Mad Style: The Monolith

Posted on May 07, 2014

A very Don-centric episode in which no woman falls into his arms or cooly stares off into the distance while she vaguely philosophizes and smokes Parliaments? That’s an episode with a lot of suits and ties. And those are the toughest ones to talk about in the “Mad Style” style. After all, even in 1969, most of the male characters in this milieu are still sticking to a fairly conformist and restrictive corporate style. It’s wilder and looser a style than before and since, but when the cast of characters we’re talking about have a median age of 45, then there’s not a lot of variation to be had. Then again, Costume Designer Janie Bryant got a rare opportunity to costume the counterculture of the period and she took it and ran with it.

 

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Here’s Pete, sporting the very latest in late ’60s/early ’70s conservative country club wear. He could be on the cover of a golf resort brochure. Modern viewers might not realize how stylish Pete has always been. Not trendy in the Harry Crane sense, but very much what a mid-30s executive who cared about his image would wear. He’s like Roger in that sense. They both dress age-appropriate, and very well.

Bonnie could be on the cover of Redbook or Good Housekeeping. Bold florals and sunny yellows seem to be defining her looks, along with eye-catching details, like that crocheted shawl piece. It’s an odd sort of thing to wear. It turns her head into a display item. And something like that would require an enormous amount of fussing to get just right – and very little fussing afterward in order for it to stay right. In other words, to get all those tassles lined up perfectly took intense focus and to keep them lined up through a meal took rigid discipline. Bonnie Whiteside, ladies and gentleman. Conquering the world through force of will and tassles.

 

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We just want to point out that this is Don’s third week back on the job – and he’s still a nervous wreck riding that elevator up every morning.

That’s not a shade of blue we’re used to seeing on Don – and he wore a lot of blue this episode. We can’t really apply much meaning to that except it tied him to Roger’s blue jacket and definitely set him apart from this somewhat colorless crowd:

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Even in a relatively plain brown suit, Harry will always stand out when standing amongst a bunch of other businessmen. Even toned down like this, he’s still the focal point of color in the scene. But the big news on the suit front this week is that Lou Avery is suddenly wearing them, after being depicted pretty consistently in a succession of avuncular cardigans. With Don back in the office he’s feeling very threatened and is stepping up his game. It’s notable that he and Jim are dressed so similarly. We noted last week that Roger and Jim aren’t doppelgangers anymore. Looks like Lou is trying to fill that void. He’s angling for a partnership.

Here’s some dreamy Stan Rizzo posters for your lockers, girls:

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Dig that groovy man jewelry. He wears that green shirt a lot.

Peggy clearly needs some managerial training. She ranks above Stan and Ginsberg. She shouldn’t be bad-mouthing Lou like that to them, no matter how right she may be about it. You don’t tell the people under you that the person over you doesn’t care about them. They don’t always respect her like they should (especially Ginsberg). Bitching about a superior to them puts her on their level when she should be placing herself above them. That’s one lesson from Don she didn’t learn, apparently.

But hey, she’s learned how to rock the businesswear.

 

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Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-4-Tom-Loenzo-Site-TLO (5)It’s not exactly business-like on the surface, but that necktie-like scarf serves to mimic menswear while she receives an astonishingly high raise (over $30,000, in to day’s money). It’s a little signal that she’s playing with the big boys now and it’ll repeat itself later.

 

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It occurred to us that the stripes kind of mimicked the stripes of a man’s tie, too. We wouldn’t have attempted to make the connection except Don wore a succession of blue and white or yellow striped ties this episode; three of them, in fact. And it kind of jumps out at us in this scene. It’s hard for us not to see their outfits having a bit of a conversation with each other.

By the way, just to settle this, because it got widely debated in Monday’s review comments section, they’ve moved Peggy one office over. She was in Lane’s office at the start of the season. The door is now on the opposite side and the space appears to be significantly smaller.

 

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Stan and Ginsberg are often dressed in complimentary outfits to underline that they’re a team. Their pants match here, but otherwise, they seem to be pretty far apart from each other. Ginsberg essentially wears the same outfit over and over again; an oversized shirt in a drab set of colors with a delicate print, mismatched to a tie and pair of pants. He’s pretty much never pictured in anything else, going back years.

We wonder about Stan. He argued with Peggy about getting too invested in the quality of the work and he argued with Ginsberg about the need for the new computer. Aside from Peggy and Don, he’s the only creative whose clothing is colorful. Most of the rest of them are portrayed in washed-out non-colors, which we felt was an indication of how uncreative the company is right now.

 

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Don’s not just haunted by Lane’s suicide as represented by the pennant, which he eventually hung up; he’s also haunted by his own past greatness. Check the advertising awards on the wall. It’s a little bit of defiant chest-thumping that comes off a bit pathetic. “You can treat me like a junior copywriter, but just look at the awards I’ve won – ten to twelve years ago.”

And yes, as many others have pointed out, the ’69 Mets could be a metaphor for Don’s eventual comeback. It’s possible. But in typical Mad Men fashion, it’s the banner of a dead, defeated man as well.

 

Mad-Men-Mad-Style-Season-7-Episode-4-Tom-Loenzo-Site-TLO (8)Mona’s dress is trying to bridge the gap between Roger’s navy blue and Brooks’ brown. As Janie often does with family characters, they’re dressed in unifying colors, like a living family crest. Keep that sense of unity in mind when we get to the farm.

 

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A short-sleeved dress shirt and a pocket protector. He’ll wear this for the next two decades, at which point it will become such a massive cliche and a generally understood shorthand for “nerd,” that he’ll finally stop. He’ll also probably be a millionaire by then.

 

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This Meredith getup caught our eye. Her normal work attire is so child-like and over-the-top feminine. Her dress is… we wouldn’t say sophisticated so much as a little more grown up than her normal fare. We don’t think we’ve ever seen her in anything but a bright. childlike color. The collar and cuffs here are businesslike and call back to several Joan and Peggy outfits. She’s flirting outrageously with Don right now and we wonder if this wasn’t her attempt at being more serious in order to catch his eye. Of course, being Meredith, she styled the dress with big hair, a headband and a flower pin and earrings that don’t quite go. The show has a well-deserved reputation for being stylish, but we’ve always appreciated Janie for creating wardrobes for characters who don’t have the best of taste or instincts, like Peggy, Harry and Meredith, among others.

And since we’re taking a tour of the secretarial pool – and people with bad wardrobes – let’s all check in on Caroline, who remains our favorite:

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We wouldn’t attempt to impose much meaning on anything Caroline wears. Janie clearly has some fun dressing her up as someone who couldn’t care less about the latest trends.

We wish she would utter the line “Little Ralphie’s spastic” again. We wish she’d say it in every episode, regardless of whether it’s appropriate.

 

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It’s tough to figure out how to dress Peggy like Peggy and still make her look somewhat imposing. Mission accomplished. From the back, she looks almost ominous.

 

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In other news, Green Acres is the place to be. Farm living is the life for … anyone but these two. They look fine – fabulous, even – but their outfits got increasingly ludicrous the smaller the city became in their rear view mirror.

 

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And the fact that Mona checked her makeup before getting out to face a bunch of filthy, venereal-disease-ridden dogs (from her perspective) tells you everything you need to know about her. Her ways are best, even when they don’t make sense. Appearance is everything. And if you don’t like it, you can lock yourself in the bathroom with some gin until you get over it.

They do look spectacular together, though. But if this scene had been shot in 1969, they’d have been made up to look ridiculous and the people on the commune would have been beautiful flower children.

 

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Instead, those are some of the filthiest hippies you ever did see. The show has made a habit of not romanticizing the counterculture of the period, from the pretentiousness of the beatniks leading to Midge’s pathetic downfall and heroin addiction, to the pointlessness of the squatters that rocked Betty’s world last season. It’s partially because Weiner wants to write a less-often-told version of the decade; the one that the grownups lived through. In other words these are hippies as seen through the eyes of wealthy, mature establishment types. “These people are lost and on drugs and have venereal diseases.” Much like how the black characters went from invisible to barely visible to having agency in the story – because that’s how the white people at the center of this story saw them over time.

You can tell Janie had a little fun here. In fact, we’d say it’s almost a little too on point. After all, why would someone work on a truck in a purple furry vest? Nineteenth-Century-style subsistence living doesn’t leave a lot of time for pattern-mixing and accessorizing. To be fair, most of the characters are very plainly dressed. The ones that got lines got more fanciful costumes.

The pro-technology people in this story are dressed in colorless outfits. The tech-eschewing characters are dressed colorfully – but they’re filthy. If the show is making a point, it’s found somewhere in between those two extremes; something about creativity within boundaries, like the worlds of advertising or television production.  Matthew Weiner always was somewhat obsessed with examining the creative life under restrictions, making no bones of the fact that he sees himself in Don in a lot of ways, fighting a lot of the same creative battles with corporate types.

 

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There is absolutely nothing tying her to her family here. Not one bit of clothing or color that signals her ties to the other two. They’ve lost her.  Of course, Roger and Mona aren’t tied together here either. This family is completely fractured. No unity at all.

 

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We love the detail of that sweater being passed around the commune. We saw it on one of the guys the day before. It goes with Roger’s feeling that his daughter is being passed around that commune too. He was pretty okay with what she was doing because he’s had more than his share of free love and drug taking. It wasn’t until he came face to face with the fact that his daughter is betraying her husband and son that he thought she needed to be kidnapped away from that place. In other words, he came face to face with himself and he didn’t like it at all. Old man take a look at my life; I’m a lot like you.

Notice how a literal roll in the mud has done little to change her look but it’s ruined Roger’s.

Meanwhile, back in the 20th Century…

 

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Joan’s character actions are the ones that bug us most of all. As we’ve said, we can understand why she’s mad at him and why she might want him kept on a leash, but the conditions laid out for Don were designed to be humiliating and hard to follow in the hopes that he’d crash and they could fire him without having to buy him out. She essentially said yes to a scheme to financially ruin Don – and she’s clearly not torn up about it since she’s letting Peggy in on it. We can understand why Jim and Bert would do something like that. And Roger probably thinks Don’ll just wow them all at some point and they’ll all forgive him. But why on earth would Joan have said yes to such a draconian punishment?

We don’t trade much in Jungian color analysis, where universal or collectively held meanings can be applied to specific colors – except in the broadest possible sense, like red denoting anger or passion. For the most part, we’re Freudian ’round these parts; choosing to look for color meanings within the story, based on how and when the colors present themselves. It’s why blue and green represented adultery to us in the story last year and why purple represented heartbreak for Joan, for a time.

Having said that, we thought Joan’s green practically reeked of money. She’s really stepped up her style game since she became an executive. Also, Peggy’s wearing blue, and while we can’t apply an adultery meaning here with a straight face, this could easily stand with, say, the Heinz exec scene from last season that was awash in the same combo and was all about corporate “cheating” and going behind another executive’s back.

But really, Joan standing outside Peggy’s office in a gorgeous green outfit, putting on a pair of gloves reminds us very much of the scene all the way back in season 2, when she told Peggy she never wanted to be part of the men’s world in the office. “Let them have it,” she said back then. Here she is now, an executive and partner, drinking scotch with Peggy, the copy chief and Don’s boss (sort of).

It stood out to us that Peggy doesn’t have any sort of necktie-like scarf or men’s style collar detailing here. It’s a fairly stripped down look, in a scene where she doesn’t feel she has any power and not much chance for success in getting Don in line.

 

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Those details return in her next scene, where Don promises her the work she asked him for. It’s subtle, but that collar and silly little tie represent a certain level of success and the attendant respect that comes with it.

Check those hoops. She’s getting bolder in her jewelry, just like Joan is. Female success can be measured in their jewelry in this world.

 

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The reference to the monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey was sold pretty hard, but we like the framing here. Two monoliths passing each other. Technology and creativity. We wonder if that won’t be a dominant theme going forward.

 

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We’ve seen Don all cleaned up and typing away while the sun shines outside. If Freddie’s pep talk really does get him to stop drinking, it won’t be as abrupt a change as it might seem. Don’s tried cleaning up his act several times now, going back to the year after his divorce, when he started swimming at the Y and trying to write a journal. We’d like to think he’s really going to try to change this time, but we can’t help noting he’s dressed almost identically to the way he was in the opening scenes of the episode.

 

 

 

 

[Stills: tomandlorenzo.com - Photo Credit: Justina Mintz/AMC]

    • gogobooty

      I think a photo of Caroline was omitted.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        ?????

    • larrythesandboy

      Speaking of Freddie’s pep talk and dopplegangers, there’s a shot during that scene in Don’s apartment where Don and Freddie are dressed almost identically and positioned completely symmetrically, echoing Freddie’s assertion that Don’s going to follow Freddie’s trajectory if he doesn’t pull himself together.

    • luludexter

      The “computer nerd” look may become a stereotype, but the costume of the IBM guy is absolutely spot on for the period. My Dad worked for IBM from the 60s and 70s, and he went to work everyday in a short sleeved white shirt and tie. And pocket protector. It was an IBM uniform. I remember pictures of the guys he worked on projects with, all in the same white short sleeved shirts and ties, standing in front of a giant computer…a sartorial metaphor for the impact of digital technology. The only difference is that many of those guys had crew cuts, like my Dad — I would have liked to see some crew cuts in “Mad Men” since in my middle class 60s childhood they were fairly ubiquitous.

      • Therese Bohn

        I grew up in Endicott, NY, home of IBM, and those white shirts were everywhere. The corporate uniform disappeared @ 20 years ago. It’s
        pretty much jeans and casual shirts now. (Sometimes I miss the nerdiness if only for it’s neatness). And yes, there should still be
        some crew cuts in 1969.

        • MichelleRafter

          I dated an engineer in the mid-80s and short-sleeved shirts were all he wore.

          • NDC_IPCentral

            viz.: Dilbert.

          • Therese Bohn

            It wasn’t my husband was it? ;-)

      • MasterandServant

        Yes! My dad worked for Boeing in 1969-1971 (moved from NY to Seattle- which he HATED!), and wore the same uniform (short sleeved dress shirt, pocket protector). Even told us stories about the computers that were the size of rooms. Ultimately, he missed the East Coast and came back, became a teacher…and wore those silly short sleeved dress shirts with pens in the pocket (sans pocket protector!) until he retired in 2003.

        • Susan Collier

          When I think of Apollo 13 costuming, that was the look of everyone in the control room.

          • not_Bridget

            Yup. Houstonian here–who remembers when NASA first moved to town, housed in various spaces until the Space Center was finished. Short-sleeve dress shirts & dark slacks (usually made of fabric not found in nature). With ties–often clip on. And crew cuts–which stayed in style longer because of the military roots of many of the guys. (And they were nearly all guys, back then.)

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Still are nearly all guys. Also a Houstonian, and I work with a wonderful woman who spent 20 years in the training department in NASA, and she can tell you about the gender discrimination that still pervades in NASA.

            • Qitkat

              I don’t disagree with you, but my best friend had a wonderful job working on the space shuttle at Canaveral, in the heat tile installing section, for many years, which she loved. I don’t recall her talking about gender discrimination, I’ll have to ask her. I’m not sure who her actual employer was though, NASA, or one of the private contractor companies.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Oh, my coworker loved her work at NASA too — she didn’t want to leave, but after the shuttle program shut down and there were all those budget cuts impending, she knew it was a matter of a time until she was let go, because (in her words) she was neither an engineer nor a man.

              And yeah, my understanding is that most of the people at NASA are contractors, not civil servants who can only be fired by an act of Congress.

            • Qitkat

              Haha, those clip-on ties. My husband worked for the Park Service, and all his ties were like that.

      • SayWhaaatNow

        I thought that the IBM guy looked like the ’60s IBM version of Don (at least, his hair did). I wonder if that was establishing another parallel between the emergence and prominence of technology versus creativity.

        • Travelgrrl

          Their ties could not have been more similar!

      • Emily Smith

        Who is that actor, the “computer nerd”? I recognize him from what feels like a bunch of things but I can’t name him.

        • decormaven

          It’s Roger Baker, who played Dr. Charles Percy on Grey’s Anatomy. He’s the one who died during the crazed husband rampage at Seattle Grace- when Derek was shot.

          • FayeMac

            I read in another place that he was in a “Justified” episode playing a heavy. He is attractive.

          • Emily Smith

            YES THANK YOU. That’s why I recognize him.

        • zenobar

          He looks like a Monkee. Mickey Dolenz I think.

          • Stephen Reid

            He looks like Paul Oakenfold, the dj …

      • Jean Genetic

        I would have liked to see some crew cuts in “Mad Men” since I think it’s a hot look for men!

        • MartyBellerMask

          And a no-fuss look. I’d think the average geek would go for that. But what do I know. :)

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Plus, crew cuts are fun to pet. ;)

        • AZU403

          What goes around comes around… in 1969 crew-cuts were straight straight straight.

      • tallgirl1204

        My dad worked at Cape Canaveral, and I can say “ditto.” I still have some of his pocket protectors.

      • Chris

        This was really the birth of the nerd look. Even in the 1980’s when they dressed a nerd he wore that exact outfit with the short sleeves, dark pants and brylcreemed hair.

        • ktr33

          He looked less like a nerd to me and more like a Mormon on mission.

      • Terri Terri

        Well my dad wore those shirts all the time also, in the 60’s and 70’s. Not a computer guy, a school principal in a hot town in California. Too warm for long sleeves!

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          My dad wore short-sleeved shirts in the 70s, too. Also not a computer guy, but a public health statistician, and he used pencils to write his statistics down. He preferred short-sleeved shirts because all that pencil would get the cuffs of long-sleeved shirts dirty. (And it was hard for him to roll up his sleeves because he doesn’t have full use of his right hand.) He didn’t wear all-white shirts; they were either blue, or white with narrow stripes.

      • suzq

        Those computers generated a lot of heat, hence the need for the short sleeves. I’m not seeing much ventilation in the old break room. I’m wondering if that thing doesn’t blow a fuse or fry its circuits when they actually try and get it to crunch numbers.

        Your iPhone sliced in 1/8 has more computing power than that machine, btw.

        • Shug

          So, with all the talk of how ludicrously large and primitive an IBM was in 1969, I keep wondering…what exactly did this computer do for them that justified the expense?

          • Karen Miller

            I think it ran algorithms about ad space availability, and markets, and costs per minutes, and rates of returns for product sales, and other lengthy calculations on the fly, so they could present data to clients when they were advising them on the best times to place their ads and on what channel et cetera.

            • Shug

              So basically it was an enormous Excel-esque program. Got it.

            • Vanessa

              Let’s just say you probably have more computing power in your smartphone than in an IBM360, but it is hard to imagine what the leap from paper and pencil to computers did for accounting and analytic tasks, including the space program.

          • T C

            It significantly reduced the headcount in accounting and statistical staff who used pen and paper. Until the mainframe leasing business launched, most medium and large businesses could not afford their own computers so acquiring one was a sign they had joined the big leagues. Well up to the arrival of the IBM PC in the early 1980s, most corporations leased computer time and little computing was real-time. Paperwork was processed in-house by clerks, whose work was then checked and batched by supervisors. Batches were sent by courier to the processing company to be keypunched onto Hollerith (80-column) cards, which were then stacked and run as batches. Off-site batch processing was common into the 1990s even at corporations with their own mainframes as part of the Information Security and Disaster Recovery plans. Many major corporations did not switch a lot of back office functionality off dumb terminals and onto PCs until well into the 1990s due to the costs of converting legacy applications and the need for additional support staff for end users and their issues.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Interesting. My mother worked at Time Inc in the 50s. They got a huge vacuum tube computer. You had to wear a gown and booties when you went into the room it was in, and all it did was store subscribers’ addresses and print the labels.

              Did you hear someone (I forget who it was) talk about hiring keypunchers?

            • T C

              The mention was of which keypunch company was used by LeaseTek as Harry led the LeaseTek guy (name forgotten) out to lunch.

        • Timmay!

          I suspect the computer will catch fire or be set on fire. Tons of references to fire this season.

          • ACKtually

            So, what, is the computer Dante’s actual inferno? I love this show.

      • NotTheRealSteveEyl

        I had a fraternity brother that had some kind of summer internship at the IBM mothership in Armonk or wherever it is. He wore a pale yellow shirt to work one day (with a tie and suit) and they sent him home to change – any color shirt as long as it’s white or blue (and not that crazy French blue, either).

        • T C

          Blue shirt was not ok when I was there in the late 1970s. Never saw any ecru or yellow. Long sleeves, white of course, were worn by the sales reps.

        • lillyvonschtupp

          Imagine if someone wore a pink shirt. Like Homer Simpson, they would institutionalize him with Michael Jackson.

          • NotTheRealSteveEyl

            Stripes is 5-10 in Falconer State Prison.

      • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

        My dad (a process control engineer who got his start at Spokane Computer in the late 70s) wore his short-sleeved button-downs and corduroy pants all through the nineties, finally swapping the cords for jeans in the 21st century.

      • zky

        Yes, Beemer (not the car) progeny here, too. Only thing missing is the black-rimmed glasses–the ones that made a big, cool-nerd comeback a few years ago. We called them IBM safety glasses. They were ugly then, but I’m wearing a pair right now.

      • Lobelia

        Great point about the crew cuts! I hadn’t noticed they were missing until you mentioned it. Some of my friends’ fathers sported them when I was growing up in the late 60s/early 70s. Wearing one sent a clear message that you were a regular middle-class American who wanted nothing whatsoever to do with the counterculture.

    • Scimommy

      Peggy has finally figured out how to dress (I loved her outfits this episode!). She will figure out how to be a boss as well. I thought her “I have what I think is very good news. I hope you see it that way, too.” to Don was an excellent start.

      With respect to the farm scene: not only is Margaret’s color scheme very distinct from her parents, it ties to the hippie guy she slept with that night – they’re wearing the same earth/berry colors. He is her family now.

      • KayeBlue

        I’ll bet a lot of money that Margaret winds up ill from a “mystery wasting disease” before this show is over, sadly.

        • Travelgrrl

          In 1969? A woman? Maybe a decade later, if you’re referencing AiDS.

          • TigerLaverada

            The first recorded death from AIDS in the US was in 1969, although they didn’t recognize it at the time. Unlikely Margaret would get HIV/AIDS, but not completely impossible. Most American doctors didn’t know what it was in the 70s, meanwhile thinking of HIV stuff as an African problem (if they were aware of it at all), where it was known since the 50s.

            • Travelgrrl

              I rest my case. The series ends in 1969-70. No one is going to be diagnosed with AIDS,

            • KTBSN

              How do we know what year the series will end in, hasn’t been written about that I’ve seen. I’m hoping the last episode will take place some time afterward with some history or resolution for characters like the fact Roger died of a heart attack in 1974 or Sally went on to found her own ad agency in 1985.

            • Munchkn

              I don’t think anybody recognized the scourge of HIV in the 70s. Going back over some medical records and perhaps even testing some preserved samples of tissue of people who had died, it’s clear that HIV was around earlier than we thought, but it wasn’t recognized as a disease.

          • KayeBlue

            The first recorded case was in 1966. It certainly wasn’t common or likely, but this is the show that had a man lose a foot to a lawnmower.

            • Travelgrrl

              Too Forrest-Gumpy for Mad Men. With all the whoring around Roger has done, seemingly with men and women, it would statistically be much more likely to be him, and again, not for many years.

            • NotTheRealSteveEyl

              …Which also be came very prominent among homosexuals and IV drug users in the early 80’s. Right?

            • Grumpy Girl

              Well losing a foot in a lawnmower was a common “urban legend” thing back in the day. That’s why parents made their kids wear protective shoes to mow the lawn, because “You might cut off your foot with that thing!” (And I kid not. that was a common statement in my little town back in the early 70s.)

        • Alice Teeple

          My money’s on the clap.

          • TigerLaverada

            Now this is very likely. Plus genital herpes and/or chlamydia. Oh, and crabs for sure.

            • decormaven

              “VD..is for everybody…not just for a few..”

          • KayeBlue

            Well, in fairness, Roger’s probably had that too.

          • another_laura

            Oh yes, that would be consistent with the zeitgeist. The pill, everybody sleeping around, rubbers are for losers.

            And she gets pregnant and they kick her out.

        • AZU403

          More likely a drug overdose, but let’s hope not.

      • Chris

        Peggy’s striped dress set with the tie is pretty fashion forward in a way because it became a staple throughout the seventies (in polyester). It does read as somewhat juvenile in shape though. I was wearing a version of it in the late seventies as a young girl myself.

        • 3boysful

          It’s the 1920’s/sailor vibe you get from the dropped waist.

      • siriuslover

        And you know, the more I think about it, it kind of was good news in a way. Don has been sitting in his office all day every day for three weeks with nothing at all to do. Roger asked Meredith if Don was in and she said “He never leaves.” Though the conditions were horrible for Don, this was actually a chance to be active again. To do his thing.

        • Scimommy

          I agree, and I wonder if Don WILL eventually see it that way. He can try to cling to his former alpha-male status and throw tantrums/get drunk when it doesn’t work, or he can forget about status and go back to doing what he loves – creating ad pitches.

          • buddy100

            Exactly. I think that this is exactly what Don needs to be at his best again. For far too long, all of his energy has been put into destroying the competition, asserting authority, having every woman and close person in his life validate his ego. Compensatory measures for deep feelings of inner worthlessness. Lil’ Dickie was a piece of shit no one loved, so Don Draper has to be infallible.

            But if he finally lets go of that need and allows himself to be a little more humble, he can put his focus back into his creativity. The creative aspects were always the part of the job that gave back, that were positive outlets as opposed to opportunities for self-destruction. The love of work will come first. The power and prestige will naturally follow. This is a huge opportunity for Don – if he chooses to see it that way.

            • CanIbeFrank

              In fact, I wonder if Don’s conversation with the computer guy was a foreshadowing of what is to come. That guy started his own company, right? Don seemed very interested in that. And while Don was a huge force in the agency that exists now, he didn’t start it from the ground up but rather forced its evolving in different ways at different times. Maybe the end will be him truly starting over by starting a brand-new agency. A small one that does brilliant work.

            • 3hares

              That’s how SCDP started. It was a brand new agency that was small and did brilliant work–that was the idea.

            • CanIbeFrank

              Yes, but I envision a start-up that’s even smaller and not with a bunch of the old office staff (Sterling, Cooper, et al). Maybe just Don and one other person–interesting to think who that would be…

      • Chris

        It was very Peggy like to prepare a little speech to face Don. it reminded me of when she told him she was leaving SCDP.

      • CantStandYa

        No doubt Peggy will adapt to her role as boss in time, but that was a disastrous start. Inviting Don AND the intern into the room at the same time, placing them both on the same level, was pure cowardice on her part. There are a million better ways she could have handled that scene.

        • Scimommy

          Can’t blame her – she needed a buffer!!

        • shmrck14

          Not as cowardly as Lou, who spent a ton of $ to have to not do it

      • 3boysful

        It’s cracking me up that Margaret has been at the commune what, a few weeks? And she already has a dirty granny dress? Its like there’s a store for hippy commune wear. So she leaves the burbs, takes no upper middle class clothing, and stops by Hippies-R-Us on the way to the farm.

        • T C

          Communes were all about sharing. Note uncles reference to the sweater.

          • 3boysful

            Oh, I know that. It wasn’t so much the dirty-ness of the dress as the fact that it’s a cliche hippy dress. You know, like it’s all about being natural and living off the land, recycling before it was cool. But instead of wearing the clothes she already owns until they fall apart, she has to get into a hippie “costume.”

            • elaine

              clothes have always served as a symbol of status or belonging to a certain community, just look at the hipsters now. no matter what your actual views are, if you don’t convey them in your looks, they somehow don’t really count (and vice versa – if you dress and act “correctly” you’re in and no one cares what you really think or do). that is, I get your point, but margaret wearing her old conservative clothes would be seen as highly inappropriate in that community (just remember betty in the squat). it would only make her stand out as a “rich kid who just wants to play hippies” not as a “true member of the community who is like anyone else there” (didn’t she even drop her name, becoming marigold instead? what would be the purpose of that other than signaling the end of the old life and beginning of a new one?). so, wearing a cliche hippy “costume” is actually serving the purpose by screaming – look at me, I’m a real hippy now, not like my stupid posh parents!

        • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

          Since I haven’t seen any of my clothes yet, I was so worried something of mine was going to show up all grungy on one of those hippies.

          BTW, I adored the earrings Mona wore to the farm.

        • Lisa_Co

          I think Roger or Mona said she’d been there 10 days.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          I doubt they do laundry very often (it would have to be done by hand), so no doubt she and others would wear a dress multiple times before washing it. Wouldn’t take long to get it dirty, especially if they have to fetch water from the creek, etc.

      • Qitkat

        Funny, I posted a little while ago that my take on all of Peggy’s differing looks is that, even as a creative leader, she has absolutely no sense of a consistent personal style.

        • Scimommy

          Perhaps not, but you can’t deny she consistently looks oodles better than she used to in seasons past.

          • Qitkat

            True :)

        • ktr33

          Remember, she’s a copywriter, not a graphic designer, tho. And is often having identity crises, it seems.

