Mad Style: The Runaways

Posted on May 14, 2014

Okay, this one’s going to be disjointed, you guys. There’s no way to write about a Mad Men episode like this without jumping all the hell over the place. But since we’re looking for themes, motifs and through-lines, keep an eye out for two things: The Threat of Pink and The Lady Gardens.

And guess what? Neither of these things are as dirty as they sound.

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (1)

If there’s anything notable here, it’s that Don is somewhat brightly colored (for Don). Yellow’s not a color we see him in all that often. We like to think that it’s indicative of their role reversal here. He’s being a good boy and keeping his nose to the grindstone. Now yellow is his “hard at work” color like it used to be Peggy’s. It definitely can’t be called his power color, because he still has none.

As for her, this is the outfit she wore on her disastrous Valentine’s Day. It’s her “To hell with men, I got a kickass job” outfit.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (2)

Think Pink.

Things to note:

1. Peggy’s gloves. Given the cold, technical feel of the computer room and Ginsberg’s ultimate fate, they have an almost clinical feel to them; like Michael is a patient of hers rather than a co-worker. Someone who literally needs to be handled with kid gloves.  We’ve been noting the proliferation of gloves on women this season. Margaret wore a pair to complete her Nixon daughter drag before she ditched it all and decided hygiene, like marriage vows, was optional. But more interestingly, Joan has been depicted several times over holding or putting gloves on in a scene; enough times for us to start to consider it a motif.  Meaning to be determined at a later date. We’re watching this one unfold for now. We’d like to think it’s a “getting things done” kind of thing; at least for Peggy and Joan. We don’t know how Margaret would fit into that, though. Maybe it’s a “Who needs a man?” thing, similar to Peggy’s outfit, which resembles some sort of girl scout uniform. Although it should be noted that Peggy’s accessory motif this season seems to be more hat-based than glove-based. This is at least the third hat of hers we’ve seen this season. Very “That Girl.”

2. The woman in the computer room. She is clean and unruffled. Literally. The minimalism of her look (and demeanor) make her as one with her surroundings, even as the pink makes her stand out from them. Given all the Kubrick symbolism being thrown at us this season, we can’t help but think of the space receptionists/stewardesses from 2001:

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO-(33)

Minimalist, efficient, ominous – and very pink. Pink found its way into the costumes of almost all of the female characters this week, binding them together or illustrating their vast differences. But in almost every case, the woman in question was considered a threat. Put a pin in that. We’ll come back to it.

3. Ginsberg’s clothes. We’ve noted before how the clashing prints of his getups tend to illustrate the manic state of his mind. We’ve also noted how he tends to wear oversized clothing. Put a pin in that one, too.

Compare his outfit to Stan’s normal getups, which are skin tight:

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (3)

Michael and Stan are often dressed in matching outfits (pants to pants, shirt to jacket, tie to shirt) . Sometimes it’s to set them apart from Peggy, if they’re sharing a scene together, and sometimes it’s just to show them as a team. United by their team colors, but wearing vastly different uniforms.

As for Shirley, she’s clearly got a signature look. Costume designer Janie Bryant likes to do that sort of thing with the more stylish secretary characters. Joan, Jane Siegel, and Megan all had signature looks, as did lesser characters like Scarlett. You saw  colors, embellishments and silhouettes repeat themselves in each character. Back in the SC days, Joan clearly had the same dress in several different colors, so consistent was her style. Shirley’s just continuing the tradition here. She’s also establishing the floral motif that’ll play itself out in most of the women’s clothes this episode.

 

 

 

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (4)

We don’t get to talk about Stan much, but that’s not because he doesn’t give us stuff to work with. He’s straddling that line between counter culture style and acceptable corporate style (for an art director, that is). That conflict plays itself out in his clothes as he keep adding little touches here and there, like woven belts or giant buckles, those thick-banded watches which would remain a popular look well into the ’70s, the love beads and scarves, the denim and fringe.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (8)

We’ve always had him pegged at a few years older than Peggy, which would put him in his early 30s. He’s too old to be a part of the counter culture and he doesn’t have the kind of job that would allow him to fly his freak flag as much as he clearly wants to, but he pushes the envelope as much as he can. Granted, given the leeway he’s given for his constant in-office pot-smoking, it’s a wonder he doesn’t just come in wearing a dashiki and sandals, just to see if he can.

Note Don in shirtsleeves, like a junior copywriter. Note Lou, who deliberately screws with Don this episode and openly insults him. He’s back to wearing his signature cardigan. Still threatened by Don, but comfortable enough in his power to go back to his signature look instead of trying to impress Jim Cutler. Note how everyone is wearing a neck tie of some sort except the secretary.

 

 

 

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (5)

A lady in pink, threatening the status quo of the story, if not of society itself. She’s unmarried, pregnant, and pretty much living on the streets. She’s also filthy. That’s appropriate for someone in her situation and it’s also of a piece with the show’s disdain for the youth movements of the time, as seen through the eyes  of the mature people at the center of the story. Janie Bryant costumed Margaret/Marigold’s commune in similarly filthy and ugly clothing. There’s no romanticizing of the hippies here. To the generations above them, they were seen as aimless and disgusting. “These people are lost and on drugs and have venereal diseases.”

Contrast Stephanie’s look with her polar opposite’s:

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (7)

Betty Francis, Lady of Leisure.  “They get so tongue-tied around us. I can only pretend so long that we’re just regular neighbors.”

This “laying out the silver” housecoat/bathrobe is working on a somewhat ironic level, because for the first time in the almost ten years of story, the former Betty Hofstadt is threatening to do something life told her she was never supposed to do:  question her role as a mere accessory to a man. Angrily and loudly.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (11)

A lady in pink, threatening the status quo. Betty, and to a greater extent, her neighbor, are working that romantic, floaty, pre-”Stepford wife” style that came into vogue at the time for housewives; especially ones of means. Ruffled collars, filmy fabrics, puffy sleeves, the occasional maxi-skirt and lots of florals.  Put a pin in all that too.

As for Henry, for once we have a slight issue with the costuming choices here. This comes off a bit too stylish and youthful for a Republican politician in 1969. The windowpane plaid, patterned tie and gold pants come off 1960s college prep rather than 1960s politician. Nothing illustrates this better than the fact that Stan Rizzo wore this jacket (or one exactly like it) when he got dressed up and pitched Don for a transfer last season. We find it hard to accept that in 1969, a Republican state senator in his fifties would own the exact same jacket as a  pot-smoking art director in Glen Campbell drag.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (6)

Megan Draper, Lady of Leisure.

And lady-lover, to boot. Although to be fair, we don’t think she and Amy have had any sort of sexual encounters. Amy clearly has a huge crush on Megan and there was definitely a, shall we say, sapphic vibe to several of Megan’s scenes this episode, but we’re not convinced that Megan has cheated on Don yet. This episode established just how much of a player and poser Megan can be. We suspect she knows about Amy’s attraction to her and vaguely encourages it without doing anything about it. She likes – and probably needs – the attention right now. There’s clearly nothing going on with her career and her marriage is over, even though neither of the parties wants to rip the Band-aid off.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (9)

That sapphic vibe was echoed somewhat in that bizarre “You’re so beautiful!” “You’re so magnetic!” exchange with Stephanie. Not that there was anything overtly sexual about it, but it continued the idea of women reacting to Megan’s beauty.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (10)

Once again, a lady in pink, threatening the status quo. Megan knows her marriage is shaky as hell and that her career and lifestyle aspirations haven’t gone anywhere. She’s too wealthy to be one of the starving artists she likes to surround herself with. She could never take the risks with her life that someone like Stephanie has (hence the admonishments about how “sloppy” Stephanie’s life is), even though she likes to pretend that she would if it weren’t for Don. Her mother once said she had the personality of an artist without the talent, which is a more restrained way of calling her a poser. She also knows that if she turned around today and told Don she was pregnant, her marriage would be magically (if temporarily) “fixed.” Don’s ultimate California fantasy (back in the days when California represented hope to him) was a pregnant Megan (dressed like the hippie she never was or will be) giving him permission to sleep with other women.

In addition, she has always had reason to believe that the one thing she’s got going for her with her marriage is the tight bond she has with Don after he voluntarily told her all his secrets; something he has never done with anyone. She hasn’t taken that lightly. Here comes Madonna-like Stephanie, representing all those things at once to her: freedom, motherhood, and secrets. Her entire existence a rebuke to the image Megan has of herself. It’s no coincidence that Megan could be taken out of this scene and inserted in the one with Betty and her neighbors and look more at home in the latter. Florals, ruffles, and maxi-skirts: the moneyed housewife style. Look at all the jewelry she’s got on. She’s no struggling actress. It’s no wonder she never gets any roles. Her entire persona this episode came off entitled and settled.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (12)

Whereas Betty is entitled and decidedly unsettled this time. She’s also a lady in pink, threatening the status quo; angrily demanding to know just why she’s supposed to keep her mouth shut.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (27)

And again.

The Francine encounter had her wondering why any lady would want fulfillment outside the home and Bobby daring to disappoint her had her wondering why she bothers putting so much work into being a mother. She was ripe for this kind of conflict with her husband. Henry’s always had what looked like a benign sort of condescending paternalism to him. He clearly looked at Betty as a princess needing to be rescued by him, but many subsequent scenes showed him as a good match for her; someone who had her best interest at heart and could weather her moods and insecurities with aplomb. It’s telling that after all the little tantrums and fights over the years, this is the Rubicon for him: a wife who doesn’t ask permission before thinking.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (13)

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (14)

Tellingly, she is not in pink or florals here, where she’s not questioning the status quo, she’s defending it like the culture warrior she’s increasingly sounding like lately. Because yes, Betty found her voice, after all this time. And it’s yelling loud and clear into a bullhorn, “SIT LIKE A LADY!” This is why we compared her to a fledgling Phyllis Schlafly in our earlier review of the episode. Of course this is who Betty would become if she ever worked up the nerve to become someone. She wasn’t going to take to the streets to burn her bra. She’s taking to the streets to tell slutty grade school teachers to put one on because there are children present. “Like everything else in this country, debate club is just an excuse to make out!” she said with some exasperation last season. Her field trip into the counterculture to look for a runaway girl last season didn’t open up her mind; it ultimately confirmed to her the rightness of her upper middle class values.

This scene was DELICIOUSLY bitchy on both their parts. Some of our readers thought Betty sounded abusive here, but to be honest, a lot of parents made jokes about breaking their kids’ arms back in the day. Henry clearly didn’t approve of it, but then again, Henry addressed both mother and daughter as “GIRLS!” Which tells you everything you need to know about what he thinks of Betty. And also lets you know why Betty’s so angry right now. “I speak Italian” was a funny line, but only because she didn’t say the more accurate “I have an Anthropology degree from Bryn Mawr, you asshole.” People forget how well educated Betty is. Seems like Betty forgot it for a time too.

As for Sally, put yet another pin in her angry plaid poncho.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (15)A lady in pink, having thwarted Don’s expectations, she’s now lying to him about it. “I tried to get her to stay…” she says weakly. What’s notable about this outfit, aside from the florals and the pinks which continue the motifs (not to mention more evidence that Megan owns an astonishing amount of clothes – she’s the character least likely to repeat an outfit) is that Amy’s infatuation plays out in her choice of outfit for the party that night:

 

 

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (16)

Different colors, but exactly the same style and silhouette. Very Single White Female.

And if you think we’re overselling her infatuation, check her out, checking Megan out:

 

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (19)

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (20)

Of course Megan was pretty much demanding that she and Don check her out. Don is the only person in the room wearing plaid and it sticks out like a sore thumb, even through the haze of smoke and dim lighting. It’s impossible to lose track of him in the scene. Megan, for her part, stands out just as much. That’s a Pucci dress. She’s dressed more finely, with more jewelry, wearing more makeup and having the most done up hair of anyone in the room. In fact, she’s more than a little overdressed.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (18)

These are people from her acting class, according to her. They clearly don’t have a lot of money and/or aren’t interested in dressing in expensive clothing. She knows this about them – or she should, anyway. That she dresses like this to host a party for them tells us that either she’s deliberately rubbing her wealth in their faces or (more likely) she’s completely clueless as to the obvious differences between her and them.

Since this dance of Megan’s was a deliberate callback to the famous Zou Bisou moment, take a look at the vast differences in how each party looked. Don’s birthday party was a glittering, brightly lit fabulous affair. This is dingy, crowded and smokey. Megan’s naughty playfulness has turned into desperation and Don can’t even be bothered to look at her. And if you think that’s an unfair comparison, then compare it to this L.A. party from last season, all brightly lit and “Harper Valley P.T.A.,” instead of dimly lit ,with clarinets and weird attention-seeking dances.

No, we don’t think that guy is Charles Manson. Sorry, folks.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (21)

Harry’s as out of place here as Don is. For all his attempts at California cool, he just looks like a well-established guy heading into a middle age wearing an ascot.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (22)

They both look far more at home in a bar, rather than some starving artist party. It’s interesting that Harry did Don a solid here, since they’ve been at loggerheads in the recent past. But the vestiges of the bright young men that populated SC back in season one (Pete, Harry, Ken) are all solidly behind Don this season. They worshipped him back in the day and they can’t stand seeing him cast aside like this.

As we noted, Don’s plaid stood out in the party scene, which helped us to connect it once again to Sally:

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (23)

The girl sure does love her plaid sleepwear. But it seems that every time Don wears a plaid, his daughter must also be depicted in one (or even two, counting that poncho), further underlining their bond and similarities.

We thought this scene cutely captured that brief, odd moment when big sisters and little brothers seem decades apart in age, even though only a few years (and puberty) separates them. Eighteen months from now, Bobby will have a deeper voice, be three inches taller than her, and insist that everyone start calling him “Rob.”

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (24)

A lady in pink, threatening the status quo.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (17)

A lady in pink, threatening GOOD TASTE AND ALL THAT IS HOLY IN THIS WORLD MY GOD PEGGY WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU?

Sorry. That is the FUGLIEST thing Peggy Olson has ever worn. And that’s really saying something. We think it’s perfectly accurate and correct, as well as hilarious, that her three big style references of the late ’60s are Mary Tyler Moore, Marlo Thomas, and Velma from Scooby Doo. This looks like something a nun picks out to wear the first day after she left the order.

She and Julio are bound by their horizontal stripes. We’re not the only ones to notice he’s roughly the same age as her own child. Although we suspect that thought never occurred to her. Still, it’s cute how she put out pretzels for him.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (28)

All joking aside, she does become a threatening figure – or at least, a highly agitating one – to Michael. Note that it’s late on Saturday night and he’s still wearing the clothes he was seen in early on Friday morning, in the opening scenes.

But before we delve into Ginsberg, one more quick jump back to the west coast:

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (25)

Our final lady in pink. She tried like hell to threaten the status quo and she’s as angry in her own way as Betty is right now, but in the end, Don’s still getting on that plane and leaving her behind, like he always does.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (26)

There was some question as to whether Stephanie returned to Oakland or stayed in L.A. She’s dressed for colder weather, as are the people behind her, which indicates to us that she is where she says she is. It’s also notable that she’s wearing clean clothes that might even be new, as well as more jewelry and a pair of sunglasses she didn’t have before. It doesn’t seem realistic that she’d have time to cash that check and go shopping, but we’ll take this as an external representation of the idea that she’s in a safer place than when the episode started.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (29)That’s one of the best dresses she’s worn in the office. Thank God. We needed something to erase the memory of that horribly ugly outfit that pushed poor Michael over the edge of sanity with its ugliness. Many of her outfits have a very subtle military undertone to them, with rows of buttons like medals and now chains, draped over military blue. We don’t take any literal meaning away from that except in the sense that she commands people in her job and that she’s perfectly comfortable in the role.

As for poor Michael…

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (30)

We got to thinking about his clothes (as we do) and how he’s always swimming in them. We used to offer the theory that he was wearing his father’s hand-me-downs, because they look like older men’s clothes. But he’s been making good money for years now and besides, his clothes, while large and wrinkled and unstylish, don’t really look like an old man’s cast-offs. He bought these outfits and he chooses to wear things several sizes too large. Years ago, he flipped out on his co-workers for looking at images of murder victims. “Put it away! I don’t wanna look at that!” He flipped out once again when he was forced to listen to a fake Beatles sing a terrible song. “Turn it off! It’s stabbing me in the fucking heart!” When he went on that blind date, he commented on how good she smelled and did the same thing when Don returned to the office this season. He screamed about the couch in his office smelling like farts. What ultimately triggered his breakdown was the incessant hum of a computer. Adding all that up, it seems to us that he’s been suffering from a form of sensory overload for some time now; consistently expressing distress over his senses being assaulted or pointing out things his senses have picked up, unable to turn the noise down. Consequently, he wears giant clothes because he doesn’t like being restricted and is trying to limit the amount of stimulus he’s receiving. It surprises us that so many people thought this breakdown came out of nowhere. We think they’ve been signaling it almost from the introduction of the character, in his dialogue and in his costuming – and they’ve been highly consistent about it. This was always where he was going to go.

By the way, we’re pretty sure Peggy got that hanky from her secretary because it matches her outfit and because it doesn’t match Peggy’s (and doesn’t seem like something Peggy would have anyway). That’s a really nice, subtle touch.

Check out just how short the skirts got in 1969. Can’t imagine anyone dressing like that in an office today.

And finally:

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (31)Don’s in a tobacco brown, most of the men are in smokey grays, and there’s a streak of blood running down the center of the table. Perfectly representing the text of the scene visually. Cigarettes and combat.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-5-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (32)

He even wears his hat jauntier than they do. Get in the cab, you losers. Don Draper needs to swagger and you’re in the way.  

 

 

[Stills: tomandlorenzo.com - Photo Credit: Michael Yarish/AMC]

    • veriance

      the secretaries in the navy skirts as Ginsberg is being taken away, it’s the office version of Meghan’s purple skirt ensemble.

      • P M

        They’re SO short!

        • MarinaCat

          I think the only other time I can remember wearing skirts that short was during the Ally McBeal years. I remember because I was in my late 20s and wearing the short skirt and suit ensemble myself!

          • P M

            I have to wonder what the ‘bigger’ women did (at least those without thin legs) in the mini-skirt era.

            • greenwich_matron

              I remember the Ally McBeal years. I worked with a lot of beautiful women who were younger and thinner. I latched on to the “more professional” look – I wore skirts that managed to end below the fattest part of my thighs but still above the knees.

            • T C

              There was a lot one wished to unsee.

            • SparkleNeely

              Have you ever been to a vintage clothing store? People were soooo much smaller then, in terms of bone structure and fat content. It’s amazing and somewhat disappointing. I’m not a big person. I buy petite sizes of things and I’m too big for some of that stuff. I’ll try on a 50s size 11 and be too big! Shocking.

              That said, I think Americans just bigger in general for a number of reasons – hormones in our food supply, growth in fast food industry, bigger portions of simply everything, too much soft drink consumption, lack of exercise and sedentary lifestyles, and also better prenatal nutrition, leading to bigger babies and probably bigger humans later on. It’s sad really, except for the nutrition part.

            • elevan

              While a lot of this may or may not be true, a lot of people of the younger generations who were not around when what is vintage was contemporary forget about fashion: foundation garments. I had to explain to my SIL, who is a tiny, svelte thing, that the reason that all the dresses in the vintage shop did not fit right was because she was not wearing a girdle.

            • SparkleNeely

              Yeah, that’s true. Still…. I guess today you can always get Spanx.

            • heartbot

              Spanx and a girdle are just not equivalent.

            • SparkleNeely

              Many people have referred to Spanx as the modern day girdle. I know several people who have squeezed into vintage dresses because of it.

            • heartbot

              They serve some of the same function: to hold everything in. But a girdle back in the day also promoted a certain shape, which was the shape most clothes were tailored to, and it’s not the shape spanx promote. Spanx will keep you from jiggling in a skin tight dress, but they’re not going to give you a teeny tiny waist with full hips. So if you want to make vintage clothes look their best and most authentic, vintage foundation garments are pretty necessary.

            • VirginiaK

              In my milieu at the time, fashion and book publishing, I don’t remember young women who wore bigger sizes, and older women didn’t wear mini skirts for the most part.

            • P M

              Ah I see. I just wondered since it seemed that the women on the show who wore shorter skirts had the legs for the garments, so to speak. Of course, they are actresses in present-day Cali, so that ‘s a skewed sample.

            • Glammie

              Well there’s a reason that pants suits came into fashion.

            • Susan Beaupre-Kish

              Honestly? There were not as many “bigger” women back then as there are now. My first job was in 1969 and yes, our skirts were that short. The office was full of young women and not one of us was more than a size 6 or possibly 8.

            • P M

              Interesting.

          • http://www.snoskred.org/ Snoskred

            Can I just mention.. I do not believe Ally Mcbeal wore as many short skirts as we think she did. :)

            I will set out to prove this theory one day by rewatching it. There were a lot more pants from her especially as the seasons went on. I do not know why though I do have my theories and one of them being Callista Flockheart was not a fan of her legs.

            • Amykl

              Ehhhhh I think she did. I was just out of law school at the time and was generally horrified by Ally McBeal. My firm sent out a dress code memo specifically mentioning the show.

            • MarinaCat

              Feh on rewatching episodes! There’s Google images!

            • rileyess

              Actually, I recently rewatched a few seasons of Ally and her skirts were very short. IN fact, now that I’m a real grownup professional, I noticed how many “suits” they put her in during the earlier seasons where the jacket and the skirt don’t even match, probably because they don’t actually MAKE suits with skirts that short for office wear!

          • Kristin

            As far a short skirt suits go: I think Melrose Place Heather Locklear FTW.

        • Erica

          Yep, as was Megan’s dress at her party. I even commented to my husband while we were watching that scene that I have no idea how women crouched down to pick anything up or bent or anything without showing underwear. Maybe showing was o.k. back then. Even my mom wore short skirts like that in pictures we have where she was holding me as a baby. Which means pretty much everyone under 30 or so was wearing them that short.

          • P M

            There’s a Miyazaki-produced anime movie where a character talks about her older sister wearing mini skirts: ‘Like everyone else, she covered her bottom when riding up an escalator’. :D

            • FayeMac

              In the early 70′s I worked at a building in downtown Houston. Some guys would spend part of their lunch hour standing at the base of the escalators to watch women in short skirts ride up and down.

            • P M

              Not looking impressed (at them, not your comment)

            • Diane Lee

              Which Miyazaki movie was that? I don’t remember.

            • P M

              It’s called ‘Only Yesterday’. Some consider it a mite slow, but I think it’s beautiful. It’s like a relaxed journey into the countryside, with a genuine love for the people and the farming way of life. It’s a character looking back on her life at a turning point, and it’s quite female-specific in parts: they even have children talking about menarche! And the animation! sigh….

              The director is Isao Takahata (Grave of the Fireflies). There’s lots of places to view it on the internet – sadly it’s never been released in the US, so that’s about the only way to view it. Search for ‘only yesterday’ in youtube and you’ll come up with plenty of clips.
              (Sorry for the essay lol)

            • FayeMac

              Only Yesterday, sounds interesting, will check it out

          • Ginger Thomas

            Showing was definitely NOT okay! We didn’t bend over or raise our arms too high over our heads. We bent our knees and squatted (also known as the “bunny dip” after the move taught Playboy bunnies).

          • annieanne

            Not in offices they weren’t. Offices still had dress codes back then. Skirts that short, as well as pants would have been banned. I’m kind of surprised Janie’s got that so wrong.

            • T C

              Depended on the office. Small businesses and creative were not like the Fortune 500. My skirts were generally fingertip length back then. I sat in office chair and scooted whenever I needed access to bottom two file drawers.

            • Susan Beaupre-Kish

              No, sorry, maybe where you lived they weren’t that short but in Boston my skirts were that short in 1969-70 in my first office job. But we were NOT allowed to wear pants suits!

          • Peggy Hazard

            I don’t recall dresses that short in 1969 although they were well above the knee. 3 years later, in my senior year in high school, I did wear one as short as the ones seen in this episode. In 1978 I wore it as a maternity top!

          • vitaminC

            “The note said Mrs. Johnson, you’re wearing your dresses way too high”

            :^)

            • TheDivineMissAnn

              With me it was the nuns. We would roll up our skirts at the waist to make them shorter when we were off school grounds, but as soon as we got closer to school and in the building we pulled them down to our knees! Otherwise we were sent to the convent!

          • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

            My 8th-grade English teacher told us that she had started teaching in the year of the shortest miniskirts, and she used to write every single thing she would need on the board before school because there was no way to reach without showing something. Incidentally, the year I was in her class she went for “dental surgery” and came back with very poorly-done collagen in her lips. We all kept waiting for the swelling to go down, but it never did. The price of vanity, I suppose.

          • VirginiaK

            I think I posted this somewhere else but anyhow — as I recall, at least in Manhattan, women wore pantyhose, often opaque, all year round, even in summer, at the time the miniskirt appeared — a common observation was that the invention of pantyhose in the late 50s or early 60s allowed skirts to get so short, since the woman no longer would be wearing stockings plus garters to hold them up. So you’d be somewhat covered up, which wasn’t the same as just having underwear show.

        • Jackie4g

          I was around then and working in retail, and for the most part, women and girls would have been called into Personnel, which is what they called Human Resources, and told their skirts were too short. It was work, so they couldn’t really send them home, like a school disciplinarian might have done. That’s one thing they get wrong. Skirts in NYC might have been that short in certain business environments, but not universally. Shirley would have been harassed unmercifully for wearing that skirt length. It certainly was not viable in businesses in New Jersey, even in artsy occupations.

          • Beth

            I agree. Although I was a young teen around this time, my sister is a decade older and she and her friends most definitely didn’t dress this way at work. Above the knee, yes, but not just below the ass!

            • Chickadeep

              You rarely saw skirts that short on professional women when I was growing up—in casual or dress-up wear, sure, and maybe on a teen working behind the counter in a store, but I think workplaces were a bit more conservative in 1969 in Maine. I imagine the standards were a little different for a workplace in a fashion-conscious industry (advertising) in the biggest, most fashionable city in the USA (NYC), though.

            • Grumpy Girl

              Yes, that is what I think–there was a reason ladies who worked in other industries looked down on those in advertising. (I saw that at my parents’ gatherings in NYC, when one guy once brought along a date who worked in that industry . . . no other woman there would talk to her.)

          • vitaminC

            Isn’t the secretarial pool at SC&P basically used like Playboy bunnies who do office work? The clients sure seem appreciative, anyway.

          • VirginiaK

            In NYC in the publishing world, skirts were that short. I have a couple of dresses I saved from the late 60s or I wouldn’t have believed it myself. (Pre-digital cameras, one tended not to have many photos of everyday life!)

          • Glammie

            Advertising is pretty closely tied to fashion, so, yes, the secretaries would have worn skirts that short at an ad agency. Makes sense that Peggy’s and Joan’s are longer since they have more professional occupations. Secretaries at agencies were partly seen as window dressing–they were supposed to be attractive and stylish–adding to the agency’s appeal.

        • SparkleNeely

          I just wore a skirt that short the other day but then I live in South Florida where it’s common. People down here wear things tighter and shorter. It’s also what’s in the stores now.

          • P M

            Yes, but this is the Kardashian Age, when some teenagers express their feels via naked insta-pics.

            • Alloy Jane

              Short skirts/shorts never go out of fashion in warm weather regions. It’s not always about showing off the goods so much as airing them out. But if you can look cute while doing it, why not?

            • SparkleNeely

              So true. It was 91 here the other day. I still look decent in short, floaty skirts so I will rock them as long as I can! :)

            • P M

              I’m not surprised by the length, I’m surprised by the length *and* the era *and* the setting. It’s an office environment, it’s in the late 60s, probably some of these women lived close to or with their families.

            • Alloy Jane

              Oh, I was referring to now. Since the popularization of minis in the 60s, they have never gone out of fashion and that this has more to do with weather than Kardashians. And instagram is just another vehicle for nakie pics. Before, you had to send your cock/tit shots via txt or email but now you can tweet and insta them to everyone!

            • SparkleNeely

              My daughter doesn’t! We both like Kiernan Shipka’s style. I hold that girl up as a fashion icon for her, without perhaps the sky-high heels. Also, the Obama girls look nice. Naked Instagrams are trashy at any age.

      • Danielle

        All the women (Peggy, the 3 secretaries) were tied together with how they were standing and their blue outfits, except for Meredith in the background as a bright yellow beacon of just not getting it.

    • imspinningaround

      Peggy’s blue dress might be my favorite outfit she’s ever worn. It’s bold in its detail, vivid in color and very flattering. I wonder if Janie chose that one like she did Joan’s beautiful purple date rape dress–the most memorable and beautiful costume for the character in her most horrifying scene.

      • Ms_flyover

        Oddly, my favorite is the Velma orange skirt outfit that was hanging on the back of her door in the episode. I’d say her clothes improve every season, but there is still the striped shirt form her apartment to remind us the transformation isn’t complete, nor will it ever be,

        • DeniseSchipani

          The at-home Velma outfit IS awful, but it’s appropriate for her hanging out at home clothes. It’s a Saturday, she was probably doing errands and cleaning, etc. A world without the regular wearing of jeans for casual clothes (or, more recently, yoga pants!) looks awfully strange to our eyes. I dressed like that in 1969. Then again, I was three…

          • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

            It’s the neckline that kills it – if it were a button-down shirt it’d be Carol Brady realness.

      • P M

        I thought she looked a little like a nurse. All she was missing was a cap and cape.

        • T. Sticks

          Oh yes, you’re right! Or a candy striper!

      • MK03

        My all-time Peggy favorite is her black-and-white plaid dress from season 2. I need to make it for myself and revel in that early 60s fabulosity.

