Mad Men: The Strategy

Posted on May 19, 2014

Mad-Men-Season-7-Episode-6-Review-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLOChristina Hendricks in AMC’s “Mad Men”

 

“That’s the job.”

“What’s the job?”

“Living in the not knowing.”

If you were to ask us what our favorite scene in the entire run of Mad Men was, we wouldn’t hesitate to name this one, from season two, where Don walks Peggy right up to a killer Mohawk Airline tag  (“What did you bring me, Daddy?”) by connecting with her on a deep and intense level and coaxing greatness out of her. It’s a scene that perfectly defines their relationship and the relationship the show has with advertising; the ways the writers use it to illuminate themes and comment on important personal and familial relationships. Well, they finally managed to top themselves – and how utterly, perfectly poetic that this time, Don and Peggy weren’t connecting over the perfect way to sell airlines to businessmen fathers, they were doing it over the question of how to sell hamburgers to overworked mothers. Instead of Don at the top of his game teaching an eager apprentice the ropes, we had Don at the end of his, well… rope, doing his best to placate an angry and bitter Peggy back into greatness. To end the scene with them slowly and sadly dancing to “My Way” made for the absolute best moment in the entire run of the show. Beautifully written, directed and performed.

We needed this episode. And by “we,” we mean the audience. Mad Men may just be one of the most depressing television shows in the history of the medium, but they really managed to outdo themselves in the last dozen episodes or so. And the creators were asking a lot of the audience to dive right back into a really depressing and downbeat set of storylines at the start of this season. It never needs to be a hilarious laugh riot, but there are times when the show benefits from a light approach and this one came at the exact moment it was needed. Even better, it sacrificed none of its integrity. Don’s life – and Don himself – is still a mess, Peggy is feeling the weight of choices and regrets bearing down on her, Pete is still kind of a shithead, Ginsberg is in an institution, Megan is miserable, and Bob Benson has gone from mysterious cipher to tragic figure.

But is it okay that we cheered at the sight of Bob again? We feared he’d been forever banished to Detroit, never to be seen again. Even better for us, we got more of a glimpse into Bob’s life and a confirmation of who he is, something that many people have been clamoring for if for no other reason than to put any further wild theorizing about the character to rest. He is what we always thought he was: except for the Dick Whitman-esque backstory,  a very typical urban gay male of the period. He appears to be “in the life,” as they used to say, and like many gay men then and now, is willing to live a lie in order to make a better life for himself. “We can live in a mansion!” Someone from Bob’s humble (and to him, embarrassing) background, with Bob’s kind of spooky ambition, would do just about anything if life dangled “GM Executive” in front of him as an opportunity. 

We’re just glad that Joan shut that pathetic thing down immediately. It turns out she’s also exactly what we thought she was in this relationship: the classic fruit fly. She’s always known he was gay and, like we said last season, she’s the one person in the cast most likely to form a close friendship with a cute young gay guy, having lived in the Village for the entire decade. She’s never had any illusions about what Bob is. You could see her trying to process it for a second, wondering if she’d somehow read this wrong, but the second he kissed her, she backed off completely; just like the time Sal kissed her and she knew immediately that he was gay. We maintain that it’s unlikely that the show will address the Stonewall riots, but if we’re reading the calendar correctly, this episode took place the weekend before. The pointed representation of the abusive cop (“Goodnight, ladies”) and the use of entrapment to get that GM exec arrested were fairly obvious foreshadowing to us. It was abusive cops harrassing gay people that set the Stonewall riots off. And now that Bob’s been rejected by his best gal, who told him he should go out and find love for himself (which: go Joanie), he’s perfectly positioned to be out the night of the riots, cruising or drinking his cares away, like so many gay men were. Like we said: unlikely to be portrayed, but we can dream, right?

Either way, Joan’s not looking for marriage proposals right now, she’s thinking like a partner and an account exec. Bob’s so wrapped up in himself that it never occurred to him that Joan would be concerned about the loss of Chevy, but he doesn’t know her as well as he thinks – and besides, gay men like him (status-seeking, a bit narcissistic -“Does my face please you?” – and conformist) are notorious for never really seeing their gal friends as fully realized people. As for what exactly is happening with Chevy, we kinda got lost around the time Roger seemed to be laughing it off and somehow blaming McCann for it. The big news is, Harry’s a partner now and Joan is furious. We’re a little torn. Harry’s a dick, but he was good to Don last episode, he’s been invaluable to the agency and to be perfectly frank, we’re not crazy about the slightly vindictive way Joan is wielding her power lately. We think our second-favorite moment of the episode was when Don eyed her blowup cooly and said right to her, ” Say what you will, but he’s very loyal.” BURN. Don’s being the good boy, but he’s feeling confident enough to let it slip that he’s not too keen on Joan at the moment. We wonder if this will be one of the relationships Don can’t repair. He got Sally and Peggy back into his good graces, but he doesn’t have the same kind of deep emotional connection with Joan to weather this. They have history and they have respect for each other (or did), but they’re not great, close friends. They might really be done with each other.

Speaking of being done with each other, Megan’s packing up her fondue pot and there’s no way in hell that’s a good sign. As she tears through the closets in the apartment looking for the things she keeps saying she misses, Don finds himself staring at an old newspaper announcing the Kennedy assassination, the exact weekend his previous marriage came to an end; the last time he felt like he does now: defeated, depressed, and desperately trying to hold on to something without knowing why or whether he should. History repeating. Megan sipping that glass of wine as she flew back to L.A. looked more content than she has all season.

Don is incapable of reconciling with Megan and he seems quite aware of that fact. When Peggy asks him what he has to worry about, Dick Whitman comes bubbling back to the surface. “That I never did anything and that I don’t have anyone.” Nobody loves little Dick Whitman. Thankfully, with this episode, Don got something back; something we didn’t realize he’d been suffering from its lack: a close female confidante. After the episode that somewhat mirrored this one, “The Suitcase,” when Anna Draper died and Don and Peggy stayed up all night drunkenly bonding and fighting, we figured Peggy was going to move into that role, but Don married Megan, pushing them further apart and he wound up taking a whole slew of frustrations out on her, ruining their friendship and taking them to this moment. Yet another person angry at Don and another round of apologies and explanations.

But Peggy’s not really mad at Don. She’s upset with where her life has taken her. “What did I do wrong?” she tearfully asks Don, after relaying the story of having to look into station wagon after station wagon of mothers with their children. It was always the great irony of Peggy’s character that she was very good at a job that had her selling products to women nothing like her by trying to get inside their heads and figure out what they wanted and needed. It seems like it’s finally starting to get to her. The way she bitterly referred to herself as “the voice of moms” when telling Don he was going to make the pitch to Burger Chef was painfully telling. “You know that she’s every bit as good as any woman in this business!” Pete exclaims, as a compliment, not realizing that he essentially just called her second class in her job. But this gave Don a chance to not be such a horrible person for once and he gave Peggy pretty much everything she needed in that moment: assurance that she was excellent at her job and that her choices haven’t failed her. It rang hollow, as they sadly danced together, each lost in their own regrets, but if nothing else, he got to be the proud father to her.  “Whenever I’m unsure about an idea,” he tells her pointedly, “first I abuse the people whose help I need and then I take a nap.” “Done.” says Peggy warmly, immediately getting the joke – and the implied compliment.  Just a fun, warm, poignant scene loaded with history and chemistry. “I just turned 30, Don.” “Shit. When?”

And finally, there’s poor Pete who is, like Don and Peggy, facing up to the consequences of his own poor decisions and what that really means for his life now. In typical Pete fashion he manages to once again blow up his relationship with Trudy (“There’s no place for you in this family,” she says, helpfully pointing out the theme of the episode and serving as a rebuke to Lou’s earlier “It’s nice to see families getting along again!”) and also manages to blow up his relationship with Bonnie. In the end, it was Peggy – because it could only be Peggy – who came up with a solution for everything.  “Does this family exist anymore?”she asks. “Are there people who eat dinner and smile at each other instead of watching TV?” Peggy drunkenly stumbled on one of the most revolutionary concepts in modern advertising: the idea that you could pitch products to non-traditional families and to women who had jobs outside the home.

In the end, the circumstances of this account and this pitch brought three people without families together to break bread and to form their own family, for however brief a moment it lasts. And how perfect that it’s these three, who have passed a bunch of secrets back and forth to each other; whose entire relationships with each other are bound up in their shared secrets and experiences. How is that not a family?

And can we just skip ahead to the part where SC&P is a smoking ruin and Draper, Campbell & Olson has just opened its doors to business? Isn’t it time?

 

 

 

 

 

[Photo Credit: Justina Mintz/AMC]

    • siriuslover

      oh my god, yes! I am so glad you guys read this the same way I did. There was so much cynicism about Don’s moment with Peggy, but I didn’t read it that way at all. I cried! I really cried! Maybe because I’m an easily manipulated sap, but not really. I’ve been re-watching the series (binge watching really, while avoiding other work), and Peggy is Don’s intellectual soul mate. Not romantic, not in the slightest, but FAMILY. And that final scene with Don, Pete, and Peggy and Don pointing out the ketchup on Pete’s face–just brilliant. And I looked to my son and said, “see, they’re family!”

      • Lattis

        Maybe because I’m an easily manipulated sap

        haha – You’ve just expressed in one simple phrase why I can’t watch “Call the Midwife.” It just takes so much effort to steel myself from tearing up because dammit – I won’t be an easily manipulated sap! : )

        • melisaurus

          There is nothing wrong with a little empathy. We need more of it.

        • Alloy Jane

          That show has me crying constantly, but I don’t feel manipulated by it. I’m just an emotional gal, that’s all.

      • Mismarker

        I am also re-watching (on season 5 now) and found last night’s episode to be my favorite of the whole series. For me, it is all about Don and Peggy. Always has been. They are two sides of the same coin and the series suffers when they are not on the same team. Loved it! Don and Peggy need to get together every four years, on or about Peggy’s birthday, to have cleansing “come to Jesus” all-nighters. I’d watch a nonstop sizzle reel of that.

      • Girl_With_a_Pearl

        Actually, I saw the Don/Peggy dance as much more hopeful that you guys. They have been on the outs since the two firms merged, really all of last season until now, with Peggy getting progressively more hostile towards Don. Now they’re back together. Sure, their personal lives are crap. But their personal lives were crap when they were on the outs too. Now that they are on the same side again, they can work against Lou together.

      • Kathy

        I also cried when they were dancing! (possibly pms-related). But did Pete actually have ketchup on his face or was Don just taking Pete down a notch?

        • Violina23

          He did… Peggy handed him a napkin :)

        • Beth

          Really had ketchup on his face.

          • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

            He looked like a kid painting the Joker’s face on himself with ketchup. But maybe that was something only my weirdo brother did. :)

        • Nancy Aronson

          Me, too. Their relationship is so moving. & it’s incredible to see Don put her interests above his own. & for him to be open, and to Kiss the Top of her Head. That slayed me. I was slain.

          • Anne

            Slain.

      • Mothra

        I didn’t cry at the episode but I sure did at the recap. You guys really do have a magical way of telling (or retelling?) a story. I love you all very much. Now go fix mommy a drink.

        • Winter_White

          Lol, Mothra.

          I understand that this show is exceptional, but I don’t watch it. I was a little girl in this era and…let’s just say, having lived through it, and with scars to show for that, I simply cannot be entertained by it. (Ms. Oversensitive here, so boring!) ;) But I’m wildly grateful for these recaps. The analysis, the writing, the images — I look forward to this the way y’all look forward to the show.

          • Prairie

            Authentic Mad Men at my house growing up, too. The show gets it right. “Yada, Yada, Scotch, Hearty Laugh, More Scotch!”

          • ehc20

            My parents (born in the late 40s, graduated high school in ’65) can’t watch either. Just too close to home, they said.

            • MasterandServant

              Funny, my parents (graduated high school in ’65 and ’68 in Brooklyn), really love the show!

            • Winter_White

              A friend, my age, who also suffered from a Mad Men early-childhood said to me, “Whadda you mean you ‘can’t watch it’ — my God, don’t you want to see all those CLOTHES our moms wore again?!!” :) She loves the show, too.

          • judf

            so true…I am Sally…still, I have to watch…want to, need to.

          • Floretta

            Oh yeah. I’m 2 years older than Sally so it resonates on a lot of levels, especially early on. I can still hear the laughter, the tinkling of ice cubes in highball glasses, smell the cigarettes of their friends and neighbors (and my dad’s pipe tobacco) at a cocktail party my parents had when my siblings and I were supposed to be in bed. Mom’s sheer party aprons, special tablecloths, assorted glassware and mysterious bottles … all too real. Fortunately my parents were happily married but I babysat for couples who were the door-slamming, “well you can tell her!”, obscenity screaming parents whose kids hid under the furniture. Sad.

            • Winter_White

              Feeling a little spaced out after reading your evocative comment, Floretta! :)

              Since I don’t watch, I have no idea if Mad Men has the following sorts of scenes, but here’s the kind of memory that still, all these years later, makes my face twitch:

              After a couple of those cocktails, a woman (whom I loved and looked up to) says to a man I don’t know: “Oh, I just hate being around women…they’re so catty.” She sighs, gives a coy shrug and looks away — but I can see that she’s basking in the look of approval — admiration, in fact! — he is giving her for saying that. (I witnessed this more than once; always the same reaction from men.) So confusing for me, as a little girl…

      • Violina23

        I didn’t cry, but the poignancy wasn’t lost on me. I’m so surprised how many people saw it in a romantic way. It couldn’t be any more father-daughter, especially with the kiss on the head. There’s something really satisfying about the idea of the two of them getting each other out of their funks. Maybe some of these characters really can be in a good place by the end of the series.

        • editrixie

          Well, I was terrified for a while that he was going to turn the moment sexual. I just have so little faith in this show anymore that I kept saying, “Please don’t kiss her please don’t kiss her.” I was SO GLAD when they just danced. But it was dicey there for a minute!

          • bmwguy

            Yeah, I was wondering if Peggy was going to say something to Don about drinking in the office, can never tell with Weiner !

            • T C

              I don’t believe that the partners have explicitly communicated the rules to Peggy.

          • Nancy Aronson

            the possibility of Don making sexual advances didn’t cross my mind for one second. i kept recalling the time in the greek diner when he reassured Peggy that she was “cute as hell.” Peggy’s always been the one who put out the vibe, actually.

        • teensmom99

          I actually think people will end up in a good place. I think Weiner is doing his typical misdirection when he says people don’t change . . . because what he really means is that their essential character doesn’t change but they can learn from experiences and have insight IF THEY CHOOSE TO.

          • SparkleNeely

            Man, I hope you’re right. I just don’t trust him, ever since Season 5. I heard that the Andre and Maria Jacquebretton aren’t writing this season and that makes sense.

            • Lisa_Co

              Yes, I noticed they haven’t been in the credits. Also, the usual DP (cinematographer) Chris Manley, has been doing a lot of directing. Last night was his first this season back as DP.

          • melisaurus

            We saw Don today acknowledge some of his patterns: Abuse the people I need help from etc.

            • teensmom99

              Exactly. He’s doing the work

        • Leah Elzinga

          I really just read this as really good friends. I initially thought “Father-Daughter”, too, but then I thought, “no, this is how it CAN be between really good male-female friendships”. There’s a security in knowing that things are platonic, and that you can trust each other enough to be physically close. It says SO much about the depth of 1. trust that Peggy inherently has, or at least wants to have for Don and 2. the level of respect that Don has for Peggy. Because, let’s face it, whether he was physically attracted to her or not, if he didn’t respect her, after enough scotch, he DEFINITELY would have made a move. It’s just who he is. BUT, this is Peggy. And she is his friend. And he respects her.

          • Violina23

            I think the reason it reads “father-daughter” is because Peggy basically “grew up” under Don’s tutelage (Hey, she’s THIRTY when did that happen?), and his guidance was the key model for her professional success. And as much as she HAS been a success, she is still learning from him. It all feels very fatherly, even though she may have reached a similar level of professionalism (or as much as she can get with the disadvantage of being female)

      • Johnny Neill

        I looked at the dance as something that kind of went from Father and Daughter to Big Brother and Sister, not that Brothers and Sisters dance together, but because she was every bit his equal. The look on Don’s face right before he kissed the top of her head was so full of everything. The look he gave Megan in the hallway of the apartment, that he knew it was over but neither one of them wanted to call it. Homes are a big theme on the show, actual physical locations. Megan wants to meet Don someplace neutral for what I guess would be last hurrah before legally breaking up. Jane was so hurt that Roger had sex with her in her apartment, because that made it part his. I just love this show so much.