          • Bluebell

            Peggy’s office was a mess aesthetically. She is great at copy but she doesn’t have a visual vibe.

            She had the little drinks bar in her office, just like Don, Roger et al but there was nothing suave about her office. To Peggy her office is a workspace, no more no less, it is somewhere for her to keep all the stuff she needs for her work. Her space is just a jumble of stuff with no single item which stands out as being a beautiful, quality piece.

            Compare that with Don’s office which works aesthetically – even if the pieces (sideboard, lamp, industry awards!) all hark back to the 1950s.

      • UsedtobeEP

        The other thing that I think Peggy did right is she waited Don out. She didn’t go rampaging in there and bust his chops about being late. She gave him some time. Granted, she took it out on the other guy, but it turned out to be a smart move, even if she didn’t know it was Freddy’s doing.

    • Therese Bohn

      I couldn’t help but notice the giant chain around Mona’s neck in her first scene– chained to her family? It didn’t look like a expensive
      piece of jewelry though, but almost plastic in its tacky clumsiness. Very out of step for Mona, I thought. TLo, thoughts?

      • 3hares

        Wasn’t that kind of jewelry a trend in the late 60s?

      • decormaven

        That type of necklace was on trend for the period. It’s pretty clunky, yes? But it’s appropriate for the day.

        • AZU403

          I still have mine, though the chain is thin.

      • FayeMac

        I think it was metal painted white. That was being worn then. White metal earrings and belts as well.

      • Kayceed

        I think it was about this time period when wealthy women really started embracing costume jewelry as appropriate – my impression is that prior, they mostly favored fine jewelry.

        • T C

          Gold was still fixed at $35/ounce until Nixon took action in the early 1970s. Much of the better costume jewelry was copies of the high end pieces and was not that much less expensive than the real deal because much of the cost was in labor when gems were not needed in a piece. When gold prices started fluctuating madly in 1973, the upper middle class started buying more costume pieces.

    • yllas

      Not much to mull over this week! I didn’t like the shawl fringe thing on Bonnie’s dress, but I did love that print on the dress. I loved the filthy hippie clothes, a couple of the dresses were very pretty in green and brown quilty prints! And I was both amused and horrified at slim trim Roger in his electric blue suit getting all muddied (this must mean something). Roger seems to always be wearing a suit (though he was once in a Hawaiian shirt, and of course a couple of times in nothing at all!) and he and Mona all dressed up in that car, on the way to the commune!!!
      ….there was one longish scene, not related to fashion, but Don was sitting in an office talking to someone, and in between them was an empty bright red chair. It was kind of distracting, it was glowing red while they chatted away.

      • decormaven

        I think it was important that Roger and Mona dressed the way they did. They brought their status to the game, but the hippie children weren’t interested in playing. I do think the commune dwellers were dressed a bit stereotypical, but it was meant to be a classic suits vs. heads encounter.

        • Chris

          Oh it was a great visual moment and played to the hilt. The fur coat on Mona alone said it all. I was trying to remember if we had even seen Mona in a fur coat before this. I remember Pete’s mother wearing one.

          • http://batman-news.com Stephaniekb

            In the episode when Roger’s mother died, there was a scene when Roger reminded Mona of the time they spread fur coats all over the bed and made love… so perhaps her wearing fur is showing her need to have Roger on her side.

        • ACKtually

          I also love that Mona checked her makeup before she got out of the car. It was a reflex for her. Something that she probably did every single time she exited a car. That commune was no different. She was going to face an audience, and she only knows one way to look/act.

          • Kayceed

            That was such a great little moment. I think for many women of that period, whether they would meet anyone during the day or not, good grooming and self-respect called for a light application of makeup in the morning. Anything else was considered letting yourself go…

            • Heather

              I still do that! Concealer and mascara.

            • fursa_saida

              Me too, most often! I pulled a mini hairbrush out of my briefcase the other day and one of my coworkers was completely taken aback that I actually carry one around with me. In this, I have become my mother.

            • Kitten Mittons

              I keep a brush, a compact, and a tiny bottle of hairspray in my desk. And a lint roller. These are required.

            • lulubella

              This is considered odd?! If I leave my house, I *ALWAYS* (include underline, bold, ital here too) have a small brush and a makeup bag containing moisturizer, concealer, eye pencil, lip pencil, lip gloss or lipstick, creme blush, tweezers, and my meds. Tampons if required timing-wise. It’s not like people under the age of 30 don’t wear makeup or fix their hair during the day – why is this maternal-type of behavior?

            • fursa_saida

              I didn’t mean it was itself maternal, just that I personally very directly got it from my mom. In my experience, among people around my age (25) there are two camps: in one, it’s taken for granted that girls are very concerned with their presentation and are carrying a full supply of this sort of thing; in the other, the Cool Girl model is in full force, and it’s tacitly expected that you look great without looking like you’re trying or letting any effort show. Like, I’ve had a male friend catch me putting on makeup and make some comment about how I shouldn’t do that because I don’t need it, and like, dude, you have literally never seen me without makeup. You’re just so oblivious, and I’m so good at letting it go unnoticed, that you don’t even see when I’ve got eyeliner a quarter inch thick on.

              So some girls buy into the obligations of the Cool Girl more than others, hence: female co-worker my age sees me pull out this hairbrush and says, “You carry a hairbrush around with you? That’s cute.”

            • buddy100

              Real Catch 22. The whole “natural” trend has little to do with actually embracing security with appearance, and everything to do with “I’m hot without trying.” If you wear make-up, then you’re superficial and care too much about what others think. Just one more way to put women (and sometimes men) down for their appearance choices.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          I understand why Roger and Mona were dressed that way. I wonder if that was fairly typical, or whether people would put on more casual clothes to go to the country. Maybe slacks and a sport coat or cardigan for Roger…not sure for Mona, but not fur. Of course, the point was the Roger and Mona would dress very establishment, maybe deliberately to make a point.

      • Travelgrrl

        Calling the cops and anyone in establishment in the 60’s “Pigs” was pretty common – right up to the Manson family co-opting that in their murders.

        Is Roger just showing he’s a Male Chauvinist Pig by literally rolling in the mud?

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Maybe…but Marigold is also rolling in the mud. Part of the sexist establishment and tied to her Daddy without knowing it? (Guys on communes could be pretty darn sexist.) Or underlining the “dirty hippie” thing? Are Marigold and Roger “tarred with the same brush”? Or does the roll in the mud mean something different for each? I think they’re both equally muddied by being bad parents, maybe.

      • flint

        Peggy’s office had a bright blue chair, and Don’s had a bright red chair. Scroll up and it’s actually in a screenshot in this article. It definitive seems to be symbolic of Peggy and Don’s conflict this episode.

    • jilly_d

      I desperately want Caroline’s frames and the little string they hang on. And that cardigan clip. *hangs head for not being stylish*

      • Chris

        They kind of resurrected the cardigan clips and the 1960’s pins for Emma Pilsbury’s look on Glee. A lot of her outfits look like she is a modern member of the steno pool from SC. Particularly in the first season of Glee.

      • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

        I love my cardigan clips and will not give them up!

        • http://www.lindamerrill.com/ Linda Merrill

          I’m very sad I didn’t keep my grandmother’s cardigan clips – rhinestones and all. I’d wear them in a heart beat!

          • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

            Mine are all bought within the last 7-8 years, it is not the sort of thing my grandmothers wore.

          • L’Anne

            I still have a few of mine’s sweater guards, but the ones that lasted were pin-backed.

        • http://www.franticbutfabulous.com/ Heidi/FranticButFab

          I had never heard of them before! What is the advantage of a cardigan clip over putting your arms in the sleeves? Signed, A Fascinated Cardigan Wearer

          • Ginger Thomas

            It’s warmer than no sweater and not as warm as actually wearing the sweater.

          • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

            Fashion, darling, fashion! They are also known as sweater guards. In the days when women wore sweater twinsets and it was chic to just throw the cardigan over your shoulders, the clips stop them from slipping, but I usually just wear mine as an extra piece of jewellery.

      • Rhonda Shore

        YES to both!!! And those frames are super stylish, in fact they are classic. I am going to find myself a cardigan clip…true design is about functionality…

        • mamacita32

          The clips are easily found on etsy. They used to be on ebay but the hipsters are now buying em up.

          • decormaven

            Well, damn. I have one from my aunt. I need to get those online.

            • mamacita32

              Oh yes you do. The Rockabilly movement is still alive and kicking, some of the clips go for a lot! The last time I bought them,at a vintage fair, I had to haggle the price down to $35 for a very simple set. Highway robbery!

          • ktr33

            Just said same!

      • Travelgrrl

        The cardigan itself is to die for! You could find those beaded ones at Goodwills and St Vincent de Paul stores throughout the 80’s, but they’re thin on the ground now.

        • Heather

          I know, right? I went into a “vintage” store in Brooklyn recently, and it was like stuff from Express that I had IN COLLEGE. We’re talking early 90s, people.

          • SparkleNeely

            How very depressing. Not to mention kinda ugly. The best stuff from the 90s came from Bloomie’s, IMO. I like Bonnie’s style. Hope she sticks around.

          • lulubella

            Oh lord that is depressing. I’ve noticed that so many beautiful vintage clothes are just gone from the stores and the items in good condition are so much money. Used to be able to buy beaded flapper and 30s dresses for nada. Not sure why they were not re-recycled by the second wave of buyers. Vintage is expensive now, even the 80s stuff, because the quality of clothes today sucks and sellers know these garments are considered premium quality in material and construction. I am hard pressed to buy cashmere or even cotton that does not pill profusely after the first wearing. I stupidly bought a J Crew cashmere sweater and the clueless/corporate-ese parrotting staff told me, when I complained about said insta-pilling, “that’s how you know it’s real cashmere!” OMFG.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              Rubbish – that’s how you know they used cheap, short-staple cashmere in the construction. “Real” cashmere gets softer as it gets washed and worn, but hardly pills at all.

            • lulubella

              I know! I laughed out loud heartily and asked if that’s what their corporate office was telling them to say because they knew they were using poor quality fibers. I then asked why I had vintage cashmere in my closet that, 30 years later, has nary a pill. Met with blank stares and repetition of corporate handbook response.

      • ktr33

        I bet there are at least 100 options on etsy! [runs off to etsy]

    • Jeremiah Capacillo

      Not really fashion related but it was interesting to note the dialogue about Marigold’s wanting to visit the moon while she and Roger were getting ready to sleep in the barn. This is 1969 after all.

      • ballerinawithagun

        I remember telling my mother I was NOT getting married until I could get married on the moon!

      • BKagainwiththesweatpants

        And reminiscent of Bert Cooper’s “eulogy” to Miss Blankenship: She was born in 1898 in a barn. She died on the 37th floor of a skyscraper. She was an astronaut.

        • fursa_saida

          That line has always stuck with me. It’s perfect, for the characters and the moment but also for the decade.

      • Cheryl

        And perhaps a shout out to the film/play “The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds”, about a very dysfunctional family albeit from a different social strata, than Roger/Mona/Margaret/Marigold.

      • ktr33

        The moon landing was like 2 weeks in the future! They were musing as if no one knew if we’d ever get there.

    • Chris

      The composition in the scene with Peggy and Joan is great. Joan is towering over Peggy who is hunched down a bit in her chair. It’s very much like how they used to shoot Peggy and Joan in season one and two with Joan a much larger presence. Joan is all money green and luxe looking. Peggy is in a military style navy blue dress not unlike the one she wore to face down Joey years ago, and the same color of her suit when she called Don a monster last season. When Peggy has to face a work battle, she goes military.

      • Shawn EH

        Naval, apparently! How cute would JH be in an Anchors Aweigh look?

    • 3hares

      Is Don’s blue suit tying him to Pete’s blue jacket/tie as well as Roger’s? Roger’s shown trying to keep and eye on Don (even if in true Roger fashion he’s too thoughtless to not offer him alcohol while doing it) and wanting him to succeed; Pete specifically pushes to get Don to be the person in charge of Burger Chef.

      I love that note about Meredith’s new black and white color scheme that still isn’t really adult. Has Bonnie ever not been in sunny yellow?

    • MarcN

      “It’s tough to figure out how to dress Peggy like Peggy and still make her look somewhat imposing. Mission accomplished. From the back, she looks almost ominous.” In fact, almost monolithic.

      • DeniseSchipani

        Both she and Lou (and Don, maybe?) had that back-of-the-head facing the windows shot in this episode. TRYING to be imposing, I guess.

        • L’Anne

          I read that blue trapeze dress as just unflattering. I didn’t see it as imposing. I thought it looked like a billowy robe with extra space to smuggle her secret Sugarberry hams.

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            Sugarberry Hams! LOL!

            • L’Anne

              FYI for any one curious about the potholders. UPDATE: I think I may call them Mad Mitts– kitchen accessories for the discerning TV-watching gourmand. Chosen lines thus far:
              Roger
              All I can get from this story is that Hitler didn’t smoke and I do.
              You what they want? Everything, especially if the other girls have it.
              Psychiatry is just this year’s candy-pink stove.

              Don– Even then, you enjoyed telling men what to do.

              Peggy– He comes back all greasy and calm.

              Cutler– Is that Shalimar?

              Paul Kinsey– Do you like Ukrainian food?

              Caroline– Hey, genius. Brooks is in jail in Kingston.

              Pete
              A thing like that.
              Hell’s Bells, Trudy!
              You always get what you want.

              Betty– Capers?
              Francine– You want to pick those out of the rug?

            • UsedtobeEP

              What about “Not great, Bob!”? Pete and Roger get lots of good ones.

          • Jaialaibean

            I think the blue dress is pretty on her — and she’s being styled to look prettier with each episode, I think, after that disastrous Valentine’s Day — but it’s reminiscent of maternity wear. It reminds me of that tan dress she was wearing when she and Ted presented their St. Joseph’s commercial idea, when Ted touched her waist as he presented her as a “beautiful young mother.”

            • L’Anne

              To each her/his own. I see a dress with secret compartments for shoplifting or smuggling stolen art.

      • greenwich_matron

        I noticed the monolithic dress too. Do you think she will ultimately have the utmost enthusiasm for the mission?

        • Travelgrrl

          Surrounded by Monkeys.

    • Frida

      Love the screen cap of Peggy and Don in their respective stripes – and the screen cap of Meredith and Peggy’s new secretary allowed me to spot a matching stripey flask on their desk too… I know Don’s been terrible towards Peggy in the past, but I’m really REALLY hoping for a reconciliation, this time where they’re both on an equal footing. I miss the early MM seasons were actual advertising and creativity were part of the drama – and these two together were the very best at it, sparking off from each other. They are the only two characters who have ever thought that what was most important was the quality of the work. Even when Don was at his most self-destructive, you never saw him let sub-par work get through. That was really highlighted by the first episode where we saw him ventriloquise a pitch through Freddy. I’d be the last person to romanticise advertising (or Don), but clearly Don’s some kind of artist… At least Weiner thinks so, and so I’d be surprised if he doesn’t end the show with a redemption.

      • ninanan10 .

        I can see that. Remember when Don stood outside the door where Peggy was pitching against him and she quoted Don’s exact words, and he overheard them and was somewhat stunned? I can see Peggy doing a total Don presentation at the end, and the story comes full circle with her being the new “creative genius” in town.

    • http://www.ellenciompi.com/ NurseEllen

      Look at Meredith in the background of that last series of photos of Peggy in the brown patterned dress. She’s right back to primary colors, and an infantile white bow headband, all wrapped up in a semi-nautical style that was popular with children of both sexes. Change is SO hard…..

      • AudreysMom

        For perspective on Meredith’s scene with Don. I was 14 in 1969. I pretty much wore that same dress for picture day freshman year.

    • Chris

      I liked how by the end Don was back in his grey suit which is his quintessential look and his armor, and Peggy’s dress has just an element of grey in it. I feel like this signals a future rapprochement between the two, at least creatively. On some level their clothes are in sync again.

      • Chickadeep

        And that dress includes Peggy’s power color (mustard yellow). It’s a blend of Don’s power color (gray) and hers.

    • KayeBlue

      TEAM MONA 4 EVR.

      I am so in love with Peggy’s styling in the last two episodes. If Janie Bryant would please open a clothing store, I’ll have my paychecks sent directly to her.

      • Alice Teeple

        I was drooling over her little stripey dress. I’ve loved Peggy’s clothes from the scooter dress-onward. I often find myself perusing Modcloth looking for pussy bow mod dresses like hers…hahahaha!

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          I loved the little stripey dress she wore at the start of this episode.

      • Denise Alden

        I’ve always maintained that Talia Balsam is living my life (first married to Clooney, now Slattery) and Mona is absolutely a character I adore. And her coping mechanism of hiding out with a bottle of gin till she gets over it is one I admit to using from time to time! :)

    • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

      Nice contrast between Bonnie’s chic nod to hippy fashion, complete with proper foundation garments, and the actual grubby hippies.

      • http://darlinglola.blogspot.com Laura K

        Bonnie looked like a “Stylin’ Head Barbie.” Pete is probably thrilled by this.

    • Tracy M

      Janie got it so, so right with the hippies. When you’re living off the grid, eschewing electricity, you get dirty. Like, ground-in dirty. And if you’re eschewing electricity, you’re probably making your own soap (because you don’t want to support the Man) and homemade soap doesn’t work for crap. So you cover it in Patchouli oil. And the dirty piles up. Incredibly well done, Janie Bryant.

      • Rhonda Shore

        It’s all so…unsavory. I always want to think of 60s style as Pattie Boyd/Jean Shrimpton/Penelope Tree, not this (though I know it’s a big part of it).

        • Maria Parramore

          Every time they switched back to the hippies, my head started to itch.

        • Cheryl

          Yes, the rich hippie look, which ironically Margaret/Marigold actually is, although she’s going for the filthy hippie look. I don’t think Margaret will be able to sustain the commune lifestyle for long. She’s going to want to have a bath eventually.

          • not_Bridget

            She’s probably been skinny dipping in the creek to get clean–but that won’t work once winter hits.

          • Sheila Buck Bates

            I was in 7th grade in 1969. I told my parents that I would not become a hippie because I wouldn’t be able to wash my hair. On another note, I didn’t understand why it was so cold that Mona would wear a mink coat and the commune members were dressed in thin cotton dresses. I think Mona’s mink coat was her armor for going in to do battle for her daughter. Her final make-up check was assuring that her battle paint was complete.

        • TigerLaverada

          Some of it was unsavory, for sure, but that was fringe folks in my experience. I’m that generation, lived communally, protested Viet Nam etc. I didn’t live like that, though, nor did any of my friends. We weren’t trust fund babies protesting the Man, either, just counterculture types. There were tons of us.

        • Travelgrrl

          When I was a kid in the 60’s, I was afraid of hippies because of the Manson Family and I could NOT get down with the shots of people in the mud at Woodstock. I didn’t like mud.

          • Rhonda Shore

            I still don’t. :-)

      • KinoEye

        Totally agreed, and I typed basically the same thing above. True hippies were DIRTY. It was more than long hair, paisley and loose-fitting dresses, which seems to be shorthand for hippies in modern media.

        • not_Bridget

          There were plenty of young people living alternate lifestyles–who managed to have hot running water. Some were college kids, others had “alternate” jobs in shops or restaurants (brown rice!) or did construction–but lived in the city. Maybe sold a bit of pot on the side.

          Then there were a few junkies & speedfreaks–who were far worse than the grubby potheads.

          • KinoEye

            Oh, definitely — I didn’t mean to generalize. My parents were two such young people in that period. Still, they both remember the dirty hippies. My dad always hated being lumped in to that group, since he was a guitarist with long hair. But he showered and wore suits.

            Mom worked just about every job imaginable, from restaurants to race horse training, and lived with a group of people in a big house. The city version of a commune. But they definitely had running water.

          • Tracy M

            Of course there were- my parents, too. Highly functional hippie-ish, dad is a Vietnam vet, mom was a granola, make your own fruit-leather mom, and they protested, too. But that’s not who Matt Weiner is showing us here- these are people who (imagine they) are rejecting society, living off the grid, back the land, “Foxfire” people. When you’re living that way, it’s dirty. It’s hard to be clean with only an outhouse, and when you have to heat your water over a fire in the front yard. My parents had friends who lived like this, and when we’d go visit, we’d bathe in the galvanized apple tub in the yard. Cleanest grown-ups first, dirtiest kids last. It’s not pretty, and there’s a reason it really didn’t last. Creature comforts, it turns out, are quite comfortable.

            • KinoEye

              Yep. And how hypocritical that they see themselves as rejecting society, yet they cling to and enforce gender roles to a T. Not to mention all the cultural appropriation in a movement that prided itself on being progressive.

            • Mazenderan

              Totally. I noticed that only the women on the commune seemed to be doing the laundry. It reminded me from the bit in ‘Slouching Towards Bethlehem':

              “Barbara is on what is called the woman’s trip to
              the exclusion of almost everything else. When she and Tom and Max and
              Sharon need money, Barbara will take a part-time job, modeling or
              teaching kindergarten, but she dislikes earning more than ten or twenty
              dollars a week. Most of the time she keeps house and bakes. “Doing
              something that shows your love that way,” she says, “is just about the
              most beautiful thing I know.” Whenever I hear about the woman’s trip,
              which is often, I think a lot about
              nothin’-says-lovin’-like-something-from-the-oven and the Feminine
              Mystique and how it is possible for people to be the unconscious
              instruments of values they would strenuously reject on a conscious
              level, but I do not mention this to Barbara.”

            • Qitkat

              :-) shoutout to Foxfire!

            • Azucena

              Wait… it was the same water in the tub for everyone????

              To be fair though, there are people all over the world who live in more challenging circumstances and manage not to be dirty and smelly. That is definitely a lifestyle choice to a great extent. And I think it must have had a lot to do with the lack of traditional knowledge about how to maintain a clean environment under those circumstances as well. Trust fund and suburban kids have no relevant training- and reading a book is not the same thing as actually having skills. Those that did have that knowledge (the Dick Whitmans of the era) were desperately trying to shed it in favor of an easier life.

            • Tracy M

              Yep, same water for everyone. It took too much wood and water to empty and reheat it. Hence, cleaner adults first, dirtiest kids last. We survived.

    • decormaven

      I like the contrast of the secretaries’ costuming in the scene with Freddy and Don leaving the office. You see a variation in hem lengths. I’m glad Janie Bryant hasn’t dressed everyone in miniskirts; she’s showing the full range of fashion.

      • Chris

        Yes, Caroline is a great example. In those days when my Mom would invest in a nice suit or dress set she wouldn’t toss it when hemlines changed, she would go to a tailor and have the hemline raised or lowered. Good clothes were very expensive and were investment pieces.

        • Grumpy Girl

          Yes, and it would be later in the trend, to make sure the change was truly worth the investment. especially to go shorter . . .

    • David McCormick

      This is the first episode where I noticed the costuming while watching the show. Take a look at Peggy when she’s in Lou’s office and how the gray and brown she’s wearing match the walls behind her. Coincidence?

    • &theJets

      Looove Caroline! I’ve watched the scene when she reads Mona’s message multiple times. “Hey, genius. Brooks is in jail in Kingston.” Hilarious!

      • http://brianfortedesigns.com/ BForte

        One of my favorite moments of the episode!

        I also *NEED* a GIF of her being “shot” by Ellory. Help me, Interwebs!

    • Roz

      Think we’re underscoring Peggy’s need to get her head on straight, with her buttoned up the front, front is back navy blue dress?

    • decormaven

      Gotta love that Joan has a scarf tied to her purse in the scene when she’s talking with Peggy in Peggy’s office. That woman must have kept the accessories counter in business!

      • http://angrynerdgirl.net/ Jessi03

        “Men love scarves.”

      • ACKtually

        Janie has shown Joan with many scarves tied to her awesome bags! I love that detail.

        • Chris

          Yes, everyone on the show has their “thing” like Joan with her scarves, Roger with his vests etc. The styles change but the characters basic taste doesn’t. Betty favors a very tailored look, I don’t think we will see her in ruffles and flounces anytime soon.

    • Noah

      We keep talking about how Joan might be projecting her anger for other partners onto Don, but we shouldn’t forget that Don fucked Joan over BIG TIME last season. Financially, by pissing away the IPO, as well as personally, by firing Jaguar and essentially rendering her “work to land the account” null and void. I’m assuming that’s where most of her anger comes from.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Yes, we mentioned that as the reason for her anger last week. It still doesn’t quite scan. She was never that angry at Roger when he lost the Lucky Strike account and lied about it to the partners. That almost tanked the agency. And if she didn’t want Don screwing up the IPO she shouldn’t have kept it a secret from him.

        • Chris

          It reads to me as beyond anger and just outright hatred of Don now. Bert too which just seems odd to me.

          • dalgirl

            Sometimes I wonder if there isn’t a bit of prejudice towards Don’s ‘white trash’ roots going on with the two of them. I think Joan always viewed Don as a suave sophisticate, not someone who grew up in a whorehouse. Bert didn’t seem to mind that Don was actually Dick Whitman, but perhaps he finds Don/Dick’s past as distasteful. We’ve certainly seen other instances of his prejudices this season.

            • Alanna

              Yup. I think some (but certainly not all) of it goes back to Hershey. “You embarrassed us, and you embarrassed the company.” Joan might not have been there, but she’s very much aware of how the company is perceived — and the rest of the advertising world apparently now knows about Don’s meltdown. As you said, snobbishness about exactly what Don said is part of that. The partners and the agency might not all necessarily be upper-middle-class, but they certainly don’t want the rest of the world to see them in the same context as what Don said about his own background. It’s obnoxious and ridiculous and unfair… but it’s also pretty human.

            • SylviaFowler

              I think there is something to this. And where Bert is concerned, even though he knew that Don was Dick Whitman, until the Hershey confession, he had no idea that Dick/Don was literally the lowest of low trash commoners. Bert probably thought Dick Whitman had been upper middle class or working class at WORST. To find out this guy is actually about 50 rungs below working class must be worse than original sin to people like Bert and Joan.

              I think Matt Weiner talked in his Paris Review interview with Semi Challas about how MM is a story the American Dream of being a WASP. Until “Monolith”, I had been assuming that the Hershey confession would not have the impact that Don feared it would with regard to how his peers see him (whether they find him less than because of it), but based on Bert and Joan this week and Weiner’s WASP quote, I think I was wrong and that they do actually think less of him because he’s illegitimate poor white trash. If the story was set today, people probably would not hold it against him, but people Bert’s and Joan’s age at their posh stations in life in that time period, would have. I’m convinced now.

            • dalgirl

              Thanks for mentioning Matt Weiner’s WASP reference in Paris Review; I also read the interview, and that stood out to me at the time.

            • flint

              Thanks for posting this. It makes a lot more sense to me now.

            • Guest

              I assumed it had a lot to do with that as well. I’m glad that this is the last season though, I can definitively understand Tom and Lorenzo’s sentiments.

            • flint

              I assumed it had a lot to do with Don revealing his past as well. I’m glad that this is the last season though, I can definitively understand Tom and Lorenzo’s sentiments and I’d rather it ended before it got totally blatant.

        • Noah

          I’m not sure it’s fair to equate how she reacts to Roger’s behavior and how she reacts to Don’s, only because she’s had such a longstanding romantic relationship with Roger (albeit on and off) that there’s inherently going to be some inconsistency there.

          My read, though, really, is that she went through a great deal of personal humiliation to land the Jaguar account. She was willing to put up with the humiliation because she’d secured a position for herself, and the company also couldn’t credit their first car to anyone but her. Now, however, they don’t even have the car. Her pain, in her eyes, was for nothing, and that is solely at Don’s feet.

          • http://www.jaimieteekell.com/ Jaimie

            I recall her saying something to Don exactly to that effect. She was willing to put up with shit, but he couldn’t deal with one dinner.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            She went through a great deal of humiliation to get a partnership. The terms of the deal stated that she wasn’t responsible for landing the account. She also made it quite clear to Don last season how much it bothers her to have see Herb in the office.

            • Noah

              I still think he represents a great deal of the power inbalance tied to her position. She has to fuck to get a partnership, he can have a meltdown and fire a huge client and still be fine.

              Perhaps, too, there’s an aggregation of aggression there. She’s watched all these men act so carelessly (your example of Roger and Lucky Strike, for example) and suffer no ramifications for their behavior, while she has had to go to unspeakable lengths to even be “in the room.” “Firing” Don is the first time she’s ever been able to do anything about it, and his return is another symbol of her relative powerlessness. While she’s certainly cold to Don, she’s not particularly warm to any of the other partners right now, either. If she had the ability to fire all of them, she probably would.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              In other words, she’s unfairly and somewhat hypocritically punishing Don because she’s mad about other things.

              I don’t know if you’re trying to defend her or not, but this all looks petty and a little nasty to us. In order to make Don look downtrodden, the writers chose to make Joan look like a villain.