        • PowerfulBusiness

          Agreed. It was spectacular.

      • Chris

        I may have been over-thinking it but the chains on it may have been a foreshadowing of Ginsberg’s restraints at the end. Navy blue is a color Peggy wears a lot whenever she has to be “strong” at work. When she confronted Don about Ted, fired Joey and dealt with the new Don situation last week she was in military styled navy blue dresses. They really suit her.

        • ybbed

          And what is Peggy staring at in the computer room? Two big giant blue nipples, screwing with everybody’s heads!

        • sweetlilvoice

          I was thinking the chains represented a nurse carrying keys around her waist–kind of like Nurse Ratchet.

        • http://www.tragicsandwich.com/ Tragic Sandwich

          I thought that scene corresponded to the lawnmower incident in “Guy Walks Into an Advertising Agency.” Peggy faints at the sight of not just blood, but violence, whereas this time she held it together enough to do what needed to be done. And in the earlier episode, she was wearing a navy dress with white polka dots.

      • testingwithfire

        Someone pointed out (maybe it was T&L’s recap) that in contrast to Miss Blankenship’s death, when Peggy needed Joan to handle everything, Peggy handled this crisis herself – and arguably this incident was much more disturbing to Peggy personally. Peggy is definitely grown folks now, at least on the job. I think the dress marks the occasion.

      • Mazenderan

        I liked the blue one with the red panels- but agree that the blue dress is lovely too. Navy blue seems to work well on her – it looks vivid, clean and professional.

    • G. M. Palmer

      “Get in the cab, you losers.” LOL.

      So what about a connection between Ginsberg and Macbeth? Both crazy, both in ill-fitting clothes. I think it might be too much of a stretch but if anyone in the cast could deliver the Tomorrow speech, it’s Michael G.

      • Shug

        Did you also hear that in the style of Regina George?

        • MK03

          I think it’s impossible not to.

    • MechaSacanagem

      What, no love for Stan’s moose knuckle?

    • French_Swede

      Ah, so now my Wednesday can finally start being productive!

    • Mazenderan

      Wow – I never even noticed all the pink outfits – but it really sticks out when you bring it all together. It makes sense in an episode where Megan’s actions were reminiscent of Don’s unwilling first time

      I thought putting both Stephanie and Megan in that dressing gown underlined the Whore/Madonna thing – Stephanie all blonde and lean and pregnant, and Megan dark, in last night’s makeup, and crossing her arms over her flat stomach.

      Your final photo of the women in the office watching Michael being taken away shows Meredith in yellow plaid, just like the one you pointed out on Sally. I guess plaid really is the uniform for Don’s girls.

      I was worried that Don’s mismatched hat in the final scene meant that he had somehow screwed the meeting up – or it wasn’t as impressive as it seemed. Was it OK to wear a hat so different from your suit at that point? It looked bad.

      • P M

        I don’t imagine men would have different hats for different suits – would they? Can someone please enlighten me?

        • decormaven

          The well-dressed, well-heeled man did. Take a lot at Roger Sterling’s hat collection.

          • Jackie4g

            Yes, but Roger was extremely wealthy. My ex-FIL told a story of wearing his old hat until a senior executive at the bank where he worked commented one day on how he was wise to wear his old hat in the rain. He said he bought a new hat the very next day. So he had a good everyday hat, and an old one for rainy days.

          • Mazenderan

            I’d have assumed you needed one to match each colour of suit you had – although I have no idea how much they would have cost.

        • Trent

          I absolutely have different hats for different suits — and outfits. And I wouldn’t have worn a hat in that shade of grey with a tobacco brown suit, but that’s my taste and not Don’s.

        • Grumpy Girl

          My dad did–and he wore a uniform for work (ie, his hats and suits were for going places with my mother or friends, so if those people made sure my dad had some degree of matching when they were out with him . . .) Yes, my dad was the guy who always wore “top of the drawer, front of the closet”; the eternal dressing project for friends, and later, spouse.

      • P M

        Also, Stephanie looked so filthy in her first hippie drag that I couldn’t even tell it was originally pink.

        • KayeBlue

          I didn’t WANT to look closely enough to tell it was originally pink!

        • Danielle

          When she hugged Megan, all I could think of is, oh my god, she must smell so bad!

        • Cabernet7

          It looked beige to me. I have to squint to see pink.

        • Mazenderan

          She did look pretty nasty. I couldn’t tell that was pink either, I thought it was cream or beige or something.

      • Kate Andrews

        Oh yeah — I forgot about the woman in the whorehouse wearing pink. Good catch!

        • Mazenderan

          I totally forgot about it until last week – when Joan was wearing a really bright pink dress, and it reminded me of the whorehouse stuff. :)

      • carolclark12

        I saw that, too. But then I noticed he has a gray stripe in his tie.

      • leahpapa

        “reminiscent of Don’s unwilling first time” – yes! I noted on Monday’s recap that the other woman was named Amy/Aimee, same as the name of the prostitute who was nice to Don and then, well, raped him. When that episode aired, I remember a lot of Internet comments shied away from calling it rape, but if the genders were reversed (ailing, vulnerable young woman whose reluctance is pretty obvious and more experienced older man) what we we call it?

        I kept thinking that pink bathrobe sort of called back Aimee’s peignoir, Sylvia’s bathrobe, and his stepmother’s apron, but I’m not sure quite what to make of that.

        • KayeBlue

          Oh, of course it was rape. He was what, 13-15? I’m glad I didn’t see comments calling it anything but what it was.

          • oldscrumby

            Comments? There were whole reviews that labeled it just “Don losing his virginity.” It’s actually how I got my cousin to start reading this blog; she was so irritated that her usual recapper, AV Club, had totally missed how that scene was a forced encounter.

            • KayeBlue

              Vomitory! I only read the T Lo recaps, and now I have another reason to be a T Lo purist.

            • leahpapa

              Yeah, I remember one that said something, like, “Oh, DD got his cherry popped by a hooker. Who’s surprised?” I thought Abigail Rine’s piece in the Atlantic (“Don Draper Was Raped”) was a really helpful corrective.

            • KayeBlue

              I shall Google that- thanks!

            • Cabernet7

              I read one review that said it was beautiful and tender and one of the few good things that ever happened in his childhood. Made my skin crawl.

            • http://bidonica.wordpress.com/ Poggy

              Ugh. That’s so fucked up. The show had the kid physically overpowered, repeatedly saying “no” and acting terrified, you can’t be much more explicit in depicting lack of consent than that.

            • smh4748

              Good read, I didn’t see that piece last year, but appreciated it now. Thanks for sharing.

      • CatherineRhodes

        Good point on the Madonna/Whore bathrobes!

        • Mazenderan

          Cheers! It was as soon as she used the word ‘Madonna’ it reminded me of the TLo recap of the episode where we saw the root of Don’s mother/whore problem. I wonder what actually might have happened if he had seen Stephanie in Megan’s bathrobe? I don’t think he would have made a pass or anything – but it would have brought all those buried issues rushing to the surface.

          • mad girl

            She was even wearing the towel on her head, similar to the turbans worn by whore Aimee, Sylvia and the oatmeal ad woman.

        • Chris

          That’s funny because when I saw Megan greet Stephanie her look struck me as modern day Renaissance. The color and styling with her hair pulled back like that. I think they were playing up a whole Madonna theme.

      • fitzg

        I noticed that they put Megan in a red dress for her first scene for the toenail painting – signaling her role as “Whore” for this episode?

        • sweetlilvoice

          You just know that whenever Megan wears red, she’s going to have a bad day. Remember her red bathrobe on the TV set when Don watched her love scene and then called her a whore?

          • Glammie

            Hunh, you think Megan would remember that and avoid playing the role.

      • MartyBellerMask

        I commented on this earlier but Disqus is being super annoying and I’m not sure it posted.
        Anyway, yes, so very accurate, and I will go one further. Ginsberg’s clothes were not just baggy, but very well-worn. Being very familiar with sensory disorders, I can tell you that soft, broken-in fabrics can be just as important (or more important depending on the person). New, scratchy clothes can be incredibly distressing to someone with SPD.
        And even further, the one time in the whole series that we’ve seen him in new clothes (or rather, the only time T Lo noted he might be wearing something new), it is a new coat. A coat would go over his clothes, so scratchy/stiff/new fabric wouldn’t have bothered him.

        ETA- and now it put this comment in the wrong place. ACKKKKKKKKKKKK. Sorry. This was meant to go with a comment about Ginsbeg’s wardrobe.

        • gingerella

          I’m compounding your “error” because I completely agree with your observation. Ginsberg would have worn those clothes until they fell off because new clothes would have been a genuine ordeal for him. I know that in times of great stress in my young life, my sister would tease me for reverting to “sack of clothes” outfits — soft, baggy and flowing. Ginsberg is a sack of clothes man.

        • VirginiaK

          Excellent, and I will unnicely add that the psychiatrist that NY Magazine consults on psychopathology on Mad Men was pretty totally off-base in his commentary about Ginsberg — this kind of thing is much more relevant than any speculation about schizophrenia or “Freudian” themes, not that they can’t be there as well.

      • Leah Elzinga

        I think seeing Stephanie in HER clothes was especially disconcerting for her. It was one thing when she was dirty and disheveled, but as a pretty blue eyed, California blond, practically blossoming (am I the only one that thought “blooming” upon seeing her in that ruffled neckline), Megan was insanely threatened by her.

        • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

          It made quite the contrast, sunny blonde Stephanie representing California versus dark-haired Megan with her sculpted features and East-Coast air.

      • andrea

        I think it ties in with his tie ok, personally. His does a better job matching overall than Cutlers, IMO

    • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

      ”They get so tongue-tied around us. I can only pretend so long that we’re just regular neighbors.” this times infinity… Oh Betty
      I have to say I really like Henry, I think he is good for Betty or as good as anyone can be.

      • P M

        Well, Betty, you do leave them speechless. For what reason though is better left unsaid :D.

        • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

          Did you see Henry’s face?

      • Susan Collier

        And how much does this sort of mirror Megan’s party? A bunch of rich and/or powerful people bringing the commoners into their houses?

        • 3hares

          You could say they’re exact opposites. Betty wishes her neighbors thought of them as the rich and powerful in comparison to them, the lowly commoners, but they’re probably not that impressed. Megan’s trying to appear like a commoner but stands out for being so expensively overdressed.

        • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

          Yes, Megan was even acting like Betty this episode.

        • greenwich_matron

          Yes. I cannot believe that Megan would be oblivious to the differences between her and her guests. If nothing else she must have noticed that no one else spent hours on hair and makeup. She looks like she wandered on to the wrong movie set. Betty tries to impress by being the uber-WASP, but Megan is very comfortable showing off her fabulousness.

          • Dorace Afton Trottier

            honestly? i agree that Megan is comfortable showing off her “fabulousness” – because that’s what it is all about for Megan. she DOESN’T notice that no one else spent hours (and dollars) on hair and makeup! she only notices HERSELF.

            • greenwich_matron

              She notices whether other people are paying attention to her, and she notices others enough to make sure no one is outshining her.

            • Dorace Afton Trottier

              agreed! that said, she *is* oblivious to how the differences set her apart from everyone else, and belie her fiction that she is a starving artist.

            • TeraBat

              In “Dark Shadows,” Megan has a friend over who’s trying for a role in, ahem, Dark Shadows. Megan lightly mocks the writing, and then gets told off by her friend, effectively saying, “Some of us have to work for a living and don’t have Daddy Draper paying the bills.” The look on Megan’s face implies she’s never really thought of the differences between them.

            • Glammie

              This. Megan is drawn to acting because she likes to be noticed. She seems to have little interest in playing Shakespeare. She was satisfied with playing a character on a soap opera.

          • Chris

            Megan made such a huge fuss over the TV Don bought, you would think she would be more aware of the message she is sending with the constant parade of expensive clothes etc.

            • 3hares

              I could believe she’d make justifications for herself over things she likes (clothes) over things she doesn’t care as much about (TVs). She doesn’t think the TV looks cool; she does think the dress looks cool.

            • Chris

              Which is funny because Margaret wore either a Pucchi dress or a Pucchi-esque dress before. It’s not really edgy at all. If it weren’t so short, I could see a young SC wife wearing that dress. It was dramatically different from what the other women at that party were wearing. They looked more “70′s” and Megan looked more “60′s” to me.

            • 3hares

              Yes, her outfits earlier seem a little more in the same style–the flowered dress and the mini with the blouse. But this dress is very mod. Plus she’s got all that hair and make up. She really stands out. In her way she’s dressing for the job she wants, I guess–she looks like a movie star rather than a struggling actress. I really like how they’ve made that choice with her and stuck with it, that she genuinely is drawn to somewhat bohemian people and wants to appear that way, but is just as strongly drawn to very expensive clothes etc. It’s a great way to give info about Megan just in the costuming because the opposite choice would have made just as strong a statement in the other direction. Like if Megan was always dressed like these folks despite having access to Don’s money it would show different priorities or values. This is, after all, someone who came to SCDP after quitting acting when she actually was one of these starving artist types working in a diner.

            • MK03

              I don’t remember Margaret wearing something like that. Betty did, though, after her trip to Rome with Don in season 3.

            • Chris

              Look at the Mad Style for Last Season’s episode “The Better Half” you will see pictures of her in it. The pictures are pretty far down towards the end of the post. The colors are softer but it’s either a Pucchi dress or Pucchi inspired. I noticed it last season.

            • larrythesandboy

              I don’t remember Margaret in a Pucci dress, but Betty wore one on the morning after her return from her trip to Rome with Don (when she spoke Italian!) – just as her marriage finally began to go down the plug hole.

            • Chris

              Margaret wears it in the episode “The Better Half” last season. Betty’s wasn’t a Pucchi I don’t think, but it was definitely bringing in that mod look.

            • Kathy G

              I thought that was a specious remark she made to Don, a lie. She was more upset about him making decisions about her home where she is “in control.” After all, doesn’t she drive a foreign convertible automobile?

        • Jackie4g

          Standing there in front of all the silver chafing dished. It’s crazy how now you can’t even give sterling silver away. People don’t want the maintenance.

          • Shug

            I’m the only 26 year old I know that owns silver polish. Recently found a gorgeous silver cocktail tray for $7 at a thrift store. Mr. Shug about died the time he came home to me polishing our silver.

            • decormaven

              Enjoy your silver, and use it regularly. Nothing beats the glint off a well-polished piece.

            • T C

              You can save yourself a lot of time and elbow grease using a foil roasting pan, boiling water and baking soda. Smaller items do well in a rectangular casserole with foil in the bottom. This method will remove any oxidation you might consider as ornamentation, especially in crevices of more embellished silver. Choose your method accordingly. Also *never* put silver, plate or copper in the dishwasher; ditto any china with gold trims. It will be etched.

          • somebody blonde

            Seriously? I’ll take your sterling silver, it’s better than money in the bank.

            • Jackie4g

              Ah, all the tea and coffee service and flatware was stolen in 1976. I left the flatware (service for 12 Chantilly by, I think, Gorham, left to me by a relative), when I got my first apartment and my parent’s house was robbed! Never got sterling when I was married. I could barely get the ex to pour his ever present beer into a glass, even when there was company.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Yeah, there’s a lot of criticism and talk about his chauvinism coming out of nowhere — honestly, I don’t think he would have been as condescending toward Betty as he would have toward another kind of wife. I am NOT a Betty basher, but she’s behaved terribly in public with him from early on, and with that one politically disastrous line: “Since when [have you held that opinion, you sleazy flip-flopper]?” — I get where he’s coming from, telling her to leave the thinking to him. Not that it was okay to say! But I think it has to do with their specific history.

        • Trent

          I do think Henry has been more gentlemanly in his chauvinism before, if that makes sense. But living with Betty, and her constant passive-aggressive behavior towards both Henry and her children, would have to wear that veneer off eventually.

          Also, Henry worked for John Lindsay, who was a Republican with a liberal voting record (and switched to the Democratic party in the early 1970′s). It’s not surprising that Henry and Betty are having clashing ideological views at this point.

        • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

          It did come out of nowhere. I think Henry for the most part is a decent guy. He puts up with a lot from her and is nicer to her children than she is. Also, I think he was more annoyed that she contradicted him (with regards to the issues he got elected supporting) in public. It’s rare to hear even today spouses of candidates directly oposing their rhetoric in public. Part of a marriage to a politician means knowing when and where to keep your mouth shut.

          • somebody blonde

            Hell, it’s not even that common to have normal couples disagreeing about contentious issues in front of other people.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              No it isn’t. Plus, the last thing he needs is people saying why should I vote for a guy whose wife even disagrees with him.

        • greenwich_matron

          It does annoy me, because up to this point they have shown Henry as being ridiculously patient and understanding with Betty (it struck me as creepy). It would have played a lot better if he said “Honey, this is a lot more complicated than you can realize! Let me do the thinking. Trust me.” and then was left flabbergasted that he could have made her so mad.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Not entirely true. He did yell at her pretty harshly/condescendingly shortly after their marriage, when Betty got drunk in public at that restaurant after seeing Don with Bethany. Something about “Is that what you need, a drink? Are you a lush now?”

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              what episode what this again? I vaguely remember it. I thought he was jealous being seeing Don still affected her in some way.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Season 4 episode 8, “The Summer Man.” I am pretty sure Henry is very clear about how embarrassed he was that she got drunk in public.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              ok rewatching:)

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Cool! Let me know what your impression is. I’m sure that Henry wasn’t happy either to see his new wife go to pieces over her ex, but I think there’s definitely a precedent for him getting angry/condescending toward her when she publicly embarrasses him.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              I will let you know

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              Ok rewatched and here is my opinion. He was definitely out of line. I don’t think I realized how condescending he sounded before. “Its called being an adult.” The worst part for me was not the yelling at Betty but the calling Don and basically uninviting him to Gene’s birthday party. Not sure, if he was protecting Betty or just plain jealous but way over the line.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Thanks! Yeah, he’s really frustrated with her childishness — especially when it embarrasses him before others. And he might have disinvited Don because he thought Betty couldn’t handle him being there, that she’d get drunk and make a scene again.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              agreed

            • Chris

              If that happened now to any of my friends, male or female and their partner did that at a work related dinner, they would be very mad also. It’s disrespectful and embarrassing. I wouldn’t give either gender a pass on that.

            • sweetlilvoice

              He told her that she didn’t get to say that she needed a drink which was really controlling. I’d forgotten that one. Let’s just say if my husband told me that I didn’t get to say something, he would be sleeping with the cat on the sofa.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Oooh, yeah. I’d forgotten that one. That’s definitely not a cool line for 21st century women to hear.

          • TeraBat

            Even the most patient of people sometimes lose their shit. This wasn’t just Betty having a tantrum in the privacy of their own home; this was, to Henry’s viewpoint, active sabotage of his career as a politician. It’s behavior that, if it continued, would be nothing more than ammunition for his enemies to use against him in a campaign (“Henry Francis’ ideas are so bad, even his *wife* disagrees with him! Check out *this* gossip from a Francis neighbor!”). It would make sense that, if Henry is going to fly off the handle, this will be what did it.

        • Chris

          I thought the “leave the thinking line to me” was out of character for him and out of line, but I could understand why he was upset at her challenging him in front of their neighbors. I would feel exactly the same if it were Betty’s job and he said “Oh since when have you thought that?” in front of of constituents. If Abe acted like that towards Peggy at a work related party I would have been mad at him too. When Megan invited them to Don’s birthday you could tell Abe was on his best behavior even though the SCDP people weren’t “his crowd”. It’s all about respect, and Henry and Betty didn’t show each other enough of it.

          • T C

            One of my father’s oft repeated lines to us in the late 1960s was “Don’t crap where you eat.” It was usually uttered at the dinner table, where my non-working mother would wince but remain silent. We didn’t often have family dinners as my father traveled extensively for business and they had to host and attend many cocktail and dinner parties for same. Within a week of these utterances my brother and I were expected to attend a business function, the first of which I can recall at around age 2 back in the 50s.

          • Trent

            “I would feel exactly the same if it were Betty’s job…”

            But “Beautiful Supportive Republican Wife” IS Betty’s job…( :

        • Ganoc

          In the main I do think Henry has been fairly good to Betty, but he was introduced as a much older man who hit on her while she was heavily pregnant with another man’s child, then proceeded to essentially “rescue” her from that situation, so it makes sense that he has some fairly traditional, oppressively patriarchal views of men’s roles and women’s roles – including whose job it is to think.

    • annejumps

      Excellent analysis.

      “Don’s ultimate California fantasy (back in the days when California represented hope to him) was a pregnant Megan (dressed like the hippie she never was or will be) giving him permission to sleep with other women.” I can’t believe I forgot that sequence.

      • mommyca

        I can’t believe I forgot it either! (as they did plenty of recappers this week, I haven’t seen that anywhere, TLo rocks!)

      • Angelfood

        I agree. Totally perfect call back. I didn’t think of that scene as Don’s california fantasy but it makes perfect sense.

      • LKN

        That’s also the scene where there’s an offer of an extra nipple (on the hookah). Very appropriate for this episode, eh?

    • Megan Kennedy

      Is Megan wearing the same nightgown Stephanie was wearing?

      • sugarkane105

        Yes, I believe it was Megan’s nightgown from the start, only loaned to Stephanie after her shower.

        • marishka1

          Yes, I agree. And even though Megan told Stephanie to make herself at home, seeing S. walk out in her robe stopped her in her tracks for half a second.

          • Trent

            …as did Stephanie’s freshly-scrubbed beauty (made extra-threatening after the “I know Don’s secrets” comment).

            • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

              I think that’s what REALLY got to Megan. Did you see the look on her face after that remark? I think she would have had no problem with Stephanie staying with them, but then she realized that Stephanie knows even more about the real Don/Dick Whitman than she does. That’s why she pulled out the checkbook.

            • ybbed

              I keep hearing this that Stephanie “knows more” than Megan. I really doubt if she knows more, I mean she may know more about how Dick became Don, but Megan was right when she said, “You don’t know him”. Stephanie really doesn’t know Don, like the viewers and Megan know Don. It was a moment of insecurity and maybe alarm for Megan, acting to protect Don from a mooching free loader that wants money.

            • sweetlilvoice

              I go back and forth on the scene. We know how ridiculous Don can be and he is the last person qualified to give Stephanie parenting advice. He would just try to take over her life and monitor worse than her mother. She’s not without a family back home. Her mom was a real pain. Anna would have totally taken her in. On the other hand, as soon as Megan saw Stephanie looking beautiful and clean (in her robe/nightgown), she got her on her way. And Stephanie was the only reason Don was coming to California which is just heartbreaking for Megan.

            • ybbed

              actually it was after stephanie said “I know all his secrets” that megan became alarmed

            • MK03

              Her waspish “But you don’t know all his secrets” really said it all. She is so threatened that Don has people in his life besides her…

      • Susan Collier

        Yes. It’s a robe to wear when one party is leaving LA.

      • Mazenderan

        It reminded me of the lacy white and pink dress that a heavily pregnant Betty wore to Roger’s party

      • Sobaika

        Yes, it stood out to me when watching the episode – correct me if I’m wrong, but the scenes felt as if they were framed and lit similarly.

        Megan wants to be what Anna Draper & co. are to Don, she’s so deeply insecure.

        • P M

          I haven’t caught your comments in so long! (waves)

          • Sobaika

            *waves back*

            I started a new job and was out of the country for a bit, and now I’m working on moving – a lot going on! But I definitely haunt this blog regularly. Need my TLo and BK fix!

            • P M

              How exciting for you :)

            • charlotte

              ETA: My question has already been asked.

        • Cate

          Yep. And she only puts it on after the threesome, like, “Did I nail it? Are you interested in me again?” Meanwhile, Don is acting like nothing even happened, and only perks up when Stephanie calls.

          • ktr33

            In fact, his first phone call from Stephanie was the first genuine smile I’ve seen on him in a long while.

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          How was Greece?

          • decormaven

            Curious as well…

          • Sobaika

            Amazing, and there was so much FETA.

            • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

              Welcome back. Tell us everything in the lounge on Friday.

        • Jackie4g

          Yes and welcome back.

      • KayeBlue

        The bathrobe? Yes. It’s got to be Megan’s bathrobe.

      • Wendi126

        It’s Megan’s robe she lent to Stephanie for after her shower

      • Angelfood

        I think it’s a robe.

    • quiltrx

      I just had to say again–I don’t even watch Mad Men, but I read Mad Style each and every week. It’s always so interesting how color and style convey a message…and your thoughtful discussions on each episode are so complete, I feel like I know exactly what went on without having seen the show.
      I know these posts take considerable time and work to put together–so, thanks from a non-watcher.

      • Matt

        I’m curious — is there a reason why you don’t watch the show? To each his/her own, of course. I’m just puzzled that while you get the “message” of color and style with the show, but…why not? :) (No offense is intended. I just am very curious!)

        • Grumpy Girl

          Can’t speak for quiltrx, but for myself . . . I actually do this with more shows than I watch. (I also like the analysis better than the speech, etc.) I tried watching the show a few times when it first came on, and I kept getting offended in weird ways about small things (why is Peggy doing stupid things? why did that secretary think it was OK to cry in the restroom?) and lots of (undesired) context of comments my mom (who would have been working in NYC at these times) said, specifically about “those crazy, immoral people in advertising.”

        • quiltrx

          No offense taken, it’s a good question! My hubby and I didn’t watch the show from the beginning–I was interested, but he really wasn’t, so we never started. I didn’t figure it would run this long, either! I’ll probably start from the beginning and watch it all, now that it’s on Netflix. I kind of hate to join shows late, particularly dramas–there’s so much of the character arc that I’ve missed.
          I like to think that what I’ve read here will ‘inform’ my viewing once I finally get there. ;)

          • elevan

            Hey at least getting in the game this late has one advantage- if you like it, you can watch as many episodes as close together as you want without having to wait a week in between. I started with Breaking Bad in either season 2 or 3 & got caught up quickly.

            So I guess that depends on if one finds binge-watching a good or bad thing.

            • quiltrx

              Plus I have the advantage of avoiding what I call “DVR Intimidation”…when you break out in a sweat to see how many eps you are behind, and the DVR’s filling up…and…and….

            • Alloy Jane

              I suppose that makes me a DVR hoarder. I don’t like to watch unless there are a few eps waiting for me in case I don’t want to stop watching.

            • quiltrx

              I have a *really* old Directv Tivo DVR. It holds (and I quote) “up to 60 hours, depending on content”. So I always have this fear that something isn’t going to record and/or something I wanted to watch that is really, really old is going to get deleted!
              You don’t want to know how often I flip through the list and guesstimate how many hours I think are already on there!

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          I watched the first episode and found all the characters thoroughly emetic, so didn’t watch any more. I like frivolity in my entertainment. But I love the depth and nuance TLo see in the show.

    • shirab

      Oh yes, 1969 was definitely a short-skirt year. It’s the year I was born, and when I was pregnant my mom gave me the Marimekko maternity dresses she had worn (she saved them for me). I thought they were blouses.

      • Alyssa_T_Robot

        my very modest mother told me that she had got ‘spoken to’ about wearing her short skirts to church as a cautionary tale lol. it’s one of my favorite mom stories bc i get to picture her as a sexy late 60′s bombshell which is also one of my favorite personal style aesthetics.

      • mixedupfiles

        My (then a teen) sister had such knockdown, drag-out fights with my parents over her skirts. They weren’t hemmed that short, but she rolled the waistband when she left the house.

        • Angelfood

          We did the waist roll up to our catholic school kilts in the late 80′s – LOL!

      • boweryboy

        That’s so awesome your mom saved her maternity dresses for you – Marimekko, no less.

    • Susan Collier

      Yes! Sally and her plaids. It looks just like the same “tartan” as her coat-style bathrobe.
      And that progressive dinner party scene: Here come the Coal Miner’s Daughter flammable ruffle dresses (but fashionable NY style)!

      • CPT_Doom

        It seemed like Sally’s poncho was a callback to both Marigold’s and Stephanie’s hippie clothes, albeit cleaner, showing her connection to the counter culture.

        • Aidan B

          Good catch!

        • SportifLateBoomer

          Fringed ponchos were definitely all the thing then. I just unearthed the one I crocheted around that time, maybe a few years later. I thought I was the bomb in it. Plan on giving it to my style-conscious 10 y/o niece, which is about how old I was when I made it (early 70s jr. hippie wannabe division).

        • sweetlilvoice

          Like Glen with his army jacket covered in cool buttons last season….

        • Katesymae

          Yeah, especially paired with her abortion comment. Definitely defiant, definitely becoming more her own person, definitely into youth culture. I’d defy Betty Francis and her huffy, old-fashioned expectations if I were her, too!

      • MissDelaware

        There are a lot of pictures of my mother and all her upper-class Chicago North Shore friends wearing those sheer, floral, ruffly maxi dresses in the early 70s (took a couple of years to get to the Midwest). With cigarettes. Amazing none of them went up in flames. (Although I remember getting burned by careless growups with cigarettes at parties as a little kid — while doing the requisite handing-around of hors d’oeuvres.)

        • Grumpy Girl

          That regulation got passed in the early 70s, about requiring more clothes made from flame-retardant fabrics, I think, after a few kids got burned. So there must have been some incidents, even if not on the show.

        • T C

          Silk chiffon doesn’t go up in flames like the synthetic copies do. A cigarette usually left an unmistakeable singed hole in the better fabrics.

    • P M

      I have to ask: where’s the fire reference in this episode? Or is it smoke now?

      • T C

        Megan’s kitchen curtains are a hybrid of flames and Roger’s vajayjay wallpaper. They’re also pink.

        • 3hares

          I think you mean Ted’s wallpaper.