        • Bobbi

          Big brother and little sister is exactly what I saw. Having grown up with a brother that was substantially older than me, I’ve experienced moments precisely like this one in tone. It was a perfect scene.

        • greenmelinda

          While Don & Megan are clearly over, wouldn’t she be reluctant to divorce him given his generous income? It would be rather interesting to see her actually try to live the life of a struggling actress.

          • smayer

            I have my doubts (though I’m more than likely wrong) that she will go through with a divorce due to finances. “I miss my things” had so much meaning to it, IMO.

            • Kit_W

              Yeah and i didn’t read the closing of those drapes when she was on the airplane as some sort of finality to her and Don’s relationship as others did, I saw it more of a clear signal to let us now what side of those drapes she was on. Especially since it immediately lead to a full on camera face shot of her sipping her champagne.
              She’s enjoying his money, and the fact that he’s so far away, far too much at the moment.

          • Julie Parr

            I feel certain that in 1970 she would be granted generous alimony, even without kids.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

            • greenmelinda

              There’s alimony and then there’s Pucci.

              Maybe she’ll end up being Rod Serling’s side piece.

          • melisaurus

            Exactly. I think that’s why she’s drawing it out.

      • Hilda Elizabeth Westervelt

        I kept thinking about the Suitcase episode and Peggy and Don in the Greek Diner. “Why is there a dog in the Parthenon? That’s a cockroach. Let’s go someplace darker…”

      • Zaftiguana

        It really read to me almost as that father-daughter dance at a wedding. This whole episode actually seemed to me to be about how at the start of the series, the central family of the story were the Drapers, who are now all scattered to the wind. Now the central “family” of the series is a very non-traditional one that revolves around Peggy. Don in a paternalish role, Pete, the father of her child, Stan as her brother, Joan as an older sister, Uncle Freddy and crazy cousin Ginsberg; and little Julio, the same age as her son, for whom she puts out little bowls of pretzels to watch TV together.

        • Qitkat

          That would make quite the sitcom! Better than Modern Family.

        • DollyMadisonWI

          After this episode, I wouldn’t include Joan.

          • Zaftiguana

            Only if it’s a Don-centric family, and again, unlike in 1960, it’s not. This is Peggy’s family, and her big sister-little sister relationship with Joan is fine. Besides, what would a family be without at least two members who are barely on speaking terms ;)?

            • melisaurus

              To me she’s more of an Aunt Joan. In real life my Gandma Joan would be about the same age as her and was also a career woman starting as a school teacher and eventually got 2 masters.

        • Angelfood

          I totally relate to this because in many instances your co-workers become your second “family”. You spend so much time with them, you see each other at your best and worst, you both compete with and root for each, you may travel together, you know their preferences and their idiosyncrasies, share a lot of meals, you go through good times and bad, etc. You build strong bonds. I have a “work husband” who I confide in about work and personal issues, office polictics, we cheer each other on and offer advice… we even have had a falling out and made amends. Peggy and Don have been through so much together it’s only natural for scenes like this to happen. I wish there were more of them! I didn’t see this as “sexual” at all, yet its hard not to put it into a familiar “husband/wife” framework. I think it’s totally natural for people at work (or other areas of life) to fall in the “roles” we are used to, spouse, child, sibling, aunt, etc. And I do believe people can be close without being intimate. Don has a poor track record, though. :)

          • Zaftiguana

            It’s true. And you know, I don’t think I put a lot of thought into how the growth of women in the workplace, particularly in peer or even managerial roles vs. just secretarial work, is probably responsible for those dynamics that we now just take for granted. Back when it was all a sausage fest, it was probably a lot more Boys’ Club than Work Family. Then again, as Peggy is pioneering the acknowledgment of in this episode, some of that shift was like due to the synchronistic change in what “family” meant anyway.

            • Angelfood

              Yes. And one of the main reasons i love this show is because of the female roles it portrays, especially the role of women in the workplace. It has made me realize just how far we have come and how much farther we still have to go. There is still a lot of sexism (albeit hidden) and residual scars we women still carry from generations past that play out in today’s workplace. I think the themes in the show are still very relevant today and it has been great fun to watch Peggy’s evolution.
              I was dying along side of Peggy when Pete said she is better than any woman in the industry. And he meant well, I don’t think he even realized how sexist that comment was. There have been so many moments like this in the show.

      • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

        It felt like a father/daughter dance at the wedding Peggy thinks she’ll never have.

        So of course I bawled like a baby. :3

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        No way. I cried. I don’t even care about how on-the nose the song was. As Don notes, there was a reason why in such unknown times that song was popular. It is such a personalized song, when you hear Sinatra’s voice, that I completely forget it can be shared through dance. It is one of my favorite moments on this show.

        • siriuslover

          Thanks for that. That song has always been one of my favorites and has always touched me. My dad was a crooner like Sinatra (but with a better voice) and he had to make certain choices in his life to stay with his family or pursue a music career. And I have always, since I was a kid, thought of him with that song. Plus, it gets you thinking about end-of-life kinds of things (first line) and how you will look back on your life when that happens. And I agree that it is one of my favorites, if not THE favorite moment of the show for me.

          • http://www.ellenciompi.com/ NurseEllen

            @siriuslover: A better voice than Sinatra? Who was your dad? Did he record, and can I listen anywhere?

            • siriuslover

              no, he was just a working-class chump who had a beautiful voice and a talent for song writing. He has some stuff recorded (demo tapes), but never sold a song or recorded professionally. He chose to stay with his family rather than hit the road. I haven’t heard that Sinatra song in years, and boy did it bring back memories. I’m surprised the song was so polarizing for so many viewers.

          • lillyvonschtupp

            After the show I looked up Sinatra’s version of “My Way” on Youtube. I learned to sing it in elementary school but haven’t heard it in years.

            • Kit_W

              Adorable! I’d love Love LOVE to see a recital with a bunch of say… fourth graders, singing such a sophisticated song about regret and looking back at the highs and lows of life from a first person singular perspective – lol! Adorable!

      • Sweetvegan

        Yes, definitely intellectual soul mates! It was further emphasized with Don saying to her, “I’m always working. So are you, Peggy!”

      • Angelfood

        Its obvious that Don thought sex was the way to get the intimacy he craved since childhood because that’s all he was shown. I think this moment was so moving to the audience because there is clarity for Don – true intimacy is found in mutual respect, honesty, caring, being there. Sally’s forgiveness taught him this. On the verge of losing his second marriage, and hitting rock bottom at work, he realizes that his relationship with Peggy is the closest thing to a true connection since Anna. He can be loving and he is worthy of being loved. And isn’t that what we all want?

      • http://www.tragicsandwich.com/ Tragic Sandwich

        Mr. Sandwich said, “Those three really are a weird little family.”

      • shoegalsteph

        “I’ve been re-watching the series (binge watching really, while avoiding other work)” OMG THIS ENTIRE COMMENT IS ME (except the son, no kids yet!)

    • Paige

      Perfect analysis. I am also at a loss for what happened between Joan and Roger when they were discussing chevy. It had to do with the meeting in the steam room, right? I had a hard time connecting those pieces after the episode ended. Any insights from anyone else? This episode was loaded with information and insights into the character’s lives but it had such a hopeful, poignant finish which was so refreshing.

      Last note–I am hoping that Megan stays in California because I had the same reaction Don did when I saw her walk into the office. Honestly, could he have looked more disappointed? It’s time to take the fondue pot to California and call it good.

      • siriuslover

        I think Joan thinks Roger will get Bob Benson in trouble (maybe fired), but Roger in fact knows that SC&P has an actual shot at Buick because of the conversation in the steam room. And that makes Roger not only relevant, but more essential than Jim Cutler.

        • Paige

          Ooohh, I like your thinking. Thanks for clarifying. I cannot help but cheer for Roger…especially if it’s a way to get Jim Cutler out of the picture. I also wonder what will happen to Ted, he’s not doing much this season.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            That shot of Ted alone in the LA office was just sad!

            • LaTrèfle

              Ted is such a sad sack these days! I hope we aren’t going to just ride out his story with glimpses of him looking morose for the rest of the series.

            • Chris

              Seriously! I need a little hope on his front in this next episode before the year long wait for the final episodes begin.

            • Travelgrrl

              That actor can’t HELP but look morose, with his fried egg eyes.

              *shudder* Ted leaves me cold. Even when he’s reading “Something” by Emerson.

            • Jaialaibean

              I prefer to think of them as Kermit the Frog eyes. When he’s happy, he’s really cute.

            • lillyvonschtupp

              Someday he’ll find it, the rainbow connection.

            • Mismarker

              Fried egg eyes. I’ll never be able to look at him the same way!

            • P M

              There should be a compilation of the best quotes from every episode discussion of Mad Men on this site. There are some real gems in here :)

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            Ted has to come back from LA, don’t you think? I think Cutler’s master plan is that the arrangement was temporary, and perhaps, that is probably what will be fought about between Pete and Cutler in not taking the West Coast seriously (or because both of such cads it will be something so benign and ridiculous) while pretending to be forward thinking with computers but being so old hat with both a creative director and the fact they are going after cigarettes at one of the worst possible times.

            • lisbeth borden

              Cigarette ads are less than a year and a half from leaving TV & radio entirely. I hadn’t thought of that angle, thank you. Harry will have nothing to do on a tobacco account, and would have motivation to leave a tobacco-heavy agency after 1970.

        • ConnieBV

          I read it the same way.

          • teensmom99

            Of course if/when they get Buick, they’ll have a car that is not a dud.

            • Juvenile Sinephile

              Who knows. Bob might actually bring them Chevy as a favor to Joan if he decides to just screw it with the idea of keeping up appearances as a certain kind of GM executive. Plus, Benson may not want to ruffle feathers of an agency where more than one person knows his secret and will bring them Buick as a, ‘You scratched my back, so now, I’ll scratch yours’ gesture. He knows Pete hates him.

        • decormaven

          Good call. Roger definitely got confirmation on the Buick nod thru the steam encounter with the McCann exec. It’ll be sweet indeed to see Roger take down Jim Cutler a few pegs with the Buick deal.

          • Violina23

            Roger came ALIVE when he got that info from Joan. I loved it.

        • Inspector_Gidget

          That’s an interesting theory. I sort of assumed Bob was going to get fired out of this. (Usually not a good sign when someone tells a partner in that place, “Don’t get him in trouble, but…”)

          • Jaialaibean

            He may yet get fired … I don’t think the future is bright for young Bunsen … er, Benson, at least not if Roger has power over it.

        • jen_vasm

          There was so much maneuvering going on. Pete wanted Don featured on Burger King because he wants Don in California. Cutler wants Roger to help out on the cigarette account, but tipped his hand about his motive to get rid of Don when he brought him up. The McCann guy was trying to manipulate Roger by inferring Don should go in order to get the cigarette account (which means they would lose their prime talent) and probably tinkering behind the scenes to get Buick to hire Benson. SC&P would then be a lot less attractive to Buick. Roger, who is not blind to seeing strategic moves, now sees McCann’s ruse and can act accordingly.

        • VeryCrunchyFrog

          Who has been doing the creative work on Chevy all this time? Don washed his hands of the account, and I had the impression that Ted’s self-imposed CA exile meant he wasn’t working on it either.

          • lillyvonschtupp

            I believe that it’s been Lou and Stan and one of the new kids (dark brown hair, sideburns, glasses, kind of looks like a skinny Harry) have been doing the creative work. Ginznipple was busy with Dow, and they made it clear to Peggy that they didn’t want any women on the team.

      • Travelgrrl

        SC&P have Bob Benson on payroll. Buick wants Bob. I think Roger feels that they have a better shot at getting Buick to replace Chevy if Bob stays at the firm (perhaps being offered a partnership himself?)

        • Jaialaibean

          But Roger also hates Bob because of Bob’s relationship with Joan. And another partner, Pete, isn’t exactly Bob’s best friend.

          • Travelgrrl

            I wouldn’t say he hates Bob. Mildly unsettled by Joan’s friendship with him. Pete might hate him, as you say.

        • mediapileup

          What is more likely is that they let Bob go to Buick and then Bob brings SC&P in as Buick’s agency. Happens all the time in the agency world.

      • Fjasmine

        I was a little lost in the steam room scene, I can’t keep track of the other executives who pop up peridocially.

      • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

        I was waiting for Megan to find out Don had been demoted. I can’t believe he never told her!!!

        • Travelgrrl

          She looked wierded out when Peggy said “His office is next to mine” (ie Not his old office) and earlier this season when she yelled “Who’s your new girl, Don?!” she meant “Who is your secretary? I can never get hold of you”, not “Who’s your new girlfriend” as some have posited. She doesn’t know.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            No, she definitely meant “Who’s your new girlfriend?” That was the entire point to that argument.

            • Travelgrrl

              As much as I hate to disagree with T & L, who I ADORE, and the flashback/teaser for next week quotes Megan saying that very quote as if Don were cheating, I still maintain Megan said it because when she called the office, she could never find him. (Because he wasn’t there, natch, and he didn’t tell her he was in Coventry.) It stood for lying to her by omission, which is really just another type of betrayal.

              All the execs there call their secretaries “Their girl”, and Megan, who started herself as Don’s “girl” only to become his “Girl” might have layered meanings (ie, his new secretary might be his mistress, as well), but in general, I saw her frustration at not being able to ever find him at work. He’s had plenty of mistresses, right down the hall in fact, and she seemed oblivious. Why when she’s in LA would she all-of-a-sudden worry about that?

              We agree to disagree. PS I live for Sundays AND Wednesdays, this time of year!

            • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

              I read it both ways, since Megan was Don’s secretary for a minute (not long after he had run Allison off by sleeping with her and then acting like he forgot.) A little wordplay on Megan’s part.

            • Travelgrrl

              Makes sense.

              Though Megan seems a bit dim for wordplay, the lines “I can never get hold of you! Who’s your new girl, Don?!” play both ways.

            • grouchywif

              Dawn was Don’s secretary and took his calls at the office, relaying messages to him when she visited his apartment. I took it to mean that whenever Megan tried to call him at work, Dawn would tell her he was unavailable, so Megan wanted to know who his girl was…meaning who is he off screwing when she can’t reach him at work.

            • Azucena

              Grouchywif, I agree. Because of the desperation and anger in her voice, why would she be asking about who his secretary is? Especially after talking to Dawn repeatedly. If she wanted to blame shuffling of the secretarial pool for not being able to reach him, she would laugh it off, not scream at him. It doesn’t add up.

              Afterwards Don says, “There is no one else. I’ve been good.” He wouldn’t feel the need to discuss his own behavior this way unless he was responding to an accusation.

            • clairebbbear

              replied to wrong person, sorry

          • ybbed

            travelgrrl, I think you are correct. I always interpreted that comment to mean, who is your girl at work? who is your secretary? why can’t I ever get a hold of you? But it implies a double meaning.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          She’s lucky that Peggy likes her enough to have not given her a Lou Avery-Sally moment redux.

          • lillyvonschtupp

            Peggy learned from that mistake early at SC with Betty coming to the office while Don wasn’t there.

    • TeraBat

      I absolutely, utterly loved the scene between Don and Peggy. I don’t think any single scene in Mad Men has so eloquently and forcefully illustrated the coming social change more than that scene – what they were discussing, and then the fact that, out of all the songs on the radio for 1969, *My Way* comes on. My. Way. And then the follow up in the restaurant!

      • siriuslover

        The scene with Don and Peggy was framed the way many endings of episodes are filmed. And the scene in the restaurant…that WAS the Burger Chef commercial, that totally revolutionary approach Tom and Lorenzo discuss above. I just watched it for the second time and will watch it twice more tomorrow!

        • MRC210

          I actually thought Don’s and Peggy’s scene was the end of the episode at first — Mad Men doesn’t start exactly on the hour where I get it so it’s a little hard to tell when it’s coming to an end. But the restaurant scene was an even more satisfying finale.

          • Janice Bartels

            The one-two combo of the office dance and the family dinner could have been a satisfying series finale.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              I view it as the sorbet between courses of angst. Would not have been happy with that as the ending. at. all.

