like yet another great idea of Don’s where if he just acquires the right woman it’ll prove he’s fixed.

            • Glammie

              I think those are all legitimate concerns and if the show goes this route, I’d think they’ll address them. Indeed, they’ll use those concerns as fuel for dramatic tension. One of my fellow crackpots, PaolaT, I think, points out that we shouldn’t like this at this point. The show has to go somewhere. No tension, no story.

            • Alice Teeple

              People in real life also meet at work and don’t end up together, but still understand and love each other in many ways. It was like that where I worked and we always tried to stay in each other’s orbits because we all worked well as a family. I don’t think love has to trivialize things either, but there’s all sorts of love. Don felt eros with Betty and Megan, storge with Peggy and Sally, agape with Anna, symposium in his work. Don and Peggy can realistically end their story with the agape kind of love. If they ended the show with their own kind of “marriage,” the kind revolving around the fruits of their labor and finding some kind of peace in that, it would be a very satisfying ending to the show, while leaving it open-ended.
              But this is Weiner, so who knows?

            • Glammie

              Yes, I think there could be a platonic ending and it would be fine–I think that’s what most people expect and would prefer at this point. I’m fine with it myself. It’s just my sense from looking at the episode, thinking about previous episodes and, now, playing devil’s advocate here that Don and Peggy are heading in a new direction.

              I do appreciate a forum where people make accurate references to Plato. :)

            • elevan

              Well I think you’re right about them heading in a new direction. I see it as having Peggy go from Don’s underling to being his boss will lead to them being able to be equals.

      • DeniseSchipani

        I don’t agree that we’re headed toward a romance with Peggy and Don, but I also don’t see it as purely a father-daughter thing. I think their relationship is more complicated,or maybe undefinable, than either of those dynamics. They’re more like two sides of a coin, attracting and repelling, needing each other and also the one person for each other than can most annoy and push buttons for the other. They’re like work-spouses or work-siblings. It’s a deep connection, but it’s not romantic, i don’t think.

      • Kim

        I had a slight feeling that don looked at her a little different after he realized she’s now 30. Like Peggy’s not the baby copywriter anymore. Also everyone always talks about Don’s take on Peggy: he looks at her like a daughter, mentoree,etc. I rarely see anyone comment on what could be Peggy’s feelings for Don. We already know she’s cool with hooking up with older, established men not only in life but also in her workplace. I think if Don ever made a move, she’d totally be willing. Not that I necessarily think it would be a good idea, but I totally think she’d go for it. I mean, can you blame her?

        • Glammie

          Man, how did I forget about that affair with Duck? I blocked it out of my mind. So Duck and Ted–yeah, she’d sleep with Don. Duck, I’m pretty sure, is meant to be older than Don. Don and Peggy are 13 years apart. He’s not old enough to be her father. There’s an age gap, but not an impossible one by any means. The age gap between Don and Megan is bigger as was the one between Jane and Roger. I think this is about the same age gap between Betty and Henry.

          Don’s also no longer Peggy’s superior–so that lessens any sense of sexual harrassment. I actually think Don has some minor qualms about making his underlings feel coerced. It’s not his SOP.

    • judybrowni

      About Joan’s blue dress TLo hates: those shirtwaist dresses (not the cupcake kind) aren’t kind to the curvy.

      But something skimming the body, yeah.