            • gingerella

              I agree that her behavior is heartless, but I do wonder if Joan doesn’t think that Don can really fall too far. She’s aware he’s a creative genius, and she, more than anyone other than Roger, has always remarked on his good looks and charisma. I never thought such call-outs were about Don’s attractiveness, I thought they were an acknowledgment that he has power outside of his talent. It would make sense that she sees him as guaranteed to be successful wherever he goes, just like a male Joan would have been. All he needs to do is step out of his own way. So she might be kicking him when he’s down, but she doesn’t think he’d stay down for long.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              So she’s agreeing to a scheme to strip him of his partnership in the company he founded but she’s justifying it to herself because he’s talented?

            • gingerella

              Yes. I think she doesn’t see Don as being down permanently. He’s a talented, handsome male in a world that rewards such attributes over and over again. She thinks he’ll get up again, somewhere else, and that the money, accolades and power will roll in again for him. In the meantime, he’s a risk to Joan’s financial and job stability, and she takes that threat very seriously.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              If that’s the case (and I don’t think it is), it makes her into something of a monster. “It’s okay to ruin Don. He’ll probably bounce back because he’s a man.”

              And that doesn’t sound remotely like the character we’ve been watching for 6 seasons. Joan’s petty but she’s never been shown to be that careless and vindictive about other people.

            • http://karenzgoda.org/ Karen Zgoda

              She’s never been a single mother raising a child on her own and terrified of providing financial security for herself and her family before. While Roger is likely helping financially, her financial security (and some of Roger’s) is tied to this agency via her partnership. This also explains her sudden interest in trying to get clients, keep clients, and learn about how businesses are run by those in power not heading the secretarial pool. It’s not like single mothers were being championed at this time, especially among women of Joan’s new class. If Joan’s actions are viewed from a “security at all costs” perspective it makes more sense, IMHO.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              She’s been more than financially secure for quite some time now. In fact, she hasn’t ever had any significant money problems except for the brief period when she was working for Bonwit’s. Roger isn’t helping her financially at all. She specifically turned down any offers.

              This is at least part of the problem with her actions. If her finances were dicey or if Don had ever significantly harmed the company with his actions, we could buy the argument for her coldness here. But she’s wealthier now than she ever has been, and because of the merger and landing Chevy, the company’s doing better than it ever has been.

            • http://karenzgoda.org/ Karen Zgoda

              I see your point – thanks for the well-thought out reply!

            • 3hares

              It’s especially interesting since this is Joan who’s so good at being diplomatic and helping things go smoothly when it comes to managing men. This was the woman who saved Bob Benson’s job when he should have been fired. If Joan really wanted things to work out for the best one would think she’d be running some interference between Don and the others, making things a little easier for Don while still making the other guys feel like they were in charge.

              Instead she’s all about Don being chastised as much as possible, so if he imploded she wouldn’t have a problem with it at all.

            • Noah

              I don’t know that I agree with that. I think she’s mad at him for legitimate things, but Don may be the target of most of her rage because she’s not in a position to channel any anger she has for others into any situations that would have outcomes favorable to her.

              I’m not really defending her, just pointing out that it’s not really inconsistent writing. As for the writers making her the villain, I don’t know that that’s true either. Had she pushed hard in the face of it being financially unviable to fire Don, then she’d be a super villain. Instead, I think Jim Cutler and Lou Avery are far bigger villains here than she is.

            • Chris

              I think it makes her more of a villain by trying to set Don up to take all his money and shares than by honestly buying him out. When she agreed with the other partners to place Don on leave she seemed resolved about it but not necessarily enraged with him. Now it’s like she wants to see him destroyed and would happily skip off after it’s done. She’s not conflicted about it at all. Jim and Lou were never his friends, Joan was. At least Don thought she was.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              “I don’t know that I agree with that. I think she’s mad at him for legitimate things, but Don may be the target of most of her rage because she’s not in a position to channel any anger she has for others into any situations that would have outcomes favorable to her.”

              I don’t see at all how that’s different from what I said. She’s punishing him because she’s mad about other things, according to you. From where we’re sitting that’s terrible writing, partially because it goes against their established relationship (“You’re one of the good ones”) and partially because the viewer has to strain so much to explain it.

            • Noah

              I think the only difference in our interpretations is the expectation of consistency. I’m not surprised that she’s being rather vengeful, inconsistent, and willing to push others out to raise herself, and it sounds like you’re put-off by it.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I’m calling it out for the poor writing it is.

            • Scimommy

              When TLo use the singular “I” in comments, I get very confused. Who is this and what have you done with the entity that is “We the TLo”???

            • http://www.snoskred.org/ Snoskred

              I’m totally agreeing with this being poor writing.

              I’ve got to say as well, it feels a bit like someone is trying really hard to get us to dislike characters we have grown to love and I can’t fathom why the writers would want that.. why do they want us to dislike Joan all of a sudden?

              Do they think this will encourage us to think better of Don? Is it because, if you asked fans of the show, Joan would easily be one of the most popular characters?

              I’m just baffled by it. Is that what the writers are going for?

            • vitaminC

              The sharks are circling, and they taste blood in the water. This is a pretty common workplace dynamic, everybody ganging up the unpopular one. All those years of resentments, past slights, etc simmering just below the surface come exploding out in one scalding geyser of bile. Not only does it reinforce their objection to his bad behavior (thereby keeping the underlings scared and off-balance), but it also unites the otherwise unbelievably dysfunctional partners into team NOTDON. Seen it before.

            • VDbloom

              I don’t think they’re making Joan look like a villain to show that Don is downtrodden, we already know he’s downtrodden – his wife left him, he nearly ruined his relationship with his daughter, he is reviled by two of the other partners besides Joan, and he is caught in the throes of alcoholism. I think the writers chose to paint Joan as a Villain in this instance to show that she is downtrodden. Yes, she may be acting petty and little hypocritically, but people act that way sometimes (Don, the main character, has always been a huge hypocrite). If anything, I think it adds realism – it’s her reacting to the fact that she has never been accepted as an executive or treated with the respect that her position commands.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              “I think it adds realism – it’s her reacting to the fact that she has never been accepted as an executive or treated with the respect that her position commands.”

              Is there anything in the writing to support this as her motivation?

            • VDbloom

              I think so. Harry Crane basically told all of the partners that he doesn’t think that she deserves her position: that he has earned it while she hasn’t. Pete was furious with her for trying to work an account herself. Roger was, at best, ambivalent about her moving upstairs with the rest of the executives and being made a full time accounts woman – in fact the only reason she was promoted was so that Jim could undermine Roger. Lou completely stripped her of her disciplinary power when with Dawn. Don, even though he stuck up for her with Jaguar originally, thwarted the IPO that she helped to mastermind on an impulse. And you even pointed out in episode 1 of this season that Ken didn’t treat her like he would one of the male partners.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              That explains a sort of generic anger. It doesn’t explain why she’s okay with a plan to destroy Don.

            • Noah

              Because she’s played Machiavelli before with men that burned her. Stripping Paul Kinsey of the trip to California for xeroxing her drivers’ license in season 2, for instance. She’s willing to mercilessly punish people for their wrongs. She’ll never do it in a way that could compromise her (which is why she didn’t push to buy Don out), but she’ll take advantage of opportunities as they present themselves to her.

            • 3hares

              So why isn’t she being Machiavelli with Harry instead of Don?

            • Noah

              Give her an opportunity that doesn’t come at a cost to herself and I’m sure she’ll take it.

            • EarthaKitten

              I just watched the clip of Joan’s lunch meeting with Mr. Avon and was quite surprised to hear Joan say wonderfully glowing things about Harry Crane and his computer which was big enough to fill the restaurant. I obviously didn’t pick up the significance of that bon mot last season. But back to the subject at hand, Harry isn’t a partner so he is already ostracized from the club. But Joan does have a zillion reasons to despise Harry going back to when he was blinded by her talent in reading scripts.

            • L’Anne

              I’m not sure that’s fair to Harry. Sure, he’s been made into a lout of character in recent seasons, but in season 2 during the script issue, he praised her work to clients and Roger. Roger said they could hire a full time “man” so you could return to her main duties. Even Joan, when talking to Greg about the script work, minimized it as “a hoot.” If there was anyone who underestimated Joan about that job, it was Joan, who never spoke out about how much liked it. Indeed, I don’t think she even realized how much she seems to have wanted it until she had to talk to her replacement.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              She didn’t strip Paul Kinsey of that trip; she simply enjoyed being the one to tell him. It’s an act so far away from trying to humiliate and destroy Don that it doesn’t even make sense to compare them.

            • fitzg

              I think he’s just an easy target for the anger because no one else is that thrilled with him either. It gives her an outlet without creating any real risk to her position. And if she’s on the “winning” side in ousting him, she will have forged an alliance based on something other than Jaguar.

            • EarthaKitten

              Actually, the list of rules was absolutely reflective of Joan’s personality. She has been the keeper of the rules (as well as the keeper of the timecards and the key to the supply cabinet). I don’t think Joan would see the rules as being a plan to destroy Don…she would see Don’s failure to follow the rules reason for him to be terminated, at last, for not following the rules. And then there is that whole $$$ thing and yes Joan probably could tell you how much more her share of the company would be worth if Don’s shares go poof.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              “I don’t think Joan would see the rules as being a plan to destroy Don.”

              I don’t think Joan is that naive or stupid. She agreed to a plan that would allow the company to take his shares from him without paying for them. This isn’t about terminating Don; it’s about her agreeing to essentially a hostile takeover of the company he founded that would leave him financially ruined.

            • EarthaKitten

              I think the writers pulled the plug on Joan in the last episode of season 6. I was dumbfounded when she sat there in her most professional suit looking smug with the other partners as they put Don on leave. I took that look to mean that Joanie had sold her soul and joined the boys. I looked up your commentary from that episode to see how you reacted to that scene. Your observation was right on target: “Also notable was Joan’s look away from Don during that meeting. That was the moment he – and we – realized he had no friends here.” In the case of Freddie Rumson, “leave” meant “leave!” I think the partners expected no less from Don and Joan didn’t seem to have any objection to that decision. I see her treatment of Don this season consistent with what we saw at the end of Season 6.

              You also commented at the end of Season 6: “The more we think about it, the more annoyed we are that Joan’s story this episode was all about reconciling with Roger, with not a word uttered about Avon. She’s more than who she’s slept or been romantically involved with, writers. Come on, now.” Absolutely, the writers have given us a very fragmented story line for Joan. Have we had any mention of Avon this year other than Joan coming from a luncheon meeting with Ken? The writers failed to build upon Joan’s transition following her breakout moment with Peggy following the Avon lunch last season. Too bad as that would have been interesting to watch.

              One final TLo quote: “Joan’s green practically reeked of money.” Her actions aren’t personal, it’s just business and business is money. I do love ya’ll.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I have no idea what those quotes you pulled are supposed to mean in the context of what we’re saying here.

              And this is clearly personal on some level for Joan, given the way she talks about and to Don now.

            • EarthaKitten

              I was trying to convey that the writers conveyed a drastic change in Joan’s character at the end of last season and that her changed attitude towards Don was evident then. I was trying to acknowledge that you saw the shift in Joan at the end of the season and called the writers out then for taking shortcuts on filling in the blanks as far as Joan’s development. My last quote was intended to convey my take on Joan’s motivation now– money.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              So you agree with us that they’ve done a poor job of explaining Joan’s motivations? Sorry, I really can’t tell which way you’re going with this. We never had a problem with Joan’s actions until this episode. We felt most of her actions were explainable up until now.

            • EarthaKitten

              I do agree with you about the writers doing a poor job explaining Joan’s motivations. But I first sensed a misdirection with Joan’s character when Don was put on leave. We have come to the same conclusion about the writing, I just felt things went off the tracks at the end of last season.

            • MarinaCat

              Quite frankly, I sat there scratching my head about Joan at the end of the episodes. The writers could have had Joan mete out “punishment” in her own sensitive way, hoping for success but it was clear that she was full of anger,doling out humiliating conditions (along with the other partners.). While the other partners appeared blasé, Joan looked pissed and I agree, for no apparent reason. If we need to put together a narrative as to why with spit and glue, then there’s something wrong. I don’t believe that Joan is lacking the self-awareness to be angry at the one man who didn’t want her prostituting herself for Jaguar, or, for ruining a plan he knew nothing about. It anything, Joan has always been the most perceptive and level-headed character on the show.

            • VDbloom

              I don’t see it as a generic anger. All of these are instances in which Joan’s forward progress in the company was impeded. She’s not mad at Don for some personal offense, she’s mad at him because he repeatedly puts the company at risk. He has always been capricious, but before she was made partner, Joan didn’t mind as much. For instance, she did not react with the same anger to the lucky strike letter. But now that she has a personal stake in the company, its wellbeing is tied to her future. I feel like since her divorce from Greg, she has decided to define herself as a career woman. She has stopped looking to men for help and she has stopped taking their crap as well. Don was simply too reckless. I feel as if, given the opportunity, she would react in much the same way if one of the other agency employees threatened the the company, and in turn, her status in it.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              “. All of these are instances in which Joan’s forward progress in the company was impeded.”

              That’s so broad as to sound fairly generic to us. And it’s apparently the result of the actions of every man in that office. You named Harry, Pete, Roger and Lou as reasons for this anger, as well as Don. It really doesn’t make any sense to us at all.

            • 3hares

              But the fact that these various things happened–some of which have nothing to do with how she became a partner–does not specifically prove that Joan is furious at Don because she sees him as getting away with stuff while she’s been treated badly. That takes a lot of imagining on the viewer’s part to connect those dots especially since, as I said, some of those things don’t even really logically follow. Harry was rude to Joan, but he’s also correct in saying that she got her partnership by sleeping with Jaguar while he brings in more money. Likewise Pete would have been angry with anyone doing an end run around him to get an account for themselves. So where are the specific things on screen that show Don making these associations? Does she say anything at all that relates to this specific idea? Or react in a way that relates to it?

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              “That takes a lot of imagining on the viewer’s part to connect those dots”

              MY POINT. Thank you. It seems a lot of people are rushing to defend Joan when we’re not really vilifying her. We’re criticizing the writing. I’ve found most of the explanations offered here to be a big stretch of one form or another, but even if I found them plausible, they’re still not evident in the writing. We saw Joan get mad at Don once, when he fired Jaguar. Aside from that, they’ve always had a respectful relationship with each other. The writing is asking us to believe that she’s willing to destroy Don, who is one of the few men in that office who hasn’t personally insulted her in some way. Just because of that one act, even though it was well-intentioned on his part and eventually led to the merger and getting Chevy as a client, both of which benefited her. She’s wealthier and she got promoted to Account Executive because Accounts was overwhelmed.

              It just flat out DOES NOT SCAN to us at all. Don would have had to have done far worse things to Joan than that or Joan would have to have lost far more than she did – which is NOTHING, by the way. She literally lost nothing due to anything Don’s ever done. She lost the chance to take the company public, something she kept from Don, which makes her rage over the matter even harder to buy and out of character.

              If Joan was some sort of hardcore bitch through the run of this show we might buy all this. But it seems to us that the writing is asking us to accept that she has good reasons for her anger and we simply don’t accept it. As we said originally, they fail to sell the actions of the characters sometimes. It’s one of the show’s biggest and most consistent flaws.

            • FibonacciSequins

              Is it possible Joan’s not angry at Don, but can tell which the way wind is blowing with the partners, and is aligning herself with the people she feels are most likely to win? I’m not as steeped in Mad Men lore as you folks are, but it seems to me that Joan is the weakest of the partners, in terms of power and influence. Maybe she sees going to bat for Don as looking for trouble.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I would have a much easier time of buying her actions if they were played that way, but she’s clearly angry at him. She could barely speak to him when he showed up unannounced.

            • FibonacciSequins

              Good point. Her reaction to seeing him can’t be explained away as anything other than barely suppressed hostility. I have a problem with the way all the partners (besides Roger and Pete) view Don right now. I don’t think his Hershey meltdown warrants their scheming to get rid of him. Even if they think computers (and not creativity) are the way of the future, they’ve indicated they don’t want to see him as competition, which would certainly happen if he leaves. Joan’s behavior is the most inexplicable. This whole story arc just doesn’t ring true to me.

            • http://www.snoskred.org/ Snoskred

              I would have an easier time buying her actions if there was a flashback scene to Aliens landing in her apartment and replacing her with a pod person.

              And that goes for pretty much everyone with definitely the exception of Betty Draper who has not changed one iota from the get go – perhaps also the exception of Ginsberg – however he used to be the funny one, now he is more like the scary one, so the aliens could have stolen him too..

              I can’t even buy Don’s actions. He had plenty of other great offers, why does he want to go back to SCD&P? Why would he struggle through this drudgery and disrespect?

              Are you all sure that while America was orbiting the moon and preparing to land on it, the aliens did not land in the USA and steal a lot of people? Plus, the aliens fake-tanned Roger Sterling so much that he practically glows in the dark now? When he goes out in New York, is the sun solely directed at him?

              This is my new conspiracy theory, and this is how I can be ok with these people acting the way they are now. That is not Joan, it is an alien.

              We should respond and react accordingly. :)

            • EarthaKitten

              I’m with you Snokred. I couldn’t believe Don agreed to the rules set out by the partners for his return. I thought AMC was playing a trick on us as they do with their damned “previews”. I fully expected to see Don follow up his “okay” comment with “you guys can go fuck yourselves.” I was disappointed the storyline didn’t go that route as that would have been far more interesting and believable. Now this week I’m hoping that we discover next week that Don was actually typing a take-off on Jack Torrance’s “novel” in The Shining”…instead of “all work and no play make Jack a dull boy” Don will have typed “Fuck all of you.”

            • 3hares

              I actually get the impression that Joan might not know there’s a side to take. Pete saw this as Cutler trying to take over. Ted noticed him doing it. Roger seems to get it now. But I don’t know that Bert and Joan are aware of themselves as siding with Cutler against the original SCDP. It’s like in the scene where Pete thought they were taking over, they changed the name and made it look like they were just doing what was best for the company and being nice by giving SC the name as well. I think that’s the way Cutler is presenting things now and Joan might be buying it, perhaps in part because Cutler’s set himself up to look like he cares about her.

            • greenwich_matron

              This is what I cannot accept about the Joan character. Several years ago, she didn’t care at all about the “man’s world” of business. After Roger married another secretary and Dr. Rapey turned out to be a financial bust, she realized that no man was going to bestow upper-class status on her. Fine. Then, the jaguar/sex deal comes up (which is laughably unrealistic in the first place). After all of this, she values partnership status so little that she is willing to be a key player in the 1969 version of Survivor, where someone with the same assets she has (and a lot more of it) can be voted out because the other tribe members don’t like him. Even if I bought everything up to this point, and I accepted that Joan was vindictive enough to want to unfairly deprive someone of everything he accumulated during his working life, there is no way that cold, selfish person would diminish the value of her partnership by letting SC&P screw Don out of his.

            • Chris

              Yes, it’s like turning that agency into Thunderdome.

            • VDbloom

              She’s not playing survivor though. It’s not as if her view of Don is on the Fringe. Why would the other partners vote her out when they all agreed with her in the first place? She wasn’t putting her partnership at risk by siding against Don. If anything, she was protecting it.

            • greenwich_matron

              They don’t like him because they see him as a threat, but they are still ganging up on him and trying to get rid of him without paying him off. They may have good reason to want him gone, but they have no reason to try to screw him out of his ownership share. The honorable thing to do is to negotiate a buyout and come up with the money.

              If they can do that, then why wouldn’t they get rid of Bert? He doesn’t seem to provide any value. All they would have to do is vote to put him on leave and then say he must forfeit his shares unless he completes some quest. Actually, Joan would be next: she has had one client for a few months (who may or may not go with her), no reputation in the industry (so she can’t take her client somewhere else), and she is easy to replace (there are a lot more office managers than heads of creative).

            • VDbloom

              They can’t buy Don out, he owns too much of the company. And the partners don’t care about honor, they want to maximize profit. Like Roger said, if they bought Don out, they wouldn’t make any money until 1974. The reason they don’t get rid of Bert and Joan is because they aren’t actively detracting from the company. Sure, they don’t add a lot of value. But they aren’t losing business for the agency like Don was. And I fail to see how they are trying to “screw” Don out of his ownership share.

            • greenwich_matron

              Replace the word “honorable” with “legal.” No partner would play this game knowing that they could be next. Bert and Joan eat 20% of the profits between them: that is unquestionably detracting from everyone else’s in the company. By trying to leave Don with nothing, they are making their own partnership shares worthless.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              But you’re explaining Joan’s actions elsewhere in the thread by saying the has all these reasons to be personally angry at him.

              There’s no evidence he’s a threat to the agency. He’s never done anything that put the agency in significant danger. And bigger, more popular agencies were courting him hard before he came back to work at SC&P.

            • VDbloom

              I mean they as in the partners collectively. Joan certainly has her own personal reasons to be mad at him as well as the fact that he threatens the company’s stability. I believe Don was a threat to the agency. All the way back to his Sterling Coo days, he has acted petulantly and capriciously. He has fired clients on whims, been drunk in the office, disappeared for weeks at a time, stolen other writers ideas, and he nearly alienated every large client in the city with the Lucky Strike letter. He acts with no forethought. The way I see it, the partners put him on leave not because of one particular event, but because they had absolutely no control over him and no idea what he was going to do next. I think that Roger and Cooper thought by elevating him in the early seasons he would learn to be more cautious in his actions, but he hasn’t, and they’ve had enough.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Again, this might explain why they would fire him, but it makes them all into villains if they essentially steal his shares from him. If he’s that bad, buy him out. If they can’t buy him out (which they can’t), figure out a workable situation. He’s hardly the only person in that office who boozed around and lost clients. Roger lost Lucky Strike and deliberately tried to tank Honda.

            • greenwich_matron

              This is why I find the writing to have become clumsy to the point of being insulting. It’s as if they feel the audience is too stupid to sense tension unless the villains are evil and the plot is catastrophic. The fact that the character development and any sane legal system make this impossible isn’t stopping them. There are plenty of realistic situations they could have portrayed that wouldn’t involve the characters descent into one dimension.

            • Glammie

              I don’t think the writing’s gotten as bad as that. To me, it feels more like the storyline’s rushed and they didn’t bother to connect all the dots. I put my own take on Joan’s attitude toward Don in the comments–I don’t think it’s all about Herb and Jaguar, but I think it’s legit to say that the show didn’t made its case here. By the same token, I don’t see why Margaret became Marigold, given what we know of her. It’s not unbelievable, but I have no sense of why a character’s who’s been prim and conservative for her age would flip the way she did. It’s just underwritten.

              Just kind of hoping the Joan/Don rift gets fleshed out more, so that it’s understandable.

            • greenwich_matron

              I am ranting a bit, but they keep pushing it too far. I can accept that Joan and Bert’s anger and disgust, but I cannot accept that they are conspiring to financially ruin him. My main problem is that this man ran away from being Dick Whitman, ran away from the Brits who bought his business, and ran away from Faye. Suddenly he has this desire to fix his work relationship to the point that he would humiliate himself and forfeit his right to the company instead of running away to the loving arms of a competitor. The writers keep piling it on.

            • Glammie

              I’m not going to defend the writing because I agree it’s got some issues. But Joan’s behavior makes more sense to me if it’s read as self-protective more than vindictive. I ramble about it later in this thread, but at this point, I see Joan’s reaction as less about Jaguar and more about making sure that Don can’t do anything to her that threatens her financial well-being. I think she’s more focused on protecting the company from Don than ruining him. I don’t assume that she knows the ins and outs of Don’s personal finances–Joan’s been objectified by men, but I don’t think she’s particularly perceptive about men in return. As much as she thinks about it, she probably thinks Don will be fine–and, you know, financially, he probably would be. He *is* employable and I don’t think a no-complete clause is mentioned, which would ruin him. We know, also, that Joan’s a lousy judge of character as far as men go. Joan’s been hurt by a lot of men, so she’s making sure that Don is at least one guy who can’t. If he toes the line, fine–she’ll warm up to him, most likely. But if he runs amuck again, she doesn’t want to have to pay out for it for the next five years. At this point, she doesn’t trust him because Joan has no reason to trust men, in general–even “the good ones”. All of this would be consistent with her character and history. She doesn’t want to be able to just support herself and her son–she wants “fuck you” money–real independence. And she wants control–which we also with her treatment of Roger.

              Bert’s reaction strikes me as more problematic and less in character–so that’s just a fail for me.

              As for Don–well, everything else in his life has kind of fallen apart and he won’t be a partner at another agency. At this point, he’s still a partner. He wants the company that he built. It *is* overdone so that we see him as the little guy. The contract scene should have gone through a few more revisions to make it more credible. Say, the partners could force a pay-out at a reduced percentage over time instead of giving Don nada, which *is* jarringly unrealistic.

            • greenwich_matron

              Roger and Bert elevated him because they wanted him to be too invested in their company to consider leaving. This is the nature of partnership. They felt that he was an asset, so they gave him a share of the business. The merger was seen as an asset, so all the partners agreed to become partners in the new business. It’s really annoying because it wouldn’t be possible anyway.

            • L’Anne

              But was Jaguar THAT big a client, beyond the status of having a car? They noted before they set out to get Jaguar that it was a minor niche car (not GM, etc.), and when they won it, they were already out of pocket.

              I’d also mention that could away with a lot because of talents and skills. Despite a last season’s rough wooings, Don still had good pitches for Chevy, Heinz ketchup, the hotel, and worked with Michael on oven cleaner. It seemed obvious that Mohawk and Royal Hawaiian still wanted to work with him. And he called the idea of basing an ad for a children’s product on a movie that is about a demon child produced through rape what it was– disturbing.

              I’ll agree that Don uses his privileges– male, and attractive– to his advantage, but he also has a rare talent. Schmitty: “I don’t know. He’s brilliant.”

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              But in her Joan way, she was handling Herb’s presence, sending some good zingers his way. And while the terms of her deal with SCDP did not require landing the account, in her eyes, that is indeed what she did. She took on an odious task and succeeded, and she was handling the ongoing repercussions.

              I always thought the idea of Pete, Bert, and Joan going that far down the IPO path without getting Don’s buy-in was crazy, as Don would sooner walk away from his ownership and sit out his non-compete clause than be beholden to anonymous shareholders. But I just take that storyline as amplifying Joan’s distaste for Don.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I didn’t see Joan handling Herb all that well. A ten-second conversation had her pouring herself a drink in rage a minute later – and she had no problem letting Don see it. In fact, she went out of her way to do it in front of him.

              Besides, Roger walked in the door with a meeting with Chevy, which means the entire agency would have been on board with dumping Jaguar for a bigger client. In other words, the partners were going to be willing to let Jaguar go whether Don fired them or not.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              Don did not know about Chevy when he acted unilaterally. Pete was equally upset about Don’s actions with Jaguar.

              From Herb’s perspective, Joan was handling him. I’ll have to go back and watch again, but I don’t recall Joan giving off “rage” vibes when she poured the drink. And even if she did, she wasn’t asking for Don to do anything about it, overly or otherwise. Remember how pissed she was at Peggy for firing Joey rather than letting her handle him in her own way? Joan doesn’t expect — or want — others to fight her battles.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Pete is not trying to destroy Don. In fact, Pete was angry at Don for the exact same thing Joan is and he’s solidly in his corner right now.

              It doesn’t matter whether Don knew about Chevy. The agency was going to court Chevy whether Don fired Jaguar or not. And they would have had to fire Jaguar in order to court Chevy. In other words, Jaguar was going to go, either through Don’s actions or through Roger’s (he aggressively went after Chevy). She knows this.

              And yes, she’s clearly full of rage in that scene after talking to Herb – and she wanted Don to see it.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              “It doesn’t matter whether Don knew about Chevy.” If you really believe that, then I’m giving up. Ta-ta.

            • VDbloom

              Exactly, the agency can’t be tied to a partner who unilaterally fires clients and gives no thought to the consequences, or how that client might be replaced. Don got lucky with Chevy.

            • 3hares

              i think their point is that it matters in terms of Don’s motivations, which are part of the reason people were angry at him and see him as irresponsible. But in terms of Joan’s career being hurt, it doesn’t matter, because even if Don hadn’t dumped Jaguar, they would have dumped Jaguar to get Chevy once Roger brought it in. By now Joan can’t really accuse Don of taking Jaguar away from her because she knows they would have gotten Chevy. Pete spelled this out in them moment it happened when Don tried to use Roger’s Chevy news to justify himself and Pete said “Don’t act like you had a plan!”

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Well, enjoy your flounce, but what I said is true: SCDP was going to ditch Jaguar either way. Once Chevy was on the table, they would have had to fire Jaguar in order to make the pitch. Sorry the truth of that has you skipping out of the conversation, but that’s a fact.

            • Chris

              And the fact CGC was doing the same thing at the same time with Alpha Romeo showed that it wasn’t just some crazy scheme or pipe dream Roger and Don dreamed up. Both those agencies believed they had a real chance to get that account. There was no way after having Don talking about Chevy as the ultimate get a season or so before that they wouldn’t try to land that account.

            • EarthaKitten

              The partners would not have dumped Jaguar had Roger not brought on board Chevy. Granted, one happened immediately on the heels of the other but that was not based on a grand scheme. Don had no idea Roger was signing Chevy which was possible, in part, because of the firm’s relationship with Jaguar.