    • Ms_flyover

      “A lady in pink, threatening GOOD TASTE AND ALL THAT IS HOLY IN THIS WORLD MY GOD PEGGY WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU?”

      Gentlemen, thank you for that. A) I did a much needed spit take with my Latte and B) It’s always nice to have your “dear christ that is ugly” sensibilities validated in the middle of the week.

      Noticing that Henry and Stan wore the same jacket in different seasons? What is in your coffee? I mean, your attention to detail is astounding, but … wow.

      • Kate Andrews

        Peg’s outfit was turrible.

        • sugarkane105

          Indeed, and its ugliness was only magnified by her wholly-unflattering pose after falling asleep on the couch. I thought to myself, “Wow, that’s the worst we’ve seen Peggy look.”

          • P M

            At least she wasn’t snoring.

            • Dorace Afton Trottier

              no, but she was TOTALLY drooling. even if we don’t see it.

          • mixedupfiles

            Lizzy does enthusiastically get her ugly on.

          • Aidan B

            That’s probably how I look when I fall asleep on the couch, but I flatter myself that I don’t wear anything as ugly as this outfit of Peg’s when that happens to me.

          • OneBonBonIsPoison

            I wonder if that was in some way intentional, making her look as unattractive as possible to further emphasize that Ginsberg’s advances towards her came from his mental illness and not a genuine attraction to her? That sounds so mean to Pegs but you know what I mean – In a different outfit where she looked beautiful (as she clearly can), that scene might have been read as more ambiguous.

            • KayeBlue

              That’s legit. To me, she looked very maternal.

            • mad girl

              I just watched again and it struck me that Peggy’s hideous outfit, the pink stripes over a white shirt, is totally reminiscent of a candy striper. So perfect. Now that’s some inspired costuming.

        • P M

          But why shouldn’t someone wear something terrible at home??

          • Kate Andrews

            But it didn’t even look comfortable!

          • 3hares

            Something terrible I totally support, but it looks both terrible and uncomfortable. Looking at her in that outfit I feel like I understand how Ginsberg must feel wearing too-tight clothes.

      • Chris

        I had thought that hideous look of Peggy’s was more 1970′s because I remember it. Now I know the ugly started in 1969.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          OMG! Now I remember why I still have fashion nightmares about the 70s. Nothing classic or classy about that decade. Nothing. Blech. (I know, I know, there’s probably an exception or two. But I can’t think of any.)

          • Chris

            I think there were some actresses and models who came through OK, but the “average” person really looked awful through most of the 70′s as I remember. Everything was earth toned, stumpy heels, made of polyester or old quilts. It offended my sensibilities even as a child. Anytime I hear the words “gauchos” or “Ponchos” I have horrific flashbacks.

      • Noah

        Seriously! I’d have never caught the jacket repeat. Though now I’m glad I wasn’t alone in feeling there was something off about that scene.

        I sort of wonder if it was done to emphasize that he had taken the more liberal position on Vietnam (seeming to Betty to be out of nowhere, but the politically savvy know it’s so as not to discredit a Republican president.) The end result is that Henry looks more progressed and Betty looks behind the times, even though that probably could have been accomplished without an anachronistic jacket.

        • Leah Elzinga

          Yes, I was thinking he was looking quite a bit more stylish than one would expect from a Republican politician at the time. And I definitely read that as a tie-in to his latent liberalism

      • testingwithfire

        Frumpcore!

        If a single gal doesn’t have the freedom to dress dowdily in her own home, I don’t know what the world is coming to. :-)

        Seriously, though, it takes a lot to make Elisabeth Moss look unappealing.

        • Trent

          LOL! I am SO stealing “frumpcore” — if Lena Dunham hasn’t already. ( :

      • PowerfulBusiness

        On a sidenote, if Peggy, Julio and Meredith could have a spinoff, I’d watch it forever. Add Stan – head exploding.

      • https://twitter.com/butt_texts Bostwick

        Ahaha, yes! “That horribly ugly outfit that pushed poor Michael over the edge of sanity with its ugliness”

        I love you, TLo!

      • Dorace Afton Trottier

        i agree with everyone that Peggy’s outfit was OMG WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU? did anyone else notice that Peggy was wearing thin vertical stripes and that they matched Julio’s shirt, which also had thin vertical stripes?

        • onetwothree

          That’s mentioned in the original post

    • sugarkane105

      I love the idea that Ginsberg’s clothes were large so as to not create more restriction and stimuli. I, too, was surprised at how many people thought his breakdown came out of nowhere. I just hope we get some resolution to his story.
      The pink motif was great – thanks for enlightening us there!
      Peggy’s blue dress is my favorite of the episode, followed closely by Megan’s Pucci.

      • Ms_flyover

        We probably won’t, I’m afraid. But I’m still hoping we find out what happened to Sal.

        • Lisa_Co

          I don’t think we will either. I think Weiner wrote Ginsberg off of the show because Ben Feldman(the actor who plays Ginsberg) is starring in a coming NBC sitcom, “A to Z”.

      • siriuslover

        and that sensitivity to the clothing makes perfect sense when he says that cutting off his nipple stopped the transmissions.

      • KayeBlue

        I think this *was* the resolution to his story. Born in a concentration camp (if that’s true), telling Peggy non-allegorically that he’s a Martian- poor guy’s a lot of bad turns. The general modern understanding of severe mental illness is that genetics “loads the gun” and stressful environments (even pre-natal and early-life environments) often “pull the trigger”. I am honestly glad they didn’t have him commit suicide like Lane. He’ll spend the rest of his life, or at least the next twenty years, in a psychiatric hospital.

        • JulieTy

          Agree (it’s called the “diathesis/stress model”). So sad. But the signs have been there from the beginning.

        • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

          There’s a lot of research that poor care or extreme stress in early life causes children/people to develop hypersensitivity to stimuli as a mode of self-preservation. Makes perfect sense with what we saw from Ginsberg this episode.

        • Mazenderan

          Isn’t there any way he could be medicated and still live a reasonably normal life? I read that Haldol was in use at this point. If he responded well to treatment, couldn’t he be seen as an outpatient?

          • KayeBlue

            I don’t know. My understanding is that pre-Reagan, people with severe mental illnesses were kept for much, much longer periods of time in psychiatric facilities.

          • T C

            There was not the cornucopia of psychiatric medications we have available today. There weren’t that many Rx drugs until direct advertising to consumers by pharmaceutical manufacturers became legal in the 1980s. The Physician’s Desk Reference did not resemble the major metropolitan Yellow Pages (often used as child booster seats) back then.

            It wasn’t until the mid 1970s that the ACLU sponsored Landis-Petrie-Short Act was approved by California Legislators which essentially de-funded the state mental health system (and hospitals) and placed the financial burden of uninsured mental health care onto county (taxpayer-funded) hospitals. LPS also eliminated involuntary commitments as there were a portion of institutionalized people who were nuisances to their families but not necessarily mentally ill, some were alcoholics and addicts. Unfortunately the California Legislature did not provide any funding mechanism for the patient load and, as a result, less than 6 of California’s 52 counties have inpatient psychiatric facilities today. This has resulted in county jails and state prisons becoming the de-facto public mental hospital. Reagan signed LPS as California Governor and brought the reform nationwide when he was President in the 1980s.

      • Chickadeep

        This is really common among people with mental health issues — extreme or increasing sensitivity to stimuli, from noise to smells to the feeling of clothing. Ginsberg has always worn loose shirts, but that last one I think is the biggest one yet — it’s made for a guy 30 lbs heavier and five inches taller than him.

        • P M

          I always wondered if he basically wore his dad’s clothes.

          • MartyBellerMask

            I just assumed (still do) that he shopped at thrift stores.

        • Lilah

          It’s my understanding that there are a lot of people who are highly sensitive to stimuli who are not mentally ill (i.e., people who may be on the autistic spectrum). Obviously, there is something wrong with Ginsberg, but for a while there I thought he might just be somewhat autistic. Though that wouldn’t have been as dramatic.

        • TeraBat

          I also wonder if his big shirts are also meant to imply straitjackets, where the sleeves are oversized for a reason?

          • MartyBellerMask

            T Lo used a shot, from either Monday’s review or the previous week’s, that showed Ginsberg with a white baggy shirt and his arms crossed. I actually did look at it and see “straightjacket”.

      • ktr33

        I hadn’t thought of that, which is great, but they also seem to indicate a “little boy lost” among men, coddled by his father.

        • 3hares

          Ginsberg’s words about his father that time he came into the office are more chilling in retrospect. He referred to him as “that man” and basically implied that he said he was his father. It’s possible that was paranoia talking there, whether his father had adopted him or was his biological father.

    • Roz

      Peggy’s dressed like a ten-year -old ’cause she’s on a date with one! Julio is sort of her Glenn–remember Betty watching TV with Glenn, back in the day? Wonder what TV show was so compelling that Julio HAD to watch–maybe Star Trek?

      • Trent

        OMG — I’d forgotten creepy Glen! I wonder if he’ll make a final appearance with Sally this season? Maybe he’ll ask for a lock of her hair for his collection…

        • JulieTy

          Please, no. No! No more Glen.

          • Trent

            “Everything you want to do, everything you think’s gonna make you happy, just turns to crap.” **stares blankly**

        • Dorace Afton Trottier

          there WILL be more Glen. he’s Weiner’s son. ;-)

      • EarthaKitten

        I recall Betty was wearing a very full ruffled dress when she sat next to Glenn…and she sat really close to him. Peggy, on the other hand, is wearing pants and is sitting far away from Julio, with her arms crossed. Very different body language and very different women at different stages in their lives.

        I thought it was interesting that Betty was watching Gomer Pyle USMC which had its last airing on May 2, 1969. Leave it up to Betty to watch a comedy about Marines while real Marines were dying in Vietnam. If Julio was at Peggy’s on Friday night, I bet they were watching Gomer Pyle too or maybe Wild Wild West; if Saturday night, I would guess Get Smart.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          Peggy and Julio have sort of a sibling relationship.

          • Lisa_Co

            I thought it was weird how the Peggy/Julio relationship changed from neighbor’s kid she was screaming at a few episodes ago to kid she is welcoming/hanging out with. Just one of several WHUT?? moments I had this episode.

            • Katesymae

              I’d bet she still treats him like a nuisance but is secretly glad for the company. Oh, Peggy.

            • Miss Disco

              i imagine he’s a kid with a mother who goes out to work a lot, and probably has to spend a lot of time alone, so probably came looking for company too. Like tlo observed, she’s put pretzels out.

              (also, who knows, maybe his family don’t have a tv)

            • lulubella

              I think she’s being a caring, responsible adult. There was no mention of Julio’s father, and maybe his mother has to work or they don’t have a TV. I thought it was cute that she allowed him to watch a show. Sad that she is not doing something with adults on a Sat night, but she’s being a kind neighbor.

        • Ginger Thomas

          Gomer Pyle ran from 1964 to 1969 and never mentioned the Vietnam war. It was consistently in the top 10. “Escapist” television was very popular then.

          • EarthaKitten

            A couple of years later All In the Family debuted with Maude debuting a year later. Those shows included social commentary in addition to wonderful comedy. Betty would not have liked either show.

            • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

              I remember watching All in the Family for the first time in early 1971. I turned to my husband and said, “I can’t believe that’s coming out of our TV!”

        • Roz

          It was Saturday night–Would have been all kinds of wonderful if the two of them were tuning in to “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” but that didn’t start until 1970. So close!

          • Cabernet7

            Was Carol Burnett on Saturday nights then? I remember watching that with my parents on Saturday nights as a kid. I know the show started in 1966 or 67 or so, but I don’t know if it was always on Saturdays.

            • Roz

              I remember that as well and wondered if that was what they were tuning in to, but it looks as if The Carol Burnet Show was on Mondays in 1968-69. Such a good show!

        • MsKitty

          According to Wikipedia, this was the Saturday primetime lineup during the 1968-69 TV season:

          ABC – The Newlywed Game, The Lawrence Welk Show, The Hollywood Palace
          CBS – The Jackie Gleason Show, My Three Sons, Hogan’s Heroes, Petticoat Junction, Mannix
          NBC – Adam-12, Get Smart, The Ghost & Mrs. Muir, NBC Saturday Night at the Movies

          • EveEve

            OMG – those were the days! CBS FTW!

            • asympt

              Sorry, NBC wins for Get Smart alone.

              CBS *will* win when Carol Burnett comes on Saturday, as well as MTM.

            • EveEve

              Get Smart moved to CBS in 1969! Anyway who can argue with a Saturday night lineup that included Jackie Gleason, Fred McMurr
              ay, Bob Crane and Mike Connors? And after MTM in 1970 came All in the Family in 1971. CBS used to rule in our house.

          • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

            It’s amazing how lasting some of those shows were – I grew up on re-reuns of My Three Sons, Hogan’s Heroes, Petticoat Junction, Get Smart and The Ghost & Mrs. Muir!

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I didn’t think Julio came there to watch television. I thought he was visiting Peggy because his mother was having loud sex with someone and he wanted to get out of the apartment.

        • elevan

          She seemed to be expecting him. That’s why she put out pretzels & didn’t bother looking through the peephole. I think they have an understanding about hanging out & watching tv.

          • TeraBat

            That’s what I got, too. It makes sense to me – if Peggy lives in a bad neighborhood, her neighbors are probably all too poor to afford a TV; and letting Julio come downstairs and watch hers probably helps her relationship with Julio’s mother.

            • asympt

              If they do have a TV, it’s probably black and white, still. Peggy’s would be color, and larger, better for appointment television.

      • Katesymae

        I love this comment so much and hadn’t thought of it that way. The contrast is that Betty was looking for a peer and found it in a child, whereas I think Peggy is just looking for the company and is desperate enough to resort to Julio, y’know?

        • Roz

          Yes, exactly! It really does underline their differences. Betty’s situation is loaded with weirdness and Peggy’s just watching TV. Love that Julio was added in, though–the writers could have had Peggy watching TV alone and we would have gotten the message that she is not getting out on a date night. But Julio showing up? What a great, real, poignant moment.

      • Dorace Afton Trottier

        i just mentioned this elsewhere – but i agree with you! she was on a date with a 10 year old, and it shows in the way that their shirts mirror each other. both small, horizontal stripes.

    • Victoria Ramirez

      You’re both geniuses. That is all.

    • Shug

      Shoutout to Megan’s hair extensions.

      • Chickadeep

        Extensions? That was a full-on fall, 1969 style! They just glommed a big ol’ long half-wig onto the back of their teased real hair. I remember watching a rather stylish amateur actress friend of my Mom’s put one of those things on before going out, right around that time (probably late ’67 or ’68). She had the big cat-eye liner a and white eye shadow, too.

        • Shug

          Forgive my millennial lexicon for these things. :)

          • Chickadeep

            S’alright…a fall is nothing more than a ginormous clip-on extension, anyway!

        • JulieTy

          One of the 20-somethings who babysat my little sister wore a fall. She shoved wadded up toilet paper under it so it’d poof up higher on top!

    • Alex Palombo

      I find it interesting, that last week Margaret/Marigold’s poncho showed her break with her family, but this week Sally’s plaid poncho tied her to Don. Sort of a cool thing Janie was doing with the two rebellious daughters.

      • http://angrynerdgirl.net/ Jessi03

        Yes. She’s turning into a drag queen.

      • P M

        I thought it was a wig. Her ‘natural’ hair seems to be shorter.

        • DeniseSchipani

          It’s a fall. My mom had one.

          • P M

            Ah, thanks!

      • MilaXX

        That’s how a lot of lady celebs looked when dressed to the nines. Pucci clothe and falls or hairpieces.

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          I’m sure I’ve seen pictures of Elizabeth Taylor wearing almost exactly that outfit, but in a maxi dress.

        • VirginiaK

          Pucci dress, big hair, I think of Baby Jane Holzer, a very rich very thin married woman who looked like that and hung around with the Warhol Factory people.

      • CatherineRhodes

        Good point. The rebellious daughter poncho.

    • siriuslover

      You guys are brilliant. I did not see any of the pink motif (which is why I need your brilliance in my life 24/7/365). I, too, was repulsed by Peggy’s Velma outfit, and they made sure that the angles on her were particularly unflattering in her home. I wonder why that is–that is, why does she look so unflattering in her home? I will say that we little kids had fugly clothes like that in the mid-70s, so maybe I’m just having flashbacks to my horrible sartorial style in childhood. And finally, I want to say that I so appreciate how you guys interact with our posts on the recap and integrate that discussion into your Mad Style analysis. Nearly 1000 comments on Monday. Thank you!

      • Victoria Ramirez

        “…why does she look so unflattering in her home?” And the inverse – why does she look so pitch perfect in the office? Another signal that her personal life is lacking at best and work is where she shines.

        • MarinaCat

          I thought Peggy looked about 40 years old in her home. And that outfit added about 10 pounds.

          • DeniseSchipani

            and her home is so depressing. Even for a run down place,it’s sad looking. Clearly after Abe she didn’t spend any time brightening up, and having been in dozens of UWS brownstones, it even LOOKS smaller than it should (the living room, that is) for the ground-floor apartment. It feels dark, dingy and cramped.

            • Jackie4g

              That was also the fashionable décor. Dark and gloomy.

            • asympt

              That living room is half of what was once a larger room. Someone walled it off before she bought the place. Old buildings so often have been chopped up to make more rooms or apartments (though the modern version is just as likely to be, let’s tear down all the walls to make this place “open plan”!, which in the future will date floorplans to the early part of the 21st century).

            • Marcy Milliron

              I didn’t notice it while I was watching, but the stills emphasize that the wallpaper is stained and peeling. Weren’t they renovating when they moved in? Was that something that just never got done after she stabbed Abe?

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Or just that she dresses down in her own home, the way everyone does? I wouldn’t put too much metaphorical emphasis on that.

          • 3hares

            Most people on this show look fabulous when dressed down in their own home.

          • mommyca

            I totally agree… she was basically wearing pants and turtleneck, I didn’t think it was so hideous…

          • T C

            Dressing down is not something the upper middle class would condescend to back then, even for yard work. Perhaps this links to her family of origin and its financial/social status.

    • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

      If Peggy doesn’t carry a hanky, she really must have come a long way from her Catholic school days. Or was it only my godmother who threatened damnation if I was caught without one?

      • P M

        That’s hilarious. Was the hanky supposed to have miraculous powers, then :D?

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          I am not entirely clear on her reasoning. I *think* that if I were hit by a bus without clean knickers and a clean hanky the saints would *know* I was not a lady and would do nothing to intercede for me.

          • selena.smith

            Plus it could sub as a chapel veil if needed. :)

            • AnneElliot

              Yes!! My mom always told me that they would cover their hair with a hanky if they didn’t have a hat on in church, though she went to school in the 50s.

            • T C

              If I remember correctly (am not and have never been Catholic), women were required to have head coverings in church until Vatican II in 1965, which also finally permitted Mass to be performed in languages other than Latin. I remember being required to wear a head covering, long sleeves and a dress or skirt that was not anywhere near a mini when I visited the Vatican in the early 70s. The Swiss Guard had no compunction in turning away those not dressed to the requirement.

        • marlie

          It totally could be a “catholic schoolgirl” thing, and it lasted well into the 80s and early 90s. My mom used to make me carry one in my purse whenever we got “dressed up” to go somewhere. I now have a collection of them that she’s given me over the years taking up space in one of my drawers.

          • NDC_IPCentral

            Good for funerals and weddings. I have a drawer-full from my mother, grandmother and great aunts, and I use them for those occasions.

            And mopping the brow in hot weather.

            • decormaven

              I carry my grandmother’s fan for those occasions.

            • NDC_IPCentral

              The fan won’t absorb the perspiration, though. And I have a fan in my purse, too. [My existence is partially defined by never-ending menopause, 16+years and counting.] It was a necessity back in the ’80s and ’90s when I was doing a lot of business traveling for Big Corporation Employer. Sitting on the tarmac at LaGuardia for hours, no kidding, as the summer sun beat down on the aircraft…. I’d pull out the fan to keep the close air moving. At one point I had two in the handbag, and on a mired-in-the-queue flight the gent in the seat behind me remarked how envious he was, so I passed the spare back to him without even making eye-contact.

              Hankies and fans: Always prepared.

            • decormaven

              Love that story! Fans are a must in the South, in my way of thinking. Too many outdoor weddings in June. Kids, that’s why air-conditioning was invented, but no, everyone has to have an outdoor wedding now. I blame Pinterest.

            • KayeBlue

              That is some stone cold classy behavior. I salute you.

            • NDC_IPCentral

              And the suffering fellow passed the fan back to me through the space between the seats at the end of the flight, too. No eye-contact at any time.

              I wish I could be “stone cold.” I am no fan of heat. The fan-in-purse is no affectation; my need for it is sweatily sincere.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              I carry a fan in my bag too – essential for the London Underground in summer (although some lines have recently had airconditioned trains added).

            • Lisa_Co

              I still remember when NYC started getting AC on the subways in the mid ’80′s. It was a YIPPEE moment.

      • Wendi126

        My Jewish grandmothers were never without hankies. And ironed their husbands. Hankies gross me out…Once tissues were invented why would a person want to carry around a piece of cloth with old snot and whatever in it and use it again? Or lend to someone….

        • decormaven

          Mr. DM is old school- still carries one.

          • Qitkat

            Good to know I’m not suffering alone ;)

            • decormaven

              Hey, I’m glad. It comes in handy when I have a teary episode. I don’t carry a purse to many events, and it’s been a lifesaver.

            • Qitkat

              Since Mr Q hasn’t bought a new one since 1869, the provenance is too sketchy for me to wish to share. Lucky you, to navigate sans purse; as much as I’d like to, it seems most unfeasible for me.

          • Grumpy Girl

            Mr. Grump keeps them, too. A regular staple in the laundry, mixed in with washcloths and underwear.

          • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

            Ex-Mr. GC always carried one and I had to iron them after they were washed. I always thought they were disgusting. He was (is) an impeccable dresser and I couldn’t figure out why he would want to put it back in his pocket after using it. I was so happy when they introduced the ones that didn’t have to be ironed. (This leads my mind right to the joke about the husband who sees his wife ironing her bra.)

          • mad girl

            So happy to know I’m in good company, Mr. MG (or would that be mad boy?) also carries one.

        • Cherielabombe

          I have always thought the same! Not for me!

        • Maria Photinakis

          I have them and use them only for tears, never for my nose. My grandmother, a Greek immigrant to the States in the 50s, was one of the legion of underpaid launderesses who got to wash everyone’s used hankies for pennies…she had visceral memories of it into her 80s. I had a boss who still used a hanky for his nose and it grossed me out and made me angry on my yiayia’s behalf all over again.

          • Tante Leonie

            I carry a large, ironed one for my hot flashes – with some lavander spray on it.

        • Trent

          @Wendi, you’ve clearly never lived through a humid NYC summer. Hankies, aka “sweatrags,” are indispensable.

          • Wendi126

            @Trent..a sweatrag is different. We’re talking white cotton hankies and for women often with embroidery and to be used for all sorts of bodily fluids but not usually sweat. And not sweat from a hot summer day. And I have lived through several Philly city summers and wouldn’t use a hankie or a tissue. Clearly

      • L’Anne

        My family’s background is Catholic, Jewish, and Baptist. ALL the women carried hankies, well into the ’90s even. If they were born before about ’65, a hankie in the purse was standard. It didn’t have to match you clothes (it would if the hanky was to stick out like a pocket square) because it wasn’t an accessory. It was a necessity.

      • CPT_Doom

        It was probably in her purse, which was trapped in the office with Ginsberg.

    • MK03

      The guy Megan dances with can’t be Charles Manson because he’s way too tall. But it does seem like a deliberate styling choice. He looks JUST like him.

      • siriuslover

        and I think he was on the down low by this time in ’69, right?

        • P M

          Weren’t the entire ‘Family’ on a ranch?

        • MK03

          Dunno. I’m not up on Manson Family history before the murders. Weren’t they running around prostituting and committing petty crimes in the months before the murders?

        • KayeBlue

          Yes… just a few miles from where Megan is living.

        • Chris

          He was out on Spahn ranch in the middle of nowhere. They came in by car when he sent the “family” to Sharon Tate’s house that night.

          • ybbed

            Spahn Ranch isn’t exactly in the middle of nowhere. It was on the western edge of the very populated San Fernando Valley which is just over the hill from Hollywood/West La and all the canyons where Megan now lives. It is maybe 20 miles at the most from where Megan lives

            • Chris

              Well I just knew it was so isolated and desert like in that area authorities presume he killed more missing people out there that will probably never be found. It’s part of a park now. And 20 Miles if you are correct, is far more than “just a few miles” from where Megan is living.

            • ybbed

              Okay, I am talking Los Angeles now. Here in LA 20 miles is nothing to drive. Back then when you got on the freeway 20 miles was like a 10 minute drive. Not anymore!!! I live about three miles from where spahn ranch was located. total wall to wall suburbs

            • lulubella

              I wish they’d say which canyon Megan is living in. What if it was Topanga, and she was on the other end of Topanga Cyn Rd from the ranch! I think they left the canyon vague so we’d speculate, plus it’s not like they are mentioning specific neighborhoods in Manhattan where other characters live.

            • Jenz42

              Laurel Canyon, I thought someone said. Don to Stephanie maybe?

            • ybbed

              They said on the last show it was Laurel Canyon

      • Chickadeep

        WAY too tall—Manson is 5’2″!

      • not_Bridget

        There really were a lot of shaggy, unkempt guys around in those days. Very, very few of them were psychopaths….

    • ballerinawithagun

      Marilyn wore Pucci. Movie STARS wore Pucci. Megan is not a star, just wealthy.

    • ballerinawithagun

      I don’t see Manson in that man at all. Lots of sexy men looked this way back then.

      • Terri Ellis

        I think Weiner might just be playing with his audience with the Manson-esqe references.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          I keep hearing this, but I don’t think it’s true at all. Almost all of the so-called references are very thin and Weiner simply isn’t that kind of show runner. Just like last season, people are reading too much into certain things. This isn’t Twin Peaks.

          • Chris

            I don’t think this guy looks specifically like Manson, he has long hair and beard which was the style for artists and hip people at the time. I do think the writers are aware of all the speculation from last season and I think there are a lot of references and things that can’t just be coincidence and thought the writers were winking at the audience. I think things like one recapper mentioning Megan’s green phone and saying Sharon Tate had one is a bit much. Who would even know that?

          • http://elizabitchtaylor.tumblr.com/ Elizabitch Taylor

            the plaids are not what they seem

        • 3hares

          Or that guy looks like Manson because tons of guys looked like Manson in California in 1969. It’s not like he stood out at the time. The most striking thing about him was probably his height, which this guy doesn’t share.

          • Chris

            Manson wished he looked like that on his best day.

          • not_Bridget

            Lots of guys looked like that in Texas, too–where long hair could still inspire rednecks to kick their asses.

            In 1970, Willie Nelson moved back to Texas from Nashville. To Austin, specifically. He began playing country music for the hippies & growing his hair. Some of the young longhairs began playing country, too. (Or resumed it.)

            Then the young rednecks began growing their hair….

        • Cabernet7

          I really don’t think so. Hippies abounded in 1969. Only a microscopic fraction of one percentage had anything to do with Manson or the family. For a few seasons now Weiner got criticized for not showing any hippies. Now he shows a hippie and everyone assumes it is something to do with Manson. Stephanie is a blond pregnant hippie…must be an allusion to Sharon Tate! Never mind that Sharon Tate was not a hippie. Seriously, a hippie just means it’s 1969.

        • lulubella

          Agree, just a slight toying around … it’s clear she will not be a part of the murders but they might reference them.

    • Kate Andrews

      I’m usually not picking out clothes’ symbolic meaning when I’m watching the show, but I did notice all the florals and how they drew Megan and Betty together — they’re not so different from each other now. Thanks for all the pink discussion, and for Ginsberg’s clothes, I think you’re spot on that he doesn’t want confining, tight clothes. He’s probably sensitive to being touched by others too.

      • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

        I’m feeling pretty vindicated by the Megan/Betty parallels this episode. When Don married Megan and people were rhapsodizing about how much of an improvement she was over Betty, I predicted that Don would eventually break Megan down with his behavior the same way he did to the first woman he married (who he described to Anna as a beauty who was so happy, smiling all the time when he met her.)

        • Nancy Aronson

          The odd thing is that Don seems to have changed somewhat this season. Megan rightly sensed that something was going on when Don was having an affair. Don having that affair did risk the destruction of his relationship with Megan (and almost his relationship with Sally).
          And there are some ways that Don has behaved differently with Megan than with Betty, in this season versus last season. Last season he told Megan about his past as Dick Whitman. This season he eventually told her about being on leave. He’s been trying to make it work with her by drinking less, refraining from taking various women’s offers to sleep with them. Even going along with the 3-way is a stretch for him — he has detested being surprised or being told what to do in bed in the past.
          In this past episode it seemed to me that Megan was doing a lot of the sabotaging herself, starting with all of the lying and manipulating about Stephanie as well as her redheaded bisexual friend.

          • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

            He tried with Betty too, curtailing his philandering ways and coming home for dinner until he fell off the womanizing wagon with Bobbi Barrett. Then Betty started her own series of manipulations, and she actually kicked Don out. Don will do what he has to in order to stay in the creative limelight, but I don’t for a minute think that means he’s changed. He’s going through the motions with Megan because divorce is rough and they both know it.

            • Nancy Aronson

              From the beginning of when we see him in his affair last season, regardless of his attraction to the new lover, part of him seems to deeply regretsthe essence of the action : cheating on a wife he loves and the only friend he’s ever respected. He doesn’t enjoy the addictive pull to cheat. He feels like a victim of his past who makes choices he can’t control. I think it’s a mistake to sum up Don by his actions. It’s the complexity underlying his actions that show his changes, such as his ability to work under peggy. As it were. Don operates less from the perspective of ” droit de senor” than he used to. He doesn’t chronically underestimate megan, disappear, hide his past identity, hide his suspension completely. There is a lot he continues to conceal. He is a product of his generation, after all. And he has changed a great deal.

            • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

              “It’s a mistake to sum up Don by his actions.”

              People are what they do, not what they tell you they are. If he beat Megan weekly but told everyone he was a sensitive loving husband who gave lots of foot massages, he would still be an abuser. I have not seen any evidence that he loves or respects Megan, in fact that’s what’s bothering her so much. The constant evidence that he does not love her. He flew out to California to see Stephanie, not Megan. She is distressed by his lack of interest in making plans to be with her long term, and even in simply visiting regularly. He flew out to give her a fatherly speech about her post-audition conduct, which is not particularly respectful. I see him knuckling under and working under Peggy in one scene trumped by his Mean Girls dick-swinging at the end of the last episode. He plowed into a meeting knowing no one would put him in his place in front of a client and that afterward their arguments would not be strong if he won the business. That is completely disrespectful, bullying behavior. He’s still the same old Don. the quarterback who’s going to throw it into the end zone all by himself and everyone else can just watch adoringly. He makes remorseful grimaces when enough of his poor choices have come back to make his life uncomfortable, but he is still thinking primarily of himself. He is smart, and he’s doing what is necessary to keep his place until he can maneuver back to the top again.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Thank you, sweetie! We love you too.

              I think you’re defining “knowing about fashion” in a very specific way. You can know about fashion without being a stylist or editor or designer. She’s been to Paris to be fitted in Dior couture, hand made for her. You really can’t claim that you don’t know anything about fashion after repeatedly experiencing something as rare as that.

    • Belvane

      Re: the glove theme, I’m wondering if it’s maybe about not getting their hands dirty, metaphorically. Joan’s standoffish attitude toward Don, Margaret wanting things to be clean and simple with Roger… not sure about Peggy, although this quote from Miss Manners may be appropriate:

      “Properly gloved, there was no situation that a lady could not carry off. Miss Manners saw this demonstrated some years ago at a fashionable bullfight in Madrid, when a triumphant matador tossed his trophy, a freshly severed ear, to Grace of Monaco. That lady, who is not called Serene Highness for nothing, was wearing her Minnie Mouse gloves, and thus was able to receive a hairy, bloody ear of bull as a lady should.”

      • decormaven

        Gloves also protected hands from dirt and grime. We weren’t carrying around hand sanitizer back then.

      • Dorace Afton Trottier

        i agree with this viewpoint. when Ida Blankenship died, the woman who had to deal with her body was shown with gloves (they looked like rubber gloves) on. definitely squeamish about getting their hands dirty.

        • Qitkat

          I would be surprised if it’s not protocol to wear gloves when coming to take a dead body away.

          • Dorace Afton Trottier

            in the 1960s? i would bet they didn’t have any protocol.

            • annejumps

              It’s not the Middle Ages.

            • Qitkat

              I have been trying to find out on the internet when that protocol began and haven’t learned anything. However, as early as the late 1800s, and definitely by 1925 it was strongly recommended that gloves be worn during autopsies. So the proper handling of dead bodies was a concern long before 1969; when that translated to police, coroners, and funeral employees is something for someone else to weigh in on.

            • TeraBat

              At the very least, not wanting to touch a dead body seems like a very human thing to do – I can totally see someone wanting to put on a pair of gloves just as a psychological thing before wheeling Ms. Blankenship out. Gloves are barriers, after all.

        • L’Anne

          And that gloved one was Megan, who held the blotter as far from her body as she could.

          • Dorace Afton Trottier

            i thought that it was Megan!

            regarding the protocol – i’m not saying that the late 1960s was the Middle Ages. i was in my teens then. what i *am* suggesting is that there was no official protocol for many things back then.

        • L’Anne

          They wrapped Blankenship in Harry’s afghan and wheeled her body away from the desk, presumably to an ambulance service to take her to the morgue. They didn’t want clients to see the body or “medics.”

        • T C

          The gloves used in that episode appeared to be the rubber gloves from the coffee station/kitchen. I haven’t noticed a dishwasher in there.

      • zenobar

        I love Miss Manners.

      • Nancy Aronson

        I must admit that I enjoyed Marigold confronting her mother about boozing it up in the bathroom. In that moment the daughter certainly took off the gloves.

    • Judy_J

      Am I the only one who is bothered by the fact that Don wore a blue/grey fedora with a brown suit?

      • MilaXX

        I think a lot of the men back them matched their fedoras to their overcoats. They were often grey or griege colored so that didn’t bother me.

    • Alyssa_T_Robot

      great job, tlo! i want to dress like megan and throw barbs like betty.

    • Kimberly Southern-Weber

      Megan seems to befriend ginger struggling actresses. Interesting.

    • marlie

      Great job, as usual, TLo! I knew that Ginsberg wasn’t quite “all there,” but I hadn’t a clue that his mental illness was going to manifest itself this way. As for Don, I think this is the beginning of his return to “true” Don form. It’s not going to be easy, but I think that Cutler and Lou are going to be forced to give him more freedom at some point. Betty reminds me so much of some of the Main Line matrons that I grew up around (a couple decades after this takes place) that it’s scary.

      • MilaXX

        I could see the Phillip Morris guys requesting he head the account should they sign with the firm.

        • TeraBat

          Not to mention – Ginsberg’s gone, and Peggy just got Burger Chef. There aren’t that many copywriters at SC&P who could handle a Phillip Morris sized account….

      • P M

        What’s a Main Line matron?

        • MDubz

          Main Line is an area of the Philadelphia suburbs with lots of money. It’s where Betty is from.

          • Lisa_Co

            Also Grace Kelly, right?

        • marlie

          Betty reminds me of all of the “old money” older ladies from the Main Line suburb of Philadelphia: rich, conservative, haughty… she reminds me of the mothers and grandmothers of some of my classmates. That was also the first place/time where I heard the name Phyllis Schafly, who was largely regarded a a paragon of conservative womanhood. That was the kind of woman that some of the guys I knew admired and aspired to marry.

          • Aidan B

            I live in an apartment on the Main Line but I know the wives of the businessmen I take the train with are probably just like the women you’re describing!

          • P M

            eyeroll at the men. But then, I’ve seen that in my own background (upper-middle-class Indian). The double standards really show when they try to get the daughters ‘married off’.

        • JulieTy

          The Main Line is where “Pine Valley” on the now-defunct “All My Children” was. *sniff* I miss it . . .

    • MsKitty

      I can’t hate on Peggy’s “chilling at home on a Saturday night” getup too much, it’s way more presentable than the t-shirt and sweats I would be sporting.

      I want that mirrored wardrobe in Betty and Henry’s bedroom.

      That plaid sports jacket that Don wore to the party immediately took me back to the Campbell’s dinner party in Cos Cob. He stood out like a sore thumb then, just like he did in this instance.

      Your Mad Style posts are always great, but the way you two broke down the use of pink in this episode is masterful. I didn’t even notice it, but looking back it makes sense.

      • Trent

        Agree on all points. It’s interesting to me how uncomfortable Don looked in his casual outfit at the party. California always used to be where Don seemed completely at-home in casual Dick Whitman-styled clothing. He looked loose and comfortable. Now he seems sartorially uptight and out-of-place, as if Don Draper has taken over completely.

        • lulubella

          I think that’s based on the milieu. And I don’t see TOO much difference between Don and Dick styling – the latter being a bit more casual. Prior we saw Dick with Anna and her family. He was happy there and there were no fashion statements being made at Anna’s home. At the huge pool party we saw a few seasons ago, and here, there is definitely a specific crowd in attendance with a particular style – the former, industry and creative types in all manner of creative dress, and the latter, broke hippies and their rag tag, sometimes dirty, cheap clothes. In both cases, Don in Don clothes looked out of place, but he would have been just as out of place in both settings in Dick clothes.

      • Alice Teeple

        I admit it. I loved Peggy’s fugly hang-out outfit and would totally wear it. It looked a bit odd on Elisabeth Moss’s body – short neck and broad shoulders – but that is perfectly Peggy: not really knowing what fit is flattering.

    • goldenholden

      Did anyone else notice the 2001 reference with the pink hued lady and the computer, and the straight out take off of 2001 during the Lou and Jim talking in the computer room? Genius.

    • NDC_IPCentral

      Thanks, as always, for much to think about on a busy Wednesday. I’ve just taken my lunch break, so to speak, reading your post.

      That Pucci dress reminded me of the Pucci bra slip (TMI?) that one of my aunts gave me as a 1968 high school graduation present. That was some mighty stylish underwear for Midwestern me. I was flummoxed but rather thrilled. You gentlemen certainly are correct that Megan overdressed and differentiated herself from her guests with that dress and hair at her party. She really looked discordant. And, yes, desperate. Don’s got her number, and it’s not a lucky one.

      “Think Pink” brings Kay Thompson and “Funny Face” to mind (and you boys gave that film to us on a Musical Monday a long time ago), but its empowerment from that exuberant show-stopper certainly transmogrifies to anger (how our faces get pink/red?) and aggression here.

      Wish I could opine more, but I’ve got to get back to work … but with compulsive peeks at the comments throughout the afternoon!

      • decormaven

        Oooh, I would covet that bra slip. Maidenform brought out floral underwear around that time. That was such a switch from the basic white and racy black bras.

      • anotherEloise

        I had a Pucci print bra-and-pettipants set (Pucci-designed, licensed to Maidenform, or whatever lingerie company) in the 1967-68 school year or thereabouts. Totally loved it! (“Pettipants” were like a cross between shorts and a half-slip, pretty much a necessary item under a miniskirt. And yes, as others have said here, we always bent the knees to reach something on the floor – no bending over when you’re wearing a mini.)

        • VirginiaK

          Also at least in NYC, I think we always wore tights/pantyhose with a minidress, even in summer. I remember having tanner-toned pantyhose for summer legs, also the epoch of white legs. Actually I think the invention of pantyhose prompted the creation of the miniskirt.

        • NDC_IPCentral

          I absolutely remember pettipants and had quite a frilly pair that I wore back in the ’60s. They helped to keep the thighs warm, too.

        • lulubella

          They were called “tap pants” in the 20s and 30s – lacy silk “boxers” for women. My mom said people wore them as part of a dressing gown combination when getting ready to go out or to go to bed.

    • http://www.what-the-frock.com Dana F.

      If I still had a locker, I’d hang a picture of Stan Rizzo inside.

      His first outfit reminded me of Fred from Scooby Doo, and I mean that in the best way possible.

      • siriuslover

        And we know that Fred and Velma never hooked up. I wonder if Janie’s playing with us here.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          But Velma never stood up to Fred the way Peggy stood up to Stan. Remember the night at the hotel? She called his bluff.

          • siriuslover

            I do remember that night. She called him “Chickenshit.” She’s more movie Velma than cartoon Velma in that regard (man, I’m pathetic!)

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              Which movie, the live action version or the recent straight to DVD movies? (I think I just one-upped you in terms of level of pathetic)

            • Alloy Jane

              My favorite Velma is the A Pup Named Scooby Doo version. It’s the sound of tinkling when she walks, I think.

    • French_Swede

      *I covet Betty Francis’ dining room drapes.
      *I thought the IBM processor was Jane Siegel.
      *Betty is watching “Gomer Pyle, USMC” on television!!!

      • Twigg

        The IBM lady really did look like Jane! I don’t think anything is meant by it but I did go back to check to see if it was her.

        • Mazenderan

          II know! That’s the third week now where I’ve mistaken a new character for an old one. I also thought the blonde who propositioned Don was a very dressed-up Stephanie, and that Aimee was Megan’s old redheaded pal.

      • JulieTy

        And last week — or the week before?– Don was watching “That Girl!!”

    • KayeBlue

      T. Lo called it, at least two years ago, that this show was going to get ugly. Well, it’s ugly. From the painfully unerotic threesome to Megan’s fug-a-tronic ruffled dress, I was almost unable to watch this episode. Brilliant highlighting on the pink! Please, Matthew Weiner, let this show end with Peggy pitching some precursor of ‘Because You’re Worth It’ so she can start her own agency and get away from Sterling Crazy.

    • Lauren

      TLo, thank you for your thoughtful, well-informed analysis of Michael’s clothing. As a mental health professional, it’s always nerve-wracking to see both how mental illness is portrayed in our culture but also as how it’s perceived by its audience. Between your recap of Michael’s mental illness as well as your *acknowledgement* of Betty’s (instead of casting her as an unreasonable, hysterical women as professionals did in the 60s and laypeople still do today), you’ve truly done the issue justice.

      I do want to add something of note. Michael is likely suffering from schizophrenia, or one of its companion disorders. One of the main symptoms of these psychotic illnesses is lack of hygiene, particularly regarding clothing. Although Michael has never quite had it together in that department (mostly due to financial constraints), this season has shown a rapid, marked, and purposeful decline in his apparel’s hygiene. I use hygiene not just in the sense of cleanliness, although that’s also certainly relevant here, but also in the sense of dressing professionally for your job.

      One of the first things to go in a psychotic episode is personal hygiene and the general basic tasks of taking care of oneself as an independent adult. His clothes are visibly wrinkled and “dirty,” although perhaps more in the sense of just being pulled off the floor, and he is clearly struggling with the basic tasks of tucking in his shirt and tying his tie. He also appears visibly “greasy,” indicating a lack of personal cleanliness as well.

      I think your analysis of his desire to maximize his stimulation is poignant, and one I hadn’t thought of. But beyond that symbolic analysis, it is the perfect, most effective way for Bryant to communicate and foreshadow his breakdown. Sadly, I don’t anticipate seeing Michael again with so few episodes remaining, as we all have a pretty good grasp of how patients were treated in that era.

      Anyway, thank you so, so much for doing the topic justice. Your nuanced analysis is more important than I can say.

      • Terri Ellis

        Great input. The interesting thing is that in the final scene, I thought Michael looked much cleaner and more put together than the entire rest of the episode.

        • MilaXX

          I’m not surprised. He did what he thought cured him by cutting off his nipple. Having done that he was calm enough to pay a bit more attention to hygiene.

          • Ganoc

            I’m not familiar with the US medical system in the 60s, but how come he wasn’t sectioned when he went in to have his nipple sown up (“They’ll sow it up for you but they won’t cut it off” or words to that effect)? It must have been evident he was in mental distress then, especially if he asked to have it removed.

            • Lauren

              I’m not super familiar with that time period, but generally sectioning is reserved for suicidal or homicidal intent, and they were probably even more lax about that standard back then. Especially in an over-crowded NYC hospital ER.

            • DeniseSchipani

              That’s what I thought. At first I was like, “no way would an ER let him just go!”, but then I thought, well, that I watched too much of the show “ER.” Back then, depending on what hospital he went to, it’s easy to imagine them stitching him up and sending him on his way. Not sure how much mental illness would have been on their radar (though I’m sure they thought he was nuts!).

            • Ganoc

              Thank you both for your comments – more pertinent than my assessment: “they must have let him go because the plot needs them to.”

            • KayeBlue

              It was a lot easier to have people ‘committed’ back then (Susanna Kayson, author of Girl, Interrupted, spent almost three years after just admitting to a prior suicide attempt- her book is great). I took it to mean he went to the hospital *after* he cut it off and they merely patched him up.

            • MilaXX

              I wondered about that as well. I think perhaps he went to the hospital to have them cut it off and they refused. I think he may have cut it off himself and bandaged it at home. So the (“They’ll sow it up for you but they won’t cut it off”) remark may have been based on them asking him if it was cut and he needed stitches and him being told they wouldn’t purposely cut off his nipple for no good reason.

            • ShaoLinKitten

              I assumed that he cut it off himself.

            • Azucena

              I figured he might have made a phone call to ask in advance, and they couldn’t trace it and commit him for that.

            • T C

              I suspect that he didn’t visit an ER as that type of discussion or self-inflicted injury would have caused him an involuntary trip to Bellevue (NYC public hospital for psychiatric cases) for an in-patient evaluation at the minimum. US men back then were reluctant to seek medical attention for themselves. Further, the typical medical insurance (when offered by employers) was Blue Cross (Blue Shield in some states and often for organized labor) which covered 80% of inpatient, outpatient and pharmacy expenses, not including mental illness, cancer and a number of other expensive diagnoses, for which separate personal insurance policies could be purchased.

            • lulubella

              I think he was making a general statement, ie, he knew a hospital would not cut it off (well, everyone knows that, the point is that he’s cogent enough to know that), so he did it himself. It hadn’t yet been sewn back on, as he gave it to Peggy in the scene. It’s possible he went to a hospital to ask them to do it and they refused. I would not be surprised if they just shrugged their shoulders thinking he was “crazy” and turned him away. It’s NYC, a big city with many people behaving “oddly” and coming in with serious injuries into an ER, so I imagine he wandered in, could not get help from an overloaded staff, and left to do it on his own.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Yeah, his neat appearance was downright chilling. I knew something was amiss.

      • KayeBlue

        Yes- Ginsberg’s thoughts have been too distracting for him to care about anything relating to personal care. I’m hoping they *don’t* do a scene of Peggy and Stan visiting Ginsberg in the psychiatric hospital where he’ll reside quite possibly until the Reagan era. That would just break my heart.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Yeah, I’ll settle for a report from Stan after he visits off-screen. Still sad, but more bearable for viewers.

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            If we don’t see a visit, I could see Peggy visiting too. Maybe Stan and Peggy trade off. Peggy visits one week, and Stan visits him the next week.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              That sounds both so sweet and so impossible for this show (even just to confirm in passing reference) and these characters (especially for Peggy, I’m afraid…she’s learned too well the lesson of “moving on”) that it squeezed my heart extra hard. Oof.

              Honest to God, I’ll be amazed (and very happy) if Stan visits more than once. It would be very difficult, I imagine, for him to go a second time, after seeing the state his friend is in and how he’s being treated, and being able to do nothing about it — to know this is “best” for him.

        • L’Anne

          And after the whole Beth Daws shock therapy story. Thanks but no thanks.

        • JulieTy

          ” . . . the psychiatric hospital where he’ll reside quite possibly until the Reagan era”
          And then all the funding will be cut and Ginsberg will be homeless, helpless and wandering the streets. :-(((

          • KayeBlue

            Hopefully by then Peggy will run a large, successful agency and pay for him to go to a small, quiet facility in Florida :(

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Oh God make me bawl with the realities outside fiction, why don’t you.

        • librarygrrl64

          Oh god, me too. I enjoy Ben Feldman’s work and have always have a soft spot for Ginsberg.

      • AnaRoW

        Couldn’t the decline also be attributed to depression? I’m not disagreeing with your diagnosis but I never would have thought schizophrenia because he’s dressing more poorly. The sensory issues also make me think autism.

        • Lauren

          A decline in hygiene definitely could indicate depression, but he has experienced paranoid delusions and auditory hallucinations for at least a couple years. I say “likely suffering” because it would be pretty presumptuous of me to confidently diagnose a TV character who hasn’t been in the forefront that frequently – if I thought I should, I’d be delusional myself ;)

          • TiarasandFeathers

            Not to quibble, but to quibble. . .auditory sensitivities-not hallucinations.

            • Lauren

              My apologies! I was referring to his mention in an earlier season of hearing voices and receiving transmissions, not his sensory issues with the computer.

            • TiarasandFeathers

              oh yes, the transmissions. I’d forgotten.

            • Shug

              Would that fall under hyperacusis, or is hyperacusis more narrowly defined as trauma-induced? I work with clients who have suffered traumatic brain injuries.

            • TiarasandFeathers

              I couldn’t speak to the technical term. Lots of conditions cause the sensitivities/overstimulation. Migraine disorder, autism spectrum (and lots of other brain conditions, including trauma). It’s also commonly reported with rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic pain issues.
              Also, concerning “transmissions”–I can sometimes (migraine and an accompanying nerve issue) hear conversations word-for-word in a hallway outside my apartment, that other people can’t hear.

              Ginsberg has a whole list of conditions that could have made him snap, all associated with creativity and genius. Any major disruption in his environment and the threat of that computer would push him over the edge. What’s interesting to me about his character is that he’s been shown as a human/compassionate foil to the cynicism of the rest of the cast as several points (the nursing student murder photos from LIFE as one pertinent example above).

            • Verascity

              Hyperacusis doesn’t have to be trauma-induced, unless you count any insult to the ear as trauma. I got it from an ear infection.

          • AnaRoW

            Got it. I stopped watching the show some time last year when I got finally fed up with Don’s BS so I really only have a couple of these posts and a faulty memory to go by.

        • 3hares

          Personal hygiene can definitely be effected by all those things, so I think it’s more other symptoms that make it schizophrenia rather than depression or autism.

      • charlotte

        It’s interesting that you mention the lack of hygiene because I briefly had a flatmate with symptoms of schizophrenia similar to to the ones depicted on MM, and she was absolutely manic about keeping up appearances (seriously, she was going for the full Marilyn look every single day). I guess there are always exceptions. Sadly I don’t know what happened to her because I moved out and never heard from her again.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Sad. But mental illness and obsessive behavior manifest in different ways — she had fixated on her appearance, maybe with a specific obsession for imitating a celebrity like Marilyn, while other people with schizophrenia can’t notice it at all.

      • Alice Teeple

        Spot on! There’s also a correlation with a craving for stimulants, right? Chain smoking seems to be a common one. We haven’t seen that with Ginsberg, but he was going to town on a Hershey bar last season. I thought his sweet tooth might be another subtle symptom.

      • Julie King

        Agree T&L did mental health proud this week.
        One dispute I have in your post—isn’t Michael trying to minimize rather than maximize stimulation by wearing too-large clothing? It seems he’s overloaded with sensory input and likely doesn’t like feeling clothing restricting/rubbing against his skin. Maybe I misunderstand.
        Agree he’s seemed preoccupied and w/o sense of proper social interaction, making me wonder if he was schizophrenic with something on autism spectrum as well. We don’t know if the story of him being born in a concentration camp is true or is an obsession. So many hints Ginsberg has dropped that are so compelling. I wish this wasn’t the end of him but fear it is.

    • testingwithfire

      “Adding all that up, it seems to us that he’s been suffering from a form of sensory overload for some time now; consistently expressing distress over his senses being assaulted or pointing out things his senses have picked up, unable to turn the noise down. Consequently, he wears giant clothes because he doesn’t like being restricted and is trying to limit the amount of stimulus he’s receiving.”

      Excellent call. I continue to be wowed by the level of insight in T&L’s posts and the comments.

      • Chris

        Yes, I can’t believe people are saying Ginsberg’s breakdown came out of nowhere. TLO picked up on the clues long before I would have, but I don’t see how anyone who watched last season and saw his actions with Bob and Stan when he was on the floor did not realize by then he had some serious problems.

    • MilaXX

      Interesting thought about Ginsberg’s have a sensitivity disorder in addition to his mental illness. Ironically enough a weighted vest or even one of those hug machines Temple Grandin made popular probably would have helped him calm down and organize himself.

      Nice pick up on Megan and how much of a poser she is. Funny how she worried about having that color tv would come across to her fellow acting friends when everything about her is rubbing her wealth in their faces. She’s so phony she doesn’t even realize she phony.

      I’ll bet good money that next week Lou will be back in his suits again. That interaction between Don & the Phillip Morris guys is definitely going to have him feeling threatened again.

      • decormaven

        Yep, Lou is going to go for the suit armor. Like a good scout, he knows the value of a uniform.

      • Katesymae

        Megan is also clearly keeping the fridge fully stocked if she had a steak on hand to offer Stephanie. She thinks she’s like her friends, but definitely is not living the struggling actress lifestyle, in terms of finances.

    • ivfive

      Loved the Waylon Jennings song that ended the episode. It was perfect.

    • Gatto Nero

      Great analysis of Ginsberg’s loose clothing as it relates to his sensory overload. This makes perfect sense and is a very telling and clever character detail. As TLo said, the signs have been there all along.

    • charlotte

      Some thoughts about men’s jackets: Don’s jacket that seems so out of place reminds me of the sports coat Megan made him wear to that dinner at Pete’s house a while back. If I remember correctly, he didn’t want to wear it at all. Both parties were events he didn’t want to attend, but Megan (okay, and Trudy) talked him into it.
      Henry’s jacket wasn’t so far off in my opinion because I always thought of him as a rather unconventional, less conservative Republican politician type. He seemed to respect Betty more than I would have expected of a man in his position in the 1960s (I was born in 1990, so that might as well be a prejudice). The same goes for his child-rearing skills.
      Also, both of Betty’s husbands are in plaids while the status quo of both marriages is threatened.

      • not_Bridget

        Don looked “out of place”–but he didn’t look like a fashion victim. He wasn’t trying to look “groovy.” That was just Don At An Informal Party…..

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          Don never tries to look trendy, which keeps from looking foolish or silly when it comes to clothes.

    • Jen

      Someone posted a picture from a previous episode on the Mad Men facebook, of Ginsberg’s shirt looking just like a straightjacket. Don’t think it was a coincidence!

      • Aidan B

        Knowing Janie Bryant, probably not!

    • ashtangajunkie

      Nothing surprising about Ginsberg, although I did not expect there to be a nipple in that little box. Although, considering the options that were going through my head just before Peggy opened it, a nipple was a bit of a relief.

    • L’Anne

      I really want to be in a band called the Angry Ponchos.

      • Kate Andrews

        It reminds me of my mother, who had a poncho from a visit to Mexico in the late ’60s. She and her college roommate dressed up pretending to be hippies (in real life, they were ladylike Georgia college students) and she wore it then.

      • jinco

        Frank Zappa had a line in a song where he asked, “Is that a REAL poncho or a SEARS poncho?” Sally’s is definitely not a REAL poncho.

        • anotherEloise

          No, but Sally’s wouldn’t be a Sears poncho either. Bloomingdale’s poncho, more likely.

      • JulieTy

        I want to be in a band called “Poor Edith.”

    • Dorace Afton Trottier

      i’m sure that i will have lots more to add to the discussion. for now, however: Stephanie, post-visit to color-me-green Megan, is wearing PINK sunglasses.
      i don’t think that is coincidental, and i’m not referring to the obvious “seeing the world through rose-colored glasses”.

      • Nancy Aronson

        interesting. TLo?

        • Dorace Afton Trottier

          in addition, those round, pink sunglasses are a call back to the round, pink sunglasses that Megan “dropped” in the Ho Jo Mo Lo parking lot.

    • Paula Pertile

      I wondered about Stephanie being in LA or Oakland too, but I remember noticing that high rise in the background the first time she called (from a different phone than in this shot), I think? so figured she had gone back to Oakland. (I could be wrong though of course.)

      You guys are awesome.

      • siriuslover

        Yes, they very clearly placed her in LA/Hollywood in front of the Capitol Records building in that first phone call. It’s a pretty place-specific landmark.

        • Susan Collier

          Yes, the only thing more specific to the area would have been to put her in front of the Hollywood sign.
          The second phone booth scene with Stephanie was more ambiguous, probably intentionally.

      • Nancy Aronson

        It looked hilly.

    • RohanMBN

      My dad had the EXACT same watch that Stan is wearing. He was also a creative director in advertising for Grays and then Darcy. That is why I love this show. I have told him about it and he says it sounds like everything that is portrayed is dead on.

      • Katesymae

        Tell us more! Like what?

    • Chris

      I think Peggy treats Ginsberg a lot like she does Julio. She probably thought “Oh both the boys want to come and play here this afternoon because they think it’s better than being home”. She’s been kind of maternal with Ginsberg before, the way she approached him at the beginning of the show was. She finds him eccentric and tries to placate him because she thinks he’s talented. Stan he referred to as a “mother hen” so his vulnerability and tendency to get excited brings that quality out in them. They have never shown Peggy present for one of Ginsberg’s big outbursts before, only the more minor ones. She wasn’t around when he was on the floor and Bob Benson had to talk to him and I don’t remember her being there when he lashed out at Cutler last season. His breakdown really came as a huge shock to her and I think it will greatly affect her going forward.

      • KayeBlue

        Peggy was sweet to Ginsberg’s father/uncle, too (I imagine the Meredith types would have just been frightened of him, but Peggy’s working-class background probably helped her see him as a decent, if odd, dude). I can see her checking in on him, sending money, in her kind and awkward way.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          When did Peggy meet Ginsberg’s father? Trying to remember…

          • L’Anne

            He came by the office once to use the copier.

          • KayeBlue

            Season 5, “Tea Leaves”.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Thank you!

        • Chris

          It’s interesting Peggy has returned to her “roots” in some ways. Her living room probably doesn’t look so different than her sister’s and her mother’s do now. She had to call her sister’s husband to help her out with the house she bought. She was so intent on divorcing that part of her life and choosing something different and professionally she did, but personally she will always be who she is. She’s not mod and hip and cutting edge and her place shows that.

    • jilly_d

      Nice call on the loose clothing = sensory overload. I hadn’t thought of that but it makes so much sense! You boys nail it every time. Also, “Get in the cab, losers.” I guffawed.

    • Capt. Renault

      Thanks for leading the way yet again, kindly uncles!

    • Dorace Afton Trottier

      TLo have remarked several times on Stan’s close-fitting clothing. he’s a big man. couldn’t that simply be indicative of how difficult it is -even now- to get clothes that fit well (unless they are hand-tailored)? there really hasn’t been any theory put out there as to why the clothing is so form-fitting (no complaints, mind you, he is pretty easy on the eyes).

      • MsKitty

        I’m always drawn to how tight Stan’s pants are in the sense that it can’t be comfortable for him, especially if he goes commando (and he totally looks like the type that would do that).