      • Vanessa

        They do seem to be compressing a lot of the harbingers of future change into this one last year of the show, even if they were still nascent in 1969. Divorce, working moms, etc, Divorce rates were just beginning to rise in 1969 and didn’t peak (at double the rate) till 1981, and similarly, women’s labor force participation had begun to rise in the 1960s but its real growth was in the 70s.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          I will say Mad Men has annoyed me a bit in how many people on this show have gotten divorced. At least with Betty and Don there was a breaking point and the fact the show seemed to go to great pains that there is no way the marriage would have lasted as long as it would not just now but a decade later.

          But back to the changing times, I love that Peggy quickly pointed out to Don that he is surrounded by so many working women. They may be secretaries and they be in Francine’s current position, but they definitely exist and now have the power of the purse to be catered to commercially.

          • Travelgrrl

            Divorce was still fairly uncommon with the common folk, but I’m guessing Big City New Yorkers led the trend on that.

          • mediapileup

            Yes, several characters have gotten divorced. And one character had a secret baby that she gave up for adoption and another one slept her way into a partnership and is raising another partner’s love child…the whole show is pretty soapy if you think about it.

            • Juvenile Sinephile

              I don’t mind the soap-y elements or the soap opera derisions against the show because it is a great soap opera. Melodrama is one of my favorite genres and it is one of Mad Men’s great strengths. I don’t mind that Don is heading for another divorce. Megan and Betty are developed enough as characters where much can be written about the complexities of those marriages but the Greg Harrises and Jane Sterlings just feel like DOA cases where I am counting down the episodes for those to end.

            • Sue Shea

              isn’t life really a soap opera? aren’t they just art imitating life?

            • andrea

              I could tell you some stories about our employees….Oy. Yes. Art imitates life. You might *think* people are a certain way or living a certain lifestyle, but EVERYONE has their own little soap opera going on. :)

          • VirginiaK

            I see this as a reflection of an important social reality, which was that long- honored definitions of male – female relationships were finally crumbling and there was in fact a divorce boom, specifically in this sector of society. Most often I think initiated by women, who no longer felt obliged to accept unsatisfactory arrangements and/ or, some of them, realized after marriage that, with the changes in the world, they didn’t want to define themselves as wife and mom.

            I’m a psychologist and have met lots of their kids in my office!

            • 3hares

              I think the issue people have had with it in the past is that the divorces started coming fast and furious even before the boom should have been happening.

          • ramona_flowers

            Clara was very pregnant.

      • Chris

        Don seems to have redeemed himself quite a bit with each of his “daughters” Peggy and Sally. I think both are going to have amazing careers.

        • decormaven

          I loved how Don truly affirmed Peggy’s abilities. No other man – not Jim, Ted, Pete, or Lou- did that in this episode.

          • Chris

            Yes, his “I don’t worry about you” was a very strong vote of confidence (even if it didn’t sound super ‘comforting’). I think Pete in his own Pete way thought he was paying Peggy a compliment saying she was the best of “the women”- especially as Roger mentioned Mary Wells this season- but he will never see her the way Don does. In some ways Don almost seems to forget Peggy is a woman and treats her as a “man” a lot. I can’t imagine him telling another woman on that show he “doesn’t worry” about them and meaning it.

            • Travelgrrl

              Your answer made me reflect that it’s a tender testament to Don that although he’s still picking up the pieces of his own flawed character, he truly does have the ability to empathize and worry about others. He probably has an internal checklist of people to vaguely worry about: Betty, check! Sally, check! Megan, Stephanie, etc.

            • Trent

              So true, and yet it’s interesting that Don can only truly understand and relate to a woman when she is somehow connected to his other great love — his work. The happiest Don ever was in the entire series was when he and Megan were working together every day in Creative. He was so smiley and pleasant during that (brief) period, but when she left it marked the beginning of the end for them. (In that vein, I didn’t read Don’s face when Megan showed up yesterday at SC&P as anger — I think he was just surprised and then remembering those earlier good times.)

              By the same token, Sally became closer to her father when he came clean to her about being fired. And his relationship with Peggy is the most intense — whether in friendship or hatred — in Don’s life, because both of them respect “the work” above all. Watching them reconnect over the Burger Chef pitch was probably the most satisfying scene in the entire series for me.

            • Fjasmine

              It also said that despite Peggy’s recent attitude toward him Don knew that their friendship was solid.

            • Chris

              Yes, even when Peggy told Don they didn’t want him back he took it pretty well. He was like “Gee thanks Pegs”. He knew she was mad and probably even knew he deserved it but he seemed less concerned about her anger than anyone else’s. I know he was dealing with the much bigger problem of the partners at that time but I took it as not devastating to him because they had clashed before and come out if it OK eventually.

            • Zaftiguana

              Pete obviously meant to pay her a compliment, and also saw nothing wrong with saying that Don needed to provide authority while Peggy provided emotion, even though those labels speak only to stereotypes about their genders and not actually to who they are in their lives right now. It almost made me wish that people were that flagrant about their gendered expectations of people in the workplace today. At least everyone would know where they stood.

          • Travelgrrl

            In fact, each undermined her: Ted, by being complicit in the meeting where she was told Don would lead her pitch (he was already on speakerphone, unbeknownst to her when she entered the room and knew about the plan ahead of time); Pete, by suggesting the above and for “She’s as good as any woman in this business!”; Lou, by baldly stating that the Dads make the decisions and provide the absolution for women’s failings, and so on.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              Peggy being startled by Ted’s dis-embodied voice from the speaker phone was an LOL moment for me.

            • Travelgrrl

              It was both funny and heartbreaking. She knew then that Ted was in on her ‘demotion’ on the project.

          • jen_vasm

            But he did have a little fun at Peggy’s expense by ‘tweaking’ the initial Burger Chef idea, just to get under her skin.

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            He did once tell her he would spend his whole life trying to hire her back when she left.

            • Chris

              Yes, which is why I wasn’t as concerned over their friendship because they had battled before several times. I felt certain their similarities and work ethics would pull them back together eventually. Some of the nicest things Don says to Peggy are after they have a blowout. She had to tell him off about him assuming she would follow him around to be the person he picks on when he gets mad before he confessed that to her in his apology.

        • katiessh

          Sally is either going to flourish or become one of those poster-kid bad girls. Either way she’ll need therapy for the rest of her life.

          • Elizabetta1022

            I can’t tell you how much I relate to Sally; I wish I could form a support group of former kids of alcoholic advertising execs. My dad was in advertising in Chicago around the same time period. He was in the Korean war and had a “secret” family and another child before he married my mom. He was also a narcissist, bipolar and probably suffering from PTSD. And you’re right, actually–I did go wild in my teen years, and I have done a LOT of therapy over the years. (Still am.) And I’m happy to say that even though I have my dark moments, life is pretty good. This gives me hope for Sally, my fictional MM soul mate. PS Unlike Sally, I have a very loving mom–she started out like Betty, but was wise enough to see that all the appearance stuff didn’t matter.

            • katiessh

              that’s really nice that you relate to her in that way. Although with weiner running the show I don’t know how optimistic we should be about sally’s future. She might just end up on that creepy culty commune with margaret. SORRY, marigold.

            • Elizabetta1022

              Ha! You’re so right. I can’t help but root for Sally, though. She’s one of the few characters who seems to be able to see through the BS all around her.

            • katiessh

              so true. If only this was the kind of tv show that likes happy endings.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              I see Sally going into law or business, or maybe politics, being a trailblazer. She’s not going to get married right out of college like Betty. At least I hope not. She’ll be one of the first Yuppies.

      • Inspector_Gidget

        Yeah Don and Peggy’s mini-“Suitcase” moment was great. Best moment since they spent that whole episode with them hashing out their relationship. Perfectly timed also. I don’t think I could take one more episode of Peggy whining and pitying herself and pretty much confirming the agency’s fear about giving too much power to “emotional” women.

        • MasterandServant

          well, now her self-pity makes a bit more sense. She was turning 30, and felt like she had nothing to show for it except her career, which was becoming stifling.

      • MarinaCat

        I am so happy with the Don & Peggy relationship. I don’t think I could have gone through the stress of the remainder of the season with Don eating shit.

        • Chris

          The problem with Mad Men is that Don never gets his comeuppance when you want him too. When he was being awful last season I just wanted someone to tell him off or smack him. By the time all his chickens came home to roost and everything was wrong and the partners went so overboard I was like “enough already”. I just wanted him to get a kick in the pants, not lose everything.

          • MarinaCat

            I see what you mean. Megan is finally closing the [first class] curtains on their marriage just when Don is looking fore lorn and attempting to act out the kind of husband he thinks he should be to her.

            • heybethpdx

              Nice catch on the curtains closing on Pete’s girlfriend and Megan as they head to LA. I assume we’ll see Megan again, but perhaps not!

    • Darren Nesbitt

      “And how perfect that it’s these three, who have passed a bunch of secrets back and forth to each other”. You said it! those were my thoughts after watching the episode. Peggy, Don and Pete have always had problems with their parents, spouses, and children. Their emotions have always been more open (whether good or bad) with their coworkers.

      When Bob moved closer on the couch to Joan I said “C’mon Bob”. I have no idea how hard it was for people then, I just wish he could have saw that Joan wasn’t going to fall into his ladder climbing facade so easily. I thought he planned decisions like that out much better .

      • siriuslover

        I loved Joan’s line about she’d rather wait a lifetime hoping for love than settle for an arrangement. And also, “their emotions have always been more open…” Again, that reminds me of family (at least my family).

        • Angelfood

          And latent gay married to women is another kind of family in a show themed around families. Perfect.

          • Bev Wiesner

            well sure- look at the way the two toddlers were filmed- Joans son eagerly ran to the door and there was real affection I thought- with he and Bob (and Erector set ) they had a genuine bond, contrasted with Petes child who was afraid of him

            • Travelgrrl

              Good point about the two different children’s reactions!!!

            • Trent

              It wasn’t only Joan’s son that reacted that way — her mom was so entranced with Bob that she was ready to marry him herself. I wonder if Joan ever filled her in on Bob being gay, or if she also knew the score?

            • Bev Wiesner

              i wondered that too, she gave Bob a cool appraising look for a couple of seconds- then Joan spoke to break the spell. I dont think mom could handle the news about Bob being gay- she made a wierd comment about the “Jews closing down ( shopping street)
              on Saturday.

            • Violina23

              Yes, that was my interpretation of the Jew comment as well…

            • Nancy Aronson

              I assumed she meant the Hasidic Jews who sell diamonds.

            • Fjasmine

              I think Gail and Joan are alike in being pragmatic. The “Jews closing down on Saturday” comment is like something a New Yorker would say it was true ,I don’t think it’s offensive at (I’m Jewish)

            • Bev Wiesner

              I notice , when anybody refers to the characteristic behavior of a people as a whole-maybe becuse of the poisonous climate we live in . maybe im too sensitive. maybe you just get so addicted to seeing meaning in everything a character says, even innocuous statements ……

            • Lisa_Co

              I have to say I found it a little offensive (I’m Jewish). I don’t advertise my religion and have had people say the most bigoted statements about Jews to me because they don’t realize I’m Jewish (and I also live in NYC!!!

            • L’Anne

              I think Joan’s mother is just an old-school racist and that includes being an antisemite. She made comments to Greg (before the divorce) about basically “uppity negroes” and Greg shut that down. The Jew statement is just a piece of that mindset. I caught it, and eyerolled. Also, I’m Jewish as well.

            • T C

              I did not read that as a weird comment; flowers for mother might mean a proposal was forthcoming. The district mentioned is where the diamond dealers are concentrated. Many of them are ultra orthodox.

            • Bev Wiesner

              I didnt see the connection between flowers for the mom and a marriage proposal to the daughter- did Bob say he was shopping in the diamond district? that makes perfect sense then – Thanks

            • Lisa_Co

              I think they were referring to 47th Street, which is the diamond/jewelry street; the businesses seem to be mainly run by Hasiidic Jews

            • JohannaEG

              The diamond district (street, really) is run by Orthodox Jews.

            • Fjasmine

              Gail would be fine with a gay son in law.

          • MartyBellerMask

            It’s bittersweet. I actually know a couple kinda like that. Married 30 years, he’s openly gay, always has been… but they love each other, say they are soulmates and somehow it works. I can’t pretend to understand it, but they are the MOST amazing people. It’s nontraditional for sure, but… who am I to judge. They get enough judgement, I’m sure.

            I don’t see it working for Bob & Joan (although I almost wanted it to), but it does work for some.

            • Elizabetta1022

              Also, Bob approached Joan with the idea as a strategy; he was another man using her, in a way. I think it’s really different if two people (like the couple you know) come to that conclusion together because they love each other and are soul mates.

            • Travelgrrl

              It’s odd but at first, he didn’t approach her that way. He came at her as if he was a hetero guy making a sincere proposal. So much so that she at first didn’t know how to respond. When he offered a halfhearted kiss, she was able to be truthful to him (letting him know he was gay) and then he rolled out the pragmatic approach.

            • TeraBat

              Which I think is a very Bob Benson thing to do. His whole life is a facade, adding a sham marriage on top of that is basically nothing for him. He basically even tells Joan that he can have sex with her, even though it’s likely to be as passionless as that kiss. He’s trying to tell Joan that he can perform all the duties of a husband – except for the one thing Joan really wants.

            • Travelgrrl

              The funny thing is, I think Bob DOES love Joan, in his own way. When she said their marriage would have everything but love, I thought he would tell her that. He sincerely seems to care for Joan and her family.

            • TeraBat

              Though they both knew that the sort of love Bob could offer wasn’t the sort Joan wanted.

            • Nancy Aronson

              & it’s implying that gorgeous Joan wouldn’t be able to nab a man. This I do not accept.

            • Alloy Jane

              I don’t know, that proposal was all kinds of insulting. He basically told her she’d never get a man and that he can give her the illusion of having one. He may love her beauty, he may love her power, but I don’t think he loves her as a person. She’s an object to him, a status symbol. I’m with TLo in thinking that Bob’s one of those narcissists (they come in straight as well as gay) that doesn’t see women as people. At the very least, he doesn’t see Joan as a person who has her own wants and desires.

            • Lisa_Co

              The way I read the scene was Joan had her suspicions about Bob but she needed that kiss (something sexual) to be absolutely sure Bob was gay.

            • Nancy Aronson

              That’s the creepy part — the manipulation. Or the invitation to participate in an unspoken agreement. Whichever. Ew.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              My grandparents were friends with a couple like that. He had to be married for work reasons, she apparently “never fancied that sort of thing” so they had a happily unconsummated marriage. After he retired he would take a couple of holidays a year with a young gentleman friend to help with his bags, while she stayed home with their dogs. It worked very well for them and only ended when she (whose name was, in fact, Joan) passed away.

            • MartyBellerMask

              Help with his bags. Ha. Love that euphemism.

          • CPT_Doom

            It’s also a great call-out to the Sal/Kitty relationship that we old-timers know so well from season 2. We’ve seen that relationship already and know it wouldn’t work.

            • Travelgrrl

              The difference is that Kitty had no idea, and Joan would have known exactly what she was buying into.

            • 3hares

              Though only because she saw through the line Bob was originally selling her.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Sometimes I wonder how Kitty’s doing these days. I assume she and Sal got divorced after he was fired from Sterling Cooper. I hope she remarried a nice straight guy.

          • Fjasmine

            Bob should propose to Meredith. She would enjoy the mansion.

            • TeraBat

              And would probably remain delightfully oblivious for their entire marriage.

        • DailyDose

          Maybe Joan hoped for Love, but Joan has NEVER waited. her relationship with Roger, her marriage to the Doctor, her prostitution to become a partner…. All says this is a very practical woman knows that Love may never come and she should not waste her life waiting. so far, Bob has offered the best that no one else has. I wouldnt be surprised if Joan accepted the “offer”

          • Chris

            I think it shows Joan has moved past her old way of thinking. Before she was willing to accept a rapist of a husband because he was a doctor. Now it doesn’t matter to her how good it looks from the outside -handsome successful husband who is a Buick executive- she’s not going to settle. She also is not going to give up her career which seems to bringing her the most joy of anything in her life.

            • Lisa_Co

              I was SO GLAD Joan turned Bob down, especially as he was pretty insulting, basically telling her “you’re old and all you have is a crappy apt. where you live with your MOM (how awful) and son.

            • VirginiaK

              You remind me, I actually expected to learn that that husband was gay, that that was the explanation ( not sympathy-eliciting) for his rape sex and his extreme rigidity about what he wanted Joan to be. (Will admit this is based in part on a personal story from long ago.)