            • Chris

              No one said it was part of a grand scheme, just that it’s hard to justify Joan’s extreme anger towards Don when his actions didn’t put her in a worse position. She ended up in a much better position- she doesn’t have Herb harassing her and the company merger that caused them to get Chevy has made her far richer. It’s ridiculous to have Joan livid at Don over a bunch of “what ifs” when his actions ended up helping her financially in the end. It just makes Joan look petty or worse.

          • charlotte

            I still believe that Don’s attempt to keep her from prostituting herself should matter to Joan (at least the way the character was written in the previous seasons).

            • Sarah

              Well, consider that Don really felt sorry for her when that whole thing went down, and Joan does not want to be pitied. At all. The other partners just shrugged it off, a woman doing what she “had” to. Or “chose” to.

              And what’s the thing about forgiving you everything, but being right? Don was right, she shouldn’t have ever been in that situation, he tried to help her and get rid of Herb, which while she wanted it, also it erased her contribution.

              Yeah, I get Joan hating Don. He’s seen her vulnerable, and felt for her, and she can’t forgive him that.

            • Jaialaibean

              Sarah, your comment finally explained to me what was familiar about that particular shade of green Joan is wearing here, and for me, it totally explains her attitude. It’s the color of money — but it’s also the same color as the robe she was wearing after she prostituted herself to Herb. She hates Don because when she sees him, she’s back in that moment. It’s not sane, and it’s not nice, but these aren’t exactly the most psychologically self-aware people you’d ever meet.

            • Jaialaibean

              And deep in Joan’s conscience, at least, is the feeling that that one moment calls into question the legitimacy of her current position. She’s wearing money because she’s afraid she doesn’t deserve it.

            • Rhonda Shore

              I think you’re onto something…

            • SylviaFowler

              Are other people supposed to find such irrational behavior… rational?

            • Sarah

              Well, people aren’t usually rational. And they tell themselves stories all the time about *why* they do things, when they usually aren’t all that introspective, and even if they are, they aren’t always truthful. They tell themselves stories that make them look or feel good about themselves and their motives.

              Consider this- research suggests that people like other people they are nice to. Not that they are nice to people they like. Seems backwards, right? But people will do all sorts of things to square their behavior with their supposed beliefs. Discomfort causes all sorts of reactions in people, and no one can call most of them “rational”.

              The research I mention is talked about in two mainstream psych books, You Are Not as Smart and You Are Now Less Dumb by David McRaney. Among other things.

              It’s not nice, not at all, but it is a sort of way Joan feels she can take back some power. She *said* that stuff about everyone being fine, no one needing or missing Don, and in some ways, that is true. In others it’s a big lie. That firm is on the verge of some big crack up, which may prove to be better, and may prove to be worse. I see Joan as angling to be on the up side of whatever’s coming, and she maybe feels like Don has let her down by going to pieces and putting things more in jeopardy. She’s been a good girl and worked hard (although yeah, that whole prostitution thing, and it’s K I L L I N G her that that made the shift for what she’s now afraid to lose- all the money and position she’s gotten) and she’s sick and tired of taking care of bad boys who land on their damn feet all the time no matter what. No, not rational. Where did we get that promise?

            • Chris

              Plus the problem with all the theories is that it either requires a viewer to become MW and start writing reasons why Joan is acting so mad at Don, because there is no clear, obvious reason given on the show, or you just have to accept after “watching” her for nine years or so she had a big personality change. Same with Bert. The last scene with Peggy and Don in season six was her yelling at him and calling him a monster, yet they showed that clip in the beginning of the episode where Don comes back just to remind the viewers where they left off so you would understand why Peggy tells Don they are fine without him. With Joan she seems furious at Don yet as viewers we are given no concrete reason why. Even if you can find reasons to justify her behavior it’s all speculative.

            • greenwich_matron

              I think Joan sees herself as a courtesan and Don sees her as a prostitute.

            • EarthaKitten

              I don’t think Joan sees herself as a courtesan at all but she does know that her colleagues have thought that of her. I believe the conversation Joan had with her friend Kate while lying in bed after a night out on the town transformed Joan. First Joan had to get through the night out with Kate during which they talked about just being two secretaries out for a night of fun. She sat at the table where the phone doesn’t ring and winds up making out with a guy who looked half her age. The next morning while lying in bed with Kate Joan says she will never have what Kate has– a husband. Kate tells her she admires what Joan has and when Joan protests that she gets no respect at the office, Kate says basically “change the conversation” (it sounded a lot like a version of Don’s favorite line). That was the catalyst. Then, there is the moment at the first lunch with Mr. Avon at the end where she takes the check so she can pay for it and she says “that’s what I’m paid to do”. I think Joan has been on a different trajectory ever since her night with Kate and, more importantly, since her decision to risk everything in meeting Mr. Avon for the business lunch with Peggy.

        • 3hares

          Yes, even at the time Pete and Joan, the two yelling at him about it who were also both in on the IPO, seemed to present it as something symbolic of his attitude rather than being literally angry over money they hadn’t made yet. And they haven’t brought up the IPO again. So I don’t think even Joan sees this as being about the specific wrong of scuttling the IPO that Don couldn’t have known he was scuttling because they’d kept it secret–in part because they already knew it was something he’d make difficult.

          • Alanna

            And as she spat back at him right after the Chevy announcement, he made it all about himself instead of “us”. She’s tired of him making decisions for everyone else, and the merger a few days later didn’t help matters. Again, I don’t think her attitude is fair to Don, the agency, or herself, but I can see this as one of the motivating factors.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              The merger a few days later managed to land them the Chevy account, the biggest get since the agency was founded.

              I could buy all this rage from Joan if she wasn’t CLEARLY doing MUCH better in the wake of Don’s decisions.

            • EarthaKitten

              I acknowledge that Don has masterminded structural moves that have benefited everyone. But Don’s behavior over the course of much of last season put the organization at risk. If SC&P had stockholders I think they would clamor for Don’s dismissal especially after the Hershey fiasco. Everyone keeps talking about Don being a creative genius. I haven’t seen much evidence of that genius for a very long time. I am hoping to see it on display before the conclusion of Mad Men.

        • Wendy M. Grossman

          But Don *isn’t* going to be financially ruined. He still has his millions (and that excellent accountant) from the sale of the original Sterling Cooper. Henry didn’t want Betty taking money from him, so although he’s likely paying for Sally’s stint at Miss Porter’s, that wasn’t a huge financial drain. And granted he’s paying for Megan (one assumes), he’s still wealthy and he still has his skills. Joan is merely looking to cut him out of the company’s *future* earnings, in part because his maverick behavior means he plays fast and loose with *their* futures.

          Just a data point, probably not so visible to younger people who’ve never seen one: Peggy’s last dress reminds me very strongly of a computer punch card. I do not think this is unintentional.

          wg

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            He made half a million off the sale of SC 6 years ago. He founded another agency which struggled through most of its existence, requiring infusions of cash from the partners. There’s no reason to believe he’s rolling around in millions. He got a junior partner’s payout 6 years ago and invested senior partner shares in a new agency (as well as partially paying for Pete’s shares).

      • Chris

        To be fair, after CGC and SCDP merged and landed the Chevy account it has to be a far more valuable agency. And realistically SCDP would have dumped Jaguar to make the pitch for Chevy. CGC did it, it was the golden apple they were all fighting for. I don’t agree with Joan’s level of anger as she still retained the shares without having Herb slobbering over her and showing up as a physical reminded of what she did. I also think wanting to take all Don’s shares and money is downright ugly and over the top.

      • bawoman

        Joan is still a partner. Its not like she didnt do it all for nothing. Quite the contrary. Annnnd, may I add, that Don decided to fire Jaguar before Joan and Bert made it known they were going to go public. So it was really as much as her and Bert and Petes fault as it was Dons for keeping that a secret.

        I understand Joans frustration at Don doing things without asking, and being careless about such things but its obvious that once she got a little power, it went to her head. And she should at least be partly thankfull for the fact she doesnt have to see Herbs pasty fat face leering at her through the office doors anymore.

        • EarthaKitten

          But Joan didn’t want help from Don or anyone when it came to Herb. Similarly, Joan was not happy when Peggy fired Joey after he made the sketch of Joan in a sexual pose. I can’t remember her exact words but I do recall Joan telling Peggy that now everyone would think she couldn’t handle Joey on her own. I absolutely thought Joan’s reaction to the IPO falling through was realistic and I thought her anger at Don was also realistic. And her anger goes beyond money but I do believe money is a big part of it. Joan has no patience for people who don’t play by the rules; a good example of this is wanting to fire Harry’s secretary. Don doesn’t play by the rules and his boorish behavior last season, even before the Hershey fiasco, would have made Joan furious as he put the company at risk. I’ve thought Joan was a bitch from the outset of Mad Men but she is a character that intrigues me and I can totally relate to her. Don is someone I continue to love like a big brother but I only have so much patience for people who behave like Don and I’ve really had enough of his downfall.

          • Chris

            Joan was flat out wrong about the Joey situation. Peggy handled it in the correct manner. Joey was fired for what he did that was wrong. He knows it and everyone else knows it. Joan manipulating a client (I think she said over dinner) to get Joey fired for some other reason at a future date is not the appropriate way to handle a situation like that. Too bad Joan didn’t like it but Peggy was acting for all women who would have to work with that creep and not just Joan. Joan being mad about the IPO is uncalled for as she and two other partners were doing something without consulting the others, exactly what they are supposed to be mad at Don for. Joan and Pete were minor partners why were they deciding what happened to Don and Roger’s shares without letting them know? Don creating the merger and landing Chevy has made that agency far more valuable and Joan got shares without having to put up a dime. Having to put in money twice almost cost Pete his share of the partnership and led to Lane’s downfall eventually. Now the most minor partner is vindictively out to help rob someone who not only founded the agency and was its biggest star but was her supposed friend for years? It just isn’t consistent with how Joan has been portrayed for the past “nine years” of the show.

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              Thank You : )

          • SylviaFowler

            So everyone in the office is supposed to watch or listen to Joan complain when she is treated poorly, but nobody is allowed to do anything to/about the offenders on the off chance that it might hurt Joan’s feelings if they did? How are they supposed to know what she wants or doesn’t want if she doesn’t say? And why should it be all up to her whether or not other people (Peggy, Don) are allowed to exercise power that they already have?

            • Chris

              Yes, Peggy was Joey’s boss. As Don told her, it was up to her to fire him if he was out of line. In that instance Don empowered Peggy in her position and told her she had authority and had to decide how to use it without “permission”.

    • Hermione

      Hope this doesn’t show up twice–I typed it and then seem to have lost my comment.
      First, I liked that the hippies were all filthy while the washing machine rusted away in front of the house.
      The hippies were my contemporaries and the representation here was true to my experience with them: they were generally dirty and free-thinking but beyond that traditional gender roles prevailed. Here the women are washing clothes, preparing food, being ogled and passed around for sex and generally being treated as sex objects. The men are tinkering with vehicles, reading, smoking, and “supervising.” Roger is the one man who breaks out of this by peeling potatoes (although he stops to ogle.)
      Marigold is also a child of privilege, which held true for most of the hippies I knew. I noted that Marigold is wearing her version of Mona’s fur.

      • Chickadeep

        This is in line with my experience too…though the hippies weren’t exactly my contemporaries (the adult ones, anyway). I was the six-year-old barefoot kid banging around that nasty farmhouse (and, in the summer of ’69, living in a tent and a VW Bus in a field), with adults who looked and acted pretty much like that—right down to the old gender roles masked by counterculture trappings. My Mom (closest analog in this episode: pregnant blonde idealistic hippie chick) was the product of a prep school upbringing and a privileged family of academics. Her mother was Mona plus a few years and a Master’s degree.

        Oh, and who would wear a furry purple vest to do chores? Every damn hippie who ever graced our place had at least one stupid sartorial affectation that they *always* wore, practical or not, until it was so raggedy and nasty it fell apart. Fuzzy vests, ratty sweater, moth-eaten fur-trimmed coat, fringe suede vest, gnarly bandana headband, yak fur boots, Indian-print skirt muddied up to the knees…seen it all.

        • AnneElliot

          I’m trying to imagine what would have happened if Margaret had brought her son to the commune with her. . . and will Sally Draper make it out to Woodstock in a few months?

          • Chris

            I always felt like that would be too much of a cliche if little, still in her early teens, Sally Draper made it out from her prep school to Woodstock. Characters on the show rarely attend the big historical events.

            • decormaven

              Hey, she got to see the Beatles at Shea Stadium with Don, so there’s always a maybe. Frankly, I hope she doesn’t, but I won’t be surprised if Glenn makes the scene.

            • Chris

              I could totally see Glen coming back to tell Sally all about his road trip with his buddies to Woodstock!

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              This is how I think the show will handle Woodstock.

            • Chaiaiai

              That little girl scream Sally did for the Beatles might be my favorite thing ever on this show:)

            • P M

              Actually, Glenn going makes the most sense….. ew.

            • Leah Elzinga

              the way Sally’s developing I feel like she would go but end up grossed out… I kind of see her creeping up on more disco fabulousness. Then again, I certainly don’t have the time frames all down pat, but if she’s fourteen now… that would sort of pan out, wouldn’t it? I could TOTALLY see her working some Bianca Jagger realness.

            • Chris

              Sally just seems so much more sophisticated than Margaret despite being a teenager. I could see Sally wanting to be cool, but I can’t imagine her falling in line with a hippie mentality. She has too much of her parents in her to fall in with “anything goes” and no hierarchy. Sally is born to be a leader.

            • Glammie

              Yep, I think Sally’s getting a power suit down the line.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              Sally would be the right age for the disco era. She would be in her 20s, which is the right age for it. I could see her trying to get into Studio 54.

            • Leah Elzinga

              and succeeding!

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              No question. She is her father’s daughter with her mother’s looks. That girl is going to be unstoppable.

            • ktr33

              Pretty much what I just said — dancing at Max’s Kansas City in a plastic miniskirt and go-go boots

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              This is exactly why I don’t think Sally, or any character will go to Woodstock.

            • Rhonda Shore

              OR she could become a CBGB type, someone who got into the Lou Reed/Bowie thing.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              I could see her being into that when she’s a little older. I think of CBGB as more a 70s thing.

            • Rhonda Shore

              So was disco. Anyway, the 60s really ended in 1973 when Nixon resigned…

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              This brings up the big question-is 1970s era Sally Draper going to be with the beautiful people at Studio 54 or the punks/rockers at CBGB?

            • Rhonda Shore

              Maybe on the periphery of both, although she strikes me more as a CBGB/alt girl. Think how much that would annoy Betty.

          • Chickadeep

            My mother wanted to go to Woodstock but was pregnant with twins, plus was caring for me and my sister (6 & 4) so it didn’t work out. The van we got later had made the trip, though—we bought it from a friend who had gone (or tried to go–never made it all the way due to traffic back-up).

            The reality is, for every Hippie who actually made the trek, there were a bunch who couldn’t get it together enough to make an attempt. And there were really not all that many younger teenagers, no matter *how* fascinated they were with counterculture and the music of the era, who were bold enough or had the means to go (especially those on the younger end, like Sally). Woodstock was big, but not CRAZY big—seemed bigger because it was in a rural place, but to put it in perspective, more people go to Coachella every year. If they do the cliche “x goes to Woodstock” thing, my money’s on Stan and Ginsberg.

            • decormaven

              Yes, many tried to go and couldn’t make it. Thankfully Joni Mitchell was one of those- she appeared instead on Dick Cavett’s show and premiered the song “Woodstock.”

            • KinoEye

              I think Woodstock is considered a big thing because it was the first of its kind, really. There was the Monterey Pop Festival and others before that, but none that shut down traffic on interstates for days. Between Monterey, Woodstock and Altamont, the template for the modern music festival was created. You can also look at those three as markers that indicate the downward spiral of the 60s counterculture — Monterey was beautiful and went off without a hitch, Woodstock was considerably more complicated and not as much fun, and Altamont was a nightmare. And now I’m rambling, but I just love this period in history. Fascinating.

            • ybbed

              SOMEBODY is going to Woodstock

            • not_Bridget

              Woodstock was too far North from Texas. And it looked damn uncomfortable. Hardly the best environment for expanding your consciousness. I’d take the TARDIS to the Monterey Pop Festival in a minute……

            • Qitkat

              I would have loved to have gone to Woodstock, but several things stood in my way. No one I knew wanted to go, I was living just outside Wash DC, and had just begun a new job, with an agency that later became the DEA. Imagine the dichotomy of an employee immersed in the drug-fueled culture up there. I was never a hippie of any kind, though I had longed to go to San Francisco for the Summer of Love, and Bob Dylan’s Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands was, and remains one of my favorite all-time songs.

            • Elizabetta1022

              God, wouldn’t it be great to see Pete there, though? Not likely to happen, but what a fun episode that would be!

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            Weiner has said that Sally will not go to Woodstock. I can’t find the interview, but I know I’ve read it and seen it on other sites. Plus this is “Mad Men” not “Forrest Gump.” I doubt a character will go to Woodstock, but I do think we’ll hear about it.

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              Someone wrote that they could see Sally becoming a punk rocker

          • ktr33

            I think with Sally being a very jaded and ironic young woman, and stuck out in Farmington, CT, she’s more likely to “rebel” by sneaking into the city (which she already did this season, by way of her roommate’s mom’s funeral), shoplifting expensive fake hippie jewelry, and going dancing at the Mudd Club, then rolling around in actual mud in a field.

            • Glammie

              Yeah, Sally’s in the disaffected group that comes right behind the hippies, I think. Some people Sally’s age will be hippies, but I think Sally has no love of chaos. If anything, I see Sally going anti-Betty, by getting her power suit and climbing the corporate ladder or going to law school.

        • Alice Teeple

          See, it was totally different in my experience in central PA! I was one of those hippie kids too, but the ones we were around all wore practical farm clothing like overalls and jeans and t-shirts, although some of them were living in chicken coops barn milk houses, and VW buses. It was a mix of privileged WASP trust fund kids, and middle class suburban kids like my parents. They quickly found out that there were hierarchies there too, but mostly because some would do more work than others in things like co-ops and whatnot. Thirty-five years later, my parents are still bitter about their ideals not working out because of some people’s laziness. I thought the fisherman sweater was the closest to the truth fashion-wise in that scene. Although my dad did have a sheepskin vest – but he never would have worn it to work on a truck!

          • not_Bridget

            The Whole Earth Catalog came out of that era. And some of those folks went on to pioneer computer use–beyond the IBM/business thing….

        • Vanessa

          The clothing also reflected the attempt to be anti-materialistic. Taking care of clothing and other status symbols was considered “establishment” and against nature.

      • Mary

        I, too, was glad to see the hippies portrayed unromantically. I went to a grammar school on Ashbury St in San Francisco during the late 60s/early 70s, and I saw the Haight up close. I get annoyed when I see tourist information making everything out to be all peace and flowers.

        • P M

          Well, it *is* tourism propoganda, as you pointed out. I always say that the State/Province (for Canada) statement thingies on licence plates are by tourism departments.

        • KinoEye

          Indeed. Haight-Ashbury turned into a nasty place pretty quickly, and I don’t like how it’s romanticized in modern times. I remember seeing an interview with Wavy Gravy on some doc about the counterculture, and he surprisingly summed it up. He said that everything was perfect for about two weeks in 1966 San Francisco before it all started going to shit. Everyone had a different experience, of course, but that sounds about right to me.

        • rainwood1

          We went to Haight-Ashbury to gawk during the summer of love (1967) while on vacation. I was 13 and I just thought it was weird.
          The main carryovers for us from all that was the music, the posters, and the mainstream version of hippie fashion during the late ’60’s and early 70’s.

        • CassandraMortmain

          I saw a documentary once where George Harrison had something interesting to say about Haight Ashbury. He visited SF during the Summer of Love expecting it to be a brilliant place full of people being artistic and having spiritual awakenings. Instead, he found it “full of horrible, spotty, dropout kids on
          drugs….It was like the Bowery, it was like alcoholism, it was like any addiction.” It actually inspired him to temporarily stop doing drugs.

          There were few cultures more retrograde in the treatment of women than the counterculture. It’s been well documented. Of course there were exceptions.

        • Lovely Rita

          There’s a famous story about George Harrison being all excited to see Haight-Ashbury and then being horrified by the reality of it. I think it scared him straight. Or relatively straight. I don’t think he did acid again afterwards.

        • Glammie

          Yep, we used to take relatives to sightsee the hippies in Berkeley and in SF. As a kid, I kind of hated it–crowded, dirty, unpredictable. Then you got the burn-out cases a few years later yelling on the corners of Telegraph Ave.

          It was so weird when I got to college and met these people who were on the 1960s nostalgia boat.

          • Ginger Thomas

            We did the same in Atlanta (Peachtree and 14th Sts.) circa 1968-69. I bet most larger cities had their own hippie districts.

          • greenwich_matron

            My dad took my mom a business trip is SF in 1970. They went on a bus tour of Haight-Ashbury were the bus driver explained drug terminology and shocked the tour goers with stories of free love. My parent’s favorite part was when the hippies held up mirrors to the bus and said “see the monkeys.” My parents were straight-laced in most ways, but they were anarchists at heart: my dad had a crew cut, but he also had all the foxfire books, and my mother always wore a bra but rarely wore shoes.

            • Glammie

              We actually lived in the SF Bay Area and my parents were lefties, but older. Sort of fellow travelers–my mother was friends with some of the original beatniks, but hated the way they treated women. Knew various hippie counter-culture types–sheltered a couple of different teens who’d been kicked out by their parents. I remember it being a very *fractured* time. My little sister went, one year, to an alternative school in Berkeley. There’s this great pix of her dead center calmly smiling amid a crowd of scruffy tie-dyed kids wearing a little white cardigan, shorts, ankle socks and brown mary janes.

      • Terri Ellis

        I’m not the only one who noticed the contrast in furs when Mona and Marigold met up! Marigolds is almost pelt-like, which I thought was a call back to the cavemen at the start of 2001.
        I also gasped when I saw Ellory (sp?) in the classic stripe shirt overalls outfit of the kid from the Shining! Talk about a Kubrick call out, he just needed a trike to go up and down the halls.

    • Anna Vasquez

      I freakin’ love Mona.

      That is all.

      • Denise Alden

        Me, too, my friend. Me, too.

        • L’Anne

          Can’t remember the episode, but she said:
          I, for one, am not about to let a bunch of dirty hippies disrupt the order of things.

    • Chris

      One of Janie Bryant’s greatest strengths is how completely she understands that not only the cut of the clothes, but the colors define an era. In so many movies and TV shows, even if the style of the clothes is correct, they are done in modern dyes or the wrong colors for the period. Just looking at the color of the clothes on the secretaries in the background, let alone the principle characters, and comparing them to their counterparts in the first seasons shows how much things have changed. The muted pucci-eque colors of Bonnie’s tassel dress are a far cry from the vivid colors Joy wore in CA a few seasons ago. The color palette of every season of Mad Men is perfection.

    • Musicologie

      Sorry to disagree with the masters, but there was one thing tying Margaret/Marigold to Mona: They were both wearing animal pelts. It’s not so much a connection as an emphasis on their disconnection–Mona’s furs show status and civilization, Marigold’s leather and fur shows her new “primitive” life. Since Margaret has always been dressed as a mini-Mona, I saw it as irony.

      • http://wikeslongtrail.blogspot.com/ latenac

        Nice catch.

      • http://bidonica.wordpress.com/ Poggy

        It helps that they really look like mother and daughter. It’s a genius bit of casting.

        • charlotte

          Margaret also reminded me of Linda Cardellini in her Freaks and Geeks days. Let’s not talk about her Mad Men days ever again.

      • AnnaleighBelle

        “They were both wearing animal pelts.”

        Heh, I should have read through the comments first…

        • L’Anne

          And Mona’s fur was a similar off-white to that hippie pass-around sweater. Marigold let it fly at Roger that he had abandoned her (them) by working, which I think is code for “whoring.”

    • ashley

      I really felt like the green of Joan’s dress was a reminder of the robe after her evening with Jaguar. Maybe to remind the audience of why she’s hanging on to the grudge with Don

      • Leah Elzinga

        I can’t remember, did the idea of it representing money come up then as well? Or was it all CHEATING at the time? Because, holy cow, money makes sense in that context.

        • 3hares

          Of green representing money? Definitely. Herb even gave her an emerald. Also earlier in the season when Peggy got Roger to give her a lot of money to cover up his mistake Peggy was also dressed in green.

        • P M

          Look at the scene last week when the computer comes up for the first time. Practically everyone in the room is wearing green.

      • ACKtually

        YES! That is exactly what I thought. She looked gorgeous, but that color and the specific nature of its use has to mean something to Janie. It was her money/cheating outfit then and now.

    • ccinnc

      “In other news, Green Acres is the place to be. Farm living is the life for … anyone but these two.” Hahahahahahaha!

      And “Old man take a look at my life, I’m a lot like you …” Word.

    • tallgirl1204

      i LOVED Peggy’s two patterned dresses– the first one, with the striped top– the darts are placed so beautifully to fit and flatter her bust and create an interesting “insert” looking piece out of one of the stripes. The gold one at the end– beautiful! Fits her and is flattering, and so powerful-looking. Did she take some of her raise and go out and buy an expensive dress? I kinda think so.

    • AnneElliot

      First of all, thank you TLo, for that dreamy photo of Stan — that made my day! I don’t normally like men with facial hair but he makes my heart go pitter-patter. I love him in the green shirt, but I think those love beads are really weird with the outfit.

      And I just noticed the framed poster in Roger’s office — does anyone know what it is? I tried to zoom in but I couldn’t get in close enough. It looks very counter-culture, just like Roger’s brush with the free love and psychedelia — maybe a nod to the upcoming Woodstock festival?

      • decormaven

        It’s “Dante’s Inferno,” by psychedelic artist Seymour Chwast.

        • Denise Alden

          Shut up! I love that!

        • Alice Teeple

          Thanks for telling me! I have been trying to work out who that was all week. It’s such a great poster. I thought it might be Milton Glaser. I’m going to look up Chwast now!

          • Alice Teeple

            It seems Chwast and Glaser were at Cooper Union around the same time and they founded Push Pin Studios together. That’s a great tie-in with Glaser’s poster and animation campaign this year. I’m learning all sorts of great stuff about my field thanks to this show and awesome viewers.

        • BKagainwiththesweatpants

          Tying Roger to Don, who was reading Dante’s Inferno on the beach in Hawaii at the beginning of last season.

        • Glammie

          Awesome. Hmmm, wonder if Roger’s nude phone post-orgy scene was a bit of an Inferno call-out–those damned souls are naked.

      • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

        I don’t really like a full beard either (except my husband – love you!) but he looks so good in that picture! Partly that gorgeous belt, but also the watch. And rolled up sleeves showing forearms, of course.

    • katiessh

      so last year there was a lot of talk about gins berg’s possible mental illness/craziness. With his latest outburst where do people stand on that?
      side note: I just want stan to be happy!

      • Malia C.

        It’s dangerous to try to divine anything from the preview, but in the next episode, he is briefly glimpsed walking in the office – possibly after-hours (the lights are off) with tissue sticking out of both of his ears. I’m hard-pressed to think of a context where that may not be intended as further indication of something being very off in his mental well-being. As to if Weiner ever truly follows-up with these hints, I have my doubts. Ten episodes left overall now :/

        • Jaialaibean

          It’s probably very noisy anywhere in the vicinity of that mainframe. Maybe it’s just another symptom of the war between creativity and technology.

          • Linlighthouse

            Yes. And Ginsberg wouldn’t mind at all openly displaying his discomfort with the machine that’s trying to erase him.

    • NDC_IPCentral

      A busy day with deadlines here at IP Central, so no time to write an extended comment of my own. I did think MONEY the minute I saw Joan in the green dress, and I actually quite liked Peggy’s last dress with the vertical rectangles – a very nice pattern there. Given what was available back then for professional wear, I thought this dress very handsomely did that job.

      I thought the commune costuming was very shrewd, down to the bedraggled torn hem decoration on Marigold’s skirt.

      Caroline’s sweater chain was a minor triumph. Those were used often by women of a certain age back in the 50s and 60s, and I think I still have one of my mom’s tucked away at home.

      Off to read the BKs’ comments and enjoy everyone’s insights.

      • P M

        No offense, but that last vertical rectangle suit looks like upholstery to me.

        • NDC_IPCentral

          As my mother used to say, “It’s a difference of opinion that makes marriage and horse races possible.” If we all liked the same thing, it’d be a pretty boring world.

          • P M

            I love that – I’m going to steal that line :).

    • Leah Elzinga

      One of the big stories for me was Don’s coloured suits! We’ve seen blue, brown, even green! To me this coincided with Don being back at the bottom, in creative. He’s spent the last, what 15 almost 20 years, as the boss, and he’s very much dressed the part. Now he’s back in the creative lounge, and it’s showing up in his wardrobe. Then after Freddy’s speech he straps on the “uniform” (dark suit, white shirt, dark striped tie, sleek hair, etc.).