        • Dorace Afton Trottier

          i’m pretty sure that he does. i admit that i’ve looked enough times to say that.

          • DeniseSchipani

            Eyes up here! Just kidding.I’m looking,too.

        • Cheryl

          Remember when Peggy and Stan both worked in their underwear? Stan DID have underwear, but were they giant not so tighty whiteys, or giant boxers. I can’t remember, but I do remember them being BIG.

          • Dorace Afton Trottier

            i’m with you on that one. all i can remember is that they were white. i kept hoping that we would get to see more than the undies.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              Not on AMC.

            • Dorace Afton Trottier

              ;-)

          • siriuslover

            I just rewatched that episode last night and they were HUGE! And I forgot what an ASS Stan was in the beginning. My, how our crushes blind us to their origins. ;)

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              Me too, but I kind of figured we were dealing with a Han and Leia dynamic.

            • Chris

              That’s a nice way of putting it! Clearly Stan had hidden his good nature back then because he really is a pretty kind guy now.

          • 3hares

            Since this is a blog about clothing I have to correct the outfit there–they worked in the nude. But they passed through the underwear stage.

            • KayeBlue

              I remember the hysterically funny Allison of Best Week Ever recaps describing Peggy’s bra as “two banana muffins in a napkin, held up by white shoelaces”.

            • Cheryl

              Hah, I forgot about them eventually being nude, so blinded was I by the giant underpants.

            • Nancy Aronson

              really? must to re-watch.

          • KayeBlue

            Stan’s underwear was ENORMOUS. Possibly made from a regulation-size boat sail.

          • Alice Teeple

            Full cut briefs! They looked like something Charles Atlas would have worn.

      • MilaXX

        Stan is making good money. If he wanted less form fitting clothing, he could afford to have them made.

        • Dorace Afton Trottier

          do you think that he simply likes tight clothing? or do you have a theory?

          • MilaXX

            No theory just that he thinks he’s dressing hip. I think his tight clothing is intentional.

        • Chris

          The actor has complained whenever he loses weight Janie Bryant just gets smaller clothes for him. That’s clearly Stan’s style, as opposed to Freddy who is often dressed in suits that are a little tight or don’t fit because it’s to show he doesn’t have much money.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I think he just likes tight clothing.

      • Glammie

        Thing is, MM can tailor clothes if need be. Bryant has made clothes for Joan. Stan’s not that outsized by any means. I think finding vintage clothes for Christina Hendricks has got to be more of a challenge–she’s tall as well as hour-glassy.

    • VeryCrunchyFrog

      Have we seen Stan wear an ascot in that way before? It creates a kinship with Peggy and her “ladies’ tie” in the opening scenes. The way his beads are double-looped in the final scene also mirrors the doubling (side-by-side) of the chains on Peggy’s dress.

      • Alice Teeple

        Yes, I noticed that before. He wore the ascot on the day of the Ted confrontation in the office. They’re definitely tied in together – pun intended. Also, their hair is parted almost identically of late.

      • T. Sticks

        Stan and Peggy need to comfort each other in the wake of Ginsberg’s breakdown.

        • Chris

          I think Ted is coming back next week. Peggy is wearing her blue “Ted kissed me for the first time dress” in the preview and she seemed like she was looking past Pete when she greeted him and was being very stilted. That’s my theory anyway.

          • Jaialaibean

            I’ve been waiting for Ted to come back! He’s been underutilized so far. All we’ve been given is short scenes in which he looks more and more like a disheveled and despondent Muppet, so different from his former peppy, Kermit-y self.

          • T. Sticks

            I noticed that, too, but the previews always seem to deliberately throw everyone off? So we’ll have to just see!

      • Nancy Aronson

        I thought the beads were standard hippie fare.

    • osu86

      Were hair extensions common back then? I was just struck by Megan’s hair and was curious.

      • DeniseSchipani

        It’s not extensions; it’s a fall, a hair piece that you pin onto your head. My mom had one in the 60s/70s, styled a lot like Megan’s (her regular hair was usually short because it’s REALLY thick and curly). I always knew my parents were going to a party when she picked up her fall from the salon, in its big box (with the Styrofoam head inside).

      • SewingSiren

        Wiglets, switches, and falls were extremely popular and common. As were flat out wigs.

        • decormaven

          My oldest sister had a fall and a switch. I was fascinated with the switch- could make a big braid with it. It was in a pentagon shaped box.

        • Zoey

          My dad always told a hilarious story about when he was dating my mom in ’69. He said that they were driving somewhere and he had to slam on the brakes and my mom’s hair went flying in the back seat. He had no idea she was wearing a wig.

      • ktr33

        My husband was like, “what’s with the hair,” and I was like, “it’s a fall. Duh.”

      • MilaXX

        Yes but they were called “falls”.

      • osu86

        Thanks all! Learn something new every day.

    • bigeasybridget

      Two things I noticed:
      1. Clean Stephanie in that pale, almost white robe with the pink belt struck me as an immediate callback to Lovely Madonna Betty at the Kentucky party, where she met Henry, where Jane told her how beautiful she was, and where she and Don had that lovely romantic moonlit dance. Not that Megan could have known any of that, but we, the audience can make those subconscious connections, and understand a little more about Megan pushing her away. It took until I saw these screencaps to realize that Megan was wearing the same robe the next morning after the 3 way, but it didn’t in any way the same – instead of the round, earth-mother fullness of the drape and belting, it was long, frilly, and runway sleek….so totally different from either Stephanie’s and Betty’s vibes in that sillhoutte.
      2. The little adorable chain detail on Peggy’s dress became like a jailer, as she was locking him up.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Aha! THAT’S the outfit I was trying to think of. Thank you!
        And yes, you nailed exactly what these reviews are about. :) Not the conscious clothing choices that the characters make, but the choices that the costume designer makes to show these associations and relationships. If you’re new to this blog, you need to check out the other Mad Style entries, pronto! You’ll be blown away! :)

      • L’Anne

        Also, the white-pink bathrobe reminded of the various white robes Betty wore in season 1. Like the one she wore when the salesman stopped by (and Don berated her about). Or the one she wore as she got ready for Sally’s party (which Don abandoned). Stephanie wears this one as Megan basically abandons her by sending her away, and Megan wears as she sees Don’d disinterest in her.

    • Coleen

      Stephanie is wearing rose colored sunglasses in that last scene. She is literally looking out an challenging the status quo?

    • French_Swede

      Maybe it’s just the era, but the homes depicted in Mad Men – the Francis’, the Draper NYC apartment and Megan’s LA house – all seem dark and dank to me, like they smell of wet wood and mildew. The Draper house in Ossining was much brighter and seemed more clean to me. The characters seem to have darkened over the decade, too. No more bright, happy early Beatles style anymore. The late 1960′s were years of war, counterculture, and uncertainty.

      • TiarasandFeathers

        I was born in the early seventies, and my childhood was full of dark drapes and wood panelling. Literally and figuratively, the late 60s and much of the 70s were dark times.

        • Laylalola

          We even had dark heavy-rope macrame plant hangers.

          • Terri Terri

            lol, my mom and I are on macrame-planter-watch this season on Mad Men. They just have to have at least one before this thing ends.

            • decormaven

              They’re already shown the macrame yarn God’s Eye wall hanging at Megan’s place. Please, popular decorating trends, do NOT bring those back.

      • DeniseSchipani

        I’ve seen the same thing — a lot of heavy fabrics and dark wood. My childhood home was built in 1968, and we moved into it in 1970. It was considered stylishly done at the time — the builder’s finishes weren’t top of the line, but they were in style. I was just looking at photos (my parents renovated more than once before selling it in the 90s), and i’d forgotten how dark it was. Pine cabinets, linoleum that mimicked dark slate tiles (in the foyer) or dark red brick (in the kitchen). Dark beams in the den. Brown or dark-yellow tile and brown cabinetry in bathrooms.

        • decormaven

          Bet you had avocado green appliances.

          • TiarasandFeathers

            I did!

          • ikillplants

            And orange formica counters.

          • Joanna

            Give me back my photo albums!!!

          • DeniseSchipani

            We did! And my mom went through a macrame phase which meant we had a hundred hand-made plant hangers. AT least the plants brightened things up. You know, against the burnt-orange drape that covered the glass door to the yard. Because why would you want all that SuNLIGHT coming in?!

        • Laylalola

          Shag carpeting of some sort.

          • DeniseSchipani

            Blue shag in living and dining. My sister had mint green shag in her room; a spare remnant of that rug was in the way back of the faux wood paneled station wagon, of course.

            • FibonacciSequins

              Oh man, does reading that bring me back! We had orange/red shag carpet in our den, and also the avocado appliances and a faux wood paneled station wagon. My dad had a VW Beetle for a while, and my sister got another one in the mid-70s when she went to college.

        • mad girl

          Haha, nodding my head. Boy do I remember the vinyl blue slate foyer and vinyl brick kitchen and pine cabinets… We must have lived in the same neighborhood :)

    • Angela_the_Librarian

      Ooh, I think your theory about pink being a sign of challenging the status quo is really interesting (and spot on). It’s very tongue and cheek to use a color usually identified with standard female gender roles as a sign of rebellion.

      • 3hares

        Yes, it made me think of the ep last season with the ladies in yellow who were also upsetting things/invading. One was Sylvia, one was Mrs. Campbell and now I can’t remember the third.

    • beebee10

      I wonder if Henry’s style-the box plaid from the party and the confrontation between Betty and Sally-signify that he is literally boxed in with Betty. He’s has political ambitions, and his wife is immature, harsh, and unpleasing to him, but now there’s no way out. He’s always objected to Betty’s aggressiveness and mothering with her children but, she doesn’t change. He hasn’t softened her into a malleable wife and loving mother. So now he’s stuck.

      • Glammie

        Yep, I think Henry figured it out a while ago, but, political pro that he is, decided to make the best of it and *handle* Betty. She got out of his control though and he flipped. It’s not an accident that he’s a Republican operative, he will be fundamentally conservative even though he’s been one of the more reasonable characters. Betty’s childishness probably just kind of confirms for him that men should be in charge.

        Which may be, also, why Sally doesn’t like him as much as the boys do. It’s not simply that she was daddy’s little girl or at odds with mom. Sally has no interest in fainting couches.

        • beebee10

          Glammie, I love your insights about Sally and Henry’s relationship. Great point!

          • Glammie

            Thanks!

      • Shelley_oppl

        The plaid also ties him to Sally, and to Don – people who don’t always get along with Betty.

    • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

      Well done, gentlemen! Very astute job pointing out all the pink threatening the status quo, and the meaning of Ginsberg’s overlarge clothing. And the plaids that Don and Sally share. And how Megan is, deliberately or not, rubbing her wealth in her classmates’ faces, ouch.

      One typo: “Nothing illustrates this better than the fact that Stan Ginsberg” — Stan Rizzo, pretty sure you want there

      • Katesymae

        I don’t think so. I think she’s just a little hypocritical. She wants to be living the life they’re living, and thinks she is, but then can’t quite help herself from buying nice things like a Pucci dress and jewelry and playing benefactress by hosting people in her gorgeous pad. She certainly doesn’t mind being the center of attention.

    • Eugene Draper

      fabulous epi….wish I would get more screen time :(

    • bayusc

      My parents were in their mid-late 20′s during the time period of the show, and it’s funny, I definitely see characteristics of them and how they raised me from watching. My mom certainly has Betty characteristics – but much more loving, thank God. She too was raised in the wealthy Philadelphia suburbs, very pretty, and did some modeling before having children, and yes, also knows some Italian. While she never had issue speaking her mind, and says that her days spent at home raising kids were her most rewarding, she certainly counted on my Dad to be “the man” at home – taking care of finances, making decisions, etc. She would use the “wait until your father gets home” line regularly. When TLo wrote about that some people thought the “I’m going to break your arms” was abusive, it made me laugh because I clearly remember my parents teaching my sister to drive. I forget what she did wrong, but whatever she did cause my dad to yell, “You do that again, and I’m going to break both your arms!!” It was in no way a true threat or abusive, but watching this made it occur to me that he likely heard that from his father or mother, and we’re all basically bound to reflect our parents in one way or another. I’m pretty sure my Mom would have reacted quite similarly to Betty if I would have come home with black eyes and nose. About clothes? Love the connection with the “lady in pink”. Meagan just seems so desperate for attention and insecure. Not a good look.

      • radioactive badger

        My grandmother was Peggy, straight-up. She worked as secretary in an insurance firm and was able to work her way up the ladder. Her drink orders were often confused with my grandad’s because hers were stiffer. He was a young college prof, so his equivalent hasn’t really appeared on the show. Though, thankfully his personality has never been similar to Harry’s, the way Harry sometimes dresses (especially the glasses) is fairly similar.

    • decormaven

      I love that Sally has that feline character (can’t tell if it’s a lion, or what) on the wall of her bedroom at Henry & Betty’s. It’s the same one from Don’s penthouse apartment.

    • TiarasandFeathers

      I remember Miss Blankenship “this is a business for sadists and masochists.” Poor Ginsberg was neither. The promo shots for this (half. . .WHY?!!!) season had the promise of darkness in them, with everyone alone in airports. The computer had to come at a price of one destroyed creative, and the signs have been there for Michael for a while.

      Now, I predict that Megan’s agent gives her a bottle of pills “just to steady her nerves” and the closing credit music is “Gotta Get off this Merry-go-Round”. Maybe everyone goes out of the window except for Don, who is the only one left standing looking out the window?

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        If Megan gets pills, the song should be “Mother’s Little Helper” or “Go Ask Alice”

      • Teresa

        I read a review somewhere they hoped the falling man that appears in the opening is Lou.

    • MartyBellerMask

      Yes, yes, YES, you completely nailed the baggy clothes theory. One of my kids has a sensory disorder, so I am familiar. But to piggyback on that, the fabric is well-worn and stands to reason, very soft. That’s just as important (or more so, depending on the person) as tightness.

    • Tracy Alexander

      So Sally was drunk when she broke her nose, right? That’s not something sober teenage girls do. To me that was the unspoken assumption.

      I do think Stephanie is in Oakland- they shot her up on a very Bay Area- looking hill.

      Great one as always, Uncles!

      • 3hares

        Sober girls do dumb things like that all the time. I think it could easily go either way. In fact, I’m going to say they were totally sober because if they hadn’t been Sally would have been suspended or expelled.

        • Tracy Alexander

          Yeah, that’s probably true. I guess sober ME wouldn’t have done that. I’m a wuss.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I don’t think they were drunk. I think they were bored and wanted to do something. I could picture someone suggesting it without drinking.

    • decormaven

      Great job, sirs. That SWF look of Amy’s- I didn’t notice that before. Good catch!

    • theburack

      Notice how Henry is wearing a tie almost identical to the one Don wears at the beginning, in his scene right before the one where he loses it towards Betty. Almost as if he ready to take Don’s place, condescending to her in that scene.

    • Luee_T

      Thank you Uncles! Also noticing all the blues tied to that computer in the final Ginsburg scene (except for Meredith, of course). You could extend that to Cutler, and Lou’s favorite cardigan.

    • golden_valley

      There is so much here that is brilliant, but I think this is the best:

      “Don’s in a tobacco brown, most of the men are in smokey grays, and there
      a streak of blood running down the center of the table…”

      Gawd, I’m gonna miss this when it’s gone for the season.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Or at the conclusion of the whole show, next season. :( Will any other show provide Janie Bryant’s level of in-depth style that inspires TLo? I guess we’ll have to keep an eye on where she goes next…

        • Alice Teeple

          I just hope there’s a Janie Bryant Fan Page within this site from then on! She’s my heroine!

          • 3boysful

            Did you notice Megan’s even wearing frosty nail polish? Details!

            • decormaven

              Ooh, good catch. Time for Mad Men to bust out the frosted lipstick.

      • siriuslover

        You can’t have the smoke without the tobacco. Don’s clothes are clearly saying that you can’t have a good ad campaign without Don Draper.

        • P M

          Wait – is that the fire reference this episode? I’ve been trying to look for one and can’t find any :S

          • Bella Bluth

            Tobacco and cigarettes – Don’s way back. He’s en fuego!

        • Bella Bluth

          Don actually looks like a cigarette in the last scene with the brown suit and grey hat.

    • NeenaJ

      I love that Stephanie put on Megan’s dressing gown. They seemed friendly enough when they met – Megan turned out as the well to do housewife in her flowery dress and Stephanie filthy in her rags. Then, when Stephanie stepped out all fresh faced – dare I say glowing – in Megan’s dressing gown, Megan was having NONE of it.

      • Geoff Dankert

        And — Stephanie looked better in it than Megan. No wonder she shut that down.

      • DeniseSchipani

        did you notice, when Stephanie was wearing the gown, how much she emphasized her belly? Touching it, cradling it… It was way more obvious than it was in her hanging hippie duds.

      • Elizabetta1022

        She was willing to play house until she realized Stephanie was more powerful than she’d initially thought.

    • http://www.lippsisters.com/ Deborah Lipp

      Beyond a shadow of a doubt, Mad Style is my favorite Mad Men writing that doesn’t happen on my own site. This is just SO GREAT to read every week.

      • EarthaKitten

        Two thumbs up to TomandLorenzo and Basket of Kisses my two favorite sites.

      • Fjasmine

        I feel exactly the same way Deborah! Annabelle Mathis

    • mommyca

      “Get in the cab, you losers. Don Draper needs to swagger and you’re in the way.” Well put!

      And both Don and the audience needed this swagger, just to keep the hopes up… Hopes that even though there might be some changes, the swagger lives and Don/Dick will be OK in the end (well… at least that’s my hope)

      • Jackie4g

        He’s going to be OK. Don is going to come out on top.

    • grahamcracker3

      Ginzo’s breakdown didn’t catch me off guard, but his self-mutilation sure did.

      • leahpapa

        Which was also…pink!

    • Cyprienne Zed

      The woman in the computer room is serving me Jane Siegel better-than-you.

      • Fjasmine

        Jane Siegal Sterling v 2.0

      • Brad Watson

        That’s what I thought too! And now I’m wondering if Jane will pop back into the story – a foreshadowing, like the Stephanie lookalike from a few episodes back.

      • MadMenMurphy

        Robo-Jane-Siegal-Sterling!

    • MilaXX

      The other thing that struck out at me from Megan’s interaction with her was how many time Megan remark on how pretty Stephanie was. I think she said it at least 3 times. It just emphasized Megan’s jealousy to me because she’s never been threatened by another woman’s beauty around Don.

    • Rzldzl122

      Ginsberg was born in a concentration camp, and lived in a Displaced persons camp for several years befoe his father found him, His mother died at the hands of the Nazi’s. Like All Holocaust Survivors, he suffers from PTSD.

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        Him at a displaced persons camp was never mentioned when he discussed it with Peggy. Never. It was just that he was born in a camp, which Ginsberg himself found impossible. But that is what his adopted father told him. Plus he was a very small child when the war ended, if not still an infant. We never got a Dick Whitman flashback to confirm an age, he seemed younger than Peggy so that puts him past 1939, but it sounds a little hard for him to have formed a memory of the event. I’m not sure how the human memory works, but I think Ginsberg’s insecurities and mental instability do have a lot to do with identity be it being Jewish, sensory overload, human sexuality, and being just plain off.

    • leighanne

      Ladies in pink threatening the status quo – so spot on. Thank you for all the insights!
      The plaids vs florals as well as the pinks vs yellows in the various scenes really stood out to me, I started taking note whenever they appeared. Looking at the stills I see the pink and yellow continue into Megan’s bedroom with the print on the wall, split into half pink half yellow. They seemed to be antagonistic colors throughout this episode.
      Henry and Sally are tied together somewhat in their scene- his bit of red and blue aligns him with Sally’s primary colors. Betty is clearly in charge in bright yellow in that moment (loved her dress btw).

      • Glammie

        What I noticed is that this is one of the rare times that Bobby is not in red, white and blue. The times they are a changin’

        • leighanne

          Wish we could see a flash forward of Sally’s wardrobe in the 70s

          • Glammie

            Oh dear, I remember my outfits from the 70s too well–am afraid to relive that era through Sally.

    • Katelorelai

      In that last shot of Don it appeared that the suit he was wearing was to small for him. Calling back to the turd brown suit being his “I’m unwanted” suit. Which makes sense in that he was not wanted in the meeting but using the power of his gray hat (Don’s power color) he has now overthrown their expectations and is too large to be contained further by the brown suit of unwantedness. Also I thought that the color combination of yellow (Peggy’s power color) and gray (Don’s power color) in his tie in the first scene was an indication that he and Peggy are at least working together more peacefully and possibly headed toward a more significant reconciliation.

      • Elizabetta1022

        Good observation! Yes, brown seems to be the color that signals Don’s submission. In that meeting, he was basically telling the execs from Phillip Morris that he would be their bitch. But that gray hat at the end worn at such a cocky angle–he’s back!

      • Glammie

        Brown may clash with the greys, but I think it’s Don’s Dick Whitman color. And, it turns out, he’s powerful as Dick Whitman, too.

        Wonder how much longer he’ll keep the hat?

        • Katelorelai

          Maybe the combination of the gray and the brown shows that he is finally integrating both of sides of his personality, that he is becoming comfortable being Dick Whitman. The fact that he seems to feel powerful in this new incarnation may be him finally recognizing that others only have power over him if he allows it to be so.

          • FibonacciSequins

            Excellent insight!

            • Katelorelai

              Thanks. I love your name, by the way, so clever!

            • FibonacciSequins

              Thanks! I wish I could take credit for coming up with it, but it’s a name of a character from PowerPuff Girls.

      • FranklyMyDear

        I think it’s the same suit. And in both meetings, I get the impression that Don appears to be taking a bad deal but really has a trick (or ten) up his sleeve. Or at least a belief that he can turn things around in his favour. I also don’t think Don was offering to be subservient to the Philip Morris guys like another poster on this thread said. i think it was a clever power play to make everyone at that table realise how much of an asset he would be to this account.

        • Katelorelai

          I agree that it is probably the same suit and the contrast to the other suits in the room is that they are nothing but suits and are completely interchangeable but it’s not about the suit with Don it’s the man wearing it that’s important.

    • AnnaleighBelle

      Do we think Amy wants to do Megan or to be Megan? She’s kind of creepy.

      Maybe she’s Charles Manson during his little-known trans-dressing days…

      • Terri Terri

        Amy creeped me out also. She seemed very fake and I couldn’t tell if that was the character or if I just didn’t believe the acting.

        • ybbed

          She could just be attracted to the wealth.

      • Chris

        Yes, it’s the original “everyone wants to be me or do me” with Megan.

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        It doesn’t help she shares the name, albeit different spelling, from the infamous prostitute who sexual assaulted young Dick Whitman. This Amy seemed keen on carrying conversation with Don and he wanted nothing to do with her. I almost think his whole disinterest in the threesome- yes, I thought was disinterested, had a lot to do with the Amy of it all.

        She seems like the type of woman who would push drugs to anybody in order to crash on somebody’s couch, and I can definitely believe Megan would take her on that offer at this point.

    • Hoffa_w_HerHead

      A lot of people think that Megan’s behavior this episode was weird or uncharacteristic, but I think her behavior fit exactly with her personality. Encouraging a threesome in an attempt to make Don interested again is very in line with her character. She’s a very insecure woman. And if her marriage fails, her lifestyle may also change drastically. She may want to “appear” to be a boho hippie, but she doesn’t actually know how to function without a back-up check book. She would not do “poor” well, and she knows it. So even though her behavior is a bit erratic, her thoughts probably are too.

      This was the episode where she decided to go all in and be aggressive- hence the pink. Thanks for pointing that out, uncles!

      • Lady Bug

        “She may want to “appear” to be a boho hippie, but she doesn’t actually know how to function without a back-up check book.” THIS

        • yllas

          Her parents were intelligent and fairly well to do, I think. She really wouldn’t be comfortable living in a dump in dirty clothes with people getting high and panhandling on the street.

          • Glammie

            Though, curiously enough, Marigold seems to be fairly at home that way.

            • P M

              I have a feeling the romance of it will wear off in due course. Oh god, what if Margaret ends up pregnant?

            • Glammie

              Now that would be interesting. She’s such a peripheral character though that it seems like a lot of plot line for her. But it would be interesting.

            • P M

              I was just wondering how Roger and Mona would deal with it. And Brooks. Wow, that son of hers would be so very confused if that happened.

            • yllas

              Yes, but Marigold is acting out, a spoiled rebellious child, wants to throw it in her parents faces. Megan is ambitious, wants a glitzy career, wants more of the finer things in life. It wouldn’t be logical for her to run off and become a poor and dirty hippie. For one thing, Don wouldn’t care, lol, might divorce her!

            • Lisa_Co

              Marigold was in a commune. That’s a ways away from being alone on the city streets and panhandling (Stephanie).

            • Chris

              Yes, I guess we are to assume she had a falling out with her mother (who seemed quite square as opposed to artsy, bohemian Anna). Stephanie takes more after her aunt I guess.

      • Miss Disco

        i would doubt she has ever really been poor, even her secretarying was probably more in search of a husband/ladder to fame. She always looked slightly more glamourous than the other secretaries, you can imagine that for all her ‘bowls of cold water’* she also had plenty of pricey products too. (Her father is an academic. They aren’t generally poor.)

        *that image of her mother never seemed in line with how she’s portrayed, but maybe she had a more effortless and natural style when she was younger*

        • P M

          ‘bowls of cold water’?

          • FibonacciSequins

            I think Miss Disco is referring to the time Megan said her evening beauty routine is just splashing cold water on her face, something she learned from her mother.

          • Miss Disco

            in the season 4 episode where megan first appears properly, the secretaries are talking with would-never-become-a-fake-hippie-i-have-phd-bitches Faye Miller about beauty rituals, she says her mother splashed cold water on her face every morning to be beautiful.

      • Fjasmine

        Megan is lost. The screecap from last seasons Hollywood party showed how out of place she is, that Pucci dress would have fit in with Danny Siegal’s crowd. Lots of people probably show up for her parties because the booze and food is better than any of them can afford.

        • P M

          That’s exactly what I thought. What a sad life for Megan.

          On the other hand, a lot of people can’t take the risks they’d like, because there *is* no back-up chequebook.

          • Hoffa_w_HerHead

            I agree, but Megan is hanging out with people that do function without that backup savings, and she wants to be able to come off as “one of them” by acting like she would be emotionally fine if she didn’t have money.

            I also agree that she is lost- she seems to absorb the persona of the crowds she hangs out in at the time.

        • dixie pomeroy

          I agree, that party last season is where she sees herself belonging. Ironic because that party was both the place where Don saw a fantasy hippie version of her and the kind of party she might be going to if Don had moved to LA as he promised.

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        I think this show’s portrayal of hippies is big on contrasting the real deal, the Upstate commune and Stephanie, and the free love posers, be it seeing little Danny Siegel looking like David Crosby at that party last season and this party. You know something’s bad when the mythic California on this show now feels sullied.

        As for Megan, I think TLo nailed it that she is very much dressing up as the wife she technically when her supposed persona is completely opposed to that wife image. There’s desperation on her part, so she rehashes another party and ‘Zou Bissou Bissou’ moment where she is over-dressed and aiming for sexpot. Now if she can actually pull this off at an audition…..

        Her mother was right. I have no idea who paid for what in Laurel Canyon, but in the past we have seen she has always had to ask Don for money because she was just never expected to carry around cash around her despite her high-end tastes. Megan has to consider she’d probably make a killing in a divorce settlement with Don but who knows if she is in denial that she really failed at something. Remember, she has no clue about Sylvia- she just has ideas. So Megan finding him this disengaged with her, being more excited about pregnant niece that she just found out existed, probably is killing her.

    • Lisa Petrison

      >Henry’s always had what looked like a benign sort of condescending paternalism to him. He clearly looked at Betty as a princess needing to be rescued by him, but many subsequent scenes showed him as a good match for her; someone who had her best interest at heart and could weather her moods and insecurities with aplomb. It’s telling that after all the little tantrums and fights over the years, this is the Rubicon for him: a wife who doesn’t ask permission before thinking.

      After that restaurant dinner where Betty first met Jimmy Barrett and the client he offended, Betty cried in the car and said that what she really wanted was to be of help to Don in his work. As a politician’s wife, she has that opportunity and likely would be really good at it. But apparently Henry hasn’t been seeing her that way, since he isn’t even going over talking points with her. His expecting her to talk about nothing but appetizers is insulting to her and not appreciating the fact that she could truly be helpful. If he were to treat her as a member of the team upfront, probably she would be happy to stay on script. Which is why her first reaction was, “I’m sorry, Henry, I didn’t know.”

      • Elizabetta1022

        I’m trying to remember the first First Lady who was asked about her political views, in addition to her opinions on table settings and appetizers. When did politicians’ wives begin to express their political opinions as they campaigned alongside their husbands? (Of course, Eleanor Roosevelt is the exception…so would it have been Hillary Clinton? Or did Jackie O. talk politics, too?) I’m asking because I thought it was odd that Henry hadn’t gone over his change in his political stance on the war with Betty–that seems like his mistake to me, and not hers.

        • Lisa Petrison

          Betty Ford was recognized for being particularly outspoken publicly. I’m not sure what most politicians’ wives talked about at dinner parties back then though.

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            I’m not 100% sure, but I would guess children for the most part were a safe subject.

            • T C

              Fashion, films and literature were relatively safe topics, especially if citing reviews or public events such as Opera and Symphony season openings.

          • FibonacciSequins

            Yes, I think Betty Ford was the first First Lady to speak her mind on political issues of the day.

            • Gatto Nero

              .. and then later spoke openly about her addiction and treatment.

            • FibonacciSequins

              And her breast cancer/mastectomy. Betty Ford was pretty radical.