              He was in fact a poseur, being dangerously incompetent as a doctor and continuing to treat patients, but not a sexual – preference poseur.

          • VeryCrunchyFrog

            I think Joan was sincere when she told Greg she married him for his heart, not his hands (meaning his surgical skill).

            • Travelgrrl

              She was happy to flaunt her engagement ring at work, (roughly about the time of Peggy’s first promotion, where Peggy was now above her), even though she already knew Greg was a rapist, because he represented a way for her to succeed in the way women traditionally did then:: by catching a ‘good’ husband, ie a doctor or similar.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              That’s true, but she also seemed to really love Greg. I suspect she could have landed other doctors.

            • Rosalius

              I seem to recall that she was flaunting her ring long before the rape (which doesn’t occur until the second to last episode of season 2.)

            • lchopalong

              She also may not have thought of it as rape. So many girls and women still don’t think of it that way, and back then the whole, “You can’t rape a wife,” (or fiancee or girlfriend who has already had sex with you before) was way stronger.

            • Travelgrrl

              I totally get what you’re saying.

              I just hated that Greg. Hated hated hated him!

            • TeraBat

              “You’ve never been a good person, even before we were married. And you know *exactly* what I’m talking about.”

              Maybe she didn’t know what it was then, or maybe she knew but didn’t know how to react.

            • lchopalong

              It’s hard to tell. It’s such a difficult and emotionally conflicting situation to be in. It’s often so hard to tell what abuse is when it’s coming from someone you want to trust in, especially in the moment. It can take years to fully realize and come to terms with it, as well as the clarity of physical distance.

              Greg was awful, and I wish Joan had never laid eyes on him!

            • TeraBat

              I completely agree, on all counts!

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              I never believed in Joan and Greg. She seemed more and more unhappy in that marriage, but doing her best to be a dutiful wife…and realizing she missed the work she was so good at.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              It was even enshrined in law. Until fairly recently, a husband forcing his wife have sex with him was not legally considered rape. Of course, Joan and Greg weren’t married when he raped her.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Planning decisions better like…when he hit on Pete Campbell thirty seconds after Pete referred to homosexuals as “degenerate”? :) Oh Bob.

        • Inspector_Gidget

          And he just happened to turn up back in the office on a day when Pete had returned to NYC. I was SURE they would run into each other and was cringing the whole time.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Ooh, you’re right. Missed opportunity.

          • UsedtobeEP

            Not great, Bob!

            • Mismarker

              There is a pretty good newer Mad Men podcast called “Not Great, Pod!”. Genius!

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            I was actually expecting that part of the reason Pete brought Bonnie to New York was to really show to Bob Benson, in bright lights, ‘YOU HAD THE WRONG IDEA, BOB’.

      • gingerella

        I think he panicked. The scene at the police station must have rattled him a lot — if he goes to Buick, he’ll be in an unfamiliar environment, and that’s going to put him at risk in the same way his client was in New York, and he doesn’t have what his client clearly has — a tolerant wife — to help buffer him.

        • Chris

          If he is in Chicago at least he won’t be arrested if he’s caught with another man. Apparently it was the only state at the time that didn’t have anti gay laws on the books. That must be why the Chevy exec said it was so much worse in NY and he didn’t know how Bob etc could stand it. Clearly the police weren’t entrapping and beating up people in Chicago.

          • Lisa_Co

            I was pretty surprised about the Chevy exec. This was NYC in 1969; surely the police had plenty of crime to deal with – they didn’t need to be (or have the time) to be entrapping gay men who weren’t professional prostitutes.

          • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

            Chicago? General Motors is based in Detroit.

            • Chris

              You’re right. I have no idea why I was thinking Illinois. Well I guess he is out of luck in both states. But he seems to have a better time back in Detroit. Maybe Michigan wasn’t being as vile as NY.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              I got the impression from what the GM guy said that there wasn’t much of a gay scene in Detroit: “How can you stand to live in a city with so much temptation?” Implying (at least to me) that there was a lot less “temptation” in the form of available gay sexual partners in Detroit. (I don’t know anything about the actual gay scene in Detroit then or now.)

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        Since Peggy was a late May birthday and Stonewall was a late June event, this is in the thick of it in terms of police brutality and prejudicial arrests against the LGBT community. In all likelihood, that vice cop propositioned that Chevy exec in an area that had a lot of raids and arrests. Stonewall was when the community had reached their breaking point with police and you can tell Bob knows all too well that for him to get far he has had to drop that part of his life.

    • TeraBat

      Also, my partner and I are watching the encore airing of the episode, and he says, “Is he wearing a rainbow?” in regards to the jacket Bob Benson is wearing for his “proposal” to Joanie. And he totally is! That is rainbow plaid he is wearing.

      • decormaven

        And what a great jacket that was! It’s one of the best male outfits shown in the entire history of the show. Perfect choice for the scene.

        • http://www.snoskred.org/ Snoskred

          And I thought Don’s jacket last week at the party and the bar with Harry was gorgeous, but this rainbow plaid one wins for best jacket ever. :) That was beautiful. I want one!

        • Chris

          I knew from the preview it would be Bob based on the sleeve of the jacket and the flowers for Joan’s Mom. Some people were saying it would be Roger, but those are Bob colors. Janie Bryant always used different colors and tones for Bob. He never wears the strong dark colors, they are always a little different than anyone else’s on the show. Plus Roger wouldn’t bother with flowers for Joan’s mother. Bob knows how to please everyone.

      • MasterandServant

        Yes! I was watching with both my husband and a gay friend who was in town, and my friend was the first to notice the ‘rainbow’ plaid.

        • Floretta

          Not sure if it’s rainbow or a madras plaid which was very popular at the time. I had a classmate in 1965 who wore a madras plaid belt to school (definitely NOT part of the uniform.) There were madras jackets, madras slacks, madras ties etc. Madras as a fashion statement has been in and out of style for much of the 20th century. The last sustained go-round was its rediscovery by the preppies in the 1970s.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        I noted that it had every color but blue — the one color Joan was wearing.

        • http://thejoyfulfox.blogspot.com/ Laura

          Haha, great minds think alike! Must be a Laura thing ;)

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Lol, I was just about to say to you: WE LAURAS ARE IN SYNC. :P

        • melisaurus

          Very rare that a character (especially a man) is multicolored it probably A. highlights his confusion, B. separates him from Joan who favors monochrome.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Yes…but I think the primary reason Janie chose that blazer for that scene is that it’s as close as you can get to putting him in a rainbow flag that doesn’t include blue. :P

      • http://thejoyfulfox.blogspot.com/ Laura

        A rainbow plaid that, if I’m not mistaken, was noticeably missing Joan’s pale blue. They weren’t connecting at all.

        • Chris

          And Joan and Peggy wore a very similar blue which is the first time I ever remember that happening.

          • Alana

            Meghan wore blue, too. To the office. Oh–and who can forget Trudy’s get-up?

            • Chris

              Megan had on purple but Bonnie, Peggy, Trudy and Joan all wore almost exactly the same blue. The blue of women being underestimated or suffering from sexist treatment by the men.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Megan’s outfit also looked crocheted. What’s with her and crocheted clothing? There was that red crocheted jumpsuit she wore last season as the blonde twin in the soap opera, then the yellow ensemble she wore a few episodes ago. I know crochet was fashionable at the time, but why is Megan always the one wearing it? (Or is she? I’ll have to look carefully. But as a crocheter myself, I usually notice crochet immediately and start thinking about how to make the garment.)

      • Trent

        Bob Benson’s proposal might have had an entirely different outcome if he had worn those shorts again…( ;

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Nah…Joan would appreciate the way Bob wears his shorts, but I doubt that kiss would have been any better had Bob been wearing them. And the kiss confirmed everything Joan already suspected.

          Funny, I recently had a Facebook conversation with a friend of mine who’s gay, about how much we appreciate that men’s shorts are getting shorter. He posted an article that included a still of Bob in those shorts!

      • VirginiaK

        I thought Bob’s jacket and Mom’s housedress patterns paired them – same colors as I recall, and you can read one as a comment on the other. Bob and Joan aren’t a visual pair. Expect to go into this further on Wednesday!!

      • mariahwg

        I’d be shocked if that jeacket doesn’t end up getting prime TLO real estate tomorrow. Also, the jacket matched Joan’s apartment, Joan matched Joan’s apartment, but Joan didn’t match Bob. Awww!

      • SamuraiEngineer

        It’s a shame that the rainbow flag wasn’t designed until 1978, or one might take Bob’s sartorial choice as a sly underpinning of his recognition that, though it clearly appears that he does love Joan as a person, his proposal is essentially asking her to be his permanent beard and status-marker as a responsible piece of Buick-executive timber rather than his wife. Joan, of course, being the astute,sophisticated woman that she is, and having presumably learned plenty from previous relationships about herself and her emotional needs, isn’t having it, unwilling to settle even as it’s equally apparent that she loves Bob, if only as a good friend…and it appears that Janie Bryant underscores this fundamental disconnect by clothing her in a color plainly missing from Bob’s summery rainbow plaid (though what the light-blue/aqua connection that appears to exist among the major female presences in this episode is doubtless a matter for T&Lo’s Mad Style take thereupon).

        Apropos of rainbow foreshadowing: one wonders whether (and, if so, how) the Stonewall Rebellion will be handled (as this episode appears to have been set a week or two prior to 06/27/1969). I, for one, would love to see Bob fighting shoulder to padded, sequined shoulder with Sylvia Rivera and the other valiant queens — and would it be too much to hope for the return of Sal Romano then, while I ask for the moon?

        • TeraBat

          I think Bob bailing the car executive out of jail after getting entrapped and beaten by the police is probably as close as the show will get to Stonewall. After all, this is a show which covered the JFK assassination via lawnmower accident – understated is generally how they handle these huge events. Not to mention, the show usually jumps forward 4-8 weeks per episode, at least for this season. I think Weiner purposefully chose to have the Bob Benson scenes happen close to Stonewall, as a way to touch on the historic themes behind the event and what it meant going forward, but that’s as close as he intends to get. I think it’s more important to Weiner that he show us what personal choices gay men had in 1969, and how none of them were good.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            They foreshadowed the assassination with the lawnmower, but then they went and devoted an entire episode to the event.

      • Kathryn Sanderson

        That’s brilliant!

    • Lattis

      And can we just skip ahead to the part where SC&P is a smoking ruin and Draper, Campbell & Olson has just opened its doors to business? Isn’t it time?

      holy crap amen to that.

      But, about Pete – my god his hypocrisy is breathtaking. He excoriates Trudy for going out with men (i.e. “moving on”) then goes to his hotel room which he shares with his girlfriend!

      • Eric Stott

        Pete has capabilities & would probably be a great partner if he could find some balance in his life & let go of baggage. Even at his worst there have been times when he was the only one in the office who was going any work.

        • Trent

          True, but who would Pete be if he let go of his bitterness and petty insecurities? Even his scenes at the LA office, when he’s supposedly more mellow than before, still have the same taste of Campbell’s Sour Soup.

      • ConnieBV

        Bonnie’s line was something along, “I don’t like you in New York” and I was like nope, me neither. Every failure of his is laid out. The child who doesn’t know him, the marriage and house he lost…. No wonder he had to dork with Peggy’s presentation. It was the work equivalent of pulling her hair, and she reacted as expected. It also helped pull Don into the mix, so we could bookend it with that great scene at the restaurant, where he once again tries to poke her and Don rebukes him as a father. Peggy looks so happy, and Pete is so readily accepting that he is in the wrong…. It gives such hope for all three, and hope is what we have been missing.

        • FayeMac

          I liked the rest of what Bonnie said when she told Pete off – “You’re not going to able to f—- your way out of this one.” Good line.

          • ConnieBV

            She doesn’t f around, Bonnie. Now he really got his Betty, right down to the dismissal when he showed his true self. Another lovely bookend, happy Pete at California deli, cranky Pete at NY Burger Shack.

          • MartyBellerMask

            He should have gone in there and washed her feet.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Can anyone imagine Pete even being good in bed? I just imagine looking up at that hairline…and his over–enthusiastic performance…UGH. How does he get these beautiful women.

            • MK03

              I dunno, his scene with Peggy on his office couch in season 1 was pretty hot.

            • Chris

              Everyone forgets now that they make VK gain weight and shave his hairline how good looking he was. He was the hot young guy in the office challenging Don’s position in season one. He and Peggy had a couple of very charged scenes.

            • MartyBellerMask

              I thought his scenes with Beth were very touching. It helped that the actors (obviously) had chemistry.

            • Leah Elzinga

              and the actors ended up getting married!

            • Travelgrrl

              Nope, always gross. The hairline and sideburns this season just underscore his creepitude.

              With apologies to Vincent K, who I think is a terrific actor.

            • Chris

              I disagree, I think he’s a handsome guy but I’ve liked him since his days on “Angel”.

            • Travelgrrl

              Yes, but that is leftover love from when he was younger and less ishy. Not having seen that show, I’m only reacting to his Mad Men looks/persona, which have left me cold from day 1.

            • Violina23

              Actually, “ishy” is word that could be used to describe his role in Angel… haha if you only knew!

              I do think he’s a really good actor though, as annoying as his character was on Angel, after the end of season 4 he was given a way to play the character in a completely different way (which I won’t spoil), and you could see where the acting comes into play.

            • Chris

              Yes, that completely made me love the character I used to hate. He only had a few episodes that last season and he knocked them out of the park. Joss Whedon also gave Christina Hendricks a great role too with YoSaffBridge. He has a lot of actors he liked and gave their start too. Before Firefly, Christina Hendricks had a tiny part in tavern wench wear in an Angel episode. Liking both Christina and Vincent is one of the things that got me to tune in the first season of Mad Men.

            • Leah Elzinga

              CONNOR!

            • Chris

              He’s always had a thing for older women ; )

            • MartyBellerMask

              Haha, this is making me think of something a friend put on facebook the other day. She posted a picture of her dinner, venison stew. Which wouldn’t be noteworthy except that she had been a vegetarian. Her explanation was “When your man kills you dinner, you cook it.” I commented that that exchange was straight out of Mad Men, but sadly she doesn’t watch the show. :(

            • Chris

              Peggy would be proud of her.

            • Qitkat

              My husband rarely watches the show, but when he saw Pete, he remarked that had to be one of the weirdest hairlines ever. But as for getting beautiful women, Pete can turn up the charm major degrees when he wants to, as well as ruin any moment with his smarminess without thinking.

            • Travelgrrl

              He’s just… yuck, physically. But Harry Crane and Ted Chaogh seem to get laid on the regular, so I guess there’s a sock for every shoe.

            • Leah Elzinga

              money. it’s all about the money.

            • Mismarker

              His character does absolutely nothing for me in that way.

            • melisaurus

              He would have to be :)

          • Lisa_Co

            I could not believe AMC “bleeped” the word. Seems like the pay channels are the only ones where you can hear profanity and see nudity:(

            • FayeMac

              I watched it on Amazon and I am almost sure I heard her say the word. I do not think it was bleeped.

            • Leah Elzinga

              Yeah, I TOTALLY heard the word on the iTunes version, but it WAS blanked out of the closed captioning.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              I also watched it on Amazon. She definitely said the word.

          • melisaurus

            I loved his confused reaction “what?”

        • MK03

          Her line also reminded me of Pete’s “I don’t like you like this” after Peggy got her first copywriting job. These two are more alike than they realize.

        • http://zatopa.tumblr.com Christine Lorenz

          That line (“I don’t like you in New York”) echoed an early character-defining moment for Pete. In the first season (Hobo Code), after Peggy and Pete have hooked up but before she understands what that amounts to, there’s a scene where the office crew are having happy hour drinks and everyone starts doing the twist to the song on the jukebox. Peggy is finally having fun, and playfully looks over to Pete as she starts dancing closer and closer to him. He gives her a stone cold stare and says “I don’t like you like this.” Peggy doesn’t say anything back, blinks back tears and keeps dancing.

          That scene took my breath away years ago; it was when I knew this show was a different kind of TV altogether.

          That Pete would get this line handed back to him years later is a reminder of how far he is from being on top in this situation. That, and the hint of the Don and Sylvia hotel room game — good thing she didn’t want him to fetch her dirty sandal, that would have been way beyond seedy.