      And I am LOVING the dichotomy between technology and creativity. As someone that really came of age during the .com boom, these episodes are making me realize just how long it took the world to figure out how to make the two work together. Now creativity and technology often go hand in hand, but it’s interesting to see the beginning of that relationship from both points of view. Along with that, I thought it was a nice touch that the IBM (or whatever) guy was initially really on guard and defensive with Don. Don’s crack about “replacing humans” was NOT well received, but I read it as Don showing a genuine interest. He might not be happy that that computer’s there, he might not think it’s necessary, but his natural curiosity and talent for creating opportunities (and campaigns) on the fly, definitely took the lead there. There were SO many little nuggets in their convos (if you could ignore “infinite”). “You’re betting they’ll last even longer than IBM thinks they will?” “I BELIEVE in these machines” I’m paraphrasing now, but there was also a bit about IBM not bothering to fix their machines because they’ll just bring out a new one, but that he thought they were an investment worth keeping. “Everything becomes obsolete eventually.” ALL of this seemed a metaphor for Don. He IS the monolith (as TLo had mentioned). And hopefully he IS worth fixing. *sorry, that should have gone on the initial post but I got carried away!

      • deathandthestrawberry

        I went to design school in the late 80s, back when “desktop publishing” started to happen, and I remember a majority of my professors, notably the older ones, not being at all happy that one of the design classrooms had been turned in to a computer lab lined with Macs and Commodore Amiga (lol) computers. While the students were all grabby handed about getting on those computers. Definitely a generational shift. By my senior year, my university was building a huge state-of-the-art computer center.

        What I thought was interesting in regard’s this episode was Stan, Peggy and Ginsberg’s disgust that computers were something the suits wanted, that computers = lack of creativity. Whereas in the 80s, 90s and onward, the advances in computer technology pushed creativity forward. I work in an agency today where web and mobile advertisements account for the vast majority of our billings.

    • SistaT

      There was Margaret, covered in mud and filthy … and I thought she never looked more beautiful.

      • P M

        Agreed. Outside of the trappings of her previous self, she’s really quite striking. And her hair! I didn’t realize it was so lovely.

      • not_Bridget

        I’d like her to leave the commune–which will become much less attractive once winter hits. And try to make amends with her son. But maybe not with her husband. Maybe she can move on to a better life, rather than returning to the old one…..

    • Frank_821

      Wow. seeing these still really brings home how sad and full of anger and self-pity Margaret is. The girl needs real therapy.

      That poor son of hers. she’ll 15 years down the line she will seriously regret everything she’s done and realize she was a worse parent than Roger

      • Chris

        Roger, like Don, had the benefit of being a man and having a responsible wife. Say what you like about Betty, she was always concerned about her children’s’ welfare. She never would have divorced Don for Henry if he wouldn’t have also been good for the kids. Mona is probably Margaret’s child’s best bet now. Or a nanny. It’s hard to recognize the smother-mother Margaret who wouldn’t let her son climb stairs last season.

        • decormaven

          Yes, and that’s a bit of a clunker for me. In this season, we see Margaret dressed for brunch, then not too many weeks later, we see her fully embracing the commune life. While I don’t need to see her entire backstory played out, how exactly did she come in contact with this group?

          • DeniseSchipani

            didn’t her husband say that they’d gone to a marriage encounter weekend or something? Some of those groups were probably good places to meet hippies.

            • decormaven

              Marriage Encounter is a religious-based weekend experience. Started in the 50s and expanded nationwide by 1969.

            • Alice Teeple

              Remember the other religious-based marriage counseling? Ted and Nan. Maybe Nan will let her freak flag fly out in California. :)

            • Chris

              There’s something about Ted’s moping and hopelessness that makes me think if their marriage breaks up it will be because Nan finally has enough and says something to him. He is just going through the motions and they have shown Nan to be very perceptive and intelligent. She has to be catching on to the fact something is up with him. I picture their sons going to school out there with the Brady kids. The older son looked like someone Marcia Brady would date.

            • Alice Teeple

              That’s true. Nan is nobody’s fool, and even though California was a band-aid, it seems that even with Peggy out of the picture, Ted’s a workaholic. We saw him coming in the office at night while Pete was schtupping Bonnie.

              I’m thinking they could be modeling the Chaough family a little on the Draper Daniels family. From what I heard, Draper Daniels’ first wife was a nice lady, but they ended up divorcing and he married Myra Janco, who was an advertising maven herself. There was a bit of a fishy period between his divorce from his first wife and his marriage to Janco.

            • Chris

              I confess I was kind of hoping Ted and Peggy would turn out to be Draper-Myra like on the show.

          • Chris

            As was discussed under the earlier Mad Men piece here this week, it would have made a lot more sense to me if she fell under the influence of some guru. Particularly one who wanted her money and impressed wealthy bored housewives and trust fund daughters.

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            Remember when Margaret said she forgave Roger? Roger asked if she’d joined a church (or religion, I forget what word he used), and she said, “Not in any way you’d understand.” I wonder if she met the commune members through that group. It seems likely.

        • Shawn EH

          Not only is Henry good for Betty’s kids, he’s good TO them. I don’t recall many interactions with Sally, but trying to figure out why Bobby was depressed after his outing with Betty was nice of him. At least he seems to know that his world-class beauty is also world-class complicated. I almost feel it wasn’t Don’s betrayal so much as Don’s pile of issues that were too much for Betty; how could she ever stay center of attention with a man that needy and screwed up? She picked Henry because he’s going to put her first.

          • Chris

            Well it was everything with Don. She knew he was cheating before she could prove it, he ignored her, spied on her through the psychiatrist and remember how mean he would be to her? I’ll never forget when she came out in the bikini and he just ripped her apart. A few years later and Megan wore tiny string ones and that was OK though.

            • SparkleNeely

              Yes, Madonna/Whore issues. Thank god Megan has never had kids with him.

          • Gatto Nero

            Henry manages to walk the fine line between supporting Betty in all her neediness and empathizing with the kids. He’s kind of a marvel that way.

            • Chris

              He’s part husband, part father and part psychiatrist to Betty which is exactly what she needs. He’s also a kind and patient father figure to the children. I would be surprised if Gene didn’t think he was his father.

            • Jaialaibean

              He’s too good to be true. There’s something wrong with that. It makes me worry about his future.

            • Cabernet7

              Yeah, Henry’s a damn saint. I’ve always found it a little too much. She had the worst luck with husband #1, but she got unbelievably lucky with husband #2, a man she agreed to marry after having spent only about 45 minutes total in his presence.

            • Glammie

              Yeah, a guy who’s willing to pursue a pregnant, married woman, but turns out to be insanely moral and upright afterwords? Never made sense to me either.

            • Babyboomer59

              I’ve never totally trusted Henry. The kind who seem a bit too good to be true.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              Don Draper, June 1965: “He thinks that man is his father.”

            • decormaven

              “There is no fresh start! Lives carry on.” – Best line Henry ever delivered.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              Along with “No one’s ever on your side.” And telling Betty to shut up because she was drunk after seeing Don with Bethany in NYC.

      • Vtg Fashion Library

        Or not, which is even sadder.

    • Heather H

      Other than, great job once again, all I can say, as a woman who’s built like Joan, is I would cut someone for that green blouse.

      • P M

        Isn’t it just faboo? I love the whole outfit!

    • Melissa

      Wow, yes, I *will* be hanging that in my locker, thank you very much. Those tight pants and that big ring are doing it for me. Excellent post as always!

      • Alice Teeple

        Someone needs to photoshop him into a Tiger Beat magazine cover, like the ones he graced when he was on “Evening Shade.” Maybe this will be my afternoon activity.

        • Chris

          I look forward to seeing this on Tumblr later!

        • decormaven

          Excellent idea! Too bad he couldn’t do a spread a la Burt Reynolds in Playgirl.

        • FibonacciSequins

          Wait, he was on Evening Shade and Tiger Beat magazine covers? *brings up Google*

          ETA: OMG. Those Tiger Beat centerfolds can’t be unseen.

          • Qitkat

            OMG. Me too. I am stunned that I have seen him many times over the years, and never realized it.

    • vintage hats

      Not to undo any theories, but I believe that Bonnie’s shawl is actually attached to her dress. Check out the neckline of the shawl–it has a binding of the same fabric as the dress. And the way it lines up along the sweetheart neckline. Her tassels stay in place because of thread, not will power.

      • decormaven

        I’m thinking it’s a separate piece, because that looks like a vintage Vera Neumann sundress.

        • Gatto Nero

          Janie Bryant may have attached the shawl for purposes of this scene.

      • SewingSiren

        I think so too.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Yes it’s attached, which is why we referred to it as a shawl piece. But the tassels still hang free.

    • Tante Leonie

      That last dress that Peggy had on: that pattern brought to mind the old IBM punch cards.

      • blurredvision

        I’ve been trawling through the comments to see if anyone else noticed that! I think that’s an important point in a way. Even though she’s in Creative, the pattern on that dress aligns Peggy with the new ways of doing things in advertising. The paradigm is shifting away from rogues like Don and Roger with their three-martini lunches and intuitive feel for selling towards workplaces where women can rise to the top and computers drive research much more. However much of a douche Harry is, his way of doing things is the future, and Peggy is more in his camp than Don’s now. Look at the way she accepts, albeit grudgingly, Lou’s 50-tags-and-then-think-of-the concept strategy for getting new business, rather than Don’s traditional way of building up a strategy.

        • Jaialaibean

          I think she has a bit of Stockholm Syndrome going on with respect to Lou right now.

          • another_laura

            Yes! shown through her totally perfect coordination with the colors in his office, when he calls her in and gives her the raise.

        • Linlighthouse

          All I noticed is that it’s unbecoming on her, but I do see punch cards now. Aah, punch cards. And no one better drop a stack or work is held up for days while they’re put back in order.

          • Tante Leonie

            True ‘dat!

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          Also, the pleated skirt of her dress matches the wood panelling in Lou’s office when he gives her the raise. He owns her.

    • colorjunky

      Brilliant analysis. Thanks, I have a MA in English Literature and still get confused by the show, I need you!

    • Katesymae

      That navy-white-mustard striped dress might be my favorite Peggy fashion of the whole series. Plays to her tastes and strengths. 100% covet!

    • Lorelei_D

      I ganked the Stan Rizzo pic for my wallpaper! My sister had boyfriends who dressed EXACTLY like this!

      • Shawn EH

        My mom had husbands who did, too!

    • http://brianfortedesigns.com/ BForte

      Thank you, Uncles, for my brand new cubicle poster of Stan Rizzo! :)

      • Alice Teeple

        I’m going to tack him over my illustration table as inspiration! Right next to my picture of Kenneth the Page.

    • Kit Jackson 1967

      “It’s partially because Weiner wants to write a less-often-told version of the decade; the one that the grownups lived through.” This one sentence may be one of the most brilliant summaries of the series ever.

    • melanie0866

      Thanks for the thought, but there is nothing “dreamy” about Stan Rizzo!

    • leighanne

      Don sans jacket in Peggy’s office makes him look like another junior copywriter. Back in his jacket in the last scene, he’s Don creative head again ready for business, more in charge. His first tie of blue and a bit of gold still ties him to Peggy.
      Mona and family “in unifying colors, like a living family crest”- brilliant!
      Now where to find Peggy’s blue and gold ensemble, love that so much…

      • Chris

        Yes stripping him of his jacket and putting him on that low sofa really visually reinforced the idea of Don’s lower status.

        • P M

          The stinkeye he gave Peggy in that scene really gave Pete’s bitchface a run for the money.

          • leighanne

            Agreed!

      • EarthaKitten

        There’s another visual in the final scene that ties Don to Peggy — the Clio. Isn’t that the Clio that Peggy thinks she deserved for the Glo-Coat ad? I wonder how Don will react when Peggy changes just a bit of Don’s tag line and then claims it as her own.

        • Alice Teeple

          Oh, that’s a good point. You know, everyone is going on about how they think Peggy is being petty and rude toward Don, who “gave her her career,” but she’s taken a lot of poison with that medicine, too. I think it’s culminated accurately: she’s sick of having everything in her career be conditional to his ego. He might have given her opportunities, but he’s taken too many away from her, too, and they were always with the condition of keeping her out of competition. I think Peggy’s general resentment and malaise is completely justified. As for Joan, though, I have to agree with TLo – her reaction seems much more hypocritical and disingenuous and out of left field.

    • John G. Hill

      I guess it’s old hat around here, that when Don gets sloshed, his business shirt takes a big hit. Wrinkled, not neatly tucked into the pants, and almost stained here and there. All this style stuff in this blog has now made me more aware of the MM look.

      • Linlighthouse

        I remember how hard it was to iron my husband’s shirts in those days, not that they stayed neat for long. Thank you to the inventor of wrinkle-free clothes.

        • John G. Hill

          I remember my first Arrow brand dress shirt. That shirt never needed ironing. I was always amazed by it.

        • P M

          FYI, those wrinkle-free shirts stay wrinkle-free because they incorporate formaldehyde into them. No kidding – Consumer Reports described the whole thing.

          • Linlighthouse

            I’ll take it, formaldehyde or no. I pull shirts from the dryer and hang them right up. Haven’t touched an iron in years :)

    • Babyboomer59

      Great insight as always gentemem!
      I love how relaxed Joan is looking since moving upstairs. No longer being responsible for all the office drama and moving secretaries around because the execs can’t behave. She’s no longer looking confined to her heavy duty girdle.

      I found it interesting Don did not put his suit jacket on when called to Peggy’s office yet put it on for Dawn when she came to his apartment.

      Are we sure Don was the one who decided to hang the pennant? It crossed my mind Meredith could have done it.

      • Chris

        I’d say Joan looks more smug than relaxed and she is definitely still wearing a girdle.

        • not_Bridget

          Space age materials are improving the quality & comfort of undergarments!

      • 3hares

        I don’t think even Meredith would consider it okay for her to start taking things out of the trash or from wherever and hang it on her boss’s wall.

      • French_Swede

        I also thought Meredith hung the Mets pennant. I don’t see Don wanting Lane’s old junk adorning his walls.

        • 3hares

          Don wants to be back at the company because he started it. A symbol of Lane is a symbol of the original company. It honors that original dream and the people who started it.

          • Elizabetta1022

            I also wonder if it’s a warning to himself. “But for the grace of god” and all that.

          • Bluebell

            That orange pennant made me think of the scarf that Don gave Megan as a gift in Ep1. The scarf was orange too. It really jumped out at me because that bright orange colour hasn’t really featured before.

      • Gatto Nero

        I don’t think Meredith would have taken the initiative (or felt she had the right) to pull it out of Don’s trash and hang it on the wall.

    • Linlighthouse

      Wednesday is my favorite day. Thanks, guys. I’ve been looking forward to this. I couldn’t help but gasp over how pretty Elisabeth looks in that blue dress, and the makeup, hair, and jewelry make the whole look elegant. Not so much the ugly brown plaid, even if she is sporting a business-like “tie.” The lipstick doesn’t go, nor do the hoop earrings. I’d want to nominate Peggy for “What Not to Wear.”

      • fitzg

        Is it wrong that the hoops are bothering me because the pattern on the dress is rectangular?

        • Linlighthouse

          That bothers me, too. Pearl studs would work better. I wonder if Peggy has pierced ears?

    • Babyboomer59

      I still remember the discussions about the hippies out in California adults had when I was 10 years old the summer of 69.one thing said was they would wear dog flea collars because they didn’t bathe. I was looking to see if any here were wearing them!

      • not_Bridget

        Were you raised in Muskogee?

    • AlisonHendryx

      I just want to know, CAN meredith’s hair get any bigger? Like, is it physically possible, by the laws of physics, for that Bump-It to Bump more? I don’t think it is. (Do you think it’s full of secrets, like Gretchen Weiner’s?)

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Meredith’s hair isn’t full of secrets. It’s full of pencils, like Grace from “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.”

        • siriuslover

          and Aqua Net, which can keep anything in line.

          • decormaven

            I bet she’s a Breck girl.

            • FibonacciSequins

              She does seem like a Breck girl. Good call.

    • Terri Terri

      I love Jim Cutler’s eyeglasses. And who knew Harry Hamlin could be so scary and icy? He is great in every episode.

      • Alice Teeple

        I love how snakelike he looks with those glasses. They really hide the “Harry Hamlin” look and the way he moves is almost ethereal. I love what he brings to the show.

        • P M

          I love it when actors take on roles that they can remove their looks from. Effie Trinket, I thought, was a genius role for Elizabeth Banks. And how Harry Hamlin. He looks *old* in this role – as he should – but what a thing that is – to be *allowed* to look old!
          The same goes for Mona – Talia Balsam has a chin, has some wrinkles and jowls – and that’s fine.

          • Shawn EH

            Mona knows how much the jewels and the furs compensate.

          • not_Bridget

            Harry Hamlin was distractingly pretty for many years. Now he’s got enough character to ACT. But he’s still good looking when he’s not being scaary….

            • P M

              He’s very distinguished looking in this role. And there’s that voice (rowr)

        • sisterb67

          I love me some Jim Cutler. There’s more going on behind those glasses than we might possibly figure out. And, of course, as we witnessed when he was voyeuring Stan getting busy, he’s also a dirty, dirty dog. Which makes me like him all the more.

        • Terri Terri

          Yes, snakelike! That’s it. He slithers around and it just creeps me out. Can’t take my eyes off him.

    • Paula Pertile

      The Generation Gap! I grew up with ‘The hippies with their dirty bare feet and long hair – they all need a haircut and a bath. And if I ever brought home a guy with long hair they wouldn’t let him in the house.’ So this all hit a nerve. I was too young to actually be a hippie, but thought they were cool. Mona, especially, was so spot on in her closed minded view of it all.
      I wonder though how long Marigold will really be able to stand it … she’ll be craving a bath, shopping and brunch before long, I predict.

      I also don’t think Don will be able to keep it up. He’s bound to hit a wall at some point, trying to be ‘good’. Its just not who he is.

      Thank god for Stan and his beads, and Caroline and those GLASSES!

      • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

        In the mid-90s I adopted “Flowerchild” as my first screen-name, and my teen-in-the-70s father was horrified. He said people would think I was easy with a name like that (I was about 10 at the time.) He also told me I couldn’t learn to play the acoustic guitar because people would think I was on drugs, and when I later married a long-haired, half Native American Marine he hung a sign in the garage that said “Hippies use back door.” Some squares never get over it, I guess.

    • Froggae

      I thought Peggy’s blue dress looked very little girl/babydoll, not imposing at all, and perfectly represented how she acted and was treated that day. Don doesn’t follow through on her order and rather than confront him directly she pouts, stamps her feet and takes it out on whats-his-name. Then when she came in with the collar, pussybow and grown up pattern dress, I thought “here we go, she’s finally ready to take charge.”

      • Kitten Mittons

        I did, too, a little. Initially, because of the dark color and the gold buttons (which brought to mind a military look) seemed more grown up, but after a minute or two, the cut of it came across as somewhat childish.

    • http://thejoyfulfox.blogspot.com/ Laura

      I thought that Roger and Mona did look connected at the hippie commune – the gold of his tie calls to the color of her coat.

      • Shawn EH

        I loved when he gave her the keys and just let her go; that coat would have been a tragedy if it ended up in the mud, too!

      • Bluebell

        And when they were in Roger’s office Mona’s dress totally matched the curtains. The was a dissolving version of the pattern on the curtains.

    • kamo12

      I thought that Mona (who looked stunning) and Margaret (Marigold!) were being linked visually by their furry, oversized tan coats. Even though a fur and a fringed poncho are pretty much on opposite sides of the spectrum, they have a similar silhouette, especially combined with their long brown hair which makes it clear that they are mother and daughter. My interpretation was that this was comparing the ways the two women dealt with the stresses of motherhood, in somewhat selfish avoidant or abandoning ways. I would even argue that the passed-around fisherman’s sweater creates the same affect, being bulky, hitting down past the hips and in shades of cream and tan. She is pretty much her mother, just the version that found counter-culture instead of a bottle of gin.

      • anotherEloise

        Well said. Your last sentence really nails it.

      • anotherEloise

        Spot on. Your last sentence really nails it.

      • BayTampaBay

        I cannot get over how young Margaret (Marigold) looks in “hippie commune” clothes. IMHO she looks only a couple of years older than Sally Draper.

    • Susan Collier

      I think about the trend in music in the early ’70s, calling bad parents to task: The Cat’s in the Cradle, Patches, and well, the whole of Tommy and later, The Wall. The hippies ain’t gonna suck it up like their parents’ generation.

    • Inspector_Gidget

      The dress and glasses make Caroline look like the old woman from the Far Side comic strip. (Now I can’t stop seeing the hairdresser combing a boar’s hairs and the other woman shouting, “Don’t tease that thing!”)

    • Lisa Petrison

      >She essentially said yes to a scheme to financially ruin Don

      Is it true that if Don loses his partnership shares in SC&P, he would be financially ruined? I thought that his money came from when the first Sterling Cooper was sold, while he was AWOL in California. It’s nice to have a salary and conceivably he might make money if the agency were sold (or they had to buy him out to get rid of him), but I wasn’t thinking that he would be in the poorhouse without his partnership shares or his job.

      I can’t remember how much money he got from the sale of Sterling Cooper. I seem to remember having mentally translated it into the equivalent of maybe $5 million in today’s money? Which, since Don has a good salary, would seem like it could have lasted a while.

      • P M

        With an ex-wife, kids, and another wife (who also has expensive taste – at least while in NY)? I’m not sure how long that would last.

        • NDC_IPCentral

          Ex-wife gets no alimony after she remarries. Betty’s now Mrs. Francis, so she’s Henry’s financial obligation.

          • P M

            Oh yeah…

          • oat327

            And Henry was adamant about Betty not taking money from Don after the divorce. Though she protested.

            • DeniseSchipani

              but he does still support the kids, I presume?

            • 3hares

              Wouldn’t that be what Henry was objecting to back then? Betty wouldn’t get alimony if the two of them were married. It would be for the kids. But we don’t know what arrangement they eventually had.

            • NDC_IPCentral

              Matrimonial law is not my specialty, but outside of a settlement sum there would be no money from the ex-husband to the remarried ex-wife. Henry’s objections must have been to a settlement. Can’t remember the details from that episode, several seasons old, but from a matrimonial law standpoint, I believe I am correct.

      • siriuslover

        Don’s share was half a million for the sale.

        • Chris

          Plus he invested twice in SCDP when the partners had to pitch in more money, plus he paid Pete’s share when Trudy forbade him using the money she wanted to use for a house. He’s got a lot invested in that agency apart from being the person who thought of the idea and came up with the idea to merge with CGC.

          • oat327

            That was (or would be) paid back, though. Why Rebecca Pryce was so bitter that Don thought he was being helpful by giving her the $50,000 Lane was owed (to be paid back over X years.)

            • Chris

              Weren’t they buying him out? Is it ever addressed how they handled his shares?

            • greenwich_matron

              It was never addressed. Don specifically said that the $50K was to pay back the loan.

            • oat327

              Lane’s shares are never addressed, I don’t think–“who buys the shares” didn’t become a big deal until Gleason and then Don–but the company was in fairly decent shape by the time Lane died and he was only a junior partner, so it’s likely that the company just worked out some annuity with Rebecca to re-absorb the shares, or took out a loan and paid her a lump sum.

              The $50,000 Don gave Rebecca, which she said was the money Lane was already owed, was to repay Lane for the money he had to loan the company after Lucky Strike. It was that $50,000 that gave him the unexpected big tax bill (because he sold his stocks to raise the cash), which caused him to embezzle, die, etc. Conceivably Don would at least get money he loaned to the company returned, unless that was in his new list of rules too.

              Not that any of those rules would probably stand up in court, nor would they be given to the star creative director in the real world, but it’s a show.

            • Chris

              Yes, that ridiculous agreement was the thing that made me throw my hands up in the air when I was watching it. I know Mad Men is a show and liberties are taken but that was the first time I had a true “give me a break’ moment watching it that I can remember.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Whatever money he got from the sale of SC, where he was a junior partner, has more than likely been invested into SCDP, at a senior-share level. He’s bad with money, according to Betty, so we doubt he’s independently wealthy outside his partnership.

        • greenwich_matron

          Yes. Between taxes, capitalizing a new company and the call the bank required after Lucky Strike, Don does not have a lot of money outside of SC&P. The fact that he is supporting two households, sending his kids to private school, and flying across the country regularly would be an extraordinary cash drain (yes, I have spreadsheets).

          • FibonacciSequins

            I love that you have spreadsheets.

            • greenwich_matron

              I love your name.

        • another_laura

          Yes, it’s why when someone asks if he got fired the first thing he says is that they’re still paying him, he’s got his contract. It’s very important.

    • MarieLD

      this is 1969? I was 3… but I remember wearing a prairie skirt to my 6th grade graduation. I want a prairie skirt right now. So, did that style move from commune wear to the mainstream over the course of 7-10 years? Curious.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Yes. Also, in the 1970s, “Little House on the Prarie” was a big show, and may have influenced children’s fashions.

        • siriuslover

          I would agree with this: more Little House and less hippie inspired. I was in elementary school in the seventies and Laura and Mary were my and my sister’s inspirations.

          • Chris

            I think it all tied together, that historical inspiration and the back to nature movement. Plus all the Bicentennial nostalgia.

            • Glammie

              Did you read Beverly Cleary’s Mitch and Amy–4th grade twins in Berkeley in the ’60s. The girl twin and her friends play Little House games–in Amy’s mother’s old evening gowns (pretending they’re gingham).

        • Susan Collier

          And Holly Hobbie.

      • Chris

        Yes, by the mid seventies everything had that earthy, back to nature, pioneer era look. Does anyone remember The Sunshine Family dolls? They were like ex-hippies who came with things like seeds to grow flowers and outfits you had to sew the trim on. The mother wore a granny dress and apron. They were all about farming and living with the land. Needless to say I strongly preferred my Barbies even in their less glamorous than they used to be, 1970’s “Best Buy” fashions.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          OMG the Sunshine Family! Forgot all about them!

        • Grumpy Girl

          Oh I loved them! They had such round sparkly eyes, unlike Barbies. (And I loved my Barbies, but I coveted my neighbors’ Sunshine Family!)

      • Chickadeep

        You can thank Holly Hobbie (late ’60s-early ’70s), Little House on the
        Prairie (started airing in ’74, I think?) and the Bicentennial in 1976
        for that prairie skirt in 6th grade…there was a vogue for
        Americana-inspired outfits in the mid-’70s, especially for younger
        girls. The hippies did the prairie skirt thing but it was more of a
        folklore influence for them, I think.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Part of the back-to-land, natural-fiber esthetic, plus they were easy to sew, which a lot of them probably did. More girls learned how to sew then than do now, and lots of young women sewed some of their own clothes.

          • FibonacciSequins

            We had Home Ec in middle school (the boys had shop), and sewing was taught along with cooking. I wish schools still offered those practical classes (to both sexes). Sewing, crocheting, needlepoint and macrame were all popular crafts then.

            • Qitkat

              A thousand likes! I always wanted to take shop, but only boys were allowed. I didn’t learn much in Home Ec as I already knew how to sew, and cook. I think students would benefit greatly from many practical skill classes being required again, including newer skills for our times, beyond computers. And more art, and gym, and music…but don’t get me started.
              :-)

            • FibonacciSequins

              Right? I liked Home Ec, but I also would have loved to take shop! And I’m sure some of the boys in my class would have preferred to take Home Ec. I also had already learned about sewing and cooking from various older female relatives, but kids today aren’t learning that as much at home, so they need those classes even more than our generation did!

            • Glammie

              True, they kind of pulled back on them because of the gender split thing, but a combo class would be nice. Everyone should know how to cook, sew and build a bookshelf. I didn’t learn how to properly hammer and drill ’til college, when I worked on sets.

            • Azucena

              My rural high school still had/has both shop and home ec. and they’re both open to anyone (although the gender split was largely maintained when I was there in the 90s). When I took sewing, there was a guy who had taken the class just so he could hang out with girls- but all he got for his trouble was a C and a sewing needle through his finger.

            • smayer

              Same for my high school. I graduated in 2001 and took three Home Ec classes. I didn’t really learn anything in them, though, that my mom and grandma hadn’t taught me. I was even an officer in our FCCLA (formerly FHA; they renamed it in 1998, I think) chapter. Ag and FFA weren’t for me.

            • Ginger Thomas

              I wasn’t even allowed to take drafting, much less shop. My senior year (1974), the came up with a class for boys called Bachelor Cookery. IIRC, it amounted to steaks, chops, and breakfast.

            • Grumpy Girl

              Heck, a guy who could could steaks, chops and breakfast could win my heart!

        • Chris

          Growing up in the mid to late 70’s was painful for me because even as a child I hated the clothes. I was watching re-runs of shows like The Monkees, Gilligan’s Island, That Girl etc and wondering why people didn’t dress like that anymore. I wanted pointy heels, go-go outfits and dangly earrings and everyone was wearing earth shoes and prairie skirts. Even the Barbies lost their jewelry and most of their glitz until the disco era arrived. As a kid it was like a rebirth seeing people wear sequins and glamorous clothes on Dance Fever!