            • Lisa_Co

              Not to forget she had been a dancer with Martha Graham – then America’s most important modern dance troupe. Betty Ford had had a real career.

            • Glammie

              Not the first–Eleanor Roosevelt definitely spoke her mind. But Betty Ford was refreshingly off-script.

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            I actually thought much more about Betty Ford than Phyllis Schlafly with Betty. I actually shuddered at the comparison with the latter. When Matthew Weiner said ‘Betty’s been politicized’, I was hoping for something closer to The Feminine Mystique than somebody who stood against all of that. Betty Ford seems like the correct moderate aspiration. Radical for the more conservative types but for liberals, very much mom having a political conscience.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          I don’t remember Jackie Kennedy talking about politics. She had issues that she cared about, like the White House restoration, but that’s not a major policy issue. I’d go with Betty Ford or Hilliary Clinton.

          • Gatto Nero

            Jackie Kennedy was worldly, spoke French, and was considered an asset when she traveled with the president. She supported the arts and brought lots of performers to the White House, as well as hosting a televised tour. She had a fairly high profile (compared to her predecessor) but I don’t think she was involved in or spoke out on anything overtly political.

            • radioactive badger

              Right. She was a dream 50s/early 60s housewife–an accomplished complement to her husband and his career, but doesn’t really have a life separate from him, while later First Ladies did have passions outside of their husbands’ politics with emotional lives to match.

              Something I just realized about Francis is that he’s taking a housewifely approach to Nixon’s politics: he “supports the President.” Nixon’s attitude towards the war is cited in the episode as being dove-ish, while Francis is sometimes identified as being more liberal, but really Nixon was just trying to do what his old boss did in 1953 and negotiate an end to the war.

              Don isn’t much different. He is back, but it will only end in tears. He also used to work for Nixon and it was at the same time he worked for Lucky Strikes and the resurging confluence of old friends, while swagtastic (for a few), trickle down to disgrace.

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            The most ‘political’ Jackie really ever got was the pains she went to really protect the Camelot Mystique after the JFK assassination. Given the history and legacy despite the curtains being raised on that family, I would say she was real effective.

        • Fjasmine

          Lady Bird Johnson was the first wife of a president to campaign seprately for him. She also worked on “beautification” which was enviromentalism before there was a word for it. She helped develop national parks and utilize native plants and irrigation.

      • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

        Betty has expressed sadness about a women’s role from very early on in the series. One of my favorite quotes is, “She wanted me to be beautiful so I could find a man. There’s nothing wrong with that. But then what? Just sit and smoke and let it go till you’re in a box?” She wants to be someone’s partner, but she’s always shut down. She’s never given the opportunity to express her opinions and so she lacks the experience to revisit her opinions, mold, and change them.

    • Lisa Petrison

      I would imagine that Stephanie got those clothes and sunglasses she was wearing in her last scene from her friends in Oakland.

      • Karin Golde

        That shot doesn’t look like any place in Oakland I know, but maybe they weren’t trying to be realistic.

        • Lisa Petrison

          That looks like a pretty steep hill behind her. San Francisco?

          • P M

            Other folks have said LA based on the Capitol Records building behind her.

            • ItAin’tMe

              That was the first shot. Steep hill was seen during the second phone call.

            • Lisa_Co

              In reality it was probably shot in LA but supposed to look like Oakland (like the places are supposed look like NYC).

            • Alloy Jane

              Yeah, I agree that even if that scene wasn’t actually filmed in Oakland, it’s supposed to look like that’s where Stephanie is (giant coat, giant hill). The important thing about her returning up north was that she knew a doctor there, so I can’t imagine her not going where she said she was going. She had no reason to lie to Megan and no reason to not go.

          • asympt

            It looked like San Francisco to me, but maybe that’s just because I live there.

            • T C

              Doesn’t look like SF, the only hills close to the water are Pacific Heights and Potrero Hill. The flats along the waterfront in SF were entirely industrial at that time. I also do not recall any palm trees near Oakland’s waterfront (or Berkeley, Emeryville, San Leandro). Given Stephanie was in the LA Hills on Friday, had to cash the check before 3PM (bank hours, perhaps extended to 3:30 on Friday) and drive up to the Bay Area on either Highway 99 inland or US 101 on the coast (8-9 hours), I don’t see how she could accomplish shopping as most stores were not open before 10AM or after 7PM (except Thursday for Macy’s downtown SF).

            • ybbed

              Read above post. How hard is it to cash a check and buy some clothes in an hour? Easy

            • Glammie

              Oakland’s waterfront is really flat–basically landfill–and at that time, most of the waterfronts were pretty industrial.

              Cow Hollow, where my parents owned a Victorian was fairly run down and filled with hippies (at least their rental was), but the shot just doesn’t read that way. SF streets now and then tend to have a lot of people on them. Certainly the Haight-Ashbury scene did.

          • Cat_Xing

            I thought Stephanie was calling from a side street east of Telegraph Ave in North Oakland… The area is called “Pill Hill” and it’s a steep slope in a few places

      • ybbed

        I think she went straight to Megan’s bank when she left Megan’s pad, cashed that check, and shopped!!! Nice jacket, pretty dress, those funky duds are history!! and I am suspicious about whether or not she was in Oakland. In reality I am sure she was in L.A.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          Why is there this theory that she lied about where she is? Is it because there was a palm tree in the background? Because as an east coaster, I can tell you that the outside scenes in “New York” never look like New York, but that doesn’t mean that the characters are lying about their locations.

          • ybbed

            I don’t know if she is lying. It is just a 6-8 hour drive to Oakland from LA. Maybe she flew? It just seemed quick that she was suddenly in Oakland overnight. Not that it couldn’t have happened.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              She left Megan’s on Friday, the day before her party. She called Don on Sunday morning, the morning after the party. It was a day and a half later.

            • ybbed

              Okay, I’ll have to rewatch (I have only watched it 4 times already). I guessed I missed a day somewhere.
              But she could still be in LA, kidding!!!

            • MadMenMurphy

              PLUS, we’ve never known Stephanie to be anything but, “tell it like it is” open, honest…calling Dick/Don on his B.S.

    • Jackie4g

      This is from memory. Peggy’s smart little Jonathan Logan type dresses were in the $30 ($29.99) to $40 ($39.99) range and a Pucci like Megan’s was well over $100.00

      • P M

        Holy wow. Megan’s really out of touch if she couldn’t figure out the difference between the cost of her outfit and the cost of the clothing the other folks at the party were wearing.

        • FibonacciSequins

          The odd thing is, she wasn’t so out of touch that she knew owning a color tv would set her apart from her LA friends, as her car would.

          • P M

            She doesn’t seem to have a vision of herself independent of the people she hangs out with. And it seems to be a very confused vision, which makes sense, given that she’s trying to hang out and blend in with several groups of people: Producers and agents, struggling actors, Don. What a mess that poor girl is.

        • ItAin’tMe

          Megan looks like she’s dressed for a party at the Factory. Don looks painfully square. Most of the people at the party probably thought he was a cop. Come to think of it, he did hustle Harry out of there as though he was wanted for questioning. And then Harry spilled his guts.

          • VirginiaK

            Baby Jane, right?

            • ItAin’tMe

              Um…Holzer? Is that who you mean?

            • VirginiaK

              yes! as she hung around the Warhol people and dressed like that (hair – dress)

            • ItAin’tMe

              Yes, you’re right, good style reference. Baby Jane Holzer was blonde though.

            • VirginiaK

              Yes, I do remember that!

    • KinoEye

      “We needed something to erase the memory of that horribly ugly outfit that pushed poor Michael over the edge of sanity with its ugliness. ” What happened to Ginsburg was too sad, but that’s just hilarious.

    • Laylalola

      Gloves — it might just be they were kind of the thing right about then (like shorter skirts, etc). Especially those little mini white gloves, even with short sleeves. It wasn’t strictly a Republican thing. I have photos of my young aunt at a teen high school dance wearing them about that time — it might have even been the Lady Bird Johnson era or more that look, but I might be mixing things up…

      • yllas

        I never wore little white gloves in my life, I was in high school and working a bit during the mid-late 60′s, and don’t recall anyone else wearing them. Except for someone like Tricia Nixon with her big sprayed hair. White gloves looked dated to me even then. Maybe I just didn’t live in white glove country.

        • Laylalola

          Her father was a professor at a liberal college, it was a college town and she was in a public high school. Weirdly, I also remember a photo from sometime in the 70s of a bunch of his students where one of the women was wearing basically a body stocking — she looked flat-out nude to my child eyes.

    • Kit Jackson 1967

      I’m hoping someone can answer a question for me. Were women in positions like Peggy and Joan still wearing gloves in 1969? I can imagine Joan would, because she’s more old fashioned, but I’m not sure about Peggy.

      The woman at the computer reminds of me “Star Trek,” and I have no idea why.

      I wonder if part of the reason Henry comes off as so paternalistic, is that he’s almost old enough to be Betty’s father.

      • NDC_IPCentral

        During the summer of 1969 I worked inside a Manpower office located in My Old Home Town in the Midwest. Manpower was a temp agency around the country, and I helped the office manager interview potential temps for our talent stable. We’d give the women we hired a packet of stuff (I’m saying stuff because I have no recollection of the contents except for one item) that included a pair of white, short gloves in a polyester sort of fabric (no fine felt for this). The women were encouraged to wear them to signal they were Manpower temps.

      • Aunt Tabby

        Peggy’s gloves went with the pink day coat she had draped over her arm.

        Gloves were pretty much required wear for “ladies” in public until the very late ’60. My Mom is Betty’s age and I am Sally’s. I had stacks of gloves in my little girl wardrobe, but never wore them in my teens in the very late ’60/’70. Nor did my mother.

        Manhattan was a little more formal. I had to wear gloves when we went to the city say for a Broadway show, a museum trip, or shopping in a department store.

        The glove thing reminded me of the pre ’70′s earring protocol. Ladies did NOT have pierced ears! Seriously, my mother considered it mutilation. It was unthinkable. Notice how Joan always un clips her earring to answer the phone. Earrings were all screw backs and clips. That changed pretty quickly in the ’70′s. I campaigned hard and was allowed to get my ears pierced (by a doctor) when I turned 16 in 1971. My mother finally broke down and got her ears pierced in the ’80′s because they no longer made clips and she hated to be out of style.

        • barbarasingleterry

          Only “bad girls” had pierced ears according to my mother, although my very proper grandmother had pierced ears from the flapper age. My mom was gifted with a pair of diamond studs that had belonged to my great-grandmother and since she couldn’t wear them without piercing her ears, she allowed me to get pierced ears when I was 13. My dad, a doctor, had been piercing his patient’s ears so he did ours. I also had to wear gloves to go downtown in San Diego to visit my grandfather’s law office in 1969, only lasted for about 3 more months though. I did love those white gloves….

          • FibonacciSequins

            I had gloves (short, white cotton) when I was little. I can’t remember the occasions I wore them. Probably just for church and going downtown.

          • Glammie

            Hmmm, I was in the Bay Area and my mother was a lawyer, but none of us wore gloves. Not even when my mother went to court. Gloves must have been phased out here earlier than in other places.

            • Bella Bluth

              Grew up in the Bay Area as well, and you wore gloves to go “The City” until the early 70s. You were still expected to dress up, but apparently the gloves were just too formal. Ha. My 94 year-old italian-catholic grandmother never pierced her ears – only naughtly girls did that.

            • Glammie

              You did, but I sure wasn’t. We used to dress up to go to the opera house for the ballet, but no gloves anywhere. We weren’t churchgoers, which may have been sort of the last white-gloves-formal sort of place.

            • T C

              My cousin was a Superior Court Judge for Alameda County, I did notice the formality levels were more relaxed in Oakland than in SF back then.

          • EarthaKitten

            OMG, clip earrings are sooooo painful! I can only imagine that the earlobes become desensitized over time, that is the only explanation for women being able to wear them. Maybe that explains why Joan can be rather nasty at times– her earlobes are killing her. BTW, my mom also subscribed to the “bad girl” pierced ear theory.

        • FibonacciSequins

          My mother and I got our ears pierced together when I was 13, in 1976. We were just reminiscing about it the other day!

        • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

          My younger sister pierced my ears in 1966. She was piercing ears in the girls’ bathroom during lunchtime at her high school almost every day. Amazingly, not one person got an infection. Since no one else was doing piercing and she couldn’t do her own ears, she went to a doctor and ended up with an infection! In just a couple of years, mothers were piercing their ears so they could wear diamond earrings and not lose them.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          New York being more formal makes sense. I know my mother had to get more dressed up to go to New York than if she was doing something in Connecticut.

      • http://tvblogster.blogspot.com Boop

        I remember when I was little, I wore little white glove to my cousins’ bar mitzvah. My mother wore some too. I think this was 1972.

      • MsKitty

        My Mom had about half a dozen pairs of white gloves in the dresser drawer, but I only remember her wearing them for special occasions (most times with her mink stole). And now that I think about it I don’t recall her wearing them after about 1973-74.

    • Terri Terri

      Peggy’s apartment is as sad as that outfit. Sure isn’t the cute girly apartment that Marlo Thomas had in That Girl!

      • siriuslover

        She could have had that awesome apartment in the high rise but good ol’ Abe convinced her of this one. I think the high rise would have better suited her personality.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          I know. She really looked like she belonged in that high rise she wanted.

          • DeniseSchipani

            i commented somewhere else how sad her place looks now — as well as small (even for what the front room/first floor of an UWS brownstone actually looks like; they’re deliberately making it look smaller, meaner, and more cramped than it should). The consolation is that it’s a whole building. If she holds on to it,she’s got a golden place to live — or a golden egg if she sells.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              That’s what I’ve said on other places. The best solution is to hold onto the building, and hire someone else to manage it. She earns money from the building, makes sure there’s someone there to take care of problems, but she gets to live someplace wonderful. When the price of real estate changes, she can sell it in a few decades and make an absolute fortune.

        • Danielle

          She really needs to sell that place and find a home she feels good about being in.

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            She needs to keep the place (rent paid by tenants=income), hire a building manager/super to deal with maintence issues, and then find a better place to live. That place, if she holds onto it, is going to fund her future grandkids education.

            • Danielle

              Yes, but back then for all she knew it might have stayed a slum.

            • FibonacciSequins

              And the apartments might have been under rent control, making it unlikely she’d earn enough from rental income to rent a fancy high-rise apartment.

            • http://tvblogster.blogspot.com Boop

              And her retirement.

            • Juvenile Sinephile

              Honestly, I would consider it an upset if Peggy doesn’t end up in LA permanently at some point this season.

        • yllas

          I’m just now thinking of poor Peggy returning home to that sad apartment, alone, after such a terrible day. I like to think someone (well, probably Stan) came home with her.

          • Fjasmine

            Maybe Julio came down for pretzels.

            • Glammie

              There are worse things–Julio seems pretty grounded as males go on Mad Men.

            • Alloy Jane

              LOL, so true and so so very sad. The most well-adjusted male on Mad Men is a ten-year-old boy.

    • Bert_Bauer

      The empty computer room screen cap is chilling. The unit on the left looks like it has two eyes (the tape reels) and an ominous large mouth. The “Think” sign is like the computer giving an order to the humans. I’m swear I’m not channeling Ginsberg and both of my nipples are intact.

      • FibonacciSequins

        If I recall correctly, that still is from earlier in the episode, and when the computer was seen again as Peggy looks at it after Ginsberg is wheeled out, one reel is blue and the other is red. Chilling indeed.

        • ybbed

          Both reels are blue, just like two big blue nipples!

          • Benten32

            Call back to 2001; HAL has been interpreted as a big red nipple! (ugh).

      • T C

        “Think” was IBM’s tagline for many years. For kicks some of us would use an m.

    • http://bidonica.wordpress.com/ Poggy

      I had this feeling that while her outfits were spot on, something didn’t quite work with Amy’s hair and makeup (the eyebrows maybe?), which to me made her look like a modern person wearing vintage clothes rather than someone actually belonging to that era. Or maybe it was just a casting issue – some faces just “fit” a period more than others (I think that’s why many of us had to do a double take before recognizing Neve Campbell – she, on the other hand, looked so believably “Sixties” to me that she basically disappeared in the role).

      And now, this isn’t style related but it keeps bugging me, so any input from more knowledgeable folks is welcome – what, exactly, could a computer like that do? I am becoming obsessed like poor Ginsberg.

      • DeniseSchipani

        I believe the computer is mostly crunching numbers for media plans/ad buys. Like a big fancy calculator — faster than humans but with about the processing power in that giant, ahem, monolith as your kid’s iPod nano. That pink lady is feeding in punch cards, remember those? As late as the 80s that’s what we used to register for classes in college.

        • decormaven

          Yes, the computer was mainly used for calculating media buys, based on the different markets.

        • FibonacciSequins

          “Do not fold, spindle or mutilate”

    • Darva Sutra

      Lou at the meeting is giving me Satanic Mr. Rogers.

    • Wattage

      Was anyone else bothered by Stephanie’s eyebrows? Impeccably shaped…

      • GinnyThePainter

        Right here with you on Anachronistic Eyebrow Patrol. If an actress really wants to look 60′s or 70′s, she has to commit her eyebrows to the process.

        • http://bidonica.wordpress.com/ Poggy

          Hahaha, see my comment about Amy’s! it’s a detail that really can make or destroy the accuracy of a look to me.

          • Glammie

            They also don’t get the long hair right–*all* of the counterculture actresses have had layers in their long hair. Something that was not happening in 1969.

            • Teresa

              This is true, severe part down the middle and one straight length.

            • Glammie

              Yep. Exactly how I wore my hair for ages. Drove my mother *nuts*–”That long straight hair parted down the middle.” One of her ongoing complaints about my hair–it’s just sort of branded in my brain as a result.

            • Chris

              It happens in all the historical movies too. Unless it’s a wig, you always see the feathering on the sides and the layers in the women’s hair.

        • Gatto Nero

          This should have been fixed in makeup.

        • Glammie

          I did notice that they got down Betty’s eyebrows though–too sharp, too dark. They gave her a harder older look, which is in keeping with the character development. What little gentleness there was is Betty is seeping away.

    • Claire

      If Asos’s “Work Clothing” section is anything to go by, skirts that short are office-appropriate again. And also crop tops.

    • Lisa Petrison

      Other than Aimee in the whorehouse, the Mad Men character that I most remember wearing pink was Betty last season, in a pink sweater, on the night that she slept with Don at summer camp. Janie said that the sweater was pink because it was a “romantic” color, but that storyline would fit in with upsetting the status quo too.

    • RKA

      I had completely forgotten about Don’s fantasy pregnant hippie Megan giving him permission to sleep with other women.

      Mad Style is the absolute best recaps around! Thanks

    • EEKstl

      Brilliant. The connection to the receptionist/stewardesses in “2001″ was genius, and spot-on.

      • MeowMix

        My husband is going to gloat over this. He said “Oh hey, 2001″ during the show and I was like, what are you talking about? Ha ha.

    • rockin robin

      A couple of thoughts: Stan’s bow seems to especially tie him to Peggy in that scene, which is interesting, since his costuming has historically tied him more to Ginsberg, but maybe it’s intimating that Ginsberg’s mental illness has meant a greater distance between them.

      Also, was that young woman who strongly resembled Stephanie who hit on him while he was meeting with another ad agency a sort of foreshadowing of the return of Stephanie?

    • Shawn EH

      Det. Cutter from Guiding Light was the central cigarette company client! Looking very patriarchal now.

    • snarkykitten

      Firstly, thank you, uncles for your wonderful recaps/analysis. Definitely didn’t pick up on that pink theme at all!

      Secondly, is there any significance to the TV shows that play during the various scenes?

      • Teresa

        I wondered that too. I could have sworn Gomer Pyle USMC was on in Betty’s bedroom.

    • dash1211

      Dear Uncles,
      You’re brilliant.
      That’s all.

    • Julie Parr

      I wish I had the power to award honorary PhDs.

      • Julie Parr

        p.s. SO I COULD GIVE THEM TO TLo, if that wasn’t already obvious.

    • Janice Bartels

      I got the impression that Betty’s party was actually the first stop of a progressive dinner- something about being glad to be first and then she didn’t go on to the other houses. Were progressive dinners trendy in 1969?

      • Terri Terri

        I thought the same.

      • MartyBellerMask

        THANK YOU. A friend of mine (about 15 years older than me) was talking about “progressive” dinners, and I had no idea what he was talking about. Makes perfect sense now. You progress from one house to the next.

      • decormaven

        Progressive dinners very of that time. Love how Betty got out the “good” serving pieces.

      • Gatto Nero

        Progressive dinners for conservative pols.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        Progressive dinners were VERY popular and rumaki was the appetizer at any kind of dinner or party. But the baby hot dogs should have been wrapped in dough (pigs in the blanket) instead of in BBQ sauce. Swedish meatballs were another standard item. That’s where the BBQ sauce might have been served.

        • T C

          BBQ sauce on Swedish meatballs? Bleargh! It would have been a white (Campbell’s Cream of Mushroom) sauce.

          • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

            I really don’t remember my mother’s mini meatballs having a white sauce. She made a glaze of grape jelly and chile sauce that was delicious. I guess the difference is that she was Jewish and not Swedish.

    • Therese Bohn

      To be honest, when I first saw Megan’s robe, I thought of it more as peach than pink. But I love the connections you always make!
      Also thank you so much for NOT screencapping Michael’s pink nipple! (shudder) But yeah, his clothing and attitude have triggered his illness for a long time. Even the ear flap hat he wore (I think) last season in the elevator gave a sense of wanting to shut the noise out. Poor Michael.

      • MartyBellerMask

        I noted once that the hat recalled Holden Caulfield from “The Catcher in the Rye”. I think it’s a bit of both. :)

    • thinkzinc

      That reading of the last scene with the cigarette execs was everything! Tobacco, smoke and blood in the middle! If it wouldn’t actually kill you you should start doing these for the production design.

      • Glammie

        Yeah, I’ve been saying the same thing, but it would kill them. It’s amazing stuff, though–all the jumbled blue-green prints against the mostly pink and brown background at Megan’s. It’s supposed to be this beautiful place with the amazing view, but it doesn’t read that way. You know Megan’s having issues when you see it.

    • salty

      I keep wondering about megan’s hair. Were extensions common in those days? I also keep wondering what kind of financial arrangement she and Don have… she’s certainly not on an allowance. Knew when Pucci finally hit the show it would be on Megan!

      • NDC_IPCentral

        Look far lower in the comments — Megan was wearing a fall (or more than one) – it’s a type of hairpiece with a comb at the end that could be tucked into your own hair, preferably a ratted portion for secure anchoring. We didn’t have extensions back then, but there were a LOT of falls and wigs, and they were stored on styrofoam heads to keep their shape.

      • Eric Stott

        I think Megan has some money- The Calvets certainly look very comfortable and smartly dressed.

      • Teresa

        The hair looked like Priscilla Presley’s wedding ‘do to me.

      • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

        Fall, wigs, and hair pieces were very, very common for women to wear. My Grandmother had a bunch as well, as the most beautiful long red wing that’s styled almost exactly like Megan’s.

      • Alloy Jane

        While I’m sure Megan enjoys free use of Don’s money (that shopping spree with her mother and Sally), she also has her own. She threw Don’s bday party on her dime and tells him so when he chides her for wasting money on it. But it would be interesting to see them going over the budget with his accountant. I would imagine that they both have personal accounts as well as their joint account, and that the money she makes is for her only, whereas the money he makes is there for the spending.

    • http://batman-news.com Nick Valenziano

      “This looks like something a nun picks out to wear the first day after she left the order.” HIGH-sterical!

      • Gatto Nero

        That whole paragraph knocked me out.

        • FibonacciSequins

          The uncles really know how to turn a phrase!

    • FibonacciSequins

      Ah, the love I have for your Mad Men analyses. I’m in heaven, reading this!

    • NMMagpie

      Once again, this is some next-level analysis. My daughter always asks why I talk about this blog so much and when you get articles like this, how can you not?

      Thank you, uncles. :)

    • MorganHW

      When I hit the comment about Peggy’s fugly outfit and laughed so hard here at work that I began to choke!
      Did anyone else notice that at both of Megan’s parties–the one for Don’s 40th and this week’s one–there’s a lurking redheaded girl watching Megan wistfully in the background? And the actresses look pretty similar. Are all her friends petite redheads? The contrast in the grooming, etc., really shows up when you just compare the two redheads!

      • Fjasmine

        I noticed that also, Megan had two look alike friends in Season 5… Maybe because her women friends are indistinguishable to her she just picks the same type.

        • MorganHW

          I agree–a type that’s very different from her. They literally have to look up to her and have a totally different look, so no competition.

        • Glammie

          You mean ladies who love ladies? If you add the two redheads to the swinger actress, this is the third friendship with lesbian overtones we’ve seen with Megan. Says something, IMO, how Megan uses her sexual attractiveness to garner acolytes, though she doesn’t show much interest in reciprocating. Different relationship than Peggy’s with Joyce, which was pretty much a straight friendship (okay, pun isn’t intentional, but there it is.) and Joan’s roommate, whom she pushed at a guy and ignored emotionally.

          Well, actually maybe Megan/Amy and Joan/roommate aren’t as different than that. Which just goes to show even if Peg’s is being grumpy, I’d still hang with her instead of the other two. She’s not a queen bee.

          • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

            Still flying my Peggy flag. Plus I think she’s a lil more up front: a working class gal from Brooklyn, what does she gotta front?

        • ABB

          I also thought the same thing! And didn’t the New York red headed friend also wear striped pants? Something about Redhead #2 looked similar.

    • Nina B

      I started watching this show specifically so I could appreciate the recaps and Mad Style posts. They add so much to my overall enjoyment of the show. Over the years I would have perhaps noticed Ginsberg’s odd behavior but would not have put the foreshadowing together, so thank you for all the work that goes into these posts.

      That said, my favorite part of this one is the reference to Stan’s style as “Glen Campbell drag”

      • Eric Stott

        In a few years Glen Campbell would have a similar beard (in a more groomed version) which was a sure signal that beards had moved out of the counterculture and into the mainstream.

        • Nina B

          Oh, I remember. As a grown-up I have a thing for bearded men and I trace it all back to my childhood in the 70s which of course included a fondness for the Rhinestone Cowboy and perhaps Kris Kristofferson

    • siriuslover

      I just noticed that the colors of her handkerchief (borrowed or otherwise) tie into Michael’s tie and Stan’s shirt.

    • Fjasmine

      Mad Style is what I wake up for on Wednesdays!

    • rachel schiff

      I wonder if Joan’s gloves signal responsibility. In the early seasons, she seemed to almost exist only in the office in a sexy little dress, and was rarely shown in practical clothes. Seeing her with her gloves now reminds me that she’s busy and tired and needs to get home to her kid.

    • Glammie

      Okay, you won me over on the Stephanie being in Oakland with the clothes. One of those rare fails on the location scouting. A lot of Oakland is completely flat–a busy street corner with black extras would have worked better.

      • Alloy Jane

        Oh how I wish my Oakland-based friend lived in one of those flat areas. Alas, she does not. There’s nothing worse than being a klutz trying to walk downhill.

        What’s funny is that in both phone booth scenes, Stephanie is alone. I think its supposed to be symbolic, Stephanie stands alone and free, whereas Megan is afraid to be on her own. Either that or they didn’t want to use race to define an area and get hit with another “minorities as accessories” accusation.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QFW22QV426LUOEPGASPZJWJMDE MishaFoomin

      Damn those knitted grandma blankets in green, vomit, booger, diarrhea and blood! When I moved out of my father’s house, I sure did not take that blanket with me.

      • Danielle

        My husband’s grandmother was still crocheting those right up until she died last year, even though she had basically blind. Still all in crazy colors – just whatever yarn she liked, it didn’t matter if they matched. She made them for all the great-grandkids, and we got 2, including one for the baby that hasn’t even been conceived yet. Lucky us.

        • MsKitty

          Yep, what they lack in style they make up for in durability and sentimental value. My Aunt gave me one for Christmas about 15 years ago in green, beige and burnt orange. These days it’s the blankie of choice for my cats, though I steal it from them when I’m on the couch during the winter months.

    • ThaliaMenninger

      This episode left me so mystified and unsettled that I have been hungering for this kind of analysis. I didn’t see the pink or the red and it makes so much sense now that I see how you’ve laid it out. Does the pink blanket that Sally and Bobby are under mean anything? It is plaid, so maybe they are under Don’s blanket.

    • Mod_girl

      “She’s taking to the streets to tell slutty grade school teachers to put
      one on because there are children present. “Like everything else in this
      country, debate club is just an excuse to make out!” she said with some
      exasperation last season.”

      And when she said that line last season, she was wearing the same yellow dress. Awesome!

    • Paula Pertile

      Had another thought – How does Stan manage to not look gay (not that that would be a bad thing) with the scarf and beads and all?

      • Alice Teeple

        To me he looks like the stoner dads of kids I knew growing up who still look a lot like that. He’s totally authentic.

      • FibonacciSequins

        Those accessories were part of the hippie counterculture.

        • Paula Pertile

          None of my parents’ friends ever wore anything remotely like that – I guess because I grew up in more of a ‘Betty and Henry vibe’ sort of household. Anyone who sported anything remotely hippie-like was either a weirdo or gay (before we said “gay”). (tmi?)

          • FibonacciSequins

            My parents were about Betty’s age, so they didn’t wear anything like that either. Actually my gay great-uncle didn’t, either – I think it was a generational difference. Probably a geographical difference too. in 1969 my family moved from a traditional, blue-collar area to a more wealthy/educated neighborhood in a different state. Literally overnight I was surrounded by long hair, bikinis, bell bottoms and love beads – talk about culture shock!