          • Trent

            Great analysis. I also thought that both the scene with Trudy and Bonnie’s angry dismissal (along with the final scene at Burger Chef) were laying the groundwork for Pete’s eventual decision to return to NY — where his daughter and his “real family” at SC&P all are. I think his daughter’s obvious fear of the “stranger” calling himself her dad affected Pete more than we realize.

            • Fjasmine

              I think Pete genuinely loves his daughter and was crushed when she didn’t recognize him. That great Pete Campbellness! lovable and loathsome

            • MartyBellerMask

              Yep, yep, yep. I felt that last week. This sealed it.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Yet Trudy said, “You’re not part of this family anymore.” I think she meant the one that included Trudy and her parents, or Trudy, Pete and Tammy together, but I hope he can have a relationship with Tammy.

      • 3boysful

        Not to mention the mile-high club tryst with Bonnie on the plane, yet he has the nerve to criticize Trudy’s behavior.

        • Snarkmeister

          I laughed so hard when I realized that was the “exclusive club” that Pete was being invited to (that’s what the blurb said about the episode on the DirecTV guide, anyway).

        • MK03

          Let’s be fair, Trudy purposely skipping out on her daughter’s birthday celebrations was really shitty of her. There’s no way she forgot about it, she did it on purpose to punish Pete and she punished her daughter for her father’s sins in the process. Poor Tammy might end up being the saddest story out of this series.

          • MarinaCat

            Was it Tammy’s birthday? How did I miss that?

            • Beth

              I didn’t see that either. Just a cake, not a bday cake.

            • smayer

              Maybe it was an early birthday celebration since Pete was in town.

          • 3boysful

            Agree. Trudy gets no awards. I was furious with Pete for his sexual hypocrisy–he called her something derogatory (like slut but it wasn’t that) that I cannot recall.

          • VeryCrunchyFrog

            Tammy was born in Ep. 4-11, Chinese Wall, which took place later in the summer than this episode. (Gene’s June 21 birthday was noted in Ep. 4-9, The Summer Man.)
            And now I’m really pissed off at Don, as I understand The Strategy to have taken place the weekend of June 20 – 22, 1969 (Oh! Calcutta! opened on June 19), and he didn’t even acknowledge Gene turning 6!

          • Travelgrrl

            Not Tammy’s birthday. Trudy just happened to have a cake around.

      • betty draper

        Typical insecure man. Echoed by the time Don called Betty a whore even though he had had more than four or five extra-marital affairs before that episode.

        • http://bidonica.wordpress.com/ Poggy

          And those were just the affairs we saw unfold onscreen. I never felt such an impulse to throw something at the tv (well, computer) screen like in that scene.

      • Travelgrrl

        Sign o’ the times – men’s cheating was tolerated but Trudy, with a child at home, was held to a higher standard. There were plenty that thought a divorced woman with kids shouldn’t date at all.

        Not absolving Pete The Shit, but it’s not atypical for him to say that, however hypocritical.

        • 3hares

          I don’t think even Pete was buying it. He knew he was actually just jealous and despairing after what he’d lost and that the idea that this was “immoral” meant nothing to him at all. Pete isn’t bothered by that sort of thing. He was just avoiding his real problem by trying to take some moral highground that was ridiculous.

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            He was drunk. That beer in the cake was not his first of the night. He just hates that she was happier than him and probably expected the roles to be reversed where he was a glowing white knight and she was miserable. Bonnie being a divorcee probably had a much better detector of what was really happening and that did him in with her.

            • 3hares

              I don’t see why he’d expect to be happier than her at all. Their last scene together in S6 was all about Trudy’s stinging remark that “how he knew” that he didn’t actually want things like this, and Pete facing the fact that he’d ruined his life. They’d been separated for a while before that and Pete had obviously been suffering more than Trudy with her parents.

        • MartyBellerMask

          And I don’t even think he was being a hypocrite (although he certainly can be). But he’s probably paying for the house, sending plenty of money home, and she’s off with another guy anyway. Henry didn’t want Betty to take alimony from Don, remember.

          I don’t know who’s keeping the divorce on hold, but I’m sure it will be rushed through now.

          • Elizabetta1022

            Also, I think he was expecting to come back to NY on top of the world with a beautiful blonde on his arm, and make Trudy realize what she was missing out on. Instead, his daughter doesn’t recognize him and Trudy has moved on. Pete’s falls from the heights his ego takes him to are never graceful, and this was no exception. Honestly, I felt he got what he deserved from Trudy.

            • 3hares

              I thought it was more like the fantasy that he’d been living in CA was broken when he was actually back. I believe VK described Pete in CA as feeling a rush at the idea of reinvention and fooling other people with his new attitude, but that it wasn’t real. Back in NY, and especially in Cos Cob, he felt all the emotions he cut himself off from in CA (emotions perhaps Trudy didn’t feel, possibly ever). It was foreshadowed in the earlier ep when he heard about Tom’s heart attack and soured on the business talk he and Bonnie always enjoyed.

            • Elizabetta1022

              Ah, good points! I think you’re right. NYC is his “real world” and CA is his dream world. No wonder he’s happier there…

            • MartyBellerMask

              Not so sure about that. He purposely didn’t want Trudy & Bonnie to meet. I think Pete had a tiny hope of reconciling with Trudy. So no wonder he was pissed.

            • aesteve212

              Agreed. The sense I had early in the episode is that Pete is implying to Bonnie Trudy’s reticence to divorce. But then in the kitchen it is so clear that Trudy has emotionally MOVED ON from her marriage, and Pete is the one clinging.

      • Lilithcat

        It was the hypocrisy of the time. A mother was held to a very different standard than a father.

      • Inspector_Gidget

        McCann takeover imminent or I’ll eat my hat. Of course, we’ll have to wait a year for the other half of the “season” for confirmation.

        • MartyBellerMask

          That makes sense. Don sells his shares and moves on. Let’s see who moves on with him. It’s not going to be the whole “old gang”, either, or what would be the point of that?

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            Don better hope his possible exit from SC&P falls around the same time Megan wishes to ‘consciously uncouple’. Though, I could see Pete helping him out due to loyalty and that Don did the same for him years ago. I think Pete would immediately exit because of how little he had in say on the matters of Don’s office rules and Commander. I take his, ‘Let’s start a new agency’ spiel he gave to Ted who could not give a hoot a lot of weight. Pete wanted the LA move to be a little more radical than this.

        • greenwich_matron

          I thought that was pretty obvious, but no one else seems to be thinking about it. I thought it was significant that Bert wasn’t at the partner’s meeting when the Chevy account came up. I can’t think of the McCann guy having any other motivation than to start to court Roger.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          Yeah, the fact Cutler is also close with Duck Phillips, now a major headhunter who gave them Lou, I can completely believe that we might have a, ‘Shut the Door. Have a Seat’ moment, except much smaller, probably just Peggy, Don, Pete, and…. maybe Stan?

          Also, could the SC&P communications be any worse? One thing for Bob to keep this to himself given the circumstances for how he found out about Chevy, but Roger completely misread the situation. And who how this planned execution for Don Draper, professionally, is going to work IF they get Commander.

      • charlotte

        That was like Don calling Betty a whore because of her angry bar hook-up.

      • Kathryn Sanderson

        Pete was being a raging asshole in last night’s episode. Completely agree about the breathtaking hypocrisy. And he was condescending to Peggy, even apart from the “best woman in the business” remark. (At least there he was being unintentionally dickish…or was in really unintentional.)

    • Tracy Alexander

      The Kennedy assassination also calls back to the first time Don and Peggy were in the office together during off hours (Don came in to escape and Peggy was reworking the hairspray ad).

      Don and Peggy hashing it out alone in the office will never not be something special.

      • Janice Bartels

        I had forgotten that it was her birthday in that episode. And that was the episode with the boyfriend and her family at the restaurant that she stood up to be with Don that night- choosing one type of family over another. So many call backs to that episode in this one! She wonders why she is 30 and alone, but there are choices she has made and she worries about the same things Don does- has she done anything that matters and will she be alone. Peggy wouldn’t have been satisfied to be a mom in a station wagon.

        • CPT_Doom

          But I read the comment about the station wagon as a link back to her comment during the suitcase, about what bothers her – “playgrounds.” She loves her job, but has regrets for what it’s cost her, and she must still think about the son she had with Pete.

        • MartyBellerMask

          As heartbreaking as that night was, she sure made the right decision. She could have had the husband, family with Mark… but god, why would she want to? He was so very wrong for her.

      • Victoria Ramirez

        It sure was – she was turning 26, it was 1965. In last night’s ep she says “1965 was a good year.”

        • Mismarker

          I loved “The Suitcase”. Trudy and Megan both run into Peggy in the office ladies’ room. Trudy, hugely pregnant with Tammy, tells Peggy it’s not too late for her (to get married, have a family) and Megan admiringly says, “26? Well, you’re doing well for yourself.” Perfect!

          • Victoria Ramirez

            Yes, I loved Trudy’s sorta-bitchy-but-not-on-purpose attitude. “26 is still VERY young!”

            • Mismarker

              Haha! Yes, that is *exactly* what she said. Loved that scene! If only she had known the secret Pete and Peggy shared.

            • Aisling O’Doherty

              I think Trudy DID say that line on purpose, though to be fair, her attitude would have been common at the time.

            • Victoria Ramirez

              Maybe so. I thought it was more a case of Trudy not realizing she was putting her foot in her mouth (from Peggy’s perspective).

            • Aisling O’Doherty

              I still think Trudy knew full well what she was saying. In those days, women were expected to marry before 30. From Trudy’s perspective, Peggy is wasting her youth on her career when she should be finding a husband, and she needed a gentle reminder of where her priorities should lie.

              (I have to admit that when I hit thirty, I actually got a few similar comments e.g. “Well I SUPPOSE there’s still time for you to find someone”. I was surprised at the amount of people who thought like that in this day and age).

            • 3hares

              Yeah, there’s absolutely no doubt that Trudy was saying just what she meant to say. She was being sympathetic and encouraging Peggy that she shouldn’t feel like she was an old maid, implying that of course Peggy thought of herself as an old maid.

            • melisaurus

              The closer I get to 30 the more people ask me about marriage or tell me I’ll change my mind about having a baby.

            • Charly

              As a 26-year-old in Salt Lake City, some things don’t change.

          • Adelaidey

            That was the scene that put Megan in my good graces. Be good to Peggy and I’ll support most of your blunders.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Was it good because she had a boyfriend or good because she dumped him? Or for some other reason?

    • par3182

      Peggy, Pete and Don: getting the band back together.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Question:
        Don knows about the baby, but does he know it was Pete’s?

        • Danielle

          I don’t think so. Didn’t he ask her in The Suitcase if she knew who the father was? I think she said yes but didn’t tell him who.

        • 3hares

          Nope.

        • MartyBellerMask

          I didn’t think so, but couldn’t really remember. Thanks. :)

        • Fjasmine

          No he doesn’t.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          I forget in what terms Peggy said except she knows who it is, because Don asked if she knew, and also that her mother still thought it was Don’s. Pretty sure there were people at the office who thought that. No more details after that, though.

          • siriuslover

            I thought everyone else in the office thought she went to a fat farm? The guys joked in a meeting that she left and came back 9 pounds 8 ounces lighter, but I don’t think they seriously entertained the idea.

            • Juvenile Sinephile

              I feel like there was one comment that ‘Draper knocked her up’.

          • aesteve212

            I thought about that too in the final scene! As simple as the scene was,I loved how many layers of family connections they had at the table. Pete and Peggy with a child they have never really seen; Don and Peggy as imagined parents; Don as Peggy’s older brother/father. I also vaguely recall that Pete’s discovery of Don’s real identity was caught up with Don’s brother’s suicide?All these connections, and not a person at the table can say any of them outloud! That is a real family there!

      • charlotte

        When Pete made that remark about focusing on motherhood instead of family, I thought of the child he made with Peggy, and it sounded as if he was shifting the responsibiliy for the whole baby issue over to Peggy. I’m not saying that this was Pete’s intention (or even Matthew Weiner’s), but it came to my mind.

    • GeoDiva

      Time to print up that Draper, Campbell & Olson letterhead! Now this is an end game I can get behind!

      • betty draper

        And please may Joan and Roger be included, too.

        • Chris

          I can’t see Joan being involved unless there is a major rapprochement between her and Don. She pretty much positioned herself as his “enemy” in Don’s mind as part of Cutler and Bert’s team.

          • SylviaFowler

            It’s not just in Don’s mind. She has been pretty explicit that she considers Don her enemy now.

          • Aurumgirl

            I’m not sure she’s so enamoured of Cutler at this point. She went to him to let him know what she’d learned from Bob, and his response to her news was to make Harry a partner. Don made the ironic remark about Harry being loyal–and I think Joan felt her own loyalty to Cutler had been betrayed. So we will see if Joan’s really against Don as she may have appeared to be.

            • Chris

              I think the fact she was really behind the idea of kicking Don when he was down is the problem. Roger reached out to Don and got him back in the agency. Joan not only wanted him out, she was gunning for his shares being absorbed. No matter how it pans out for her I can’t see Don wanting her on his team again.

        • marishka1

          Sorry, but Roger is quickly becoming dead weight and Joan has positioned herself as severely anti-Don. They don’t get to play along this time :-)

          • Chris

            I think Roger, because of who he is, will always be worth something as an accounts man. He has access to the right clubs and the right crowd and he is the kind of guy people like (plus he is rich and from old money). Even forty years later these are great assets to have.

          • Travelgrrl

            Roger’s family money started the whole firm (with Bert Cooper), he brought in Chevy, he’s going to bring in Buick as some kind of way to overthrow Cutler and Co.

            Roger, despite all appearances, is not dead weight.

          • leviramsey

            “[Joan & Roger] don’t get to play along this time.”

            Joan is stuck in the past with Roger (no matter how much free love and acid trips he partakes in), and the overall plotline is in some sense about the young (and those who think young, as Don is still occasionally capable) completing the break with the past.

            Joan is, like Roger, stuck in the 1950s or early 1960s.

          • Aurumgirl

            I don’t think so. I think Roger has a plan up his sleeve after hearing about Joan’s news. We shouldn’t write him off just yet.

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            Roger’s too tied up in his family drama and ennui that has built up into this various messes. He can hustle when desperation calls, however. Jim Cutler can call it a failure all he wants, but Roger got that Chevy lead. But I think this, for Roger, is easily a time that calls for hustling even if he has no idea there could be another shoe dropping that he also does not know.

        • DollyMadisonWI

          I only want them to take Ken.

    • VoicOff

      After a frustrating season this episode was very satisfying to watch. At Last.

    • ExUSA

      That moment was absolutely perfect– where Don realized he was forgiven. The expression of bewilderment, then gratitude. Pure Dick Whitman. Not to mention the complimenting colors. Looking forward to the recap on Wednesday.

      They really nailed it this week.

      • TeraBat

        I seriously hope they pay attention to how similar Peggy’s outfit was during That Scene to what she was wearing last week when having Julio and Ginsberg over.

        • Eric Stott

          except that Peggy looked GREAT in that Coral (?) top & hoop earrings.

          • 3boysful

            AND the blue dress. I thought the ladies looked particularly good this episode.

            • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

              A lot of blue dresses this episode, I noticed Bonnie and Trudy in the same color and a very similar silhouette (Bonnie at the office and Trudy in her only scene.)

            • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

              That blue dress was a joy to behold. Great style, perfectly tailored. And the rest of her looked especially excellent, too.

          • Chris

            Red is a good “power” color for Peggy since she went to CGC. Remember the red Chanel style suit she got for herself after she was made Copy Chief there? This was the best she has looked all season. Even her hair looked more modern and stylish.

            • Hilda Elizabeth Westervelt

              I loved her hair in this episode. Much darker and so sleek and chic. Made her blue eyes pop.

          • Bev Wiesner

            whn I saw her in that top, i thought of her boyfriend ( Abe? ) and the first scene they have together coming back from Fire Island ,
            she had on a bathing suit, and hes making love to her, and he comments about how much he loves her shoulders . I thought she looked fabulous also

      • ConnieBV

        THAT FACE. Hamm nailed it.

        • FayeMac

          I loved when Peggy laid her head on Don’s chest. She finally had a moment of feeling held and loved by a strong caring man who knew and respected her.

          • JulieTy

            And then when he kissed the top of her head!!!

            • FayeMac

              yes, I forgot the kiss. So sweet and tender. Great scene!

            • Kathy

              stop! I’m gonna start crying again!

            • FayeMac

              Go ahead and cry, Don will hand you his hanky.