          • Susan Collier

            Yes! It was an era of dungarees and overalls and Dorothy Hammill easy-care haircuts and I wanted to wear fabulous frocks, like Carol Burnett, but have long hair, like the girls on Zoom.

            • Chris

              And Cher too. For a while it seemed like she was the only woman who still appreciated a sequin in the 1970’s. Bless her and Bob Mackie.

          • T C

            Economy was pretty awful in the mid-late 1970s which resulted in lack of glamor.

        • Alice Teeple

          Oh yeah. I wore plenty of calico stuff and had a Holly Hobbie doll in the late 70s-early 80s – I inherited my older cousin’s clothes (she was born in 73) so I was always about a decade behind in fashion. Calico, ruffles, Gunne Saxe dresses, even bonnets. I had an honest to god calico bonnet straight out of Little House.

          • DeniseSchipani

            Oh,yeah. Holly Hobbie — I had her, too. As I said above we had these floor length prairie dresses, and nightgowns. I remember a cherished long dress that was called a granny gown.

      • Kathryn Sanderson

        I started grade school in 1970, and remember styles for kids being a mixture. There were the somewhat traditional to middle-of-the-road dress-and-knee-socks combos the Brady girls wore in earlier seasons, and then there were things like overalls and maxi dresses (I had a red one with a tiny flowered pattern, almost calico, and a brown vinyl belt that laced up in the front, and I think had tassels). You could still get beaded leather headbands, though no one wore them to school. This was in the years before “Little House on the Prairie.”

      • MarieLD

        Thanks all for your answers. I love the knowledge on this site. in other news, I’m going to finish putting the fringe on the poncho I crocheted a few years ago. My mom and my aunt made ponchos for me and my cousin back when we were 7 or 8 and I was able to replicate the design. One other thing while I’m thinking about school clothes: For my junior prom, my best friend and I both wore party dresses (full skirts, fun). The other girls in our group all wore (ugly to me) Gunny Sack dresses (early 1980s). They were preppier, richer kids. Abby and I were more fashionable, I thought. : )

        • FibonacciSequins

          Crocheted ponchos were all the rage for the junior set in the 70’s! I didn’t have one but many of my friends did. I had a red cape that my mom made for me and I adored, probably made of some kind of polyester. It had slits for my hands and pockets just beneath. I was styling!

          • DeniseSchipani

            I had several crocheted ponchos. Aside from a few items like the boots and the cable sweater and the dirty hats, what the hippies wore (but CLEAN) was mine and my sister’s wardrobe in the 70s. I had a nightgown like Margaret’s, for example. And dressy dresses were all long and farmer-flouncy.

            • FibonacciSequins

              Me too – dresses that had a ruffle attached at the bottom, in the same fabric. And the vests, peasant shirts and long, belted, knit cardigans.

          • Glammie

            So true–I can’t actually wear ponchos because they’ll always feel dated to me–I just wore the hell out of mine in the 70s. That was my poncho quota for life.

          • Annaline39

            My mom made me a lavender cape and shift that I wore with white gogo boots. Quite styling for 2nd grade. :)

          • JeanProuvaire

            I remember a brief crocheted-poncho resurgence in 2005-ish, when I was a high school junior. I found a cheapo olive-green one at someplace like Ross and it was my very favorite item of clothing that year. I always wore it with one of those metal bead chokers and army boots.

          • ybbed

            I am remembering my self made crochet poncho that I wore to high school, 68-71, the fringe was at LEAST two feet long. It was amazing and the fringe kept kind of getting tangled up together, but it was a fantastic thing.

        • Grumpy Girl

          Wow, in the hinterlands of NC, I bought a Gunne Sax long dress for $15 in the summer of ’82. I remember, because I wore it in a beauty pageant (I was having a George Plimpton “try something you’d never do as yourself” moment), and for my senior prom. Why yes, I got my $15 worth out of it.

      • Glammie

        I think before that. I had to wear a prairie skirt for a choral performance in 1971–so they were readily available for kids by then, along with various “peasant” blouses–mine had short puffy sleeves and was made of red velour (!)

        • Logo Girl

          I had a similar experience. the girls were all in prairie skirts and clustered on tie dyed circles on the ground and sang “Turn Turn Turn” for the HIGH school graduation in 1971. This was Marin County, CA, so it wasn’t really an example of “mainstream” though.

          • Glammie

            Oh man, Marin–Tamalpais High had its share of drug problems and various drop-outs at that time. Some real lost kids from there. Not sure why, but the 60s seem to hit Marin particularly hard, even for the Bay Area.

            • Logo Girl

              True I think it was in part the influence of the free-floating rock stars and movie people

          • not_Bridget

            Remember Gunny Sacks? Commercial versions of hippy handycraft…..

            • Logo Girl

              I had a pale blue Gunny Sax dress in ninth-grade. It was bought for a cast party I think. I was a drama geek. This was 1978.

      • another_laura

        Late 60s/1970, I’m in junior high/high school and in SoCal they were called “granny dresses” and there was a lot of them around. Full length, maybe color blocked or ‘quilt’ prints, short puffy sleeves.

    • Lisa Petrison

      Are the buttons on Peggy’s blue dress green (with the gold around the edge)? I can’t tell in these pictures, but I seem to remember her wearing a dress like that in Season 6.

    • KinoEye

      Janie hit the nail on the head with the commune. We’ve seen the whole gamut of counterculture styles in this show — the party in LA from last season comes to mind — but not the gritty, shapeless, hippie dippy drag worn by many who were immersed in that culture. And I love that they’re so dirty. My dad, a guitarist in a 70s progressive rock band, always hated being called a hippie — “We weren’t hippies. We showered and wore suits, damn it!” And my mom, who also grew up in that period, remembers being disgusted by the lack of hygiene at concerts, festivals and the like.

      That dirtiness tends to be washed away in modern interpretations, so I’m thrilled to see it here. They didn’t all look like the pretty, topless girls with delicate headbands at Woodstock (you can tell, looking back at those documentaries from the period, that the camera operators were overwhelmingly straight and male). Like the uncles said — this show challenges the dominant narrative(s) regarding the 60s, and the result is often more true to form than most of what’s being written/filmed about that decade.

      • not_Bridget

        Some of us were a bit older in those days & remember a fuller spectrum of experience. Suits? Nice shirts & jeans, maybe—except for the arty weirdos in Red Krayola. There was always the western look among the Texas folkie set. And the patchouli/hashish, Tolkienish style of those who’d made the trip to London. Or San Francisco…

        Of course the media representations usually sucked. Remember when the Enterprise encountered Space Hippies?

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          “And the patchouli/hashish, Tolkienish style of those who’d made the trip to London. Or San Francisco…” – in the Tweed hinterland (northern NSW) you can still find potteries called Middle Earth, run by drug-fucked old men who crawled up there in 1970, probably dodging the draft, and never left.

    • MichelleRafter

      “There is absolutely nothing tying her to her family here.” Not so! If you look at the stills of Mona and ‘Marigold,’ they’re both in fur — only mom’s fur is right side out and daughter’s cape, which looks pretty spendy for hippie fare, hides the fur. A commentary on how polar opposite they are now? I think so.

    • MichelleRafter

      Also, the shots of Don riding the elevator to work reminded me a lot of similar elevator scenes from much earlier in the series showing Peggy riding the elevator to work — another visual cue from M.W. of their opposite career arcs, one on the way up, the other on the way down.

      • ashley

        agree! the elevator always always makes me think of the episode where don looks down the empty shaft though …..spooky

    • Travelgrrl

      Pete’s date’s dress had that little shawl thingy sewn on – it had a wee little collar of the same material as the dress, and in the back view you can see the zipper disappearing amid it. I still agree that the tassels would be a bitch to keep straight – showing both how hippie-fashionable she is, yet so coordinated, and buttoned up. She wouldn’t just throw a crocheted shawl over her dress, hell no – it’s sewn right in.

      I actually did see commonality between Mona and Margaret’s ensembles – they both have ‘fur’ on (Mona’s very real fur coat and Margaret’s faux fur poncho) and are both overdressed for mid May. But I guess the difference between her real deal and Margaret’s grunchy fake underscored Tom and Lorenzo’s point about the costuming and their differences.

    • Shawn EH

      Stan’s watch is the grooviest!

      • Alice Teeple

        Everything about Stan is the grooviest. I’m excited to see Jay Ferguson’s even longer, curlier hair out on the red carpet. He’s going for the full Creedence Clearwater look. It’s breathtaking.

        • Shawn EH

          I’m watching earlier episodes sort of randomly on Netflix now (trying to avoid things like Don’s latest fling and Connie and Joan’s husband), and it’s amazing to see the earlier 60s all-buttoned up and preppy Stan. He used to look like Harry, but now Harry would be lucky to look like him!

    • French_Swede

      Terrific recap. I’ve noticed that as Joan has climbed up the corporate ladder that in addition to wearing more (and expensive) jewelry, she has toned down her makeup, especially her lipstick.

    • AnnaleighBelle

      I loved Bonnie’s tassels – the first time I’ve liked a macrame-type look on the show.

      “Check the advertising awards on the wall. It’s a little bit of defiant chest-thumping that comes off a bit pathetic. ‘You can treat me like a junior copywriter, but just look at the awards I’ve won – ten to twelve years ago.’ ”

      And the way the light hits the plaques really plays up the embossed years.

      “There is absolutely nothing tying her to her family here. Not one bit of clothing or color that signals her ties to the other two. They’ve lost her.”

      Well, both Mona and Marigold are both wearing animal skins, except one smells like Chanel N°5 and the other, well, doesn’t.

      I always smell Chanel N°5 when I see Mona on the screen. Joan makes me think of Shalimar, but that might be a little heavy and old fashioned. Is Jean Nate old enough for Peggy?

      • anotherEloise

        Jean Naté is old enough for Peggy’s grandmother.

        • AnnaleighBelle

          My much older sister wore it, it seemed modern to me.

        • ThaliaMenninger

          Jean Nate started in the 30s. But because is was lemony I think it had a resurgence in the 70s when the other lemon stuff took off. To me, it still smells like grandmas who bought their bath splash at Walgreens.

          • MilaXX

            Heh! I like lemon scents and I still have an old bottle of Jean Nate. I never wear it out, but I do sniff it on occasion. It reminds me of my childhood and time sent with my grandma.

          • Logo Girl

            I used to wear it as a 15 year old in the late 70s. I thought at the time it was “new” I think.

      • FibonacciSequins

        My teenage sister was wearing Jean Nate in the 70s, so I would say Peggy wouldn’t wear it.

        • Glammie

          She could afford the good stuff, but it’s a few years until Charlie.

          • FibonacciSequins

            I could totally see her wearing Charlie!

      • decormaven

        I bet Peggy wears an Avon scent, purchased from her sister, who’s probably become a rep as her children have gotten older. Chantilly, something like that.

        • ThaliaMenninger

          Chantilly was by Houbigant, I think. Not Avon. My sister bathed herself in the stuff. (See below.)

          • decormaven

            You’re correct. I meant Charisma. Chantilly was Houbigant.

        • Karen

          Sweet Honesty

          • decormaven

            Ha ha! Good call.

        • Chris

          Peggy probably gets hers free as Avon perks from Avon in one of those boxes they sent over.

      • ThaliaMenninger

        Jean Nate was cheap Walgreens stuff to me in the early 70s. The junior high girls were all about Yardley (Oh de London) and Love’s Fresh Lemon (“I picked a lemon in the garden of Love” was their tagline) while I think my sister, who graduated from high school in 1969, was into this awful stuff called Chantilly. And my mom, a suburban housewife with a part-time job as a secretary, wore… Chanel No. 5. I think your perfume marks what you aspire to in some ways, not who you are.

        • ItAin’tMe

          Love’s Fresh Lemon was my absolute favorite! And my bathroom was full of Yardley. I do remember Chantilly being big, also Heaven Scent. And yes, my mother wore Chanel No.5.

          • LittleMascara

            I wore Heaven Sent when I was in high school in the late 70s. I find it really cloying now.

            • ItAin’tMe

              I didn’t realize it was still available. But yes, the formulas for a lot of those commercial perfumes have been changed, and they don’t smell as good as they used to. Je Reviens, by Worth, is a tragic example of an altered, cheapened formula.

            • not_Bridget

              I encountered Caron’s Narcisse Noir when I was 18 & loved it. Still do, although the formula has become less magical. However, I think animal cruelty may have been an issue. We wore musk or civet oil–which were definitely questionable. Not just esthetically. And who can forget patchouli?

            • ItAin’tMe

              I don’t know Narcisse Noir, but I’m curious about it now. Animal testing, yes. Having to curtail animal testing is probably what caused the change in many of the old scent formulas. I still quite love patchouli, though more for the sake of the nostalgia than as a scent. Young Living Essential Oils has an excellent patchouli.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              My grandmother used to wear Je Reviens! And Nina Ricci, l’air du temps.

          • Alice Teeple

            I had Love’s Fresh Lemon, but I always thought it smelled like Pledge. Ugh, Jean Naté! My nana wore that. I can see Joan wearing Shalimar – after all, that’s Moira’s scent. Maybe My Sin or Evening In Paris, some throwback to her youth. Peggy wears Chanel No 5. I think that’s a pretty standard working lady perfume for the time, and just good enough to not be a cheapy Walgreens scent. My mom had a bottle of it from her brother that she kept for special occasions (rare) for years and years.

            • ItAin’tMe

              It probably did smell like Pledge, but it was lovely to me. My mother’s No. 5 was also saved for special occasions and lasted for years. And she probably still has the empty.

            • Alice Teeple

              Evening In Paris is my favorite. They still make it, amazingly. I like Chanel No. 5 too, but every time I wear it people think it smells like old lady. I don’t think Mona would smell like Chanel – I think she’d wear something overpowering like Chamade.

            • ItAin’tMe

              I don’t know Chamade, but I agree Mona would be wearing something overpowering. Maybe gardenia based. Does Evening in Paris still come in the cobalt blue bottle?

        • sweetlilvoice

          I was a kid in the 80s and wore Exclamation! What an 80s perfume and they still make it. When I was in jr. high/high school in the 90s everything was vanilla scented with still makes me think of PE class.

          • Alice Teeple

            I liked Exclamation! Yeah, they still make it. I remember the ads for it. EX-CLA! MAAAA TION! Charlie was another popular one. I hated the smell of Charlie.

      • Chickadeep

        I see Peggy going for classic ’70s scents like Charlie or perhaps Rive Gauche (launched in ’71). I always assumed Joan was the Chanel No. 5 gal, given the scent’s connection to Marilyn Monroe and Joan’s association with her. If not that, something intense like Shalimar, Youth Dew, or maybe Arpege?

        Mona strikes me as having that old money thing going on…for some reason, I imagine her wearing something like Joy by Jean Patou (would have been introduced when she was a teen, and very fashionable for younger women of means in the 40s onward).

        I’m guessing Margaret used to be a Miss Dior kind of gal, but now she’s reeking of pachouli and feet.

        • Grumpy Girl

          yes, it would be Youth Dew, based on how my mother described scents for executives in that time frame. (that is what her boss’s wife–who would have been Joan’s contemporary age- and position-wise–she was also a co-owner–wore. And then my mom adopted once she reached that age.

        • AnnaleighBelle

          Joan = Arpege. Perfect for some reason.

          Peggy definitely needs something light and almost citrusy.

          • Chickadeep

            Chantilly? Lots of citrus top notes, and yet a drugstore perfume that a practical Brooklyn girl might’ve been able to find back before she was making good money.

    • Capt. Renault

      Thanks for sharing your usual brilliance, T-Lo! We love you SO MUCH!

    • Travelgrrl

      I spend much of the 80’s and 90’s in versions of Caroline’s beaded cardigan, paired with some narrow Levis and penny loafers. My Geek Chic for quite awhile.

      • Alice Teeple

        I wore them with a grey pencil skirt and Hush Puppies 2-tone loafers!

    • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

      “The reference to the monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey was sold pretty hard, but we like the framing here. Two monoliths passing each other. Technology and creativity.”
      This is easily my favorite thing that you guys have written.

    • Bobby Jahn

      Joan had always been about the status quo. We’ve seen this as far as back as season one when she was “helping” Peggy to for in. So it’s not surprising that she would be upset with Don for threatening the stability of the group and acting extremely out of character.

      • DeniseSchipani

        I made this same point earlier but Discus ate my comment. When the partners had that quick meeting last episode while Don was awaiting his fate, Joan said “this is WORKING” (ie, without Don) in what seemed to me to be a prickly,pissy, kind of crazy-eyed way. She likes things to run smoothly.

        • Qitkat

          The problem lies in the inability of the non-creative team members to collectively, and separately, recognize that WORKING means nothing, because creativity is becoming more and more stale, and eventually no one will be considering this agency for new work, because they aren’t staying trendy, which requires all those untidy, undisciplined creative minds.

          And yes, Joan is showing a very unattractive side of herself when she is prickly, pissy, crazy-eyed, and vindictive.

          • not_Bridget

            Men can be “difficult.” But women must not be “unattractive.”

    • EarthaKitten

      The still shot of the creative team walking away from the company gathering brought to mind another moment from the meeting scene. In the still shot you see the creative team (minus Lou) closely walking together…and then you see Don way in the background walking alone away from the creative team. I didn’t notice this while watching the episode but the still shot kind of hit me. That shot brought back the moment during the meeting where Roger indicates to Don that he should join him on the other side of the room. Don shakes his head no. That shot might have telegraphed that there are 3 camps, maybe 4 camps now at SC&P. There’s Jim along with Lou and Harry in one camp, Roger and Joan in another, Don in another, and then Pete and Ted who are just totally out of the picture and are given no say in how the company is being run. In any event, the scene clearly signaled this is not a unified management team. It also brought to mind the scene with the Englishman who was run over by the lawnmower. God do we need a lawnmower now to take out some of these partners!

      • decormaven

        Yes, and Meredith can be the stand-in for Lois Sadler’s part.

        • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

          Or anyone, these are New Yorkers….

    • Still Anonymous

      I would have thought that the skinny ties would be gone by now even for the most conservative men. Is it still a year or two too early for that?

      • Logo Girl

        Good point though I think it is right on the cusp.

    • leahpapa

      Lots of comments already so maybe someone’s mentioned it, but – what do we make of the Hollies’ “On a Carousel” playing while Don is typing and the scene fades out? Seems to conjure the Kodak slidewheel/carousel moment of genius from seasons back, the inevitability of cycles repeating, the impossibility of homecoming (“the carousel takes you to a place where you ache to return”). It was a much more heavy-handed song choice than the esoteric and vague play-outs usually are, but I thought it nicely upended/contradicted the immoveable solidness of a monolith with something that is always in motion but never really goes anywhere.

      • Cheryl

        Yes, the same thing occurred to me on first watch.

      • siriuslover

        In some ways, I think it reflects back on the older seasons where each episode was shot like a movie. That easily could have been an ending of a movie, and with a few extra character closings, could have been the final scene of the series.

      • Gatto Nero

        Yes, I think this was discussed in Monday’s recap.

        • leahpapa

          Oh, oops! I usually skip the recap because we watch MM timeshifted and I want to avoid spoilers :) Sorry for being redundant.

          • Gatto Nero

            Not at all! It was a very striking callback.

      • Qitkat

        I never mind if any of the ending song choices seem heavy-handed. I love the fact that there is enough research to find songs that fit so well with the themes of the episode. I also find that hearing a song like “On a Carousel”, which is one I have sung mindlessly along to many times, takes on a richer, deeper meaning ever after, with the context of the episode being applied to it.

      • Jaialaibean

        I wonder, though, if Don will ever get anywhere on that carousel, or if he’s just spinning around. I think he’ll go somewhere, but he’s made no headway in the past.

    • Lauren Fonville

      I wondered if Don’s blue suits and ties, especially in his scene with Lloyd discussing IBM, was a reference to IBM’s nickname “Big Blue.”

    • heartbot

      The main thing I notice is that Don has on his Dick Whitman face pretty much all the time these days except for the occasional confrontation with someone or when he’s drunk. (Or maybe Dick isn’t wearing his Don face anymore?) To me, the biggest potential game changer this season is that Don’s lost all of his bravado. Or it could just mean he’s finally become the sad alcoholic he’s always been.

    • greenmelinda

      Given the time of year, why would Mona be wearing a fur coat? We should be in May or June of 1969 and while temperatures can definitely drop once the sun goes down upstate, isn’t the fur coat more an exaggeration of status than anything else in this scenario?

      • decormaven

        Yes, it was a show of money/power.

        • judybrowni

          Not only a mink, but a blond mink: more expensive and flashy.

      • SylviaFowler

        It’s April 18-21, 1969 in this episode.

      • not_Bridget

        I knew a girl who’d lived at a farm/commune up north. In the beautiful Massachusetts countryside. In May, there was still ice on the pond. So she said, fuck it. I’m going back to Texas.

        Mona may have felt a chill. But she also saw the fur as a power symbol..

    • ampg

      I love the Mad Style posts, but I don’t actually watch Mad Men, so I never have anything to add to the discussion. But I did want to say that my dad sported Harry’s exact haircut/sideburns/glasses combo back in the early 70’s. Seeing these pictures is incredibly eerie.

      • ThaliaMenninger

        My dad had Pete’s hairstyle and sideburns. It’s weird for me, too, especially since my dad was anything but fashionable. His wardrobe was more like the Burger Chef guy.

    • AZU403

      I noticed that there was a lot of orange/blue throughout the episode. Some of the oranges might have been red, though, my TV tends to do that.

      • Jaialaibean

        I think orange and blue has been a running theme this season. They seem to be SC&P office colors — there are orange walls and orange and blue sofas and chairs. I’m not sure what that means, though.

        • MilaXX

          The logo is also orange

        • FibonacciSequins

          Orange and blue are the Mets colors.

          • Jaialaibean

            Oh, EXCELLENT!

          • decormaven

            Winner winner chicken dinner!

          • Bluebell

            Oh great! The orange scarf given to Megan, the pennant and the empty orange chair in Don’s office take on new meaning.

    • http://www.what-the-frock.com Dana F.

      Weirdly, I thought this was the best Margaret/Marigold has ever looked on the show. Yes, she was filthy and disheveled, but this was the first time ever that I realized that the actress who plays her is very pretty.

      I guess that a smile instead of a scowl, not to mention natural hair instead of a fussy bouffant, are in fact very flattering.

      • ThaliaMenninger

        I agree, and I thought the actress looked SO much younger this way. I think it’s about my eye reading the hairsprayed, formal hairdos and heavy makeup as something that went with old people, while long, loose hair and no makeup reads younger. But she really did look like a teenager this time out, when she’s seemed 30-something before.

        • LittleMascara

          I agree. The sprayed hairdos read older to me and always will. I was in grade school in 1969 and all the teachers had bouffant hairdos.

      • Elizabetta1022

        Same here! Free love suits her.

      • MilaXX

        Certainly the most youthful she has ever looked.

      • Gatto Nero

        She looks radiant under all the grime — if maybe a little crazy around the eyes.

    • James Chew

      I believe we are going to have a flashback that will tell us why Joan is so mad at Don. I suspect after the meeting in which they told Don to take some time off, him and Joan met and had a conversation that left Joan angry.

      • SuzBald

        One theory I’ve had is that Joan is angry at him because of her being the one that Sally came to…and obviously in years past she has been a support for Sally and Bobby. She’s a mom who is now a working mom, and now she clearly sees what a crappy dad Don has been. Just a theory – and not a fleshed out one.

        • 3hares

          That Sally came to when? I’m not clear why Joan would be seeing Don as a bad father or when Joan has ever been a support for Sally and Bobby.

          • SuzBald

            Sally, when seeing Lou in her dad’s office (after losing her purse), says, “Where’s Joan?” Her first impulse is to find Joan. Seems like Joan also had to step in during situations between Betty, Don and their kids when they arose at the office….again, not a fleshed-out theory.

            • Shawn EH

              No, sadly, Joan wasn’t available right then when Sally needed her. But maybe she just saw Joan as one of her dad’s friends who was also an office fixture. Sally was confused by everything at the moment, due to Don’s secrets.

            • 3hares

              But that was just Sally knowing that Joan is the person who knows what’s going on in the office. In early season Joan seemed to see Don as exactly what an executive would be–sometimes he slipped out of the office and she would cover for him if it came up, but she wasn’t his secretary so it wasn’t something she had to deal with a lot. When Sally came into the office with Joan in Three Sundays Joan dealt with her as much as she had to and then had her own work to do and eventually found Sally passed out drunk–and iirc, Don kind of glared at her about it. So I don’t think Joan has much evidence at all to think Don’s being a particularly bad father. I don’t think she’s had much to do with Sally at all–I’m not even sure she’s ever met Bobby.

            • decormaven

              Whoops, just saw your comment.

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              I also remember that she referred to Sally and Bobby as Don’s “brats” when Peggy was consulting her about covering Don’s ass

            • Gatto Nero

              That’s because Joan generally knows where everyone is. Sally figured that since Lou wouldn’t tell her where her father was, Joan would.

        • Gatto Nero

          Sally ran to Megan after falling on the floor in the office while running from Don. I don’t remember Joan ever comforting her, but I could be mistaken.

          • decormaven

            Joan was the pseudo office babysitter for Sally when Don had to go in the office on Palm Sunday for the American Airline pitch in S2 E4 “Three Sundays.” Joan didn’t keep too close an eye on Sally, though. Sally helped herself to a untended alcoholic beverage and fell asleep on the couch.

          • MarinaCat

            Maybe there was a passing scene in an episode (that I don’t remember) but I don’t recall any plots or themes that involved Joan caring for Sally. And if she does carry some kind of resentment for babysitting Sally years ago, she kept it well hidden in the subsequent touching scenes with Don in seasons to follow.

      • http://www.what-the-frock.com Dana F.

        I don’t think there’s much mystery to why Joan is pissed at Don. She’s angry that he threw Jaguar away after what she did to land the account, and she thinks his erratic, irresponsible behavior is detrimental to the agency.

        I don’t think that the depth of her animosity towards Don is justified when he’s one of the few people there who has always been respectful towards her, but I can sort of understand it. At the very least, I doubt there’s going to be a big surprise reveal.

        • 3hares

          When I watched the inside Mad Men clip for the last ep I got the impression from what CH said that the show might not even intend for her to be angry. She said something about how Joan didn’t mind Don back but she needed to be able to control him, as if the things he agreed to were just about keeping him from doing something wrong. If that’s the case the whole idea that Joan’s being too hostile is a complete mistake. They think the way Joan’s treating him is neutral.

          • Azucena

            This makes more sense, because it is the attitude she adopts with everyone she has power over. Her default management style is passive aggressively domineering.
            I think at this point she almost sees Don like one of the secretaries who needs to be kept in line with constant supervision. Her curt, superficially polite style of addressing him is nothing we haven’t seen before with other characters. Whether or not adopting that attitude with him is in her best interests is up for debate, though.

    • http://www.what-the-frock.com Dana F.

      Also, I think that after Mad Men is all over, there needs to be a half-hour sitcom spinoff about the SC&P secretaries in the 70’s. I would watch the shit out of a show about Caroline, Meredith, Shirley and Dawn – not to mention Scarlett, Clara, and Moira.

      LET’S MAKE IT HAPPEN, MATT WEINER AND AMC.

      • siriuslover

        kind of like 9 – 5, but with more shenanigans?

        • http://www.what-the-frock.com Dana F.

          And less rat poison.

      • Logo Girl

        I really think you’re onto something. Please disregard what it came out as before the edit! I hate iOS

    • Ana the Hated

      Not sure if someone else has mentioned this already, but furthering the confusion about Joan’s ire towards Don is her own emotional outburst in the Jaguar test drive episode. She threw the model plane at Meredith and had a total meltdown in the lobby of SCDP. Don took her out and completely changed her outlook on her divorce. And then in the next episode he went on to be the only one to discourage her from sleeping with the man from Jaguar. He helped her a lot that season.

    • Elizabetta1022

      If Matt Weiner is still following the Divine Comedy metaphor that ran parallel to last season, it may be that Don is now in the 9th circle of hell, which is full of traitors. As someone else pointed out, Freddy Rumsen might be analogous to the poet Virgil, who leads Dante through purgatory. If Don isn’t surrounded by traitors (although many of his old colleagues had good reasons to turn their backs on him) and in purgatory right now, I don’t know where he is. Beatrice is the next “helper” character after Virgil/Freddy–her role is to take him on to “paradise.” I do wonder, though, how Weiner keeps all his motifs straight, because we also have Space Odyssey/Hal overtones happening at the same time with the installation of the new computer.