            • Paula Pertile

              interesting about the geographical slant on it – never thought of that before. I grew up in California, near San Francisco, so … yeah, ground zero, so to speak.

            • anotherEloise

              Same here. Even the Bay Area suburbs were cutting edge, I suppose. My teen-aged cousin (living in Marin) went to concerts at the Fillmore and covered her bedroom walls with psychedelic posters, and she wasn’t even considered a hippie (though she did go to art school later on).

            • P M

              Talk about social mobility :D

        • VirginiaK

          That is right, and the beads on men for example pretty definitely denoted ideas about India and/or Buddhism — ideas of expansiveness and non-westernness. They weren’t foppish or gender-experimental.

      • T C

        Scarf and beads were not considered gay back then, they were creative and counterculture (vs. suits). Other than female impersonators (not necessarily gay), most gay men did their best to blend in, especially at work, as almost all states had laws discriminating against them. There were certain locations and bars/clubs where one could hook up and once there physical cues as well as certain accessories denoted specific activity preferences.

        • Eric Stott

          Gay men at that period tended to blend in at work, and if they did “express” themselves it would be like Sal did- being a little dandyish

      • Shawn EH

        It’s the beard. Those didn’t show up for gays for at least another decade.

        • Paula Pertile

          Yes! That’s it. The beard.

      • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

        bc that was common “straight man” fashion. Some of the middle aged men might have thought he was a little too dandyish, but men back then took care with their appearance to the point that we would consider unusual today.

        *ditto for women. I was raised by my Grandmother and every day I get dressed & “put together.” I’m often asked why I’m dressed up even when I’m just wearing jeans and a blouse XD

    • insomniacattack

      Anyone else notice the outfit Cutler was wearing in the scene where Ginsberg spied him and Lou scheming in the computer room? He’s wearing a powder blue blazer, a bright yellow shirt and khakis. It’s the most color we’ve ever seen on him. It seems to underline the fact that we’re catching him in a moment that reveals his true nature, one of a secretive plotter, and that everything else we’ve seen of him has been a facade.

      Also, that fugly outfit Peggy wore at home features a turtleneck. She may talk about feelings for colleagues not being real, but I’m not so sure I believe that she believes that. Looks like next week is Peggy-packed so we’ll see what happens.

      • ashley

        wow, it’s amazing that when she said that to gins, i thought of pete. and not ted. poor pegs

      • Glammie

        Hope that she and Don have more of a rapprochement. She and Don have had some great work chemistry together. And, hey, they both huge debts to Freddy Rumsen.

    • Beth Cooper-Zobott

      I was very curious about the use of gloves in this episode and others. I saw a reference on line to a book called “Fashion and Fancy: Dress and Meaning in Rembrandt’s Paintings” that discusses the use of gloves and their meaning: “In medieval times gloves served as ritual objects in liturgy and could be a symbol of legal authority. In the age of chivalry gloves were taken up as acceptance of a challenge and served as gifts demonstrating loyalty and service to the recipient. They also served as gifts to wedding guests or provided as funeral attire. “

    • louiseb338

      “Get in the cab, you losers” is my new take-down line!

    • Beth Cooper-Zobott

      PS: One of the things I noticed about Amy, in addition to her eyebrows and looking like a modern person in retro clothes is an issue that many period movies/television shows have: all the actors have perfect white, straight teeth. It throws me off, because many people in the 1960′s and 1970′s didn’t get braces, and there really weren’t any teeth lightening products at that time except for maybe “Pearl Drops” tooth polish. .

      • FibonacciSequins

        Almost everyone I went to middle school with (1974-76) got braces. But I think you’re right that it wasn’t routine for adults at that time to have had braces. Aside from Pearl Drops (boy, does that bring me back), I think baking soda was the go-to for teeth-whitening.

      • BluesD

        Bright white teeth definitely don’t fit the time period, but many actors probably don’t want to yellow up their veneers or expensive bleach work.

      • http://tootcomic.com/ Dick In A Bog

        There is a joke last season about megan getting her teeth fixed; it’s just a little bit of suspension of disbelief you gotta put up with.

        I’m watching The Pacific and the brightest thing in every scene with these filthy marines are their bright white chompers.

      • Columbinia

        Movie stars would get their teeth “capped” to make them white and pretty back then. Literally the teeth were ground down to receive crowns. They’d get a full set of caps, giving them perfect smiles with straight, white teeth. I think this kind of cosmetic dentistry was done in Hollywood starting in the 1930s. Until relatively recently, crowns were the only cosmetic repair for a damaged, discolored or unsightly tooth.

    • Pennymac

      You guys put in so much work on these Mad Style posts! THEY ARE EVERYTHING!

    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/divine_aphasia/ Constant Cat

      Oh how I love thee. Great recaps. Also, glad you commented on the 1969 shortness. Good god, Shirley looks fab and I want want both dresses, but MAN are they riding high. The other secretaries have the long legs too. I dig it.

    • snarkalicious

      I realize this isn’t really style-related, but all the discussion about Megan being a “poser” and losing confidence, etc. made me think about how natural and easy she seemed when she was around Don’s kids – way back before they got married. Maybe she SHOULD have been a mom. Or was that all an act for Don’s benefit too?

      • Glammie

        I’ve been wondering about that. I think it wasn’t a pose in that she’s genuinely nice to kids, but she’s shown zero interest in them recently. Doesn’t seem to ask about them. Certainly doesn’t suggest that they come out and go to Disneyland together. More indications that Megan is really young in a lot of ways. Looking at Stephanie didn’t make her consider being a mom. Instead she took the other route–of trying to be a hypersexy wild thang.

        Man, this show has a major riff on mothers going. Joan’s probably the best one of the lot. What little we’ve seen of Trudy indicates she’s also a good mom–naturally, both women are now single. Anna was a maternal figure–and, possibly, the only reason Dick Whitman’s pulled it together at all.

        • Karen

          Megan is an actress. The problem with that is that she only acts in what seems to be “real life”: a vacation, a party, at work.

          When she got married to Don and it BECAME real life, she had her work cut out for her. It’s like she can manage the audition, but cannot play the part when she gets the role.

          • Glammie

            Interesting way to look at it. When we saw her soap bit, she didn’t seem to be a very good actress. She’s very pretty and she’s passable as an actress. There’s not a lot of depth to her. There isn’t with Betty either, of course–and that says a lot about how Don chooses women. It goes back to Joan’s speech about these are the type of women Don marries. He wants them to fit his image–the ad campaign for his life. But since no one’s life is an ad campaign, reality hits and the cracks appear.

            So, is Neve Campbell going to show up again, I wonder? It would seem that she would.

            • http://tootcomic.com/ Dick In A Bog

              Why would neve show up again? Lovely as that little bit was it seems pretty clear that don isn’t looking for another mother/prostitute stand in at the moment, and I have a hard time figuring the writers would have him go for someone frankly identical to sylvia so late in the game. If he was gonna cheat it would have probably been right out the gate, and I can’t say he wont again (many episode left) but I doubt it’ll be another lengthy affair.

            • Glammie

              Because Neve is a name actress and there was a lot of set-up for a character who had one scene. Doesn’t make sense not to do it. Or to hire a name actress for one scene.

              Might not be a regular affair. It’s also more than possible that Don and Megan’s marriage is kaput. In which case, we’re not looking at adultery. Hell, maybe she’ll be his AA sponsor.

              Main thing is that I doubt Megan is Don’s end game.

        • Katelorelai

          Megan is an actress. I think in the beginning she saw herself in the role of awesome stepmom like Julie Andrews in the Sound of Music. After she was confronted with the harsh realities of these family relationships, she started to move in a new and darker direction. This mirrors the changes in film and television from the musicals and light comedic fair of the sixties to the much darker “realistic” stuff of the seventies. She is very defined by what is “in” and that influences her fashions and her passions.

        • FranklyMyDear

          I think she had a good connection with the kids when she was content being Mrs Draper but that conversation with her dad about being a sell out, at which point she decided she was going to be an actress, was a big turning point in how she connected with everything in her life. I tend to feel bad for Megan a lot of the time. Her parents used her in their emotional tug-of-war; she put aside a promising career in advertising for a frustrating and humiliating ‘restart’ in acting; just as she was getting somewhere with that she quit to go to California with Don only to be told that Don wasn’t going. As far as being maternal, let’s not forget, she had a miscarriage. This kind of event can fundamentally impact how a woman views motherhood. And as another poster aptly pointed out, her husband who had been lying to her and cheating on her sent a pregnant, beautiful hippie, who trampled on her attempted hospitality and intimated that she knew his secrets, to stay for an indeterminate amount of time.
          I’m not fully flying the Megan flag, she is definitely insecure which has led her to make decisions that affect her own happiness in order to please those she considers important in her life. But I do think her character has been excellently written, and furthermore, kudos to Jessica Pare for so convincingly playing a character that inspires such incredibly strong reactions in the viewers

          • Eric Stott

            She had a nice connection to the kids as long as they were still easily bendable.

            • Alloy Jane

              I think Megan, still being fairly young, genuinely got along with Sally. They became friends when Sally ran away to Manhattan, and things seemed fine up until Megan had to start being an authority figure and dealing with Sally’s rebellion. They never really show her interacting with the boys, other than the Disneyland trip, but it’s one thing to sometimes babysit children and another to be responsible for them regularly. If she was already of the mind that she didn’t want her own kids, then having to be responsible for Don’s probably bores her and wears her out. The kids being malleable won’t make a difference when she sees having them and having to be responsible for them as something that interferes in her own life.

          • ybbed

            I totally agree with everything you said. I am flying the Megan flag.

          • Glammie

            I think Don is a crap husband, but the fact that Megan was that easily swayed from a successful career in advertising by some criticism by her father indicates a lack of maturity and self-knowledge on her part. For that matter, her venture into advertising was all about pleasing Don. Left on her own, as she is in California, Megan is kind of falling apart.

            I don’t think Megan was affected by the miscarriage in a way that has deeply changed her view toward motherhood. I didn’t sense she wanted the child at that point. The miscarriage just sort of showed a bit of a rift between her and Don–he seems to like having kids even if he’s not much of a father. Megan, herself, isn’t ready emotionally to be a mother. Very different than Joan and Trudy.

      • Gatto Nero

        Megan’s not that good an actress. Those scenes played out very naturally and may reflect the breezy style of her own upbringing. Whatever Megan’s mother may be, she’s not an uptight Betty type.

        • kerryev

          I thought she was good with kids because she had to care for her siblings each night after her mother passed out. Remember Megan putting her drunk mother to bed in the NY apartment?

          • 3hares

            Megan’s the youngest. It’s her nieces and nephews she’s babysat.

      • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

        Way back when they first introduced Megan she mentioned she was from a big family & that’s why she was comfortable with kids.

        • Columbinia

          Why haven’t we ever heard of or seen any of Megan’s many siblings?

          • 3hares

            Because there’s never been any need for them in the story. Better to make it simple.

      • tallgirl1204

        My personal theory is that Stephanie is going to abandon the baby with Megan, thus giving Megan and Don an abandoned baby– much like Don was given up at birth–
        But then, I have been a Manson theorist and a Bob Benson-is-a-spy theorist too. (Actually, going way back, I thought Megan was a scam artist too. I am really good at the whacko theories.)

    • suncus etruscus

      These are incredible, of course. The only point I want to bring up is that Ginsberg’s fate may not be so sealed. Deinstitutionalization of state hospitals (serving the mentally ill) was already well underway by 1969 and a nonviolent psychotic episode such as this would not be a reason to keep him long. It was a giant tragedy in the sense that many patients with psychosis entered the criminal justice system if they could be construed to have committed a crime, or simply became destitute, forming a large portion of the homeless population. My grandmother was a practicing psychiatrist in a state hospital at the time and it was a full blown tragedy. I don’t know if Wiener has a desire to illustrate the elimination of services for the mentally ill as one of the breakdowns in social order in the late 60s, but if he does, this character is primed to illustrate it.

      • CassandraMortmain

        Ginsberg’s psychotic episode most definitely was not non-violent – he violently mutilated himself.

        • Columbinia

          Ginsberg seems to say that he got a doctor to stitch up his self-inflicted mutilation. How is it that the doctor didn’t call in a psychiatrist when he treated the bizarre wound? How is it that he let Ginsberg walk out of the hospital to show up at work?

    • shopgirl716

      My parents had the same daybed that is in Megan’s apartment. I think you are right on point about Ginsberg having sensory issues. He probably also likes big collars and cuffs because the material chafes. Excellent write up, as usual.

    • CassandraMortmain

      I know that the final scene was all about Don pulling a typical unpredictible, brilliant stunt and getting his mojo back. But I’m going to be curious if it really turns out that way. In that scene outside the Algonquin with Jim and Lou he’s swaggering alright, but I don’t think he looks good. There’s the issue of the grey hat with the brown suit. Contrast that with the way Jim’s hat has a blue tone and nicely complements his suit and tie. Cutler looks far more elegant. Don’s suit also looks a little bit too small – the sleeves are short, shorter than Jim and Lou’s sleeves, and the jacket looks a tad too tight. To me, it looks like Don’s trying very hard but that he doesn’t quite have it together – yet.

      Much of the writing really bugged me in this episode, especially with Henry’s character. Yeah, I know he hit on a pregnant Betty, but he’s pretty consistently been portrayed as the most decent man in this universe. His extreme, nasty chauvinism really seemed wrong and out of the blue. It felt like the writers needed him to act that way in order to set up Betty’s arc, even if it was completely out of character. That said, I’m really looking forward to seeing where Betty takes all this.

      I was sort of sympathetic to Megan. If my absent husband dumped a filty, very pregnant hippie on my doorstep for an indefinite stay, I’d probably be taken aback. And if said hippie refused my steak, wore my robe and slyly intimated that she knew all my husband’s secrets, I’d have been reaching for the checkbook too.

      • Katelorelai

        The last shot of Don had almost a superman feel to me with the way he is almost bursting out of his jacket. It seemed like he was just way to much man for that shitty brown suit.

        • Gatto Nero

          And the way it’s shot from slightly below, to make him look larger than life.

      • Glammie

        But it’s not out of character–Henry’s a decent guy, but a traditional one. He pictured Betty on a Victorian fainting couch. She wrote him letters during their courtship. Henry’s a nice guy, but he’s in charge of his career and Betty’s never been encouraged to do anything outside of the domestic sphere. Also, when she drank too much with a political couple, he got angry with her a couple of seasons back.

        We don’t generally read Henry as rigid because Betty and he both thought Betty should perform a traditional womanly role. It’s never been a conflict or even a matter of discussion. But what kind of man would coddle Betty and treat her like a doll the way she wanted when her father was ill? (“I’m your little girl!”) The answer is a man with pretty traditional views. And that’s what we see with Henry.

        A somewhat more cynical take is that part of the reason that Henry’s not bothered by Betty’s petulance and irrationality is that he doesn’t take her seriously as an equal. His expectations are low–”She’s a silly woman,” his mother told him, but Henry married her anyway and, most of the time, shrugs off anything that might be bothersome about Betty’s personality.

    • MadisonStu

      But you got nothin’ to say about a grey fedora with a brown suit? Whazzup wit dat?

    • pomme de terre

      I’m pretty sure Peggy’s terrible outfit was meant to contrast with Megan’s fabulous one as a commentary on their respective Saturday night plans. That said, the California threeway still looked like less fun than the NYC trio of Peggy, a neighbor kid, and a mentally ill co-worker.

      • John G. Hill

        Speaking as a Californian, I’d go with the 3-way, while doing my best to keep a positive attitude about it. :)

    • BrooklynBomber

      I had a plaid poncho with fringe. I miss it.

      • Eric Stott

        That Poncho is as close to Hippie style as Betty (or the school) will let Sally go.

        • BrooklynBomber

          Funny, because it’s a sort of preppy car blanket plaid. Mine was darker, more muted and, dare I say it, hipp(i)er.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        My daughter had a fantastic plaid, fringed poncho with matching pants when she was 2 in 1971. Ask anyone in the family what they remember most about her from that year and they’ll tell you about the cute poncho set. Everyone loved it.

        • BrooklynBomber

          When she was 2! How cute.

    • John G. Hill

      When they were in the middle of taking Ginsberg away, I thought of one thing, my favorite book, “Something Happened,” by Joseph Heller. Here are some lines from the book;

      “Something did happen to me somewhere that robbed me of confidence
      and courage and left me with a fear of discovery and change and a
      positive dread of everything unknown that may occur.”

      “I think that maybe in every company today there is always at least one person who is going crazy slowly.”

      “..if you asked any one of them if he would choose to spend the rest of
      his life working for the company, he would give you a resounding No!,
      regardless of what inducements were offered. I was that high once. If
      you asked me that same question today, I would also give you a
      resounding No! and add:

      “I think I’d rather die now.”

      But I am making no plans to leave.

      I have the feeling now that there is no place left for me to go.”

      And finally; “Everything passes. (That’s what makes it endurable.)”

      • P M

        That’s …… so very sad. And well-put.

    • TeraBat

      One upsetting thing about this episode – no Joanie.

      • http://tootcomic.com/ Dick In A Bog

        Yeah that was weird wasn’t it? I hope it gets brought up with the wider cast next week in some way.

        Come to think of it joan really didn’t get much face time with ginsberg, did she?

        • TeraBat

          I doubt she’d need to in her role as personnel – Ginsberg didn’t rate having a secretary, and his weirdness was managed by Peggy and Stan.

    • janierainie

      Having been a friend to someone who descended into madness in the mid 70s, I don’t think it’s such a surprise no one at the office was alarmed. Those times were so different from now as far as acknowledging uncomfortable situations. I can see the reality of the characters chalking up his behavior to him being a “creative type”. My friend was in a punk band and the more outrageous the behavior became, the more we chalked it up to a “put on” for the sake of performance. We just thought it was spilling over into every day life. Some of us just felt like it was maybe drugs or whatever.They lumped all mental issues under the “nervous breakdown” explanation. My friend was diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic. It came down to a worried friend calling his parents to come get him because he had been locked up in his apartment eating only junk food and sitting in a chair for days and days. This episode was hard to watch.

    • gogobooty

      Oh, how Betty slayed me this week! “I GAVE YOU THAT PERFECT NOSE!” and, “I’m not stupid, I speak ITALIAN.”

      People have a fuck of a lotta nerve, sassin’ Betty. She is NOT HAVING IT.

      And again with the Ethel Kennedy hair style (that little poof on top with a barrette or whatever.)

      • Linderella

        I can’t help it, I love Betty. Have from day one. For all her faults, whenever life or her family dumps on her, I’m always like, “Awww, poor Betty.”

        • Johnny Neill

          I am also in the Don’t Dis Betty camp. When Glen’s mother went off on her about giving him a lock of her hair I thought, Slow down! She just took care of your kid on a school with no notice at all! Let that be their moment. I also thought, Can I have a lock of your hair, Beautiful Neighbor Lady?

    • Johnny Neill

      Is it just me, or is Harry Crane going to turn into the creepy guy that hung around Burt Reynold’s house in Boogie Nights?

      • Kane

        The Colonel?

        • Johnny Neill

          Yeah! I tried to paste a picture of him here but couldn’t. Same ascot, glasses, jacket, side burns, and apparently, trajectory?

    • Eric Stott

      Details I love: In Sally’s bedroom all the patterns clash: the sheets don’t go together and the blanket doesn’t match either one, and when her brother comes in it’s like he was from a different universe. Betty gives absolutely no thought to decorating there – unlike MY mother who made certain that EVERYTHING in the bedrooms matched.

      Those decorative panels over Peggy’s couch in the popular 60′s technique of little colored lumps glued to a background. They might even be a home craft kit. Probably the newest pieces of art in the apartment and meant to be noticed since they face the entrance. If Peggy sticks around there and gets more money she’ll probably buy better stuff but it will never occur to her to go over to The Village and buy some real art.

      • verve

        She’s had those wall panels for ages now. They were hanging over couch in her previous apartment. And while looking for a screenshot to verify that, I came across a blog that identified the originals– they were indeed an art kit thing. “Mosette by Craft Master.” :)

        • Eric Stott

          Thanks! There’s so very much to remember in this show.

        • T C

          I remember doing the crushed rock Craft Master projects in the early 1960s. The string border was glued first and the interior was carefully dumped into the glue-laden outlines. Mine were clowns and did not survive a house move in 65. The cat logo from “Mr. Lucky” was very popular. Paint-by-Numbers was also abundant back then. Both were truly passe by 1968.

          • decormaven

            Were they the sad-eyed clowns?

            • T C

              No.

        • Blimunda

          Thanks for this information – my grandparents had Peggy’s panels and I’ve been noticing them for quite a while and wondering about them. Just searched on that name and read up. I did not know they were “home made” from kits! Now wondering who made them…

        • MadMenMurphy

          She’s probably got some of those mod, “large-eyed children playing instruments” paintings somewhere, too!

    • MissusBee

      Love Peggy’s at-home Velma fug. Perfectly captures the way she is ‘together’ at work and lost in her personal life. Also contrasts mischievously with the other ladies’ perfect house dresses and peignoirs.

      Also loved the unflattering up-nostril camera angle as she woke up on the sofa. It’s a sitcom move, handled in a deadpan way (a lot of Peggy’s scenes are like this) signalling that we are ‘at home’ with Peggy too as we know her flaws and love her, while laughing affectionately at her expense. She is the Doris Day of this show. Great work.

      • Glammie

        I like that–and Doris Day played a series of somewhat sexless career women in her rom coms.

        • Columbinia

          Yes, Peggy is a Doris Day.

          Professional virgin became Doris Day’s nickname in Hollywood (in reality she married at age 19 and had her son at 20). There’s an old Hollywood joke (variously attributed), “I knew Doris Day before she was a virgin.” She was still playing women of outraged virtue at age 40 opposite Rock Hudson and Cary Grant.

          Peggy has had affairs with two or three married men, slept around a bit, given birth and had a live-in lover, yet she still seems inexperienced. She innately has that Doris Day sexlessness.

    • Teresa Wyatt

      “Don Draper needs to swagger and you’re in the way”. I love it. I am glad to see him swagger again.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        His swagger reminded me of the strutting John Travolta did at the end of “Saturday Night Fever.” Sexy and powerful.

    • Lucy Polk

      What about Megan in the last episode in yellow macrame and Betty in this one mirroring her in closely knit yellow housedress? What about Megan barefoot int he kitchen with granny dress mirroring Stephanie’s hippyness? Yes, it’s more stylish but not like east coast neighbor’s yellow dress. They are all part of something bigger than Don!

    • Linlighthouse

      “That’s one of the best dresses she’s (Peggy’s) worn..”. I’m probably the last living Color me Beautiful geek, but darned if Elisabeth isn’t a clear spring. That particular navy, which is clear and not grayed, looks fantastic on her. She’s worn clear reds, lime greens, medium grays, purples, and golds and they make her look beautiful. I don’t care for her in those Peter Pan collars that are too harsh a white against her skin. That striped sweater vest, the “fugliest thing she’s ever worn” (amen) is a color nobody looks good in. I don’t think Peggy always tries things on in the store and checks the mirror.

      • P M

        I have the feeling she does what my mother does: looks, thinks ‘good enough, everything is covered and is decent’ and buys it.

        • Glammie

          I also think Peggy went to Catholic school and she’s more comfortable in uniform-like things. That’s what I pick up from her military touches–she’s putting on her uniform to go to work. Peggy tends to look awkward when she tries to dress “up.”

          Peggy and the secretaries in dark blue almost have a military funeral quality to them as they stand there grieving over their fallen comrade.

          • P M

            Which makes me wonder: is there a secretary’s version of ‘Taps’?

          • Chris

            Which is one costume choice I question. Speaking as an ex-Catholic school girl, it tends to turn you off of plaid completely. Most girls who spent over a decade in a plaid uniform never want to wear it again.

            • Glammie

              Well, Pegs has kind of edged away from the plaid, hasn’t she? I thought she used to wear more of it.

        • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

          Yep plus: I wonder what Katherine and Anita are wearing now? I also still don’t know about the age diff between Peggy and her sister, the actress that portrays her sis was in these Prego commercials and she looked a lot younger without the mid-century Catholic housewife and mother drag and in that Avon episode from last season, Peggy said she and Anita had fought over Avon Beauty products as children.

          • P M

            Oh man, I’d *love* to know.

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              Oh! Plus maybe she wore that because she knew a kid was coming?
              My lil bro noted that Peggy wouldn’t pull off pure black, there are a few exceptions and they aren’t some column of color (her checkered dress from Season 3, the Funeral dress from last season, and the flirty empire waisted mini dress with the pink sash)

            • Linlighthouse

              I hope Katherine and Anita have let their hair down out of those awful buns.

      • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

        Elizabeth Moss loves blue and has asked Janie Bryant to put Peggy in it more often, but Janie has a story to tell with color and clothing style. And I think part of that story is, Peggy doesn’t seem to have a great idea of what looks good on her :)

        • Glammie

          Yep, I think TLo said last week that Peggy has no sense of style–meaning she doesn’t know how to dress to express herself. Peggy’s clothing choices are always a little bit off, though sometimes she gets closer than others. But you never see her pulling off the perfect look the way Betty, Megan and Joan do. Or even Trudy and Mona. It’s a lovely bit of characterization.

          • not_Bridget

            You can see her style in the way her apartment is decorated. Or not decorated. Her mind just doesn’t work that way…..

            • Glammie

              I think it’s also meant to represent the way that Peggy’s a little bit out of touch with herself and a bit guarded. She’s awkward as a woman, or, rather, awkward about her femininity and using her sexuality. She’s a pretty woman playing a plain one because that’s the role she’s comfortable in.

      • buddy100

        You’re not the last. :)

    • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

      Ginsburg’s giant shirts have always reminded me of hospital gowns with their small, pale, busy patterns.

    • ShaoLinKitten

      TLo did call the Ginsberg breakdown from way back. I have to say, for the record, I don’t think he’s schizophrenic. I think he suffers from extreme anxiety and sensory hypersensitivity. Add to that the childhood trauma and you have a recipe for a psychotic break. My hope is that he can make a full recovery, though I doubt we will ever see him again.

      Also, this is the episode that tipped me over into disliking Megan. A poser and a pink lady indeed.

      • Kane

        Schizophrenia IS a psychotic break. He has some classic symptoms: paranoid delusions of conspiracies against him (technology making him a “homo”) & hearing voices that tell him to do things. The self-mutilation is also a major psychotic behavior.

        Schizophrenia is of course not multiple personalities, which is a different illness entirely.

        If he had Asperger’s, he’d be avoiding eye contact and he’d be overly literal & have trouble catching on to hints, sarcasm, & subtext.

        • ShaoLinKitten

          No, schizophrenia is not a psychotic break. A psychotic break is a specific incident of acute psychosis. A person can have a psychotic break for a whole host of reasons, some of which are not related to a chronic mental illness (drug use, for example, or due to trauma). It may signal the onset of a serious illness or may be a one time event. Schizophrenia is a chronic, incurable, lifelong mental illness. Often it’s not diagnosed until some major incident happens (the psychotic break).

          I have several friends who had Asperger’s diagnoses and they didn’t fall neatly into these diagnostic descriptions. Aspies can be sarcastic, they can be capable of subtextual understanding. What they have trouble with is social cues, which Ginsberg definitely had. Also, the hypersensitivity, to the point of madness at times, is an Aspie quality.

          Anyway, trying to diagnose a fictional character is kind of a fool’s errand. Ginsberg might well be schizophrenic, if the writers choose that for him. I don’t feel positive that he is. Or maybe I’m just hoping he’s not because it makes me sad for him and for his father if he is.

          • Kane

            But he does have paranoid delusions, and he talked last season about “them” telling him to do things, right? I had thought those were schizophrenia.

            • ShaoLinKitten

              They might be. I’m probably being delusional myself, here. He talked about transmissions. At the time, I thought he was being metaphorical, but I guess not. Maybe his behavior at home was much weirder than it was at work. I will have to just work towards accepting it :(

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              When you have a character talk about transmissions beaming into his head that he can’t shut off and then later you have that character go through some sort of psychotic or schizophrenic break, then clearly he wasn’t being metaphorical in his earlier dialogue.

            • ShaoLinKitten

              Yeah, you’re probably right. I’ve been resistant to accepting it because I have always had a soft spot for Ginsberg. Schizophrenia is a rough diagnosis. We will probably never see the character again to know for sure what happens to him, either.

            • tallgirl1204

              “I’ve been resistant to accepting it…” Yeah, and it’s worse when it’s your own family. When my cousin quit talking in his teens (like, didn’t talk at all to anyone), everyone said things like “He’s going through a phase,” or “He’s always been shy,” or “well, his parents were prone to living out in the woods and he never learned good social skills.” When he attempted suicide and got his diagnosis, his parents told us all in a very matter-of-fact way: “Schizophrenia.” (I loved them for that. I think they were relieved to have a name for it.) A year later, my mother asked me “What do you think is wrong with your cousin? Is he depressed?” I said “it’s schizophrenia, ma. You were there when they told us.” I don’t think my mom ever accepted it. My dad always blamed it on them living out in the woods.

            • ShaoLinKitten

              I’m so sorry about your cousin. I think I am bringing my own baggage to this discussion WRT schizophrenia and mental illness. Thank you for sharing your experience.

            • Columbinia

              In contrast, my mother thinks any and all serious mental illness is schizophrenia. To her, bipolar disease is schizophrenia.

              I also had a second cousin who was diagnosed with schizophrenia in his late teens. Eventually he rejected treatment, medication and his family and ran away to live on the streets. He also had catatonic episodes.