            • plimsoul89

              As Roger did recently with Margaret when they were camped out in the commune’s hayloft — poignant moments, and bittersweet.

            • Bev Wiesner

              You dont always get what you want.
              But sometimes you get what you need.

      • aesteve212

        I didn’t realize until TLo said it how much I needed an episode like this. They really knocked it out of the park.

    • Bill Craven

      The only thing that bothered me about the closing scene (the “invention” of the constructed family) and my reaction to it was remembering, only on reflection, the child of Pete and Peggy; it’s almost like we’ve forgotten how they got to where they are. Yes, Peggy, Don, and Pete are a work family, but somewhere there’s a 8 year-old kid who may or may not one day wonder about his own truth; Don at least has Sally, but it looks like Pete’s daughter is probably lost, and Peggy really has nothing. Except a slow dance with Don to “My Way”.

      But I did love that Don continues to mentor Peggy even on his way down (sideways? off the roof?) and that Joan wisely stood up for the possibility of love. I do hope they get the Buick account; we had a 1969 Buick LeSabre as our family car in the early 70s and I loved that car, especially lying unsafely full length in the back seat, looking out the back window listening to the radio.

      • TeraBat

        I think that might actually make the scene more powerful? What ties Peggy and Pete together is *not* their child, it’s their shared career. I think those three characters were chosen very specifically by the writers to illustrate that fact. It’s about the changing definition of family, and therefore the changing structure of society. Like the modern slogan, “love makes a family.” Pete, Peggy and Don don’t love each other, but they do love their careers, and it’s that focus on self-fulfillment, for both genders, which really separates 20th century America from 21st.

        • Bill Craven

          Of course, that’s the point. I was just reflecting that in the moment, I forgot *why* they got to where they got to, because I was happy for them for finding a new way to be that we’ve normalized now. They’ve made their mistakes, but in the space between the old and the new, others suffer because the reality of the time outside of Manhattan will take years to catch up. It’s easy to forget, but I remember being bewildered by the fact that it seemed like all my friend’s parents were divorced even in the late 70s.

      • Verascity

        Really? The child was on my mind for a lot of this episode, with Peggy ironically lamenting her inability to be “the voice of moms” and coming together with the father of her child and her own spiritual father at the table.

      • not_Bridget

        Giving the kid up for adoption was the best solution. Peggy might have convinced folks that Pete was the father–breaking up his marriage. Which would have ended his career–his father in law’s contract was important. Her career would have ended, obviously. So she & Pete would have been tied together (if not married) in resentment & poverty. Remember–his family’s fortune was just about gone. Peggy would not have had that “happy” suburban mom-hood–that wasn’t The Whole Truth even in the 1950’s.

        Of course, she still wonders about having “a child.” If she found the right guy–who wanted a wife with a career. But she doesn’t have time to go looking.

        Her & Pete’s kid might well show up on her doorstep…in 20 years.

        • JulieTy

          Peggy sure lit up when Abe mused about the children they might have together. It’s still a source of longing for her, I think, but when confronted with actual children she doesn’t seem to want to connect with them.

          • Chris

            She seems to be doing fine with Julio.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              It seems like she slowly and grudgingly let Julio into her life. We first see him yelling at her (at his mom’s request) about fixing the toilet. Next time we see Julio, it’s several months later, he’s watching TV and eating pretzels with her, and she’s fine with it. I would have liked to see that relationship develop. It would make a fun 70s sitcom. Possibly produced by Norman Lear (for a more serious slant) or Garry Marshall (more silly).

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            If we’re talking about the ‘Aunt Peggy’ Peggy than yes, a woman in her early twenties fresh off leaving a mental ward of some sort because of how traumatic that birth was, was probably not a good fit to be around children, even her sister’s children.

            Kids don’t bother her but I am sure the responsibility of one was something that maybe only recently she could feel prepared for.

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        Peggy had a closed adoption so the kid is never going to know. I also thought the point of Peggy’s conversations in both this and The Suitcase is not to feel guilty about her choice even if her life is not exactly where she wants it to be. Honestly, either she would have lived in shame having a child out of wedlock and living with her mother for the rest of her life and not do what thing she loves- to say she has nothing is an insult to Peggy’s skill in the ad game- or, even worse, had thrown that in Pete’s face that would have forced them into an unhappy marriage. She would be in Trudy’s position with him and stuck in suburbia, also likely not in the ad game.

        • Bill Craven

          Oh, clearly; the options for everyone were limited. This whole show is about how limited even the people born into privilege are by the society. I think the only one who comes close to escape is Bert, really, since he’s the only one with old money, but he’s old and mostly irrelevant a lot of the time. Pete’s got the old name, but not the resources as a young man to do what he wants. Don has the skill, but not the name and with a healthy dose of self-loathing. Roger’s got the contacts but not the self-control.

          My statement above was more a reflection on me, as a viewer, being caught in the moment with the characters, than any opprobium on the choices they’ve made or how they’ve chosen to deal with them. They’re all bastards, in their own way, but all of them have some redeeming qualities.

          I just wonder if absolutely everyone in advertising in this era was so miserable, or whether that’s just the slice that Weiner is choosing to show us. Or maybe it’s just the nature of work in America? I don’t know. I do know that the closest to happiness these three characters get is when they’re close to each other and working together.

    • Baba Yaga

      How great was that shot of the flight attendant closing the curtain on the plane? I know there’s a billion conspiracies bouncing around Megan, but I think we might have (finally) seen the end of Megan (and I guess Bonnie, too — NO ONE likes New York Pete!). I also noticed (by accident, on tumblr) that the scene where Don was looking at Megan preparing breakfast in the other room was blocked almost exactly the same as the scene where he danced with Peggy — just interesting that Don once alienated and pushed Pegs away a couple seasons ago when he married Megan, and now their close mentor/student dynamic has been (finally!!) restored while his second marriage is crumbling.

      Also, much love for Shirtless Stan Eating A Banana. Too beautiful for words, that man.

      • SylviaFowler

        ” we might have (finally) seen the end of Megan”

        You all say that literally every week since she slept with Don the very first time.

        • Travelgrrl

          Wishful thinking, all of us!

      • MadMenMurphy

        ALSO, multi-colored paint stains on his jeans! (As though in his spare time, he’s a painter — like a lot of *the best* commercial artists were/are!) So great to imagine what his work would look like…

    • Jenna Lynn C.

      I totally agree that Don and Peggy’s scene is probably the best scene of the entire series. So touching.

    • katiessh

      yes! trudy is back, awesome.
      I struggle so much with pete- I love how he’s so often in don’s corner, but the way he treats peggy and trudy is just so… pete.
      I’m glad we get an episode with don and peggy actually on an upswing because you’re right, this season as been depressing on top of the usual mad men depressing.

      • Danielle

        Not just a girlfriend – he’s in love!

        • katiessh

          I am not happy at all by this development. But he was eating a banana, so at least he’s getting enough potassium which is about as positive as I can get.

          • Trent

            SO off-topic, but was I the only one surprised at how hairless Shirtless Stan’s torso turned out to be, given the magnificent mane he has for a beard?

            • katiessh

              now that I think about it, it’s weird. wonder if he man-scapes.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          That kind of underlined for me just how work-based Peggy’s work relationships are. Stan has kind of been her work husband but she only knows his personal life in details be it his schedule from last season, where we first saw his awesome apartment and Moshe Dayan mural but an unknown naked lady in his bed, and now this certain ‘baby’ he expects to receive a call from. To be fair, she kind of has given him enough cold shoulders and she saw him do Gleason’s daughter while drugged up in “The Crash” episode.

          I was devastated, too. I shipped them and I also cannot deal with the idea of 8 episodes left and Peggy finding somebody possibly not yet on the show seems like something I am not sure Matthew Weiner would go given there is so few left for people to be satisfied at that.

          • Chris

            I’m still predicting it’s Ted and Peggy, otherwise why show him in this depression all season?

            • Juvenile Sinephile

              I think because the ‘real’ Ted is mostly in step with Cutler. Remember Ted originally?

            • Chris

              I don’t think so. Ted was the one who wanted everyone to get along and be happy when the merger happened. He was the one who cared about Gleason and was devastated when he got sick and then died. Cutler’s response was “Ted doesn’t know how to handle these things”. Ted kind of kept Cutler in line a bit when he was too aggressive and now Cutler is using Ted’s absence and depression to manipulate and control things. Cutler appointed his stooge Lou and is allied with Bert Cooper. I think if Ted snaps back he will want more unity in the agency. Unless his personality has completely changed for good and he’s no longer and optimist.

      • MartyBellerMask

        It’s not going to happen. Just not. Maybe he’s got a friend for her, though.

        • katiessh

          this is the worst, britta style.

      • Joanna

        He keeps saying he has a girlfriend and I keep saying, “Shut up. No, you don’t.”

        • Mismarker

          We’ve never seen her, have we? I bet his girlfriend’s name is George Glass.

    • PastryGoddess

      Holy cow, you guys weren’t kidding about getting this up ASAP.

      yes!

    • Frank_821

      Yes that was very satisfying. I was watching the 2nd repeat. AMC keeps changes things up on me

      I had such a mixed reaction to Pete and his visit. He was total hypocrite berating Trudy that way and wrong to do so. But she wasn’t exactly an innocent angel. Trudy is more mature and self-aware than Pete but she can be pretty selfish and callous. I found it irksome that Trudy clearly and deliberately arranged to be out of the house when Pete came for his visit. And her comment that that Pete got his annual visit out of the way, so he should just leave was a low blow on her part.

      That being said both of them should have been upfront about seeing other people and trying to move on.

      Bob was kind of sad during his scene with Joan. Too bad we wont get any more Bob especially since The Crazy Ones was cancelled.

      • PastryGoddess

        I don’t know. I think we might not be quite done with Bob yet.

      • asympt

        It would have been nice if Trudy had been upfront with Pete about having better things to do than make polite talk during his visit, but he hasn’t exactly earned it. Poor Pete–always throwing away what he has in his misery over what he doesn’t have.

        Where Trudy really failed Pete was way back when she didn’t respect his need to be a city boy. He wasn’t perfect in NYC, but he was so much less a miserable bastard than when he was trapped in the suburbs. That didn’t matter to her and that was the end of any chance of a working marriage. For a little time they were really good together–for a little time he and Bonnie were really good together too.

        Poor old Pete, his own worst enemy.

        Meanwhile I suppose the Pegistan shippers can’t be happy that Stan’d rather spend the weekend with his baby than run to the office for Peggy.

        • Eric Stott

          Pete was a hypocritical ass, but I think Trudy should have at least been there to meet him and pass the daughter over. There have always been times when the Spoiled Brat in Trudy flares up

          • Janice Bartels

            I agree. He’s only there once a year and she can’t be there? I have a little trouble believing she wouldn’t try to make things easier for Tammy, at least, by facilitating that visit.

            • Eric Stott

              I think it says something that her maid actually had a uniform – that was something that even Betty never did. Trudy is determined to live an upper class life, probably on a middle class budget.

            • betty draper

              Betty’s new maid has wears a uniform – the exact grey uniform Trudy’s maid wears.

            • Eric Stott

              I guess you have an image to protect.

            • Aurumgirl

              I vaguely remember that Carla had a uniform, too–a blue one. Am I wrong? Someone correct me if I am!

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              Trudy has her daddy’s check-book at her disposal.

            • Travelgrrl

              The ‘once a year’ thing was just a bitchy thing to say. He hasn’t been gone a year, more like a few months.

              She was just trying to emphasize that he was OUT of the family for all practical purposes. And she likes it that way.

            • Aisling O’Doherty

              Trudy only made the “once a year” comment after Pete started criticizing her for dating other men (which really is the height of hypocrisy coming from HIM). Also do we even know for sure that Trudy WAS out on a date?

            • Travelgrrl

              She admitted to Pete she was. Wherever she was, her home is in suburbia and her car was in the driveway when Pete got back with Tammy, so she got picked up by someone. (ie she wasn’t driving herself when she was out.)
              Regardless, Pete’s a shit. But she’s a snide bitch – giving Bets a run for the money is the horrible department.

            • Lilithcat

              He’s only there once a year and she can’t be there?

              That’s exactly why she wouldn’t be there. If he can’t be bothered to see his child, why should she be bothered to see him?

            • Janice Bartels

              It isn’t about seeing him, I just don’t think Trudy has Tammy meet him (essentially a stranger to a 2-3 year old) alone.

            • Lilithcat

              I just don’t think Trudy has Tammy meet him

              He has as much (if not more) responsibility to meet Tammy. He’s living in LA, not New York. That was his choice. He’s keeping himself from seeing Tammy.

            • Janice Bartels

              I don’t think I’m explaining myself well. It isn’t that Trudy isn’t perfectly justified at being pissed at Pete and not wanting to see him or that Pete should not have made more of an effort to see his daughter. It just seems like Trudy is a pretty good mom who would have, for the sake of her daughter’s comfort sucked up her resentment/anger and been there for the hand-off. My parents divorced when I was an infant and my father was in the Army overseas. I only got to see him once or twice a year and every time he was a stranger to me- because when you’re 2 or 3, 6-10 months is a pretty healthy chunk of your life for someone to be missing and being handed off to a stranger would be terrifying.

            • Kit_W

              i don’t see Trudy as being all that pissed at Pete. i think she had long gotten over him being out of the house and it was
              just a matter of having the divorce papers signed at this point. She wasn’t pissed at least until now, when he sat there and stewed like an immature idiot an then tried to call her amoral for moving on with her life, exactly as he was doing at that very moment.

          • Vanessa

            I don’t blame her in the least for trying to arrange to avoid having to see him at all. Many divorced couples managed to pass children back and forth with a bare minimum of contact, especially when wounds were raw.

          • Chris

            I agree, if only for the daughter’s sake Trudy should have been there to make the transition more comfortable. Trudy made a remark about Pete’s once a year visit and should have known it would be strange for Tammy.

          • Victoria Ramirez

            I don’t know. If I were Trudy I wouldn’t want to see Pete even for a second. I don’t really blame her.

            • Lisa_Co

              Still, Don and Betty don’t have a good relationship but Betty has always been there when Don picks up the kids and drops them off.

            • Chris

              I get that Trudy has every right to not want to deal with him. It’s his fault the marriage broke up and she can go and do whatever she pleases as far as I’m concerned. I’m just surprised that Trudy who was 100% devoted to her daughter didn’t want to make sure she was comfortable with the hand off.

        • Vanessa

          Pete was less miserable but he was still sexually predatory (Peggy, the au pair next door) and not particularly likable.

        • megohd

          Not so fast … he would have gone back to the office if she’d asked at the end of the convo.

          Sigh … I love Stan. He seems to be the most evolved member of the cast at this point.

          • Travelgrrl

            To Peggy: “Thanks for the subtitles!” when she states something obvious.

            “I’m surprised her cat has that much money!” about Peggy’s (Shirley’s) ginormous bouquet of flowers.

            Oh Stan, you card.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Trudy had no obligation to see her soon-to-be ex-husband. I don’t see how the “annual visit” comment was out of line, when that’s clearly accurate enough that Tammy didn’t even recognize him.

        • Danielle

          I didn’t quite buy that though. Pete may not have been around much since they split, but he did spend Christmas with his daughter a few months earlier. And when he still lived in the same house, he saw her all the time before that. My son is at least a year younger than Tammy, and he recognizes relatives he hasn’t seen in months and months that we only get together with on holidays.

          • 3hares

            It seemed like Pete saw her regularly even after the split but he had a long gap between this visit in the last–he kind of warned us about that on the plane. Personally I was more surprised Pete didn’t recognize her. The few times we’ve seen her in the past she was blonde. She walked out looking like she was wearing Megan’s wig from the party last week!

            It almost makes more sense as a dramatic point about Pete–everyone’s always looking for the slightest excuse to cut him out of the business or family or whatever so of course this would also apply to his child. She doesn’t see a need for him in the family either.

            • Fjasmine

              Casting for Tammy hit a bump, she was a chubby blond toddler a few months and this dark haired little girl looked around 4

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              Then casting was off before, at least age-wise. Tammy was born in August, 1965, so she is almost 4 years old in the current episode.