    • Qitkat

      I have got to talk about Stan this episode. First of all, non-apropos, his is one of my favorite names. His styling is beautiful in the olive green shirt and brown slacks. My first thought is how refreshing it is to realize these men are decades away from the ubiquitous cell phone in the front pants pocket. His cigarettes are nicely tucked away unseen in his unbuttoned shirt pocket with the flap tucked in, a small but satisfying detail. His shirt sleeves are rolled up just so, everything fits him correctly, he has a solid but not heavy, trim body. His styling makes me want to swoon. All his accessories are perfectly masculine, from the beads to the ring to the ID bracelet. I love the watch with its leather cuff and his striped belt most of all. Such care is paid to his grooming of the beard and hairdo, appropriately trimmed for the period while acknowledging he is one of the creatives. Swoon again.

      Love Peggy’s striped top, pleated skirt, scarf-tie ensemble. That could easily translate to today’s clothing with few changes. While I agree it doesn’t look managerial, it does look professional, perhaps more high end secretarial. In other words, if I could find this on a rack today, it would be mine. Her raise, so casually dropped in her lap, astonished me. I was never anywhere near that fortunate. And she seems to be so blasé about it. Peggy has so many tschotskes lined up on her desk, all uncoordinated and messy. Speaks to her disordered mind these days. Damn it Peggy.

      I love Caroline too. The woman who sees all the bullshit, and gives as good as she gets. The cat’s eye glasses, even then, out-of-date I believe, the eyeglass chain, the sweater clip, it’s all functional and puts her in her practical element. I’ll bet this is a woman who can throw a party for 50 with one hand tied behind her back. Too bad we never see her personal life. She is a pistol.

      Mona: Appearance is everything. Man, does that bring back memories of staid relatives who always were concerned about ‘what would the neighbors think?’ before everything else that would really be important.

      In spite of her clothing, I’ve never seen Margaret look so beautiful. As delusional as she is, Marigold finally looks Margaret’s true age. Roger sitting on the porch with the motley crew of the hippies peeling potatoes in his loosened tie, and jacketless but still wearing his vest ensemble has to be one of my favorite screenshots of him ever. Brilliant comment from TLo: Old man take a look at my life; I’m a lot like you.

      Several times we’ve now seen those beautiful gold patterned drinking glasses. I owned those once upon a time. 1970 wedding gift I think. Nice period touch. Without going into color meanings, I liked the solid color contrasts between Joan’s higher end deep green dress and Peggy’s plainer, but still appropriate navy one. When Peggy shows up next in that drab brown/beige, graphic dress with the collar and silly tie elements it feels like a step backwards to me, more dated. Janie is really telling up that Peggy, even as a creative leader, has absolutely no sense of a consistent personal style.

      Thank you Don for sticking with navy blue suits. Much better.

      • Jaialaibean

        Peggy’s entitled attitude really annoys me. She’s always been that way, but usually, she’s had to speak up for what she deserved. In this instance, she hasn’t done anything particularly stunning creatively since the St. Joseph’s commercial, she’s a terrible manager, and she can’t even manage to work with a difficult boss without badmouthing him within earshot. Exactly why does she think Lou would want to give her a raise? She does seem a little uneasy about the Burger Whatever account, but only as it relates to Don.

        • siriuslover

          No, I think it’s about Don and her. She said they were waiting for one of them to fail. She knows.

          • Jaialaibean

            Yes, but she also thinks she deserves the raise. That smug smile on her face when she left Lou’s office spoke volumes.

            • siriuslover

              I agree completely, and I think she deserves the raise. One can be happy about more money (significantly more money) and still recognize that it’s some kind of set up. I would have reacted the same way if someone offered me $100 more a week (and I mean in today’s exchange).

            • Jaialaibean

              I haven’t seen evidence that she’s doing anything unusual to earn it. When she was working with Ted, she seemed to be on a creative streak, but now she’s just doing her master’s bidding, presiding over a group that seems to have lost its edge.

            • siriuslover

              I think she deserved the raise before hand, for the work she’s doing. Not a bonus, but a salary to match her job description. There’s a difference.

            • Jaialaibean

              She did get a raise when the two firms merged.

            • siriuslover

              We will have to agree to disagree.

            • Shawn EH

              She figured it out. At first all she saw were dollar signs. Not that I blame her. The wisest move she made was keeping Joan as a confidante. I just watched the episode the other day when she realizes all of Joan’s early-on advice wasn’t about putting her down, but was meant to be sincere.

            • Chris

              It worked out for Joan as well, possibly even more so. If Peggy hadn’t pulled that trick for her with Avon she very well could have been fired. Joan is on top now but in that group of partners there appear to be few loyalties and she is the most junior partner with the fewest shares.

            • Shawn EH

              Joan realizes the need and is willing for them to stick together. I don’t know if Peggy is flexible enough to realize how much help they’ve already been to each other. At least they’ve come to an understanding, which is what I thought when Peggy called Joan back in after basically bitchfacing her down the hall. She didn’t want to burn that bridge for no reason.

      • FibonacciSequins

        I noticed Peggy’s desk too. The arrangement of small tchochkes doesn’t look impressive or professional. It looks more like a secretary’s desk.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          I thought the exact same thing. It’s a nice touch, if just a little bitchily condescending.

          • Glammie

            Funny, I was looking at the set design and decoration after some of DecorMaven’s comments and wishing that you guys could be cloned so that there was time for a MadMen set style.The attention to set details is amazing.

        • Chris

          Well it looks like a woman’s desk. Don has a picture of his wife in a bikini on his. That also doesn’t scream professional to me. Lou has his dog trophy or something. A lot of the men have stuff, airplanes, nautical, animals etc. We just don’t think of them as tchochkes. Only women’s stuff gets that label.

          • FibonacciSequins

            I disagree – I would use “tchochkes” to describe those items on the men’s desks too. It’s not that Peggy has stuff (everyone has stuff on their desks), it’s how her stuff looks. Peggy’s tchochkes are all about the same scale, and look even smaller on her broad desk, The items I can identify would have been inexpensive, and look it. The bud vase with a (presumably fake) flower barely poking out of the top really sets the tone. The desk is a bit of set dressing that’s in line with Peggy’s office wardrobe.

            • Chris

              The gold box is definitely Avon which is one of her accounts. I’m not sure if some of the other stuff is. I disagree about “tchochkes” as I have never heard it referred to as anything but women’s stuff before. I’ve never heard it in connection with anything masculine in my life.

          • Bluebell

            Yes to Peggy’s desk detritus.

            In Don’s office he has photos on his desk of Megan (in a bikini), Anna and him, and Sally. There are other photos (maybe of his sons) but they are further away, off to the right rather than front and centre. There was another photo of a young Sally on Don’s shoulders which you could see when he was talking to Lloyd.

            I don’t remember Don having family photos in his office before. Something in Don is different now and he is more in touch with what really matters to him and is able to show it publicly.

    • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

      “And the fact that Mona checked her makeup before getting out to face a bunch of filthy, venereal-disease-ridden dogs (from her perspective) tells you everything you need to know about her. Her ways are best, even when they don’t make sense. Appearance is everything. And if you don’t like it, you can lock yourself in the bathroom with some gin until you get over it.”
      Love this. Thanks, guys!

    • VeryCrunchyFrog

      “Janie clearly has some fun dressing [Caroline] up as someone who couldn’t care less about the latest trends.”

      But she has succumbed slightly to hair-dressing trends, with a flatter hairstyle that does absolutely nothing for her.

      • L’Anne

        When is this episode set? That’s a mighty big Star of David pin on Caroline. Did she pull out her Pesach best?

        • VeryCrunchyFrog

          April 18 – 21, 1969.

          • L’Anne

            That might mark a Rosh Chodesh. Also close to Yom haShoah.

      • Glammie

        Love her embroidered sweater and clip, though. By the early 80s, my crowd would have been digging through vintage stores trying to find that sweater.

    • ItAin’tMe

      The way the “hippies” are dressed and the level of filth they’re sporting is absurd and offensively stereotypical. The Manson Family on the Spahn Ranch looked better than these people! Girls of the culture and the period looked sexy and feminine in their feathered, beaded, and patchoulied way. Women in mixed groups always try to look good, whatever the style. (And we always cared about our hair being clean!) By 1969 most of the boys had longer hair than these 2, and they wore bell bottoms and fringed vests and paisley. The back to the land types maybe affected a more farmer style, but it was highly romanticized. Margo’s prairie dress is accurate, but not the dirt of it. And no one was ever dirty like these people were. (my god, even Marigolds hands are filthy. They’d have been swimming naked in streams, if nothing else, and washing their clothes there too. There would have been drugs, yes. Weed and mushrooms and acid. Some speed. Not heroin or crack. And the rampant venereal disease notion is mostly myth, too. Crabs, ok.
      I understand that Margo, and Roger to an extent, would’ve expected the squalor, VD, and drugs. But when they got to the place, they’d have been surprised to see that it wasn’t as bad as they’d thought, though Margo, especially, wouldn’t have admitted it.

      • 3hares

        Another person in the thread with personal experience thought they were spot on.

        • ItAin’tMe

          Hmm…I’ll look for it.

          • not_Bridget

            I’m a bit older than you; there were all types of “hippie.” Raised in the country, I was glad to stay urban; we rented old turn of the century houses & loved them, even if some paint jobs were dicey. We definitely had running water–and you shower a lot in a Texas summer. Especially if you don’t have air conditioning. There were hard drugs in the city, but those folks were scary. I worked in a law office for a while–wearing dark tights so my unshaven legs were secret; boy, did I meet some scary folks there. (Not hippies, at all.)

            The “country commune” thing was more for trust fundies. Somebody has to pay. Often a country place was owned by a really rich kid who eventually got tired of hangers on. Or they got tired of hanging on. But there was usually some kind of artsy/craftsy stuff happening, too. For some folks it was a phase but not everybody became Republican suburbanites. Think about the folks who work the Renaissance Festival circuit….

            • ItAin’tMe

              Yes, not_Bridget! exactly! I was around both types of places and I did prefer the city places because when the rent was due it was easier to get a temp job for a day or to than to actually grow potatoes and try for sustainability. Money was always needed, especially when the trust fund kids got fed up or cut off. Sure, lots of crafty stuff: macrame, tie dyed t shirts…I had a friend who made beautiful tie dyed sheets. And hard drug people were considered sort of low class. Because heroin didn’t expand the consciousness like we thought weed and LSD did.

        • Logo Girl

          Some communes were like this. Lots of kids in rags with dirty faces eating half spoiled fruit. Others were nice and orderly and sweet and had fanciful women who sewed velvet capes. (I grew up in a nuclear family but my parents were still hippies and many of our neighbors were in communes.)

          • ItAin’tMe

            Definitely, half spoiled fruit. Because dumpster diving isn’t a new movement. And because getting “back to the land” wasn’t so easy as it sounded.

      • Glammie

        Well, I remember plenty of dirty hippies. Certainly, not all, but they were not a clean bunch compared to the straights.

        When I was a kid and didn’t want to take a bath, my mother told me that when I grew up I could be a hippie and be dirty, but not until then. My parents owned a Victorian in Cow Hollow that they rented to hippie types–and, boy, it was a run-down mess. They sold it–what a mistake.

        But, no, from the outside, at least, hippies didn’t have a clean appearance.

        • ItAin’tMe

          Well, the appearance may not have been clean because clothes weren’t ironed, hair wasn’t sprayed into submission, and beards were scruffy looking.
          As for housekeeping, I remember this one Easter Sunday, we had all eaten a bunch of acid and decided it was a resurrection trip, which for some reason meant taking on the cleaning of our really run-down, messy house. And that was probably the last time that place got cleaned, though we lived there another year. So yeah, showered daily, went to the laundromat weekly, but housecleaning? Not so much.

          • Ginger Thomas

            Running water makes bathing a lot easier. If you’d had to haul water from the stream and then heat it on a fire, you’d be a lot less likely to bathe very often.

            • ItAin’tMe

              True enough. Naked swimming in icy streams would be a summer activity.

          • Glammie

            Oh, I’m not saying there were no clean hippies, but I do remember some dirty (smelly) ones. With the farm, it seems to me that it’s less about personal cleanliness than dirty clothes. If there’s a lack of hot water and no washer-dryer, the state of the clothes is pretty understandable. The fisherman’s sweater would have been a hand-washing project, so probably wasn’t happening too often.

            Actually, what struck me as off were all the layers in the long hair. Probably not a lot MM could do about that–everyone has layers now, but back then not so much. My mother used to bitch about the hair all being “long, straight and parted in the middle.”

      • ShaoLinKitten

        Let me put it to you this way: a child I was mentoring about 10 years ago lived on a commune. The people living there had running water and availed themselves of social services, so they had food and soap. But that child, his siblings, and the various adults living there were every bit as dirty as the hippies on the show. Some hippies are dirty. It’s a downright ethos for some. Not all, but think about it– Margaret came from such a hifalutin, antiseptic world. Being dirty probably feels very good to her, refreshing, authentic.

        • ItAin’tMe

          Ok. Well, I’m talking about a particular subculture that existed in the 1960’s. I’m not sure that the people you knew in, what, early 2000’s, are part of the same subculture. As for Margaret, I can believe that dirt felt subversively good to her.

    • CassandraMortmain

      Just to reference another Sunday night show, something about the commune seemed like a less sinister version of Craster’s Keep.

    • Bobbie_Loblaw

      Regarding Mona and Margaret:
      “There is absolutely nothing tying her to her family here. Not one bit of clothing or color that signals her ties to the other two.”

      See, I disagree. I feel like Margaret’s grubby cape serves as foil to Mona’s fur coat, because the characters share an abandonment of their maternal responsibilities. Margaret by literally abandoning her family, but Mona by detaching emotionally and drinking. Margaret is the new Mona – a neglectful mother for the modern age!

      • Jaialaibean

        Do you remember reading about those experiments they did with baby chimps, seeing if they would get emotionally attached to fake monkey mamas? Mona’s fur and Margaret’s animal hide are reminiscent of those fake monkeys, which were just bolsters covered with monkey fur.

    • marlie

      My first thought when I saw Joan was “Dayum!” She looked pretty fabulous. Her hair, her clothes, her jewelry… it ALL identifies her a a successful, well-off woman. LOVE it. And I also like Peggy’s wardrobe this episode. Compared to the little-firl type clothes she was wearing in the first episode, I like seeing her in more grownup, professional clothes this time.

    • MilaXX

      I find this season interesting, but it doesn’t always make sense. It’s interesting to see the Don/Freddie parallel, but I still have trouble believing Don would take that awful deal to begin with. As mentioned, Joan’s whole attitude towards Don makes no sense either. However, Joan’s green suit screamed money. No only in the color, it looked expensive. I missed the green/blue of the outfits that Joan & Peggy were wearing. I did however notice that Peggy was wearing the color of the firm’s logo when Lou gave her that raise. She’s been side eyeing him all season, but she was all business the when Lou gave her that hefty raise and told her that Don would be working for her.

    • Pepe Yapur

      Don has never apologized. To anyone. For anything. I think if we actually put ourselves in Peggy and Joan’s shoes we’d be mad as well. They both screamed at him and called him selfish last season and what did he do? Nothing. These are two women who love and admire him and who he has hurt, and we never even saw a sign of much remorse on his part. Sometimes a lack of ana pology can be worse and lead to more resentment than an actual offense. And in the end, I think it all comes down to the fact that they both loved and admired him and felt betrayed. And it will be up to him to win their trust and love back.

      • Gatto Nero

        He apologized recently to Megan and to Sally. This was new behavior for him, which (in Sally’s case anyway) paid off. Maybe he’ll be more conscious of this in his professional life at some point.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          He apologized to Betty too.

    • Betts4

      When Don and the LeaseTech guy were standing in the hallway and chatting (the first time) I was thinking that they were dressed very similar – white shirt, tie, black pants – but one wore a shirt with long sleeves and the other had short sleeves. I didn’t notice the pocket protector per se, but it was the uniform of the day for awhile. Now it’s cargo pants and cute tee shirts.

      One thing I did notice while looking thru that article is that when Don was not producing and just laying around he was in just a shirt, tie and pants. Old Don would never have been without his suit jacket. Even just in the office. He never would have wondered around in just the shirt and tie. I think that was to show his feeling of demotion. I noticed this when he cleans up and he jumps back into the game – he is at his typewriter in his suit.

    • Lattis

      Apropos of nothing – I love those tumblers Joan is holding. And they look fabulous with her dress and jewelry.

      • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

        I KNOW. Sort of like Moroccan tea glasses. I guess if prosperity for the ladies is indicated by bling, blingy glasses show a prosperous businesswoman.

    • Logo Girl

      There always were holdout TV shows at the time that presented hippies as messy and lost, even more so than here: I recall an Ironside episode for one, and I’m sure Dragnet did the same. Most other outlets presented the romantic vision.

      • decormaven

        Dragnet definitely did.

        • KinoEye

          That Dragnet episode is hilarious. It’s like the LSD version of Reefer Madness. Not to say that acid is a harmless drug or that everyone should take it, but it’s funny how the negative effects get blown out of proportion. In the three times I took it, I never had any desire to chew bark off a tree, peel the skin off my face or jump off a building because I thought I could fly. It’s always better to be truthful about that stuff. The real danger is how it can screw with a person’s brain chemistry, especially if they’re imbalanced already. Or if it’s laced with something else. I knew a person who took some laced with strychnine — real horror story. Still, at least that episode was trying to address the darker side of that scene in a meaningful way, unlike most other media at the time.

    • sherrietee

      My dad has a closet full of those short sleeve dress shirts. He did away with the ties sometime in the mid to late 80’s, but he still wears those short sleeve dress shirts and he’s been retired for almost 10 years now. (Well, mostly retired. He still does consulting work when he gets bored.) And yeah, my dad worked for Big Blue right out of college in the early-to-mid 60’s.

    • leighanne

      I miss seeing fashion-forward Clara. Did she travel to CA with Pete?

      • siriuslover

        She’s Ken’s secretary I believe. And Moira’s also there (Ted’s secretary), as Joan offered her to Peggy as a new secretary.

        • leighanne

          Thanks!

      • 3hares

        She seems to be Ken’s secretary now.

    • NotTheRealSteveEyl

      I disagree on Marigold and Mona in Shangri-la. They are both wearing a version of the Fur coat- Mona an old school moneyed one, Margaret the new school Butch and Sundance/hippie style.

      Also, Roger wears the hell out of a double breasted coat. It’s a rare man who pull that off convincingly. Love his look in the scene at SCP with Mona and son-in-law.

      • ConnieBV

        I agree. I saw a bit of the cream from Mona’s coat in Roger’s yellow tie, and a bit of the brown from Mona’s sleeves in her daughter’s flowered brown dress. They are faintly linked, but in bizarro twisted versions of themselves. Of them all, Mona is most untouched.

    • judybrowni

      Didn’t Joan also put on a green (for money) kimono after having sex with Herb Rennet?

    • Bob Ross

      Don did win a several cleos, so his awards are not all more then ten years old. He was also honored at some advertiser of the year dinner right before He and Betty got divorced. As to the Joan anger, maybe its his public meltdown and the other partners anger at him that is driving her? She has always been one to put on appearances as a tough, imperious person and seeing Don freak out might have been too on the mark for her. Plus, she now seems very protective of her partnership so if the other partner’s do not like Don, she may not feel secure enough or knowledgeable enough to go against the other partners. Like Pete learned when Don paid his share when they were having troubles in season 4, the partnership share she has is only a golden ticket if everything is great. If the business implodes, she will have 5% of nothing. She is pretty conservative in a 50’s way (minus the husband) and is risk adverse. Before she got her partnership, she was the bean counter with Layne. Bringing Don back is a risk in her eyes, so she is against it.

      • judybrowni

        Don scuttled the Jaguar account that Joan had fucked into existence, Don scuttled the public offering of the company, which could have made millions for the partners, and Don scuttled any possibility of a Hershy account: more money out of the partner’s pockets.

        Don looked on his way to destroying the company, when the partners sent him home. A company Joan has put decades of her life into, and the only support for her and her son.

        Ya know, I would be inclined to be angry at Don, if I were in Joan’s stilletos.

        • Pennymac

          This is right along with what I’m thinking, too.

        • Bob Ross

          I do not believe she was partner yet when they were doing the public offering, so she would have made bupkiss. I believe she is upset about Jaguar, but that is pretty ironic since one of the reasons he hated the guy was because he made Joan a prostitute for him. It was a case of bad communication between him and Joan, but in his eyes, I am sure he thought she would thank him for getting someone so odious away from them. Plus, as Tom and Lorenzo pointed out, Don is not the first person whose issues cost them potential business. Roger and Pete both screwed up accounts because of the personal stuff. I am not saying they did not have reason to put him on leave, its the hostility of Joan to him which is bothersome.

          • 3hares

            Joan was totally a partner when they were doing the public offering.

          • Cabernet7

            She was a partner when they were doing the public offering. I understand all the reasons why she’s angry at him, and I can understand why she’s not happy he’s back. But kicking him while he’s down and trying to goad him into fucking up so she can steal his money legally is over-the-top mustache-twirling villainy. He’s not the only man who didn’t treat her right, and he wasn’t the worst of the lot. They were friends (at least work friends) at one time, and there’s not one shred of compassion or sympathy for him having a nervous breakdown in a pitch?

      • RKA

        The awards on his wall are all from the late ’50s.

    • BrooklynBomber

      Old man take a look at my life; I’m a lot like you.
      Nice reference!

      I had a fisherman sweater. We all did. Sigh . . .

      • NDC_IPCentral

        I still do, but I bought it in the Gaeltaecht in Ireland in 1981. It’s held up well.

        • BrooklynBomber

          Nice. They were/are definitely solid pieces of clothing that held up. As opposed to the skirts and dresses made out of Indian bedspreads.

          The stripes in Peggy’s first outfit are making me woozy–they’re so authentic I feel like I’m in a time warp.

          • NDC_IPCentral

            I’m a tad younger than the professional women at SC&P but back then there wasn’t a professional women’s counterpart to the reliable Brooks Brothers suit or similar corporate/career/workplace uniform for the white collar crowd. I have vague recollections from 40 years ago when I was interviewing as a graduating law school student and then after graduation, and I wore dresses. There weren’t suits of the sort that cropped up in the very late 70s and all through the 80s that were reliable, “Dress for Success” (or at least reassuring conformity) choices.

            I’d have worn Peggy’s dress first, which was more stylish than most anything I was wearing back then, in a heartbeat! Well, in different colors; that palette wasn’t mine in my blonde youth!

            [PS & off topic - where were you on Saturday? Would have been delighted to meet you at EMC2.]

            • BrooklynBomber

              Yeah, I’m younger, too, but certainly lived through all those styles as a child and then teen. I’m not sure what year the show is in right now, or how old Don’s daughter is, but I suspect I’m about her age!

              Saturday. I’ve just been ridiculously busy lately – not much free time (except moments grabbed at the computer!).

            • NDC_IPCentral

              This past episode, someone here noted, occurred in mid-April 1969. I was finishing my first year at Big Ten U back then.

            • Glammie

              My mother was a professional at the time and she wore a lot of simple suits at the time. Also a lot of black, which was unusual as opposed to ubiquitous as it was in the ’90s.

            • yllas

              I always think of the 50’s-60’s career women wearing little tailored gray suits. Like Hitchcock women.

            • Glammie

              Yep, though my mother’s weren’t usually grey. I have a blue-green plain one of hers from the 60s. She also wore some dresses, but she loved her suits–they were comfortable, she could take the jacket off in the office and put it on when going to court. She liked pants at home, but I don’t think she ever wore pants suits. Not quite dressed-up enough for her, I think. Pants suits didn’t really become elegant til the 90s in my opinion.

        • roverrun

          Mine from Sears in the mid 70’s, from some snythetic yarn that never made it shrink, or get stretched out regardless of the numerous laundries. I still have it in a drawer some where. I imagine it will out last any natural or man made disasters.

        • Gatto Nero

          Lucky you!

        • decormaven

          Oooh, covet….

        • ShaoLinKitten

          I bought my Arran wool sweater fisherman’s sweater in the UK in 1986, and it looks almost as good as the day I got it.

      • yllas

        I have the cardigan style with leather buttons. I still wear it as a jacket in the fall, on a particular kind of cool, sunny, windless day. (all I need is a plaid skirt, knee socks, Bass Weejuns, and I could be back in high school, out picking apples on a weekend!)

        • BrooklynBomber

          I remember those, too!

    • Glammie

      So, here’s my take on Joan–or at least my attempt to find some sort of logic in her behavior. I had a friend who really did sleep with a guy for a job and while the circumstances were different, there are some commonalities. First of all, she, like Joan, wasn’t in dire straits. She had a job, she would have been fine if she hadn’t slept with the guy. But it was a really good job and would set her on a higher-level professional path. Like Joan, she grew up with a single mom and she was sexy and beautiful.

      Sooo, a few thoughts about my friend that also apply to Joan. First, sex with a particular guy wasn’t a huge deal to her. She would have pity sex, or fun sex, and no-strings sex–I think Joan’s been portrayed that way too. She’s an experienced woman, with experiences that are good and bad. In a way, Joan knows, this time, she’s really going to get something out of sleeping with the Jag guy, when she’s slept with a number of men who didn’t really come through.

      Second, my friend, like Joan, didn’t have good taste in men. She wanted them a little too much, perhaps, was willing to give up things a little too readily. So even though she’s extremely bright, capable and a feminist, men tend to have the upper hand in her relationships, which also seems a bit like Joan to me.

      Soooo, my take is that Joan, in many ways, has always wanted security, but also *success*. She wants to rise above her background and *matter*. She thought she could do it through marriage, but that was disastrous and she gave up a lot for that marriage–her right, in a sense, to say “no.” By sleeping with the Jaguar guy, Joan has to say “yes,” just once, but she never has to do so again. For Joan, it’s better to prostitute yourself once than to be a marital rape victim or be at Roger’s whimsical beck and call (remember when he sleeps with Jane at her new apt.? Joan can say “no” to that.)

      So why does Joan have it out for Don? A couple of reasons work for me–one is practical. Joan does not like or appreciate chaos. Don was pure chaos last season–to the point where he disrupted Joan’s plans to be truly independent and wealthy by blowing the IPO. I think, also, Joan was ticked by Don here because her goals didn’t even register with Don (yes, he didn’t know, but Joan’s not playing an impartial judge here.) In some ways, the pettiness of the contract is Joan’s way of making Don pay attention to what she wants. After years of literally being under men, Joan wants the upper hand. In some ways, she’s always had the least control over Don, partly because he hasn’t been interested in her sexually. So she’s taking a different way.

      • Bob Ross

        That is true, he is one of the few people that seem immune to her charms in that way.

        • Glammie

          Yep, and sex is kind of Joan’s ace in the hole. I don’t doubt that at various points, Joan would have slept with Don. We can say that Don not making a pass at Joan is a sign of respect, but for someone whose self-worth has been based, in part, on her allure, there’s a tiny whiff of rejection–the gorgeous, successful guy who didn’t even really see her. She and Peggy had that resentful, resigned conversation when Don married Megan. Joan’s attitude toward Don is a bit screwed up and definitely vindictive, but I think there is a thread that connects. More for me than Bert rejecting a potential client so he can lecture Don.

          • Gatto Nero

            Don confessed to Joan at one point (their night out at a bar, a couple of seasons ago?) that he was a little bit afraid of her. I’m guessing that for Joan that might have been just as gratifying as a sexual pass.

            • Glammie

              Possibly, but perhaps, not fully? Does Joan want to be an object of desire or feared? She seems to go back and forth, doesn’t she? Awesome head-bitch to sex kitten and back again.

            • Gatto Nero

              It means power, either way.

            • Glammie

              Yes, but Joan’s not Machiavellian in that sense–she’s been a lonely character in many ways–being feared has not been a huge challenge for her, but being loved and cherished has been. Yes Roger loved her, but he left Mona for Jane. Greg was a selfish, weak bastard. Her love life actually hasn’t been much better than Peggy’s.

              All the main characters are kind of lonely, aren’t they? Failed attempts at intimacy are an ongoing motif in that show . . . Oh, Mad Men, I can’t quit you even when your writers come up with sucky episodes.

            • Gatto Nero

              Being loved and cherished and being desired sexually are two different things, though.
              I don’t see her as Machiavellian, but I think that for Joan (and not only for her), engendering either fear or desire has the same result: it gives you power over others. Even with her brains and business savvy, a woman like Joan didn’t have many options for getting ahead in the ’60s — so she used what worked.

            • Glammie

              Yes, Joan is consistently desired, but never cherished. I don’t know if it’s so much that she wants power over others–well, to some degree–as much as she wants them not to have power over her.

              I just got far enough back in the thread to read TLo’s earlier debate over the believability of Joan’s acting. I agree with them that the writing is not up to snuff. We’re all interpreting like crazy. However, I think my take is that Joan wouldn’t need to be mercilessly vindictive to behave as she has. I don’t think she’d necessarily be thinking in terms of financially ruining him–more that she’d be laying down the law as she did as office manager *and* protecting her own financial standing by having a way of getting Don out without SCP being hit hard financially. In a way, it’s less about hurting Don than making sure he can’t hurt her. The lack of a romantic connection gives her, perhaps, the emotional distance to do this without thinking of what she’s doing to Don.