            • Kane

              Well, at least we can be sure he’s not headed for Briarcliff…

            • Columbinia

              Not all paranoid people are schizophrenic. The Diagnostic Manual has other mental illnesses that have symptoms of paranoid delusions.

          • VirginiaK

            I agree with you, he is psychotic but does not have to have schizophrenia in order to be having a psychotic episode. Other possibilities besides what you’ve mentioned could include paranoid personality disorder. Diagnosis would depend on how he fares in future.
            PTSD wasn’t recognized much at that time outside of wartime conditions in military personnel I believe.

            • Columbinia

              PTSD was called “battle fatigue” during the Mad Men era, a term from WWII. Before that it was called “shell shock,” a term from WWI. For non-military the vague term “nervous breakdown” or “nervous collapse” would be used to describe post-traumatic stress, and someone who couldn’t overcome it might be described as “having a nervous condition” or with the archaic terms “hysterical” or “hysteric.”

          • buddy100

            “Schizophrenia is a chronic, incurable, lifelong mental illness.”

            Schizophrenia is not “incurable.” Is there a lifelong higher risk threshold for psychosis? Yes. But that is VERY different than framing schizophrenia as an end-all life cancer that can’t be managed. I work with clients diagnosed with schizophrenia, and can assert both from personal account and research that many many MANY go on to amazing careers, education, and home lives. We just tend to highlight the worst-case scenarios because they’re a) more visible and b) more prevalent solely due to a current lack of resources.

            I can also say that I am almost certain that schizophrenia is the diagnosis the writers were aiming for. There are very distinct differentiations in the types of hallucinations/delusions experienced by people with affective psychosis (as a result of PTSD, sleep deprivation, etc.) and the types of experienced by people with true chronic mental illness (specifically bipolar I and schizophrenia).

            The first is the multisensory integration/sensory sensitivity component, which you noted is also true with people with Asperger’s. However, the second distinction is that people with schizophrenia have specifically AUDITORY hallucinations that are disconnected from affect. People with affective psychosis tend to have visual hallucinations in addition to auditory. Additionally, their hallucinations/delusions tend to reflect their mood (e.g. I’m depressed, so therefore people are watching me and hate me because of it). Ginsberg believing that his nipple was a valve controlled by external forces is not an example of an affective delusion (as far as we know).

            The symptoms here were very very specific to schizophrenia in ways that clinically should not be differentially diagnosed.

            • ShaoLinKitten

              I never said it wasn’t treatable or manageable, was a death sentence, or doom to a life of misery. It is incurable. You will always be schizophrenic and must be vigilant about treatment. That’s not to say that a person can’t have a productive life. I defer to your greater understanding here. Previous episodes seemed vague enough that I wasn’t positive. I always figured it for more of an Aspie/PTSD/anxiety combination until now.

            • VirginiaK

              You are right as far as I know, that it is considered to be non-curable, but treatable (I am a psychologist, FWIW). I don’t want Ginsberg to have it which prompts me to remember there are other conditions in which you can have the same symptoms. in a way history and future history — how much recovery will he have? — determine diagnosis. I can think of at least one person I know who gets quite paranoid, similarly to how Ginsberg gets, but who definitely is bipolar and not schizophrenic, raised a family though required medication and some hospitalizations.

            • martha

              Ginsberg presents classic symptoms of schizophrenia, which is a chronic but treatable disease

            • lucie

              Auditory hallucinations are also a symptom of PTSD and anxiety.

          • lucie

            A fool’s errand indeed. It’s just a show, after all.

        • Columbinia

          A psychotic break is not always schizophrenia. Psychosis can have causes other than schizophrenia. The manic phase of bipolar disease can have psychosis, for example.

          And there is some current thinking that what we call schizophrenia could be several different diseases with different causes.

    • Elissa Malcohn

      That shot of Stephanie and Megan sitting on stools immediately brought me back to the shot of Sylvia and Megan on stools in “The Collaborators.” Same angle. Madonna figure to the left (Sylvia’s dress was blue; Stephanie’s stool is blue).

      • L’Anne

        YES!!!!!! I was also thinking about how the figure in “crisis” in each was notable less “formally” dressed. Stephanie in a bathrobe, Megan in casual pants vs. Sylvia in a matching ensemble, Megan in a dress with jewelry. That adds to the sense of the establishment and the tone of disaproval and judging.

      • Susan Collier

        I’m also thinking about the bathrobe/pyjamas vs fully clothed dichotomy throughout the past several seasons.

    • smh4748

      Maybe navy will become Peggy’s post-Ted power color. Ted sort of co-opted the mustard yellow, and with him gone, she could stand to find herself a new groove. Mustard never really did much for her (or, let’s be honest, for most people) anyway. She should try out some more blues.

      For all of Megan’s phoniness, she really does the “late 60s glamourpuss” thing extremely well. Whenever she’s in her “Look, I’m an ACTRESS!” mode, she looks stunning, and that’s been true for a couple of seasons.

      Megan’s pink lingerie in the threesome scene is certainly not accidental. There was a huge thing with women in pink nighties/underwear last season, as painstakingly detailed by T&Lo, all calling back to the prostitute who forced sex on him. There was no way was Megan going to undress to reveal a black or green bra. (I’m sure that was brought up in 600 of the 676 existing comments, but it just goes to show how well trained we are becoming!)

      • Glammie

        In which case, the marriage is really, really in trouble. That 3-way may have been the last straw for Don, even if he doesn’t know it yet.

    • MarinaCat

      I was just reading some other recaps and did a V-8 slap when someone made the comment, “Hamm sandwich” in regard to the threesome. How did nobody here make that observation?! Feel free to slap me again if someone did and I missed it. It’s hard to get through 1,800 comments.

      • Lady Bug

        To quote Homer Simpson, “Hamm sandwhich, mmm…”

    • Lady Bug

      What is Betty watching on T.V.? Gomer Pyle U.S.M.C? sorry if this has already been covered, haven’t gone through all the comments yet!

    • Lady Bug

      Noticed in that picture when Peggy is crying while they’re taking Michael away, Peggy and all of the secretaries have shades of blue on-all of the secretaries except Meredith who is standing off to the distance a little bit, looking down at her desk and is wearing a bright yellow plaid dress. She seems very ‘removed’ from the scene, maybe to symbolize how she is removed from the harsh reality of Ginsberg’s breakdown?

    • VirginiaK

      Great article! and I am so happy to see you noting that Betty is a Bryn Mawr graduate — I’ve been waiting for her education and intelligence to show in some way — you really couldn’t go to one of those schools, or graduate from it, unless you were basically smart, though you definitely could come out of one of them with your personhood as distorted as any other woman’s in that era.

    • Linderella

      I always sort of assumed Ginsberg’s oversized clothes meant he had lost a lot of weight by not eating (often a side effect of mental illness). I assumed the clothes had fit at one time–they are out of date, so perhaps they fit when he bought them.

      • MadMenMurphy

        LOVE, love, love your icon, Linderella! (“Sparkle, Neely, sparkle!”)

        • Linderella

          Aw, thank you! Helen Lawson knows that Broadway doesn’t go for booze and dope! (While downing champagne, natch!)
          Nothing makes me feel gayer than a viewing of VofD. (Well, there IS one other thing…)

    • Joy

      I’m obsessed with all the housecoats. My grandma’s housecoats never looked so nice!

      • P M

        Yes, well, I doubt many of us commenters could actually afford even Betty’s housewear! :D

    • judybrowni

      Betty was wearing my stepmother’s 1969 housecoat: and her bitch face.

      My father and stepmother got along beautifully, until she began having Opinions, and then it was bickering for the next 20 years.

      • Shawn EH

        I was always sort of stunned by how Henry swooped in and scooped Betty away from Don. Sure, the marriage was built on a lie and things were already quite shaky, but he basically saw a woman as a prize on a pedestal he coveted and he went after her full bore, marriage and society be damned. Now he’s got her, but will her beauty be enough once she steps down to the real world? He’s not a dumb or even morally scrupulous man, so I hope he can keep up.

        • Fjasmine

          Now that he really is in the public eye it is more of a concern.

          • http://tootcomic.com/ Dick In A Bog

            Pretty much. And he didn’t seem to have much of a problem when she was fat-suit-betty.

            Honestly he seemed a bit over the top in this episode. I know he’s under pressure and what not but it was like “goddamn man they give you a manual on how to be maximum shitty tonight”

    • judybrowni

      Stan is wearing his clothes skin tight because that’s what young men did back then. (The actor has said he’s uncomfortable with it, but Janie’s attiring him period correct.)

      Ginsberg went the other way, thrift store baggy.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Stan is wearing his clothes skin tight because his partner wears his clothes too loose and the costume designer decided to highlight the differences. Virtually every costume choice on the show is period correct.

    • in a pickle

      I had the exact same thought about those dresses- super short! Would those really have been office (even advertising office) appropriate?
      TLO pointing out the red on the table in the last shots made me notice the blood (bath) mat outside the Algonquin. Too far?

    • librarygrrl64

      I covet Megan’s floral maxi dress. Great post as always, gentlemen, Poor Ginsberg.

      • Fjasmine

        I thought Megan looked beautiful in that dress, it was so flattering. It showed off her figure instead of just being about long legs.

      • SuzyQuzey

        I loved that dress, too.

    • KT

      Bravo, as always. I continue to be impressed and amazed at your observation skills, and I only wish I could be as insightful as you!

      I laughed so hard at this: “She wasn’t going to take to the streets to burn her bra. She’s taking to the streets to tell slutty grade school teachers to put one on because there are children present.” I love you guys.

      And speaking of love, I am growing to love Betty more and more – even though I disagree strongly with her about 99.99% of the time. But DAMN if she isn’t fabulously bitchy, and some of her lines are pure genius. “I’m smart you know. I speak ITALIAN.” If you had just given me that line and asked me which character said it, I would immediately shout, “BETTY HOFSTADT DRAPER FRANCIS!!!” She is so delightfully un-self aware. Regardless of Betty’s ridiculousness, however, I will always respect a woman who stands up for the right to speak her mind. Well, except maybe Ann Coulter.

    • bingo

      Outstanding analysis, as always. Question for the crowd–does anyone know the name of the actress that played Amy in this episode? IMDB didn’t seem to have it and google hasn’t provided me with the magical answer. She seems familiar, but I can’t place her.

    • katiessh

      it comes out of nowhere in the fact that while he’s been off this whole time this was such an escalation. Especially the whole ‘the machine is turning everyone homo’ thing. I was reading an article by vulture where they talked to some psychologist, and raised the potential that he is a closeted homosexual and it fractured his mind

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        That’s how these kinds of breaks happen. They escalate suddenly.

        I doubt very much he’s gay.

        • DeniseSchipani

          Agree. I said somewhere else in this thread that the vibe Micheal’s always given off to me is kind of asexual. Like any notion of sex and sexuality is totally alien to him, and kind of freaks him out.

        • katiessh

          perhaps, but that’s why it would seem like it comes out of nowhere for an audience. It’s not necessarily how real it is, it’s how it’s perceived by critics and an audience. And sure, people who read these posts wouldn’t be too surprised because you guys have thought about this before, but a lot of people would have just gone from ‘ginsberg is odd’ to ‘woah, what was that?!’

          Not saying he’s gay, just saying it’s an interesting view point, particularly considering how specific his fears were

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            But it didn’t “come out of nowhere.” It was planned from the character’s introduction. Just because some viewers missed the signs doesn’t mean they weren’t there. There’s nothing wrong with missing those signs, since they were deliberately subtle, but when you insist the breakdown came out of nowhere, I think it does a disservice to the excellent manner in which it was subtly foreshadowed going back years.

            • katiessh

              well I didn’t insist that, and I don’t really think I’m doing a disservice to anything.

              I’m just saying that a) I can understand why some people thought it came out of nowhere, and
              b) I personally got a bit of whiplash because until this episode, this season everyone has been adrift so his behaviour wasn’t that out of the ordinary. Yes, there was that stuff last season, but considering many of us thought bob benson was a spy and megan was going to die, personally I’ve been cautious interpreting these signs like that.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              The problem with the Bob Benson is a spy and Megan is going to die theories was that there was never anything in the text to support them. It was all based on wild supposition and an ignorance of how the show tells its stories. With Ginsberg, all of it was meticulously placed there for a viewer doing a close read. We feel a need to defend that, both as people who believe strongly in applying close reading techniques and as people who think the writers of the show deserve more credit for their subtlety and planning.

            • katiessh

              I was personally less surprised than some because I noticed ginsberg unravelling last week, but I can understand why people thought the nipple thing was somewhat out of the blue and I don’t think that’s necessarily the viewer’s failing.

              I don’t find their storytelling techniques particularly subtle; a lot of the time it feels like they might as well be holding up a sign yelling ‘THIS IS THE THEME!’
              And while I can understand the wish to read closely but not wildly, you criticised a lot of people for reading too much into bob benson. While he wasn’t a spy as some dearly wished, he also wasn’t simply a gay guy either. I personally sometimes find it hard to know what direction mad men is going; in one corner you have a lot of death imagery circling around don and megan but that’s wild speculation, and in another you have odd outbursts from ginsberg that is meant to lead us right to mental illness. But perhaps that makes me an ignorant viewer, as you put it.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Bob Benson pretty much was simply a gay guy. One who had an embarrassing past like Don’s, but he obviously wasn’t any of the insanely off-model theories that were circulating last season, nor was he operating any grand scheme, except to keep his job and move ahead in it.

              I really don’t know where you’re going here. You claim that the writing isn’t subtle while at the same time claiming that it was really hard for the viewer to pick up on the Ginsberg clues.

            • lucie

              Don’t be so mean to your readers. It’s unbecoming.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              How is having a conversation with a reader equal being mean to them?

            • katiessh

              I did not see this reply until right now, but you do realise you made the same paradoxical argument in saying that everyone should have of course noticed ginsberg’s break-down but also that mad men is incredibly subtle? I genuinely think it can be both unsubtle in terms of theme and subtle when it comes to elements like colour pairings.

              Look I love you guys, I think your mad style posts are fantastic, but there’s no need to be so persnickety. I was merely trying to articulate why some people might have thought ginsberg’s breakdown came out of left field. I’m not really sure why you kept insulting me though, it leave this bitter kitten feeling very self-conscious.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Here’s something we wrote from further upthread:

              “There’s nothing wrong with missing those signs, since they were deliberately subtle”

              We have never once said that “everyone should have noticed Ginsberg’s breakdown.” You clearly have some sort of bone to pick with us and we have never once insulted you in this conversation. You’ve been needlessly defensive from the start.

            • katiessh

              you commented on my post, so the bone to pick was you with me, not the other way round. you suggested I was ignorant, watching the show wrong and doing it a ‘disservice’. Maybe I was reading it wrong but that comes off as pretty punchy language. So… yeah, might just leave this alone now, as it’s clearly already spiralled into something less lighthearted and more combative.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Yeah, you read it wrong. I never once called you ignorant, nor did I say you were watching the show wrong. You’re misreading – or deliberately misrepresenting – a lot of what I’ve said here.

              Commenting on someone’s post is merely having a conversation with them. You clearly had a problem with that, right from the beginning of the conversation.

            • katiessh

              The issue I have is not your reading of the show or that you disagree with me; it’s the dismissive tone you take in doing so. I try to keep it lighthearted and you treat me like I’m some irrational troll looking for a fight. Even in the above comment you’ve claimed my behaviour is both odd and that I clearly have a problem with conversation. If you think I’m disruptive then I’m sure you can block me from commenting. Otherwise, we disagree about ginsberg and that’s fine; I don’t understand why this is such a problem. I would like to leave it here and move on to the RPDR finale, which I’m sure will have its fair share of disagreements.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              “The issue I have is not your reading of the show or that you disagree with me; it’s the dismissive tone you take in doing so.”

              I know. It’s been obvious from the beginning of this conversation. I just wish you hadn’t wasted all that time pretending this was about Ginsberg.

          • Daphnemcl

            You know what’s funny … I’m from the NY area and When Ginsberg came on the scene with all his frumpiness neediness I thought he just looked like many people I knew from college back then. My gage of normal ness must be way off!

      • gsk241

        I don’t think he’s gay so much as he is afraid. Perhaps “homo” is the way Michael expresses “everything I’m afraid of.”

        • Chris

          He also asked Bob Benson last year if he was one too.

      • 3hares

        But isn’t that the way it might happen? He was off, he had little explosions (like the time with Bob Benson when he talked about the transmissions) and this was just another one, brought on more acutely by the disruption to his environment and the constant hum of the computer.

    • sweeney

      As the episode was ending and Don showed up in brown and I yelled “Don’s in brown!” and my husband was like “What?” and I just said “Tom and Lorenzo.” I was so happy to see that wrap up the recap – I feel like you’ve taught me so much :)

      • MartyBellerMask

        At least you didn’t shout, “Turd brown!!!!” LOL :)

        • Benten32

          Doesn’t Don look like a Hershey bar in brown?

          • Vtg Fashion Library

            Don looks like sex on a stick. I may need a moment alone…….

      • Susan Collier

        The color of tobacco too.

    • MartyBellerMask

      Comment #850ish. If anyone is still scrolling…
      Early in the season, two characters made comments about cigarettes starting fires. That has stuck with me and it finally came to me. It’s not about fire, or foreshadowing a fire. It’s about cigarettes. As in Phillip Morris. Don lit a fire at the Phillip Morris meeting. I don’t think the red on the table is blood (although much love to T Lo for bringing the red to my attention, I never would have noticed it), I think it is fire.

      Whether the fire is a metaphor for creativity or destruction, or a combination of the two, that remains to be seen. But guess who the phoenix will be???

      • tallgirl1204

        OOOOOOOOOOOH. “who will the phoenix be?” yikes, you gave me chills.

      • Lady Bug

        Great observation!

      • FibonacciSequins

        That’s a very good insight. But if the phoenix is rising from the ashes…what are the ashes? The agency?

        • MartyBellerMask

          Anybody wearing gray!

          • FibonacciSequins

            I like the way you think!

    • Aimee_Hackerling

      Did Megan sleep in her wig? Her hair is at least a foot longer in the final scene than it is in the first.

      • P M

        I think she may have, though how it stayed on through the night is beyond me.

        • http://tootcomic.com/ Dick In A Bog

          Wigs can stay in place pretty good, especially if it’s not JUST a wig and is a wig / extension combo, since those can clip into the hair. I dated a gal that wore uncomfortably similar big wigs like meg has on in that scene (it was unfairly attractive).

          I’m also guessing a bit that it wasn’t a full 8 hour sleep.

      • Danielle

        After the drugs, drinking and 3-way, she probably passed out. Her black eye-makeup is still on and all smudged in the morning too.

    • Vtg Fashion Library

      I know that everyone keeps calling that a Pucci dress, and I know that it sure looks like one, but I haven’t seen a photo that shows his signature “Emilio” in the print. Has Janie Bryant definitely said that it’s a Pucci, or did they just do a really, really good repro?

      • tallgirl1204

        I think Janie said it was Pucci, in the video summary she did on the clothes for the episode.

      • Fjasmine

        It is Pucci, Janie talked about it and shows the dress up close.

    • tallgirl1204

      So, I have been through as many comments as I could– and I still wonder: Is Don wearing the same brown suit in which he slunk back into the office, and he just fills it out in a rock star way because Dick shrinks into his clothes and Don fills them out? Or is it a different suit that is cut better?

    • kathryn_dc

      I was surprised to see Don wearing a gray hat with a brown suit…I guess I expected more of a match in the colors?

      • Bella Bluth

        What other color hat would represent smoke rising from his tobacco brown suit? Don’s en fuego.

    • Laura

      Has anyone else pointed out that Henry was wearing blue and yellow in the kitchen scene with Betty? And there’s lots of blue and yellow in that scene at the progressive dinner. I recall that those colors signified moments of serious disconnection between the characters. These scenes would apply, no?

      • Columbinia

        The official colors of New York state are blue and gold.

    • TheBrett

      I didn’t notice the degree to which Amy was crushing on Megan in those scenes until I saw the screenshots (like that one where she’s blatantly checking out Megan’s ass).

      • http://tootcomic.com/ Dick In A Bog

        I don’t think he would have such a blatant display of “aww yiss” about another woman standing in his (wife’s) kitchen, but given how long it’s been since he saw Steph, that he may have thought it was her, momentarily. The smile certainly indicates that, as does the bemused confusion when she turns around.

    • Dorace Afton Trottier

      a couple of other small points:

      1. someone mentioned somewhere that all Megan ever seems to cook is spaghetti. that makes total sense – spaghetti is Megan’s comfort food. it’s what her mother made her, and what she makes for Don’s kids. it was the inspiration behind the Heinz Baked Beans pitch. Megan makes spaghetti when Don is around because she flat-out needs the comfort.

      2. it’s probably a stretch, but i did notice that the sunglasses that Stephanie is wearing when she calls Megan and Don back are round and pink. they reminded me of the round and pink sunglasses that Megan “dropped” when she left the Howard Johnson Motor Lodge.

      • TeraBat

        Spaghetti is also very simple to make, and Megan has never struck me as much of a homemaker.

      • Aunt Tabby

        Spaghetti??? No. Megan,s Don pleasing dish is Coq Au Vin. As I recall Coq Au Vin has been on her menu at least 4 times. As a serious cook myself, It’s the only thing I respect about her.

        • Dorace Afton Trottier

          i’m not talking about Megan pleasing Don. i’m talking about Megan pleasing Megan. She offers Stephanie spaghetti. that’s why i mentioned it. Megan cooks many things, including Boeuf Bourguignon in a tiny yellow pot, with absolutely no mess. Megan is NOT a cook.

          • Columbinia

            Megan’s doing better than Beefaroni, chow mien and tuna casserole. Seems to me that the writers mean for her to be a decent cook, they just don’t know how to show her cooking. She turned out a steak in short order, but all they showed was her washing the pan afterwards. The failure of the show to make the character’s cooking look authentic doesn’t change the fact that she’s supposed to be capable of cooking and serving up coq au vin and boeuf bourguignon.

            Something interesting that I only caught in the T Lo screen shot is that Amy is reading McCall’s magazine, something Megan had in the house. McCall’s is the magazine of the domestic woman, one who cooks. It fascinates me that it was lying around Megan’s house instead of fashion magazines like Vogue, Glamour or Mademoiselle, or even Cosmopolitan or Variety.

            • Dorace Afton Trottier

              while i don’t necessarily disagree, it’s besides the point i was trying to make, which is that Megan makes spaghetti as HER COMFORT FOOD. Megan needs comfort at this point in the mess of her relationship with Don.

            • Columbinia

              While I do take your point about Megan and her comfort food, I thought I was responding to your last sentence, which was, “Megan is NOT a cook.” And also to your point about producing boeuf bourguignon without any mess in a tiny yellow pot. Sorry I confused things.

    • Daphnemcl

      So next week Don wakes up unexpectedly in some hotel room. I’m wondering if Cutler drugged him. That might be a little too diabolical even for Cutler I suppose.

      • Columbinia

        Cutler already drugged the agency one weekend with vitamin B and speed courtesy of Dr. Happy’s shots.

    • Redlanta

      “pot-smoking art director in Glen Campbell drag”. This is Stan YES!
      “Velma from Scooby Doo”-unfortunately this has been the downward spiral of Peggy fasion this year. Just too earnest and no hint of her sexuality. God, I’m rooting for these two crazy kids….

    • Columbinia

      I know there’s thinking that Mad Men is about people fragmented on the inside, which is not an analysis that I particularly embrace. I see instead a story about identity, selves presented to the world, inner selves, hidden lives and secret identities, and, especially for the women, changing identities. Nevertheless, by 1969 in the US we are seeing a fragmenting culture. It’s not just a split between the Establishment, as it was negatively termed, and the counterculture and antiwar movement. The conflicts and splits were along many lines and at many levels. They were manifest in terms like credibility gap, generation gap and various shifts in attitudes labeled as revolutions, like the sexual revolution, cultural revolution and social revolution. Little on Mad Men shows the societal fragmentation better than the clothes.

      Lou Avery’s sweater started out seeming faux avuncular. Now it’s beginning to look symbolic of the generational, cultural and creative split between Lou and the young guys on the creative team. Lou’s sweater is channeling an outdated fake Fred McMurray and his creative energy goes into a hokey cartoon concept from about 1950. Meanwhile the young guys on his creative team are channeling the subversive hip of The Smothers Brothers Show in their clothes and sensibilities. The middle ground is occupied by Don, who is still dressing like an agency partner, and Peggy, who, while not hip, at least is dressing for the right year. At her best (the dark blue dress with chain-and-button detail), she looks like something out of 1969 Glamour magazine. At her worst (polyester knit pants outfit), she’s dressed like a 1961 pre-teen, which makes her a suitable sartorial companion for her child neighbor. She is a character who actually reflects the fragmentation of female identity in the culture with her conflict between career lady dress vs. girl-child leisure clothes.

      The oddest sartorial show of fragmenting culture is at Megan’s party. There are, of course, Don and Harry Crane in their Establishment casual styles meant for a suburban patio party. Then there’s the odd collection of hippie styles from Megan’s “acting class.” Here I have a problem. Aspiring New York actors might dress this way, but given the look of movies and TV shows of the time, I have a hard time believing that aspiring Hollywood actors looked as grungy as the gang at Megan’s party. I’d expect many more beach boy types, wannabe Warren Beatty’s and Julie Christies, and California girls in Megan’s crowd. As pointed out, Megan is at sartorial odds with her social group. She’s dressed up like a glamour-puss starlet. In fact, she’s dressed for a party at a Beverly Hills mansion. There’s that old advice that one should dress for the job one wants, not the job one has. This leads to asking what is Megan dressing for? Is her whole Cosmo cover girl getup meant to make her a Bond Girl, a starlet (a fleeting career at best) or find her a rich show biz husband who will give her a brief acting career before making her a Hollywood wife? Does she want the Hollywood scene more than she wants the actual acting career? I dunno. The character still doesn’t make sense to me unless her evolution is supposed to end at nutball.

      Anyway, that’s my two cents. The late 1960s was a time when fashion wasn’t just filtering down from the haute couture houses, it was also percolating up from the street in various anti-establishment trends. Culture and sartorial style were fragmented and conflicted. In some respects it was personified by Nixon walking in the sand on a California beach in a suit, tie and oxfords.

    • Banbonet

      “Don needs to swagger and you’re in the way.”
      Love it!!!!!!!

      So glad Don – MY Don – is back.

    • FunKyChick

      Great style recap as usual. I think this one had me laughing more than past posts though.

    • JulieTy

      Thank you. Excellent article.

    • KatFromJersey

      “Check out just how short the skirts got in 1969. Can’t imagine anyone dressing like that in an office today.” – I have two words for you: Ally. McBeal. I worked in a corporate environment in the late 90′s, and short skirts crept back into the workplace for a brief time, due to the popularity of that show and Calista Flockhart’s ever shrinking bottoms!
      And poor Ginsberg. I agree with TLo that his breakdown has been telegraphed since he was introduced. The fact that he, very seriously, said he was from Mars was a huge red flag for me.

    • RossDC

      One small quibble – Stephanie did have her sunglasses in the scene with her arriving at Megan’s house – they were just in her right hand, so not as visible. Otherwise, great review!

    • SuzyQuzey

      Oh, my lovely uncles, I must disagree with you on one point (sorry if someone else has already said it; I haven’t read all the comments): Megan’s and Amy’s party outfits were very different. Megan’s Pucci dress was a graphic print with an empire waist, plunging neckline, and a tulip skirt that hugged her lower body. Amy’s outfit was a basic A-line flared skirt and button-down floral-print blouse. How do you see those as the same style and silhouette?

      • Rosalius

        They’re not comparing Megan’s party dress to Amy’s outfit, they’re comparing the outfit that Megan wore earlier that day (similar blouse and mini-skirt) to what Amy wore that night.

        • SuzyQuzey

          Oh, good lord, you’re right. Apologies, uncles!

    • zingit

      Megan must be wearing a wig or some kind of hair-piece during the party scene, but I’m surprised it didn’t look more wonky after she slept in it.

    • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

      Anyone notice that Peggy and the secretaries outfits match the computer room with their greys, whites, and blues?

      • P M

        That’s a big creepy.

    • lucie

      I think Megan’s phone should be avocado green instead of black.

      • Lin

        Isn’t her phone aqua? I love that phone.

    • Danielle Smith

      I’m incredibly surprised you guts didn’t show the 2 ladies (stephanie and Megan) in the same robe…I thought it would be for sure mentioned here…I wanted your take on. Stephanie had it on freshly showered with her hair up…Don would think she was radiant and fresh and Megan had her hair down and was hung over and appeared tired and desperate.

    • JohnTodd916

      I know I’m late to the discussion, but thank you for bringing Ginsberg’s continuing issues to the fore. My son is autistic, suffers schizo-affective disorder, and coincidentally, Sensory Processing Disorder. Ginsberg as a schizophrenic with SPD really makes sense now.

      • Lin

        Being born in a concentration camp couldn’t have helped. He may have been experimented on.

    • Mark Stewart

      Absolutely T&L, at the end of last season my partner and i were talking about how Ginsberg was headed for an appointment with the men in white coats. It was obvious as all hell.

    • Eve M. Troutt Powell

      You guys are brilliant. I love how you read these scenes.

    • Lin

      Didnt notice the American flag pants in the scene but darned if I didn’t have a pair of hot pants just like that, circa 1972. “2001″, for all its advances still had women in the subservient roles. I always loved those little corduroy mini-skirts. I think Betty’s hatred of slutty women and counter-culture comes from her time with Don. A handkerchief was something that all ladies carried then and gentlemen. There’s a scene where someone, Don I think, whips his handkerchief out of his breast pocket and hands it to a crying woman. That’s the ultimate gentlemanly behavior.