    • Joe O’Connell

      Regarding Joan’s apartment – I don’t know if it’s an intentional comment by the Mad Men design team, but it was pretty common for people in the West Village to get a place, basically dig in their heels and never, ever change it. Even today I know a few folks (a very few) who’ve lived in W.V. apartments since the time of “Mad Men” and their apartments are still essentially decorated in early 70′s kitsch. I can imagine Joan keeping that same apartment and that same decor until sometime around the turn of the century. Also, as you mentioned, Joan used to have to split the rent on this place with a room-mate, then had a husband (he did bring in SOME money, if not enough to support a family), but now Joan is paying for it herself and supporting a son and her mother. (Her mother is taking care of the rug-rat, and certainly not working.) So that is indicative that she’s moved up somewhat.
      And as for her being able to afford a better place, even if is making great money she still is a woman in 1969. If she wanted to buy a place, the bank would no doubt insist that a man, any man, co-sign the mortgage loan. In Peggy’s case, Abe could’ve signed off on the house since he’s the one who really wanted it. (And anyway, the seller was probably dying to get rid of the place given the neighborhood it’s in.) Who’s going to co-sign for Joan? She’d die before she asked Roger to do that.

      Poor Bob. From his point in history, his plan IS actually kind of practical. But from our POV, it just seems tragically short-sighted. Not just because being gay, and even gay marriage is acceptable, but who’d want to own even a mansion if it was in Detroit now?

      And I’d just like to point out that if this episode is just a week before the Stonewall riots, then it is the first episode set in a time that I was alive. (Born May 12, 1969 here!)

      • Luneowl

        I grew up in metro Detroit and those car company executive mansions were NICE. We’d sometimes drive through the neighborhood at Christmas time to see the extravagant decorations, like a wreath surrounding the double front doors so you’d have to step through it to enter the house. They were still pretty nice by the time I moved away in the late 80′s so Bob would have gotten a few good decades out of one if Joan had accepted his proposal. Lord knows how those mansions look now, though.

        • DeniseSchipani

          You could buy one for a song, now. Sadly. Probably for the same face value Bob would be looking at in 1969!

          • P M

            OUCH.

            • VirginiaK

              Actually if you are an artist Detroit will give you a house to live in, I believe. Seriously.

            • P M

              You couldn’t pay me to live in Motor City. No offence, but just, no.

            • VirginiaK

              I imagine that such sentiments are behind the city’s reaching out to attract interesting young people. Actually I’ll be interested to see if a community develops. It could be a nice adventure for some people.

            • elevan

              I thought this was a fascinating read: http://www.buzzfeed.com/drewphilp/why-i-bought-a-house-in-detroit-for-500

              As much as it appeals to me, I would never do it.

            • VirginiaK

              Eleven thanks so much for that article, I’m happy to read that what I’d imagined was really happening, that there are people for whom it’s working to take the Detroit situation as an opportunity to get themselves homes and build community. I feel as if I haven’t encountered that spirit very much in a long time. It’s encouraging.

              I’d imagine the people doing it are, like the author, connected to the city or the region in some way. I hope he and others write and film about this as it goes on.

            • P M

              Good luck to them :)

            • VirginiaK

              Ok read up on it – if you’re a writer they’ll give you a house!

      • P M

        How do we know when this episode is set, again?

        • Logo Girl

          Opening of Oh, Calcutta, June 17, 1969, Pete and Bonnie were going then Pete bails.

          • P M

            Thanks.

        • DeniseSchipani

          Peggy mentioned her birthday was a few weeks ago and (as I read on another site; I’m not THIS obsessive) we know her birthday is May 25 because in The Suitcase, it was her birthday on the same day as the Sonny Liston/Ali fight. Stonewall happened on my third birthday, June 28, 1969. Toddling around Queens, I was blissfully unaware of it. I wonder if my parents were; I’ll have to ask.

          • P M

            Oh yeah, the fight! Thanks for reminding me.

      • P M

        Not to mention Detroit’s long, excruciating collapse will begin within 5 years.

      • Kim

        I don’t know. Joan is a partner at a major Madison ave ad agency. I think she’d be able to get a mortgage on her own regardless of gender or the times.

    • pamasutra

      That’s the longest skirt I’ve seen on Megan in some time.

    • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

      Anyone notice that Peggy gained back the weight she seemed to have lost last season? I may be very busty but like Peggy, I always been rounded in the belly, hips, and buttocks area. And it seems we both favor a line skirts.
      Plus I kinda like how Joan looks in that baby blue dress Joan wore, though that’s me
      Also anyone think Peggy will never give a burn to Joan about how snippy she has been in earlier seasons and for the times Joan insulted her clothes and looks, love Joan but really need to see this

    • Sarah

      Longtime reader, first-time commenter. Tom and Lorenzo, you are a national treasure. This episode was the best since The Suitcase, and the reason was the rich, fascinating relationship between Don and Peggy. Last thing: I don’t think enough of the principals wear glasses. Harry, Lane, Jim Cutler (and Lane and Jim cancelled each other out)… anyone else? In pictures from the period, the glasses — the materials, the shocking angles, and the sheer number of people wearing them — jump out at me. Uncles, any thoughts on that? Much love to you, dear community.

      • Qitkat

        My memory may be faulty, but I think I recall seeing both Don and Joan put on glasses at some moments.

        • TeraBat

          Yeah, Joan sometimes has glasses on in partner’s meetings. It looks like they’re reading glasses for her.

    • Ma. Gabriella Dutari

      Nobody cares about Lou, it’s as if he doesn’t exist; Peggy and Don go to his office, brainstorm, drink his booze and dance. That really isn’t Lou’s office.

      In the final Burger Chef scene, when Peggy says she wants to shoot the add there, Pete expresses his doubts about it and Don stands behind Peggy saying “She’s doing it the way she wants to do it”. I’m probably overthinking, but I found it reminiscent of a discussion with a pregnant woman who wants to give birth at home instead of a hospital. She wants to “give birth” to this new, revolutionary idea, and Don’s with her. Also, they’re a solid block bound by Peggy’s power color mustard/ochre!

    • Jay Kamins

      Just for the record, when Mad Men goes back on hiatus until 2015, I’ll be missing these posts as much as the show itself.

      • MarinaCat

        With only the current styles on which to comment, I’ll be missing the word “frippery.”

    • DesertDweller79

      This season of Mad Men is eligible at THIS year’s Emmys. Not next year’s. And, yes, they absolutely should submit this episode for Art Direction.

    • EarthaKitten

      Is it possible the “IBM Lady” served a greater purpose than the color of her dress? I did not notice in when watching the episode but I was struck by the screen shot that the woman was a dead ringer for Megan — or what Megan may have looked like and what Megan may have been doing had she not married Don. Couple that with the fact that Megan was treated as no one special by the secretary — she did not know Megan was “Mrs. Draper”. I thought Megan seemed so out of place in the office and she conveyed a sense of being ill at ease. Even more reason to get the hell out of New York and back to LA where she is not an appendage of Don’s (other than his bank account). Again, I think that “IBM Lady” had greater meaning in the scene but I could be imagining that significance.

      • Gatto Nero

        I thought the IBM lady looked like a younger Hillary Clinton in a red wig.

        • DeniseSchipani

          Is that redhead the IBM lady, or Peggy’s secretary? The IBM lady in the computer room is the Jane Siegel lookalike.

          • Gatto Nero

            Yes, sorry — the “IBM drone lady” is the one behind the glass in that scene.
            The secretary looks like HRC.

      • leighanne

        I saw her in the stills and thought the same thing- a throwback to when Megan used to work there.

    • DeniseSchipani

      Oh, for anyone keeping track of smoke/fire references, witness Bob fiddling with Joan’s cigarette lighter, and Joan saying, “What IS it about those things? boys love them.”

    • Jacquelyn

      Uncles, any chance we can get you to do more Mad Men Style posts during this hiatus until 2015?? Cause, these not being in my life on a weekly basis is going to be an issue.

      Wonderful as always!

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Maybe you could go back and revist older episodes or minor characters that you haven’t covered yet. I love your site!!

    • MaggieMae

      Wow!

    • katiessh

      The oddest mad men theory i’ve heard today- Donald Draper is actually D.B Cooper and will blow up an aeroplane.