            • Gatto Nero

              I agree that for Joan it’s entirely a protective strategy and not meant to be read as vindictive. It’s not so much “power over,” I guess, as the power to guard herself (and her son) from being hurt financially or otherwise.

            • Chris

              Part of the situation with Roger and Joan was she was the one who always kept a distance. She never let it go beyond hotel rooms etc. I don’t know if it was because Joan didn’t see herself as a home wrecker- Roger and she were just indulging in some fun that didn’t mess with his home life, or because she thought he would never leave his wife. I just remember it as Joan keeping an emotional distance. Jane came in and seems to have just thrown herself wholeheartedly at Roger. She was gunning for a husband. Although it was never stated explicitly I always assumed she was the one who told Roger she couldn’t go on as they were, and wanted marriage. Joan was always self contained and self sufficient. I cannot imagine her begging or threatening a man, it would be beneath her. With Greg, I think she had enjoyed being single and having fun she didn’t want to give it up. She pushed it as long as she could, then when Paul put her license up on the board and everyone saw her age she figured she had to settle down soon to still get a good catch. Greg seemed good on paper, good looks and being a doctor’s wife appealed to her. Once she realized what he was, she probably felt like in her 30’s she couldn’t start over, break up with him and find someone new. Plus Joan never let men see her vulnerability which both worked for her and against her.

            • 3hares

              I don’t think it was about keeping a distance, it was about knowing that Roger was not someone she could actually rely on to leave his wife so she had no intention of becoming dependent on him. Roger kept more of an emotional distance from Joan, because he’s just thoughtless.

            • Glammie

              I’m with 3hares here–I think Joan knew Roger wasn’t going to leave his wife–he screws around a lot, but when he has his heart attack he screams for Mona. Even now, there’s a rapport between Mona and Roger–they know how to talk to one another. Roger’s “lion” tribute to Mona at Margaret’s wedding kind of summed it up. (Another reason Mona was in blonde mink–she’s a lion.) So Roger’s midlife crisis was a shock for Joan. I think it also was for Jane. There’s no sign to me that Jane pushed that marriage in particular. It was much more that Margaret was growing up and Roger was feeling old, so he grabbed a pretty young thing as a way of not dealing with age (and death). We see Roger talk to Don about putting his marriage together, but Roger’s own talk of compromising talks Roger out of his own marriage. Jane just happens to be the young piece with whom he’s sleeping at the time.

              As for Joan’s attitude towards marriage–that just doesn’t ring right for the time for a non-rebel, status-conscious character like Joan. There was an incredibly strong push to be married for women. My mother, who was a lot more rebellious than Joan, used to talk about it–and how marrying at 23 was marrying on the old side. This is before 1960, but the whole post WWII era is filled with very young brides. So, some ambiguous feelings about marriage on Joan’s part (she does enjoy working and being independent), but Joan very much wanted the success of a big marriage. She didn’t need Paul’s humiliation to make her feeling she was running out of time–that would have been made very clear at that time no matter what. Peggy’s goals actually are a little different–she’s just enough younger to not feel as constrained by the you-must-marry expectations. Peggy wants marriage, but I don’t think she’d ever marriage her rapist.

            • decormaven

              Season 5, Christmas Waltz, after their visit to the Jaguar showroom. This may be the tell for all of this, and I’m paraphrasing here: Joan said when someone called her to the receptionist desk, it was for a flower delivery. Don said “Those flowers, that first week I thought you were dating Ali Khan.” Joan said, “My mother raised me to be admired. All those flowers, but none from you.” And Don said, “You scared the shit out of me. Bert Peterson said you were the one person in the office I shouldn’t cross.” Bert- what a prognosticator!

            • Gatto Nero

              Yes — thanks for the details!

            • Glammie

              Oh, nice. So, Don crossed her, without intending to, and she’s going to make it tough for him. And, yes, she’s noticed that he wasn’t sending flowers. Though, of course, he does that one time.

          • P M

            “someone whose self-worth has been based, in part, on her allure” – remember when she said in Season 1: “You know what they say: the medium is the message”. I always wondered why she sounds a bit sad (along with a bit angry) when she said it. All her allure couldn’t get her taken seriously the way copy (i.e Peggy) was, however limited the respect for Peggy actually turned out to be.

            • Glammie

              Had totally forgotten–Joan’s always shown some conflict over her chosen role. Very mixed feelings about Peggy not having to use her looks for her career.

            • P M

              That must have been so confusing and frustrating for her on many levels, some of which weren’t even conscious.

      • SylviaFowler

        How is Don more chaos than Roger is, though? He is practically never there. And even last season when Roger was there a little more than he is now, he did work than Don did.

        • Glammie

          Roger doesn’t do anything, so that can be managed. He’s too busy finding his bliss to bother with things like dumping Jaguar because he’s pissed off at a client. And Joan does have some control over Roger–he loves her and she has his son.

          Oh, and there’s a bit of white-male privilege isn’t there in the way Don dumped Jaguar without repercussions. Joan could never get away with doing something like that. So, in a way, I think Joan may feel it’s time Don paid for his behavior–the way women do. Her probably unacknowledged anger may outweigh any appreciation of Don’s general respect for her.

          Actually, when I think about it, no wonder Joan thinks everything was working without Don–from her POV it is. Bert and she are on the same wavelength (green). Pete and Ted, who probably aren’t really, are off in California. Jim treats her with respect. Lou’s apathy as CD doesn’t even register on her. Her having honest-to-God accounts would limit the crap she’d take from Harry.

          I think she’s still too inexperienced as an account executive to really value the CD who can bring the goods. Joan does have her blind spots and her pettiness. The first episode I ever saw of MM was where she fired Jane and her bitchery was on full display. Had to see the other episodes to get the context and see why Joan was fabulous.

          In other words, Joan always has a bitch streak–sometimes her bitchery’s well-deserved at other times less so.

          You know, I’m actually kind of talking myself into this.

          • P M

            I always thought Joan was capable of being a Mean girl. Not quite a Heather…. perhaps a Plastic?

            • Glammie

              Definitely a bit of a queen bee. In the beginning, she seemed to focus on dominating other women and charming men. Not as mean and twisted as Betty–who set up that affair for her friend and then reamed her out for it–but enough so that she was very judgmental of women who didn’t toe the line. On the other hand, she has kept an okay relationship with Peggy. Joan’s kind of improved over the years, but the vindictiveness toward Don still shows she has some serious limitations.

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              I thought of her as the Janis to Peggy’s Cady. Am I right on the ball here? Consider also Cady’s transformation in Mean Girls too

            • P M

              Hmm… I saw Joan as kind of a Regina.

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              Cady = Peggy
              Regina = Joan
              Janis =
              Damian =
              Aaron =
              Gretchen =
              Karen =
              What do you think? : )

            • P M

              Janis = Midge? could work
              OMG Meredith is Karen!!

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              For some reason I thought if I could do a Mad Men mash up of Mean Girls trailer that I’d make Betty Regina (esp. with the weight gain)
              Yeah Midge could work : )

            • P M

              Betty as Regina would work. OMG she has both their (Joan’s and Betty’s) blood in her :D

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              Okay here it is

              Principal Duvall = Bert

              Ms. Norbury = Carla (miss her)

              Michigan Girl = Dawn

              Cady = Peggy

              Janis = Joan (they do have a mean streak and did guide Cady/Peggy)

              Damien = Stan

              Cool Asians = Honda Salesmen

              Jocks = Pete and Lane punching

              Burnouts = Beatniks

              Art Freaks = Creative

              Regina = Betty

              Gretchen = Trudy Campbell

              Karen = Meredith

              “two fendi purses and a silver lexus” girl = Rachel Menken

              Aaron Samuels = Ted (?)

              “You Could try Sears” Saleswoman = Mama Francis

              “Why are you eating a Kalteen Bar” Boyfriend = Henry

              “I’m sorry I laughed at you” Girl = Shirley

              “I’m sorry I called you fat” Girl = Megan

              Seth Moosekowski = Michael Ginsberg

              I really seemed to have worked on this a lot haven’t I?

            • P M

              um, wow, yes, you did.

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              : D

          • SylviaFowler

            Oh I agreed with you about Joan never having any real power over Don because he was never going to sleep with or fall in love with her.

            I do agree that she will always have some sway over Roger because he did. But he is just a far more chaotic and less productive presence at work than Don ever thought about being. And even when Don has made huge moves (swung to another vine), they always work out for the company for the better.

            I don’t agree that Don dumping Jaguar is white male privilege, a pointless phrase that I hate anyway. None of these people think like that. And if Joan was any kind of real feminist anyway, she would have an entirely different personality (i.e. no bitchery to other women and minorities just because it gave her pleasure, which it does). I do agree that she has a bitch streak, although I think it’s more like her default setting than a “streak”. And I still don’t think she is fabulous, for this reason.

            • Azucena

              Well part of the point of white male privilege (or an unfair advantage, if you prefer) is exactly that those who have it never have to think about it. Those who don’t have it are forced to consider how others’ perceptions of their gender, race, etc. affect how their actions are interpreted, or suffer the consequences.

            • Glammie

              Sorry didn’t mean to annoy you with current jargon–it was a sort of a shortcut way of saying that Joan’s got to resent, at some level, the way men get away with things, even if she’s not challenging the status quo or identifying herself as a feminist in a couple of years. But she knows the rules for her and the rules for the men are different and since she knows she’s capable, sometimes it’s going to be galling. Particularly as she’s been forced out of the traditional path of feminine success (marriage to a successful man)by men and circumstances.

              I don’t think Joan (or Peggy) are political animals and thinking in terms of changing the system. But that doesn’t mean they never notice that they’re not treated the same as the men–and that it’s galling. In Joan’s case, she’s kind of swapped marital success for financial success. And Don did, blindly, get in the way of that.

              I’m not saying that it’s fair that Joan would be pissed at Don for this, but thinking it over, it seems possible to me.

    • Kathryn Sanderson

      Something that hasn’t come up yet, AFAIK. Roger tells Marigold, “It’s time to leave Shangri-La, Baby.” Remember how Don was watching “Lost Horizon” in the first episode? It’s about a group of travelers whose plane crashes in…Shangri-La. Not sure how the two things are related, if at all. (But both are included pretty deliberately.) Part of the carousel theme? Something about the ephemeral nature of paradise? Whaddaya think?

    • ktr33

      Most of the commune-ites look like Hippies As Styled by Walker Evans.

    • madge

      “It goes with Roger’s feeling that his daughter is being passed around that commune too. He was pretty okay with what she was doing because he’s had more than his share of free love and drug taking. It wasn’t until he came face to face with the fact that his daughter is betraying her husband and son that he thought she needed to be kidnapped away from that place. In other words, he came face to face with himself and he didn’t like it at all. Old man take a look at my life; I’m a lot like you.”

      Not sure I agree with this … at least, not completely. What it seemed like to me was that he was absolutely fine with everything, until he saw evidence that she was having sex with other people. Drugs and freedom are okay, but Roger’ll be damned if he sees his daughter turn into one of the girls he has orgies with …

      • 3hares

        I don’t know if it was just that she was having sex. Not only did Margaret say that flat out when they started, but Roger didn’t react when he actually saw Margaret going off with the guy to have sex. It was just the next day he’d decided this wasn’t a good place for her. So I don’t think it’s just a case of him having different rules for his daughter when it comes to sex.

      • Gatto Nero

        “Roger’ll be damned if he sees his daughter turn into one of the girls he has orgies with …”
        That was my impression, too. And he was probably as horrified in that moment by his own recent behavior as he was with hers.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        We’re saying pretty much the same thing.

        • madge

          you know, when i was watching the episode, for a minute there i thought there was gonna be an orgy at the farm and roger was going to be part of it and it was WIGGING ME OUT

          • FibonacciSequins

            So did I, and I was so uncomfortable until it became clear that wasn’t happening.

            • Glammie

              So we know that Roger does have limits. Whew.

    • AViewer44

      Maybe someone else has made this point already, but I think Bonnie’s lacy shrug is part of her dress. If you look at the first picture you can see it has a split up the back that looks a lot like a zipper. And if you look at the second, you can see it has piping around the neck in the same fabric as the dress, with shoulder straps beneath. My guess is that it’s linked together, like a lace dress with a silk chemise under it. I think she just puts it on and zips it up and it all falls into place and stays put.

      In other news, I love the point about the lack of romance in the show’s depiction of the counterculture. And I totally agree with the unbelievability of Joan’s and Peggy’s behavior toward Don. (But I think you mean that Stan and Ginsberg are dressed in “complementary” outfits, rather than “complimentary” ones.)

      • JeanProuvaire

        Ginsberg’s outfits are never complimentary.

    • Peggy Hazard

      Thanks, guys…I cannot get the Green Acres theme song out of my head. It is spot-on as a reference to the farm story, of course.

    • ladyeve

      Wasn’t green a big color for Joan in the Jaguar episode? She wore a green robe after the deed (when Don tried to too late to stop her — “you’re one of the good ones”) and Herb gave her an emerald because green goes so well with red hair? Seems like a major callback to the that episode and an indication that Joan’s animosity (agreed, over the top) is all about the shame she still feels regarding that episode and that Don, in effect, threw away her sacrifice. Shame, especially sexual shame is a recurring and powerful theme on the show (both Don and Joan are also the only two major characters to have been raped — Joan by her husband and Dick by the prostitute) and seems to be a kind of unseen motivator for some pretty destructive behavior. Agree though that if that’s what the writers are going for, they’re making it VERY subtextual.

      • Anton

        Thanks so much for saying, that Don was raped. There are way too many people out there who think, that Don has Mommy-issues because of that prostitute. It was clearly rape. And thanks for the parallel of Don and Joan. I wouldn’t ever have thought of it myself.

        • P M

          That whole story makes me deeply sad, and it’s not one that is told often about men.

    • rhymeswithorange

      Joan’s necklace reminded me of her pen necklace, and her hair was up more like it used to be. I also thought the scene with her and Peggy was a callback to their relationship in the first season or two- Joan is standing over Peggy and shot from below to look much larger than her. It shows how far their relationship has come.

    • A Shiny O’Connor

      “We’d like to think he’s really going to try to change this time, but we can’t help noting he’s dressed almost identically to the way he was in the opening scenes of the episode.” – He’s going around in circles, getting nowhere.

    • ItAin’tMe

      Your dad and his band are beautiful. And they look pretty darn clean. I guarantee those jeans are bells.

      Yes of course, there were hippies on heroin. But it wasn’t the norm, and it definitely wasn’t the drug of choice in communes. (And of course I would never say never). It was a problem then, like it is a problem now, but hard drugs are not what killed the scene, not that they didn’t contribute. And yes, the decimation of the San Francisco scene by 1967, due to crystal meth addiction has been well documented.

      I stand by what I said originally. The commune people as depicted in this episode, are too dirty and unattractive. There is no reason that Margaret would be attracted to them, as far as I can see. There needs to be a charismatic leader looking like a long haired, hippie God. Like, your dad, maybe. ☮

      • Karen

        Dirt kept the drugs in the system.

    • Vermona

      About Bonnie’s dress: I don’t think getting the tassels just right was that hard. The crocheted part is actually attached to the dress. The piping at the neck is the same fabric as the dress itself, and you can see the zipper in the back.

    • Karen

      I found the commune clothing the most interesting, but wondered where much of it “originated.” That is to say, after Vietnam, men in the counter culture wore pieces of military attire (the field jacket/John Lennon) as an F-U to the establishment.

      Prior, you see Harry’s glasses (military issue-like) and Don’s home-work clothes (khakis, white t-shirt from the war) as hangovers from the service. But what of the commune crew’s?

      She doesn’t have money, yet I think that despite her Pig Pen appearance, Marigold looks pretty damn cute AND HAPPY. She wears what seems to be a Little House dress, boots, but it is hard to trace exactly where the look was handed down from. Where it was snagged from/ handed down from–what era. What they are all wearing should give the appearance of throwaways more than anything.

      • Glammie

        As well as being an FU, I remember that Army surplus stores were a big place to buy things–cheap and sturdy stuff.

      • ItAin’tMe

        I like your post, and you’re right about the military clothing. I think the clothes would’ve been more thrift shop, than throwaway. Like, there was still some life in them. The prairie dresses were sold in mainstream stores by that time. They were the Boho chic of the time, and many were beautiful and high end. St. Laurent did a line. Maybe Margaret brought hers with her?

        • P M

          She ruined a St. Laurent? Margaret, do you know how valuable that is now?!

          • ItAin’tMe

            Lol! No, I didn’t mean that was one of St. laurent’s peasant dresses!

            • P M

              I know, but it was a fun flight of fancy ;)

            • ItAin’tMe

              I must say, Marigold in a tattered and funked up YSL peasant dress would be fierce!

        • Wellworn

          I owned a prairie dress and a poncho in the early 70s. I am thinking that she did bring some of her clothes with her, maybe shopping for them to prepare for her commune life. If they were clean and new, they would have been fashionable at the time. A suede poncho was not a cheap item then, as I recall. Mine was woven – kind of sarape fabric. I wish I still had it.

          • ItAin’tMe

            Oh hell yes, I so wish I had still had some of my clothes from then. I had a killer paisley prairie dress! It had the off the shoulder peasant top, and a cinch belt of the same fabric. Never had a suede ponch, though.

      • yllas

        I noted her dress right away, because I had a midi-skirt, almost identical, yes, back in the 60’s. Tiny prints, calico, Indian prints too – were all the rage, it wasn’t all paisley and colorblocks and glaring psychedelic swirlies.

      • ldancer

        Some of the guys who wound up on communes were vets, too. That scene brought to mind Lauren Groff’s novel “Arcadia”, most of which takes place on a commune further upstate. One protagonist comes from aristocratic Southern parents she’s rejected, another is a damaged Vietnam veteran.

        The moment that Margaret/Marigold yells at Roger is the most real and honest I’ve seen that character be. It was great.

    • ElevenSeventeen

      Hi everyone. I finally registered with Disqus just so I could comment about Joan and her apparent new hostility toward Don. My apologies if someone’s already mentioned this, but thinking back to earlier seasons Joan really was kind of a Queen Bee and I think that side of her is showing again. She’s always been impressed with status (which was why marrying a doctor was a priority for her) and a stickler for rules. Don’s broken an unspoken rule and lost his status and I think she and Bert both think of him as being “trash” now and an undesirable. I think her inner snob is showing itself.

      • 3hares

        I’d actually think that the type of woman Joan is would instinctively still see Don as being more impressive than the likes of Lou and Bert.

    • Man Dala

      I love EVERYTHING about Roger and Mona together on their way to and arrival at the commune, especially Mona’s fur, jewellery, hair and makeup. Talia Balsam is absolutely fantastic. Coincidentally (or not) I am reading a book by a Jungian analyst that emphasizes the importance of the “spectrum” of the psyche, from red to ultraviolet. “We were cold and we were clear, ’til we let the spectrum in … and every colour illuminates.” — Florence, “Spectrum (Say My Name”).

    • P M

      Is it just me, or has Caroline’s hair changed? It looks like her, but a 1969 version of her hair, ya know?

    • P M

      That Mets pennant is still on my mind. The placement in the office, the pennant itself. To me, it represents Don’s penance. That’s why he’s keeping it. If ever he gets too cocky, that bright red sticks out in his memory and his office like a scar.

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        The Mets were orange and blue./Mets fan who really, really, really hopes the magical month of October 1969 is covered to the point I wouldn’t care if the show breezed through the moon landing or Woodstock in order to guarantee me seeing it for 2014

        But in terms of colors, it does represent Lane and in a way, sacrifice. Lane was the new kid, much like the Mets were when Lane came to the country in 1962. He was ignored/made fun of/considered a joke but was nice, warm, and became apart of the office family and the identity of the office. You can say his ginger hair, always made him always red-headed step-child, which was often a common way the Mets were poked fun at in the press and even the orange of the team colors underlined that point of contention- not to mention all those last place finishes. But as SC&P enters the new decade, orange is the office color and the current ‘hip’ (the Mets, despite being a mediocre club had the highest attendance in the league and Tom Seaver was a golden boy who was more apple pie than rebel like Joe Namath) baseball team is about to really make its run. Now, orange, white, and blue were the colors of New York anyway, and the colors of the Knicks, but I also just identify that pennant with Lane. Don’s cross to bear. He feels responsible for not just what was built with him and Lane’s effort for the agency but eventually, even in an impatient city like New York, good things can happen- even if it feels like a stroke of luck, which is arguably the Don Draper/Dick Whitman story, too.

        • Benten32

          The Mets orange and blue pennant exactly matches the orange and blue Dante’s Inferno poster on Roger’s wall. This connects Roger and Don and — the Mets will lead Don out of hell.

        • Susan Collier

          “Now, orange, white, and blue were the colors of New York anyway, and the
          colors of the Knicks, but I also just identify that pennant with Lane.”

          Yes. Very NY colors. And I heard that those colors were chosen for the Mets colors because they took an element each from the two NL teams that departed for California the decade before—the Dodgers and the Giants.

      • Gatto Nero

        He probably harbors some guilt over Lane’s death as well.

    • Jasmaree

      The last suit Don wears actually gives me a bit of hope. Here’s why:

      The first time we see Don in that blue suit, its a light blue-gray color. It’s almost the color of all the other grayish suits in the office. Since blue is an unusual color for Don, it does signal some change on his part to wear that suit, but it’s still markedly similar to his old uniform and the dress of all the other male partners. The last shot has a much brighter blue, more bold and energetic. I saw it as a signal that though Don was losing steam in the beginning, he’s regained his sense of purpose by the end.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Good read.

      • FibonacciSequins

        I noticed that too. I also think “On A Carousel” playing at the end of the scene can be interpreted as another sign that Don’s getting back up on the horse, so to speak.

    • april

      My dad worked at the post office as a clerk for years 60’s-2000’s, he wore short sleeves button up, pocket protector the whole time. Added jeans in the 90’s, but that’s about it. Must have been a non-uniform uniform during that time.

      • april

        Heck, the one time we went to the Galveston beach he wore that!

      • snarkykitten

        Dude, my dad still dresses like that. To be fair, he was 19 in 1969, so he kind of stuck with it. But oddly, he doesn’t look totally ridiculous!

      • ThaliaMenninger

        I immediately think NASA when I see short sleeves and pocket protectors. Mission Control in Houston, you know?

    • Funkykatt

      Stan sorta dressed like the guys in ‘Bread’.

    • SportifLateBoomer

      When I was growing up we totally had those exact brown coffee mugs that Don is drinking out of the morning after the binge. I’m cleaning out my dad’s house, and I’m hoping I find one remaining. It’s those little details that get me every time.

      Also, the floppy hat on the hippie chick. I remember my sister crocheting hats with exactly that shape, exactly at that time.

      Agree with the notion downthread that Mona’s fur and makeup is her armor. She is most definitely going into battle. I also love that Talia Balsam has let herself age naturally. Both she and her TV/real hubby are gorgeous with faces of great character and expression.

      • Babyboomer59

        To Mona looks are everything her clothes and make up her armour and her daughter was raised to be the same way. It was a painful and ugly scene between them before Mona left and it will be interesting to see how it plays out. Margaret may yet surprise us if she gets tired of wearing filthy clothes and cold weather comes. She knows her parents cared enough to come after her and hopefully she will come out of this a bit more mature.

        • Glammie

          I love the fact that the two of you both have “boomer” in your names–because we’re looking at the generation gap.

    • ybbed

      I don’t know if this has been posted, but something that stood out to me right away when watching Mona and Margaret is that they are both wearing animal skins! They sort of mirror each other with those animal skins, one very expensive and one very low budget.

      • Glammie

        And one’s furry on the inside and the other on the outside. They’re inside out images of one another. Marigold’s rebelling, but she’s still her mother’s daughter no matter how she feels about it.

    • http://tvblogster.blogspot.com Boop

      I’m a dyed in the wool Mets fan (I know – it’s a burden I must carry), and I love the dichotomy between the pennant representing the remnants of a dead man, and the symbol of a 1969 miracle. This episode is hitting home for me big time. (I’m a New Yorker, born and raised in Westchester and I flipped when I heard Francine mentioned Dobbs Ferry last week.) My dad was an lifelong IBM’er and was part of this business machine culture that started making it’s way into offices back then. The building he worked in had an annex that was a windowless cement building. It housed all the mainframe computer systems that contained about the same amount of content that one iPod could carry today.

      Final thought. Why isn’t Don getting some grey around the temples yet? Are they trying to make him so ageless – so stuck in time that he’s not even going grey? And if he touched up his temples, they would have shown that because….exposition. That would be something Weiner would let us in on.

      • Susan Collier

        Me too. I sometimes wonder what kind of person I’d be if I were born into a Yankees family. Would I expect more greatness or accept less failure?

        There was an article recently involving metrics and maps of MLB team allegiances and two teams, the Mets and the A’s, were the only two that had absolutely NO foothold in any geographic region at all.

    • Nick

      I’m pretty sure that the Mink coat Mona is wearing is the same one Betty wore in “The doorway” season 5…

    • smh4748

      I am actually tempted to make that image of Stan a poster for my work area, because I love Stan so much, and because that look on his face is so priceless. Yay Stan. Please be on every episode until the end, please and thank you.

      Characterization quibbles aside, Joan is KILLING it in that green dress. I personally think that’s a Top Five look for her.

      The hoop earrings really stand out on Peggy–I don’t think I’d notice them that much on anyone else, but for whatever reason, they really leapt out at me.

      • not_Bridget

        I agree with Joan’s look. Writing a serious critique of the show is a daunting task; I read good recaps but am mostly content to see how the season goes & draw conclusions at the end. Is there some other reason for Joan’s hostility? The show does sometimes keep “secrets”–and then reveal them.

        But it’s always fun to just look at the costumes & the decor. Shallow? Not really….

    • buddy100

      LOVE LOVE LOVE your observation of Bonnie Whiteside. Her bright sunny colors and florals are supposed to indicate breezy distinctly non-threatening cheeriness. But it’s those little details – like the perfectly lined up tassles – that reveal her for the calculating mercenary she is. You realize just how intentional her performance is. She is going to be the most positive most optimistic real estate agent in CA and you WILL close right now. With a smile. Dammit.

      • P M

        Pete’s met his match all right.

    • samitee

      I was just waiting to see someone in a Dharma Initiative jumpsuit strolling through the background of the hippie farm.

      Also, I NEED Caroline’s glasses.

    • ModernDowager

      I think the point about Stan’s colorful outfit is interesting. I would even go so far as to suggest that this is pointing towards some surprising plot development for Stan. He was pissed that he didn’t get the California position. Remember how excited he was to start something new? the groovy and professional get-up he wore that expressed that? Stan is disillusioned but his clothes tell me he is not defeated. Stan’s keeping the status quo to pay the rent, but I wouldn’t be surprised if he has something else going on…his clothes feel hopeful to me and maybe he will be the creative to jump ship, to screw the monolith and stay creative. Go Stan!

    • deirdre

      With all the dopplegangers (Mona and Marigold in their furs, Don and the IBM guy with their Brylcreem standoff and white shirts) did anyone notice the older secretary in the hallway with Peggy? She was also in browns and grays, but they both had on the same hideous brown tights and thick black shoes. She was like future Peggy. Peggy’s brown outfits are turning her into office furniture. She’s a fixture.

    • buddy100

      This might be random, but I finally figured out what Ted has been doing this whole time. “A Day’s Work” shows Ted working on
      a model airplane while Pete is on a conference call with the partners back east. In “The Monolith”, the model is shown completed on Ted’s desk.

    • http://twitter.com/guy_in_london The Guy Next Door

      Brilliant analysis – You guys are genuises !!!

      • Daphnemcl

        I agree. I was a Hippie back then but I don’t remember anyone looking that dirty.

    • http://www.susankane.com Susan Kane

      Holy crap, I have Caroline’s sweater in taupe. Got on ebay.

      • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

        Shoot Molly Ringwald’s character in “Pretty In Pink” would wear that and her style is awesome! Minus that destroyed prom dress of Annie Potts

    • zky

      Sorry if this has already been mentioned, but did anyone else think that the woman who offered Peggy coffee toward the end of the episode (is she her secretary now?) looked a lot like an earlier-in-the-series Joan?

    • Daphnemcl

      I think I’m right on this. Don and Lloyd were dressed alike and looked alike, but Lloyd’s tie was a bit shorter. I remember at some point in the seventies men’s ties got shorter. Obviously it showed that Don wasn’t the new, sharp kid on the block anymore.

    • John G. Hill

      BTW, if you see Christina Hendricks today, you’ll realize she’s really trimmed down, which makes me realize her over-the-top figure is more a part of her character than what Hendricks wants for herself.

    • oli

      Look at how well Peggy’s skirt matches Lou’s wall. It’s like she literally belongs in his office.

    • eekahil

      Hippy Guy’s furry purple vest = counterpoint to Mona’s pristine creamy mink coat.

    • ChaCha

      I had a daisy pin just like Meredith’s. It disappeared years ago. Maybe Weiner’s minions snuck in and stole it for the show!