            • Kathy G

              So was I. My parents didn’t divorce til I was 7 though. My brother was 4, my sister, like Gene, a baby. My father was an accounts man who worked for Westinghouse, took the divorce hard and was let go (I think it was his drinking). He got a job with Borg Warner for which he had to relocate. He lived in Pittsburgh (not across the country) too far for weekend visits. Tammy and I are the same age. My mother and stepfather didn’t waste time in getting together after and my father was very bitter. I was not as shy as Tammy though. When I was four I ran up to a very tall very dark black man in the post office, wrapped my arms around his legs and yelled “Daddy!”. My grandmother was the village clerk, family was pretty well known and I think my mother turned several shades of red before she called me and apologized to the man who probably wished the earth would open up under him.

        • MK03

          Maybe she doesn’t have an obligation to see her estranged husband, but she damn sure has an obligation to her daughter.

          • Azucena

            Maybe she was thinking of Tammy, though. She knows Pete’s an ass and is likely to make a scene if she’s there. By not being there, she avoided having the drama unfold in front of Tammy. Pete took his daughter out for a nice visit and had his tantrum while she was sound asleep.

            • 3hares

              I don’t think she had any reason to know he’d make a scene. It’s not like we’ve ever seen a pattern of that.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Bob was sad. He was grasping at straws, for sure. It aint easy being Bob, despite his (very) pleasing face.

        Semi-related: I heard on the news (ok, it was “Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me”) that mens’ shorts are back and shorter than ever. COINCIDENCE?? :)

        • Kathy G

          I am very happy about the shorter shorts trend for men.

      • Aisling O’Doherty

        “I found it irksome that Trudy clearly and deliberately arranged to be out of the house when Pete came for his visit”.

        I don’t know, maybe she just didn’t feel like making chit-chat with her soon to be ex-husband. People often behave like that shortly after a break-up (never mind a divorce).

        • 3hares

          I was thinking about the nanny and finally realized why it seemed significant–less to Trudy than Pete. Pete’s totally recreated his own family situation with the Vogels and one of the things about his growing up (unfortunately I think this is something MW said in interviews but has never been presented on the show) was that Pete was mostly left with the help–the help being a series of employees like this woman. So it’s not really important why Trudy happened to be out, but the message to Pete was that he was back with the help, not part of the family.

    • Man Dala

      There was so much I LOVED about this episode but I’ll limit myself to my Top 5 moments:
      # 5 – Reappearance alive of Trudy Campbell — I’m looking forward to your critique of her (in my view) antiquated wardrobe. I was rooting for Pete and Bonnie, I hope they reconcile.
      # 4 – Reappearance alive of puppy-eyed Bob Benson — the arrangement proposal to Joan was heartbreaking and touching. Joan’s reaction to it was both adequate and moving, and Christian Hendricks performance was outstanding in that scene.
      # 3 – Harry Crane being made a partner — it triggered in me the same contradictory feelings (joy? pride? resistance? uncomfortableness?) that it did in the partners.
      # 2 – The re-definition of the concept of “family” that one of the Holy Trinity of Peter, Paul and Mary (Pete, Don and Peggy) came up with at the fast-food restaurant — the house-shaped structure of the restaurant was the perfect frame for that “family” portrait.
      # 1 – Don and Peggy slow-dance — perfection.

      • Vanessa

        And Don is now in the room with the partners when decisions are being made! Big change from last week.

        • MartyBellerMask

          And Ted wasn’t even on the line.

        • Inspector_Gidget

          The real irony though is, the more successful Don becomes the easier it is for the partners to shitcan him. I could definitely see a scenario where he lands a big account but violates that dumb contract and gets dumped. Which probably won’t end well for the firm, but they aren’t exactly the sharpest knives in the drawer these days.

        • Man Dala

          Good observation.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Harry’s going to be insufferable now.

        • MK03

          Oh god, can you imagine how skeezy he’ll become after this?? I don’t even want to think about it.

        • Man Dala

          You mean “more” insufferable? Yes.

    • CMSmith1848

      Wonderful write-up! I too cheered. I had problems with last season, but this one has brought me back. I was intrigued by how “good” Don was this episode. He tried to be accomdating to Megan, and could have easily been an ass about Burger Chef, but he didn’t. He is “doing the work,” not just in the office. I felt bad for Pete. I thought Bonnie was a good match for him, she and Trudy actually have a lot in common. They won’t put up with his $hit. Was it just me or was there a twinkle in Roger’s eye at the end of the show?

    • Janice Bartels

      Such a good episode! I loved Joan’s hold out for love and New York Pete (who nobody likes) petulantly slamming his beer in the cake, but the best moment was Don and Peggy in the office working late. It looked like a father/daughter dance, but instead of starting a new adult life with a husband, she is finally (I hope) figuring out how to be an adult at her job instead of this weird sulky teenager she has been this season, always questioning the motivations of everyone around her, including herself.
      You must not have gotten much sleep last night, guys. Thank you for having this up so early this morning!

    • http://www.snoskred.org/ Snoskred

      OH MY GOD CLARA’S OUTFIT!!!!

      • Mismarker

        And she’s pregnant? I somehow missed that development!

        • betty draper

          I thought she looked very pregnant, too.

          • Mismarker

            Yes! That voluminous tent of a dress made her look weeks away from delivery. Oh, how maternity clothes have changed. I’ll have to re-watch the episode where Joan talks to Ken about Butler shoes. I think that’s the last time Clara was shown?

            • L’Anne

              Yeah, I definitely thought preggers too. I know, the trapeze style was full and flowing. BUT I saw when she put her arms down. That looked like a clear bump. Clara being married or in a stable relationship makes sense. She is clearly a clothes horse, and secretaries didn’t make that much money. If she had a husband, boyfriend, she’d have more of her income to put to fun stuff. It would also explain why she never seemed interested in relocating with Pete (presumably she could have– that often happened, see: Moira). She has a root in NYC.

          • decormaven

            In the first episode of this season, we see Clara, who does not appear to have a baby bump. She may be one of those women who doesn’t show until the latter stages of pregnancy.

            • Mismarker

              I am nearly 16 weeks along with my 3rd child and have almost no bump. Different for everybody (and every body).

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          So Ken was right about Clara seeing an account guy nightly, then? Ken does keep an eye out.

      • Aurumgirl

        Yes, and was she actually pregnant and at work? That leads us right back to Peggy’s statement about Don being surrounded by moms who work.

      • decormaven

        I’ve got to look more closely at that outfit. Very reminiscent of a Denise Are Here dress. I loved that line back in the day!

      • MasterandServant

        Yes! I noticed that, too- followed very closely by Peggy’s comment about Don being surrounded by working moms.

    • HelenNPN

      Yes there will be a new firm in town, the allies have been forming for the last 4 episodes or so, but more importantly, Don Draper will be ready soon enough for wife number 3, Peggy, and this time he at least will be ready to do it right.

      When they ran into each other at the movie theater, I knew it – Peggy will mature at about the rate Don will to be able t have a real relationship with a colleague and a career woman, Peggy who he is starting to see as a woman. The “30” thing jolted him – she’s no ingenue anymore.

      But I don’t think they’ll get together without the threat of one last fling with Betty – she’s on the outs in her 2nd marriage and she and Don sleep together pretty easily on those overnighters with the kids.

      • Chris

        I can’t imagine Peggy and Don ever getting together romantically. I don’t think he has ever seen her that way and I can’t imagine, despite her attempt on their first (day?week?) to touch his hand, that she has any of those feelings for him. I think Ted, if anyone will end up with Peggy.

        • larrythesandboy

          TOTALLY agree. And I think that even the hand touching in Ep 1 was just because that was what Peggy thought she should be doing, following Joan’s advice. The hand touching (Don to Peggy) in the suitcase episode was an expression platonic affection, I thought, as was the dance in this episode. I will have to stop watching if they hook up romantically – all wrong!

      • sweetlilvoice

        If that happens (Don and Peggy), this show will jump the shark. He’s her mentor.

        • HelenNPN

          Just remember – you heard it first right here from me! ; )

    • http://www.snoskred.org/ Snoskred

      Well, I’m calling this one as the best episode of this little season-let we are experiencing.

      I say this because I am going to anticipate – based on the past 5 episodes – that this mid-season finale thing is going to be crazy hectic and have way too much going on.

      I suspect next week will be the equivalent of herding cats while wearing 6 inch heels and a miniskirt with a man in the room whom you are desperate not to bend over in front of because you just remembered you forgot to put on underwear.

      This week was a welcome relief. A much better pace, no crazy bi-coastal wackiness, plenty of Joan, actual ad work, finally Peggy is human again, and New York Pete. It was like clean fresh air which we have been craving.

      • blondie65

        “I suspect next week will be the equivalent of herding cats while wearing 6 inch heels and a miniskirt with a man in the room whom you are desperate not to bend over in front of because you just remembered you forgot to put on underwear.”

        OMG!! That was great…I am wiping diet pepsi off my monitor!! But yes, I agree..next week will be one of those episodes I’ll have to watch 3 times to follow everything, then I’ll come here and see all the things I still missed.

    • MarinaCat

      “Thanks for the subtitles.” Stan kills me.

      • Elizabetta1022

        I’m stealing that line from him! ha.

    • ConnieBV

      Correct me if I’m remembering this wrong, be re: Joan and Harry’s partnership. Didn’t Harry angrily call out once that Joan only made partner because she slept with someone and he at least deserved it? I immediately thought that was why she was so against it, and why she went to Roger (her Don). I also thought briefly of the Joan who was inconsolable when Marilyn died, Marilyn who was just looking for love.

      • Tony

        Yes, it was when she tried to fire his secretary. “I’m sorry my accomplishments happened in broad daylight and I can’t be given the same rewards.”

        • JulieTy

          That’s right! Horrible heinous Harry.

          • Chris

            Well I can see Harry’s point of view as well. He is a very valuable member of that agency who has been ignored for a long time and Joan should have at least spoken to him before she fired Scarlett (after she got in a yelling match with her in the middle of the agency). I can’t imagine she would have done that with Moira Ted’s secretary. I’m sure him hearing Joan got her partnership for sleeping with someone really rankled him. It wasn’t a nice thing to say, but I am sure he wasn’t the only one saying it.

          • SylviaFowler

            It’s not heinous, it’s honest.

            • JulieTy

              Fair enough. But he has become heinous in my opinion. I used to root for him but his lecherousness and big mouth have made me turn on him.
              I did like the scene with h and Don in the bar last week.

            • Headphone Princess

              I thought it was both. Classic Harry!

          • greenwich_matron

            Harry’s point is completely valid. if that happened in a firm I was working for, I would immediately start looking for a new job.

        • ConnieBV

          Ugh, I had totally forgotten that she did that. Do you remember why? Were the reasons valid?

          • Tony

            Scarlett left her place for 4 hours and asked Dawn to cover her. Joan caught them lying and tried to fire Scarlet, but at the end she gave Dawn office keys as a sign of confidence.

          • Chris

            Scarlett had fudged a time card over a longer lunch and roped Dawn into it somehow. Joan ended up having a really unprofessional yelling match on, or by the stairs with Scarlett over it and firing her on the spot. When Harry found out he was furious and IMHO justifiably so.

            • Bev Wiesner

              But wasnt Harry involved with Scarlett?

            • sweetlilvoice

              I don’t know if they are involved but they are close. She seems to baby him and say how smart he is which is probably what he really needs in a secretary. Plus, her outfits are fab!

            • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

              When Joan was going down the list of possible secretaries to give to Lou, she said that Harry and Scarlet were just about married.

            • Chris

              I miss Scarlett and her mod outfits!

            • Chris

              Yes, it’s definitely been implied if not shown, but Joan was having an affair with Roger for years. Megan had one with Don and so did Allison. Roger had one with Jane before he married her. That’s never been grounds for dismissal at SC. According to Joan this season Scarlett and Harry are “practically married” though not in the literal sense. I took it to mean they are still as thick as thieves.

          • Travelgrrl

            Scarlett was not at work when she should have been, even having another secretary falsify her time card. she DID deserve to get fired, and Harry should have kept out of it. He wouldn’t have challenged the authority of any of the male partners in that way, much less called them whores.

            • Chris

              It’s Harry’s secretary and Joan spent plenty of time not at work with Roger over the years. Scarlett really works directly for Harry so at least he should have been consulted before she fired her. Don has let his secretaries go early etc. If Harry didn’t mind it shouldn’t have been a big deal and Joan really acted unprofessionally yelling in the hall. None of the other partners would involve themselves in minor secretarial matters like time cards. The point was Joan was still acting like the head secretary not a partner which is why she ended up delegating the job to Dawn. Also Joan never would have yelled like that years before when she was a secretary, she was the sole of discretion. Even when Jane undermined her with Roger she didn’t react in that way. It was good that she passed those tasks on because they were making her crazy.

            • Travelgrrl

              It’s been established from episode 1 that Joan is in charge of the secretaries. Before she was partner, before she was in charge of finances, she was the chief secretary and in charge of the others. This has now been passed off to Dawn. It was totally in keeping with her previous interactions with secretaries to have fired Scarlet. The series has shown the executives expressing favor or dismay at who they’re assigned (Mrs. Blankenship?!) but it has always been Joan’s call. Ergo, Scarlet did not work ‘directly for Harry’ any more than the others under Joan’s aegis.

              Harry was out of line in that whole mess. I’ll never forgive him for what he said to Joan!

      • Aurumgirl

        Joan’s particularly miffed at Harry’s partnership because she knows a) Harry’s pretty much useless. Even thought TV is really important in advertising about this time and it’s poised to take off to become even more important, Harry’s not a creative or hard worker at selling the agency as well as he could, so he’s valued even though he contributes very little; and b) Joan knows Cutler’s making his alliances and wants to cut all the former SCD people out–Don, Roger, and her! And Harry’s now being rewarded with a partnership for coming up with a really stupid marketing gimmick (a computer that actually doesn’t even do much more than a big rolodex would). So yes, besides the personal insults Harry lobs at her, he’s kind of the typical underperforming, limited in talent, standard white guy in a corporate environment, while Joan’s way more skilled, has done so much more, has brought in so much more in revenue, but will always be considered not just “the girl” but “the girl who slept her way to a partnership”. Oh, and one more thing: Joan’s the one who’s loyal, bringing the news about GM to Cutler in an effort to give everyone a “head’s up” about what’s about to transpire…only to have Cutler reward Harry and betray her efforts as a standing partner. So when Don says “Say what you will” about Harry, it’s a bit too much for her.

        • BritneyE

          I don’t know if Harry is useless. There was a time when Joan was doing that work and doing it better than Harry but that was a long time ago. Harry has been in the business for ten years and the connections he has in television do run deep. You can’t just put someone else into Harry’s job and get the same results. He sees the value of his work and has advocated for it when no one else at the agency gets it. Joan, earlier this season, saved an account by pointing out that the agency has network connections you can’t get when you go in-house for your advertising. Joan doesn’t like Harry so she lets that color her view of his usefulness but Harry knows his job and makes them all money.

          • Aurumgirl

            Yes, but the point keeps being made: compared to the value and revenue brought in by Joan, and her diligence, skill, and capabilities, even in outperforming Harry at his job, Harry keeps getting rewarded for his comparatively average ability, while Joan is consistently overlooked for her much more effective efforts. It happens again, this episode, when once again, Harry profits with little effort, while those putting out the true efforts go unrewarded. For Joan, this is a repeating theme.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Joan never outperformed Harry at his job because Joan never had his job.

            • Bev Wiesner

              Joan was given the task of scoping soap opera scripts to look for unfortunate juxtapositions between products and plot lines or events and she was briilliant at it, she was even thinking of how to use the scripts to enhance product placement – then Harry gave
              her assignment to a damp little twerp ( becuase he was a guy) I think what Arumgirl is saying is that Joan was Crazy good at her job, not Harrys job. She was doing 2 jobs . She was so good thyat there wouldnt even BE an agency without her.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              It wasn’t her assignment; she was just filling in because the partners hadn’t granted Harry’s request for a new hire. Then Roger went ahead and granted the request, which meant Joan was no longer needed to fill in. Harry didn’t “give her assignment” away.

            • Bev Wiesner

              Ok, Ok. my point is she was SO GOOD, and Harry didnt have the eyes to see. poor Harry, he will never be one of the cool kids- that scene after the Rolling stones where Harry wants the last White Castle ?

            • 3hares

              He knew she was good, but this wasn’t rocket scientist and Joan already had a job. It wasn’t that he couldn’t see she did it well, it was that it didn’t occur to anybody that it was a bad thing for Joan to stop filling in once he hired somebody. That was always the idea.