      • Lady Bug

        I read that theory as well. I think I’d rather have Megan get offed by the Manson Family

    • Matt

      I’m so glad you guys pointed out the subtle aging on Joan in the living room scene with Bob! I totally said to friends, “Joan is looking her age there; she’s looking tired!” Excellent job by the makeup and lighting folks because if you weren’t really paying attention, you might have missed it. I figured TLo wouldn’t, though. :)
      Also: my mom is a total latecomer to MM; she was very reluctant to watch despite my sister and I raving over it, but she must have seen an episode while changing channels and now she’s watching it. Getting her perspective of things from having lived through that time has been fascinating, and her opinions of the characters (knowing so little about them outside of what she’s watching and the in-script references, if any) have been spot-on. When I mentioned that some folks think Megan will have a Sharon Tate-type of fate, she disagreed and pointed out what I did last week: “she’s not a very determined actress, so she’ll probably get some fairly innocuous guest shots on Medical Center or something and that’s her life.” :D

      • Glammie

        Yep, I think Megan will get just enough parts to stay an actress, but not really go anywhere. The marriage/nonmarriage to Don will go awhile ’til one of them becomes serious about someone else. They’re amicably separated now.

        • Matt

          Absolutely! Actually, your comment about Don and Megan being amicably separated reminds me of the same situation that actors Jack Klugman and Brett Sommers (my all-time FAVORITE on Match Game) had in the early ’70s. Klugman and Sommers separated in 1974 and never got divorced. When Sommers passed away in 2007, Klugman remarried until his own death in 2012.

          • Glammie

            I think Megan and Don will divorce at some point–the energy’s out of their marriage at this point. Just not really anything to keep them together.

    • http://batman-news.com JLawGirl

      While I’ve never had strong feelings about Megan — don’t hate her, don’t particularly love her either — I see her being one of the only ways Don was going to reach his bottom. He had to reach it professionally and personally, and divorcing Betty Draper wasn’t enough to send him there. However, the one thing that bothers me about this relationship and Megan’s apparent “abandonment” of it is that Megan is a struggling actress. She’s not succesfful. If she leaves Don how does she support herself? Am I to believe they just go on living independent lives, but remain married? I don’t think that makes sense either. She seems so self-assured and pleased with herself on the plane, but without Don’s money Megan is a struggling actress in LA.

      • linddsaaay

        He would probably continue to support her financially– alimony is typical in divorces even without children.

        • http://batman-news.com JLawGirl

          True. I didn’t consider that.

    • VeryCrunchyFrog

      Add a few inches to Bonnie’s blue dress and remove the flower applique on the front, and you pretty much have my 1972 confirmation dress. From Sears. :-)

    • JeezyLouisey

      I work right down the street from that Burger Chef location and took some pictures this afternoon:

      https://www.flickr.com/photos/20553942@N04/sets/72157644787170411/

      • ItAin’tMe

        Those are great, thank you! Were you aware of the filming when it happened?

        • JeezyLouisey

          I wish I had known! It’s a pretty busy street, I have to think they filmed very early or very late. Although the interior furniture is not the same I kept thinking, Don Draper sat heeeeere!

      • John G. Hill

        Notice the unpainted yellow sides of the building? They knew the camera angles would not pick that up, so money was saved by not painting those parts. Every little thing costs. Everything is budgeted, just like the ads the agency produces. Excellent pics too.

    • ElaineMarie34

      Ah, you’re absolutely right about Ali McGraw and Love Story. I didn’t catch it but now it seems so clear. As a young teen I crocheted many a cap to wear with my long, straight, very dark hair, emulating Ms. McGraw!

    • Glammie

      So, here’s a link to Malibu Barbie who came out in 1970-71–pale aqua suit, pink lipstick, blonde hair. Definitely see a link between her and Bonnie-buying Barbie:

      http://www.barbiecollector.com/shop/doll/malibu-barbie-doll-n4977

      • ItAin’tMe

        Perfect.

    • French_Swede

      Thanks for the reminder. I’ll go check it out.

    • paul in kirkland

      It sure seems like they’re making Don look…well, a little frumpy. It seems like his clothes are all a little small for him, and since I’m sure they’re explicitly tailored, it has to be on purpose, right?

      • ItAin’tMe

        Yes, he’s paunchy, pale, and frumpy. I’ve been watching the first season again, and it’s a little shocking to realize how much younger he was then. 8 years have gone by in real life too, but I think the paunch and the frumpiness is part of the role.

        • Glammie

          Yeah, Don’s only 43 or 44, but he’s an old 43-44. Jon Hamm looks younger.

          Boy, the one they’ve really been hard on though is Pete. Pete looks radically different in Season One. Poor Vincent and his shaved hairline.

          • ItAin’tMe

            I know! Pete looked like a choirboy in the first season. Now he’s an aging lech.

        • Alice Teeple

          I think it’s an allusion to his inside starting to match his outside. The shell of Don Draper is starting to crack to reveal rotten Dick Whitman. I have a bad feeling something is going to happen in tomorrow’s episode regarding his identity and really bust open his secret.

    • flint

      The blue painting on the wall above the couch Peggy sat at reminded me of all the women in blue dresses that stuck out in this episode. Especially Joan’s scenes. It seemed very fitting somehow.

    • jl

      I think the light blue color used throughout this episode denotes the female’s independence from a male figure, not necessarily anything having to do with motherhood. Look at the scenes in which the color was worn:

      Joan wore it when she turned down Bob
      Trudy wore it when she turned down Pete
      Megan wore it when she was packing up the odds and ends to take back to California (and Don realized that she was going to be there for good)
      Bonnie wore it when she stopped by Pete’s office, leaving him with a quick kiss without letting him show her around (even if later she ended up saying goodbye and not on her own terms)
      Peggy wore it when she presented the pitch that she came up with on her own (even if it wasn’t the one that she ended up using)

      I don’t think this episode was about motherhood so much as internal or external judgment of where the women were supposed to be in their lives and how they weren’t measuring up. Trudy wasn’t supposed to be going out on dates, Joan wasn’t supposed to be a single mother, Peggy wasn’t supposed to be 30 and unmarried (or she wasn’t supposed to be leading the pitch). I don’t know where Megan or Bonnie would fit in with that, but that’s what I took from it.

      • P M

        Tammy also wore blue (sort of) when she was initially rejecting Pete’s gift.

        • jl

          And in the last episode, Betty wore light blue in the scene in which (according to TLo) she was finally “question[ing] her role as a mere accessory to a man.”

    • Nicole MacPherson

      I need someone to talk about Megan’s hair. It’s long in the scene with the purple dress, then suddenly short like she used to wear it. WHEN DID SHE GET A HAIRCUT???

      • Gatto Nero

        This has been discussed here. She’s wearing a fall — a popular hairpiece extension at the time, attached to the existing hair with a comb.

        • Nicole MacPherson

          Thank you! It was killing me.

    • jennmarie19

      Brilliant, brilliant job as usual, gentlemen, but I have to take issue with this statement about Joan’s apartment: “You could take the uncharitable route and say that she’s just not
      focussed on her home at all at the moment, but that would imply that
      she’s not a very good mother.”

      She’s a single mom of a toddler in 1969. When is she supposed to have the time to redecorate her home? The fact that she hasn’t spent extra energy on renovations or moving suggests she’s putting her off-work time into mothering her son. Good for Joan! (Note: I am speaking with a chip on my shoulder, as I’m a working mom of two young kids, and my house perpetually looks like shit!)

      Love you guys! Keep up the amazing work!

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        We’re talking there about the art direction choices and how they reflect the inner life of a fictional character.

        • jennmarie19

          Of course! My point was that the art direction might be factoring that in; i.e. that Joan doesn’t have much time/energy to put into projects other than work or her son. (My house looking like shit notwithstanding!)

          And — OMG you read my comment! Thanks for responding!

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            You’re welcome! We try and read all the comments.

            I don’t disagree with your interpretation; I just wanted to make it clear with my reply that when we make statements like the one you quoted, it’s not a commentary on real people (in this case, real mothers) and how they live their lives. It’s questioning what the art direction says about this particular character. Unlike in real life, everything you see onscreen is the result of some sort of decision made as a means of storytelling. The difference between “What color would I like to paint my living room?” (a point of personal preference) and “What color do we think this character would like to paint her living room?” (an attempt to say something about a character).

            So when we say things like “Isn’t it odd that Joan hasn’t moved or redecorated in ten years of story time, even though every other character has?” It’s not talking about real people who don’t move or redecorate for various reasons. It’s not questioning that choice when real people make it. It’s wondering why that particular decision was made by the creators of the show.

            Just wanted to clear that up.

            • jennmarie19

              Crystal clear, and it’s wonderful of you to take the time to clarify. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate the care and thought you put in to each post.

    • http://www.spellboundbymovies.com Beth Ann

      Joan has been very focused on the future–hers and Kevin’s. I would argue that she’s investing her money where she sees it as having value toward building those futures. She doesn’t want to invest in that apartment. It’s a way station. She’ll invest in clothes and jewelry that make an impression at work, but she’s probably careful with how much she even spends in that area. I would guess she’s saving the majority of her partner income.

    • tatiana.larina

      I’ve never seen the inside of a Manhattan apartment in real life, but Joan’s place in this shot seems to have insanely high ceilings. Is it possible, especially for a presumably cheaper place that Joan would share as a secretary with her roommate? I’ve been living most of my life in the places where you don’t even need to climb on a stool to change the lightbulb, so it struck me as unusual.

    • Joann Bacon

      Just a little history of the discrimination women went thru in the 1930′s. My mother had taught in an elementary
      school for 10 years and was forced to resign when she married! Only married men were hired as they were
      the head of the family.

    • snickerdoodlegoth

      Could somebody please explain why Megan seemed so relaxed and self-satisfied on the plane trip back to California? Was it because she knew her marriage was over and she was happy about it? I thought she would be sad or introspective knowing she’s likely never to see Don again.

      • Molly Hirschfeld

        That struck me as strange at first, too. Then I thought that she was probably just happy to be heading back to LA with her things. By the time this (final, I’m assuming) trip to New York took place, Megan had already started to detach from Don in a major way. The whole experience with Stephanie and the threesome seemed to be her breaking point. She wasn’t in New York to try to win Don back; she was there specifically to get her stuff. No more tearful pleas for emotional honesty, no more cries for attention, no more threesomes. She may not have been 100% conscious of it, but she was DONE. And after a strained weekend with your soon-to-be-ex, it must be nice to kick back with a cigarette and a glass of wine in first class, deciding whom to invite to your fondue party, knowing you have the most amazing wardrobe anyone has ever had in the history of the universe safely tucked away in your 20 bags of designer luggage.

    • Lin

      I loved the Joan and Trudy dresses, not so much the other one. The aqua-turquoise family is my color. Elsewhere someone opined that every time a woman wore blue, in this episode, she was getting a beatdown. To me, the Burger Chef scene was also a tribute to the Sopranos ending. Wiener worked on the Sopranos and said it was a perfect ending. Additionally, I think he’s trying to let us down easy with “Now the end is near”, this scene and Bert’s death and ressurection. The end of Mad Men is near. Although he’ll have to do more than a Soprano ending to get us to stop caring. He’ll have to pull a “Medium”. I cried the first 5 times I watched it. I’m going to feel the same way about Mad Men.