            • ybbed

              Joan has never brought in more revenue than Harry.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            People tend to overstate Joan’s time working with Harry. She worked briefly as an assistant to him, and turned out to be good at it, but she never got the chance to excel at the job, let alone “doing it better than Harry.”

          • bksalt

            I can’t see making Harry a partner working out well for Harry or the agency. Here’s why: it’s June 1969, and the biggest project underway is the courting of Philip Morris. However cigarette advertising is about to be banned from television, which will make Harry less valuable and the decision to ‘partner’ him look even more desperate. Could also be a harbinger for SC&P, a symbolic telling of how behind the times it is. Points even more to the development of a new agency.

            • Floretta

              Even with being banned from television there’s still a ton of print advertising to fill the void.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          Harry has always been portrayed as very good at his job and very valuable to the agency.

          • Aurumgirl

            I think many of the partners make comments throughout the series about how little Harry is worth. Roger and Bert have said many times that he contributes little (remember that scene in season 6, episode 4 where Harry demands to be made partner because of the “financial boon” he’s brought to the company, but Roger and Bert decide they’d rather give him a year’s salary instead? Then they chat about how it would be better if they could fire him and stop payment on the cheque, and how his insistence on payment was probably the only impressive thing he’s ever done for the company? Remember Harry’s machinations in Jai Alai, “Broadway Joe Namath” (for which he demands the partnership) and the comedy show so tasteless it lasted 11 minutes–all those efforts got him a ton of recognition and compensation, but they were all utter failures? I don’t think he’s ever been portrayed as “good at his job”. And the agency keeps crediting him as “valuable” and we see that he keeps being rewarded, but we’re actually being shown that he is not. We’re shown the opposite where Joan is concerned. I don’t think that’s accidental.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              The very fact that they gave him a year’s salary bonus in order to keep him happy and firmly in place at SCDP tells you something about how valuable he is. The fact that he was one of only three people the partners approached to help form the new agency is another. The Jai Alai thing was Don’s failure, not Harry’s.

              And we’re afraid we strongly disagree about how he’s been portrayed. He’s always been portrayed as forward-thinking and smart about where the industry of advertising is going – TV and computers. The fact that people like Bert and Roger undervalued him is indicative of how out of touch and clueless they both are; not an indication that Harry’s bad at his job.

            • Aurumgirl

              I’m not so sure. I think, once again, we’re about to see Roger somehow pull his business together despite Harry’s much lauded “efforts” and the series of events they bring about.

            • Chris

              In Roger’s job, he can be out of touch and clueless with technology and the times and still get the agency accounts. It all depends on who he is dealing with. A lot of the people in charge of the accounts are older, rich white guys like him. That’s why they have Harry and the creatives to handle the rest. Roger’s job is just to “romance” the clients.

            • decormaven

              Yes- Roger got business done at the NYC Athletic Club, and Jim did business on the golf course with the guy from Phillip Morris. That’s how business was conducted- in clubs, predominantly populated by men in power.

            • Chris

              Did you notice how off the description of this episode was? What “club” was Pete asked to join?

            • decormaven

              Mile High Club.

            • Chris

              AHA! Oh that never occurred to me! I was thinking of Roger! Thank you!

            • http://www.jaimieteekell.com/ Jaimie

              That’s awesome! Oh Matthew Weiner, you troll.

            • MilaXX

              I’m not so sure. I’m wondering if we’re about to see the old guard, ad people like Lou, and Cutler die and the new generation of ad people like Pete, Peggy and Harry take their place. I can easily see Don heading a new firm with these guys because he appreciates talent and innovative thinking. Roger hasn’t done anything to pull his business together. It was Lane who alerted them that the Brits were going to sell the firm and helped hatch the idea of them creating the new firm. Sterling just went along with it. It was Don who came up with the idea of Ted & co. merging with them to create SC & P.

            • L’Anne

              I think its easy to conflate Harry’s social awkwardness (oh my, that Derby party was painful) with his significant business acumen, especially since we see little of his dealing in the business arena. Instead, we get references to convention whores, hookers who’ll take traveler’s checks, and snivelling to get money to change offices.

            • Mismarker

              DING DING DING!

            • jtabz

              This a hundred times.

            • sweetlilvoice

              The whole Derby party was painful, especially Roger in black face. I cannot imagine attending an office event now and seeing that.

            • SportifLateBoomer

              Agree — Harry’s like the workhorse there, pushing the agency to expand on TV and seeing the future importance of that. People don’t like him because he’s abrasive and pushy and outspoken/ill mannered. None of Don’s smooth good looks, or even Pete’s patrician WASPy veneer. He’s the future and he’s hard to swallow for the likes of Bert and Roger.

            • MartyBellerMask

              Bingo. Bert & Roger are definitely out of touch.

            • Inspector_Gidget

              That’s the way I’ve been reading it. The partners seem to have disdain for him because they don’t want to accept that TV, computers and Hollywood schmoozing are where the industry’s going in the future. He may have been a mediocre print ad man, but he knows how to BS with the best of the LA crowd.

            • Danielle

              Harry’s never been one of the cool kids, even back before he got all confident and bitter, when he was still simply, “Harry Crane, married.” He’s never gotten the same respect as all the other guys and that’s what’s held him back. His work has always seemed solid. Becoming partner has been a long time coming for him.

            • Jaialaibean

              Harry’s there to make it look like the others (even somewhat clueless Pete) have mad social skills.

            • Fjasmine

              It’s the bow ties

            • VirginiaK

              You just said what I was thinking but wasn’t sure I remembered right — about Harry totally getting it about television, and being met with resistance and derision by the people older than him. He is definitely presented as having the consciousness of somebody in an age group younger than the others, and at the same time as not really being all that hip if I remember correctly (an episode involving the Stones, his knowing about their concert but not recognizing them or someone claiming to be one of them).

            • Juvenile Sinephile

              Harry’s important and valuable. On a Sorkin show, Harry would be the hero and look like Don. But here, he is Harry Crane is a piggish jerk who is very unlikable but he needs to still work with them because he is good at his job.

          • AuntFiona

            The media dept @ a 60’s/70’s agency was the company’s money machine. Harry’s role is critical to the agency, though MW hasn’t made a point of that. Creative is the carrot, but the media buyers (and there should be a lot of them) are the stick, generating most of the revenues. They’d be the ones earning 15% of the billings in those days, getting best possible placement/time slots, and providing all those free tickets the exec’s love. Always surprises me that MW doesn’t make more of an issue that Harry would supervise a large staff. Creating unusual media opportunities would be cutting-edge moves for that era.

            • Glammie

              No. That’s not actually how it works. The accounts guys get the client to agree to a budget. That set budget is then apportioned between media buys and production (the actual ad development). The magazines and networks then kick back part of that media budget to the agency. So, no Harry is not generating that income–he’s managing part of the budget.

              It’s something Mad Men gets wrong, but I generally let it go. I was the media director at a small firm, so I know print, not television, but the principle’s the same.

              Part of why Harry would become a bit of an ass, by the way, is that media directors and buyers get taken out and shmoozed by magazines and networks. So, the sense that Harry knows all these people in L.A. is right.

        • Vanessa

          One of the ironies of the show is that the partners act as if harry is useless, but it is a sign of their short sightedness in not recognizing the huge role of media/TV in the next decades.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            Not to mention computers. Harry was a very early advocate of both.

            • Joanna

              And Pete complains to Harry that “You made your job up….” and he says “No, I just looked at other agencies and saw that they had a media department and we didn’t.” Which is genius. People don’t like Harry because he was nerdy before and now oily/nerdy. He’s not comfortable in his own skin and it repels people. Kind of like how Pete’s effort and open desire to please people does.

            • Chris

              Yet Pete is an excellent accounts guy, which is all about people liking you. Remember when Pete used his charm on Megan’s Dad? Many people find Pete charming it’s his co-workers who find him lacking. Although to be fair Peggy found him pretty magnetic first season.

          • Chris

            They have always treated Pete and Harry poorly because they don’t care for their personalities and they are probably the most forward thinkers (business wise). I think Don has come to appreciate the people who respect his work and are loyal to him, not just the “cool” people at the agency.

            • gingerella

              And obviously, his appreciation means a lot. Both men have jumped to help Don probably in large part because he recognized their talent.

          • bksalt

            But not w/r/t Philip Morris. Cigarette advertising is about to be banned from TV (early 1971 IIRC).

          • JulieTy

            The same is true for Pete. He has spotted social trends — to the agency’s advantage — LONG before anyone else has.

        • betty draper

          Also, Joan did a fabulous job reviewing the television scripts for Harry when he supposedly didn’t have time to do it. Afterwards he just blew her off and allowed jealous Roger to put a man in that job full time, with pay. Joan wasn’t getting anything extra for reading the scripts but she caught on instantly and did a great job with the clients, charming them in the meeting way more than Harry ever could. Sadly she just took it in stride when she was kicked to the curb by Harry, as she has done with many, many other humiliations in her career and her life — except for this time, when she voted against Harry. Go Joanie! (But please get over your attitude with Don…)

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            She wasn’t kicked to the curb or blown off by Harry. She was filling in in his department since the firm hadn’t okayed the hiring of an assistant for him. Once the firm okayed it, her services weren’t needed. She never expressed any interest in the job and Harry would have had no way of knowing she was interested. In fact, she was engaged to be married and openly talking about how she was going to leave the company.

            • betty draper

              I disagree. Don’t you remember the hurt look on her face when he took the job away from her? And how she shut down emotionally when she was told to brief the new guy? Also reading scripts at home in the evening, with interest? She clearly loved the job and was humiliated when it was pulled out from under her.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Yes, she was sad to lost the temporary position. But Harry had no idea she wanted the job and no reason to think to give it to her because she was leaving the company when she got married. No one kicked her to the curb. She just realized that she was capable of more than she knew in that moment.

            • betty draper

              Harry didn’t realize it because he is insensitive. And I still maintain that she was kicked to the curb: by Roger, who didn’t want Joan in that position, and by Harry, who was too blind to see how much it meant to her.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Harry didn’t realize it because Joan herself didn’t even realize it until it was taken away from her. She was a secretary filling in and she gave no indication to anyone that she had any ambitions. In fact, she spent years telling everyone the opposite: that she was there to find a husband and check out. Joan wasn’t a victim of Harry and Roger here; she was a victim of the lowered expectations she was operating under. That was the point of that story: not that something got taken away from her, but that she realized she was capable of wanting something like that in the first place.

            • betty draper

              Okay, okay. You win.

            • marishka1

              They win because they are, actually, right. Joan never expressed that she wanted the job. And I’d beg to differ with the original comment in this thread; Harry’s not completely useless. He can be inept, but…he started the television division completely on his own initiative and grew it from there. He brought the idea of having their own computer (although I’m not sure what it does for them at this time) and we know from hindsight that this is also very important.

            • L’Anne

              I really don’t understand Harry. In season 1, he’s a devoted husband and he and Don bond over talking about the cave paintings. he’s driven to tears over his one night stand and estrangement from Jennifer. Even in season 2 and 3, he’s a friendly, if socially awkward guy, who bumbles in parties. Then BAM– Don doesn’t like him (per Megan) and his response about Zou Bisou, convention whores, etc. What happened?

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Harry is easily the worst written of any of the characters.

            • Qitkat

              I have to strongly agree with this. I haven’t rewatched any of the seasons, while I realize that along with the multiple viewings the two of you do, so do many of the BKs, hence the insights and recalls that I have forgotten. But that’s my point. Harry has the most muddled storyline in my memory compared to almost any other major character, after my one and only viewing of each of the episodes. Last week I confused him with someone else, and I also could not describe him to a casual viewer as easily as I could describe any of the other major characters. He disappears for long stretches of time, and then he becomes important to the storyline again, but it’s not enough to make him memorable in my mind; I guess he has actually never seemed to be a major character to me, although obviously he has played a part in some crucial moments of the show. I find him forgettable.

            • JulieTy

              … since Paul Kinsey. ;-)

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              I don’t think his evolution as a callous womanizer is that shocking or unrealistic. Most newlyweds (like Pete Campbell, back in the day) are idealistic about being monogamous, but it doesn’t last. The jokes about convention whores, etc., can be understood as being shaped by the culture/his peers, absorbing the ugly sexism around him.

              Others go the opposite way — remember what a jerk Ken Cosgrove was at the beginning, when he chased one of the secretaries at that office party and lifted her dress to see what color her underwear was? He really settled down over the years.

            • L’Anne

              I don’t think its unrealistic. Its ungrounded. We actually see some of Ken’s transition– getting attention for his writing, getting more responsibilities and recognition at work, weathering various work-transition-storms, going to a “sausage grinder” of an agency, and getting married. We see a series of transitions in him, going from womanizer, good-time guy insulting Peggy to getting more serious, ambitious, professional, and hood-natured. We see his politics changing (stop dropping Napalm on children!).

              But we got nothing on Harry. After all, he was around just as much ugly sexism, adultery, and womanizing in the first 3 seasons, when he was a devoted husband who stumbled once and was utterly broken up about it. He was socially awkward, but good at his job and a loving husband. Even his long standing interest in the media bottom-line (which is essential for his job) is being cast in an extremely negative light (the MLK jr assassination).

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Good point about the difference between “unrealistic” and “ungrounded.”

            • Chris

              Harry’s always been a mix of sentimental and weak. He started cheating in season one, and though he felt bad about it, he kept it up. He’s not handsome and slick like Don but he has a good business sense. I think success brings out bad qualities in him but like all the characters he has good ones. He will have a nasty little hook up with Paul’s manipulative Hare Krishna girlfriend in his office then give Paul money to get away from her afterwards. He’s a deeply flawed character but without the panache of a Roger or Don. I categorize him with Pete a lot, except Pete is much better drawn as a character and gets more screen time.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              I think Harry succumbed to the glamour and temptations of LA once he started traveling out there regularly with the start-up of SCDP in season 4 (I don’t recall any mention of Harry traveling when it was still SC). Harry is a little embarrassed by his wife’s lack of social standing (she tried so, so hard to fit in with the “cool kids” at Roger’s Derby Day party — and failed), and he has referenced her father’s blue-collar occupation as being useless in terms of business connections (unlike, say, Ken’s situation and Pete’s when he was still with Trudy). LA provides an escape, and he makes the most of it.

            • Teresa

              I worked in a small ad agency long ago and the media buy is the gravy. I think the agency skims off 15% of what the client bills with tv ad time. This was an extremely important part to the agency’s bottom line and shows us how much the cigarette account will be a letdown when TV ads are banned. I’ve always thought Harry was a little brusque but he’s on top of tv and media.

            • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

              I worked in a recruitment agency around 1980. Aside from charges for display artwork, the only revenue from the clients was the 15% kickback from the newspapers in which we placed the ads. That is one reason ad agencies were ranked by media placements.

            • Travelgrrl

              Good call They’ll beat the shit out of you until you agree, LOL.

            • MilaXX

              I agree. I also think this was the first glimmer of thought that perhaps she could be more than just a secretary, but sadly she put that out of her mind in order to marry her doctor.

            • L’Anne

              Yeah, I’ve always seen it that way. She ends up both enjoying and being good at the script work. She called it “a hoot” when talking to Greg. That look is one of sadness, regret, disappointment. She didn’t realize it herself just how much she liked it and what a loss it was because it was both fun for her and she was great. No one knew how much she liked it, not even her. Harry even praised her to the company and the clients– so her ability was noted. Joan was mismeasuring her own ambitions more than anyone else mismeasuring her.

            • Joanna

              I think the anti-Harry sentiment on Joan’s part is almost entirely the fact that he openly talked about how her partnership came into being. He’s the only one to have thrown it in her face so openly and disdainfully (which I think is Joan’s biggest fear and why she is sometimes reticent in asserting her power/influence in the company.)

          • Aurumgirl

            Exactly. This is why I doubt that Harry’s seen as the one who’s good at his job, because in this one example, the reality is that he blew off the assignments he asked Joan to do because he failed to see the revenue potential in them as she did. She “got” that instantly, and Harry couldn’t “get” that. Imagine just how much further Harry would be in his job if he had Joan’s intelligence and her skills.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I’m sorry, but your memory of this episode is way off. Harry didn’t blow off the assignment; he specifically went to Roger and asked for more help in his department because he couldn’t handle it all on his own. Joan found some clever ways to make pitches based on her script reading, but Harry’s been doing that same sort of thing over and over again for years.

            • VeryCrunchyFrog

              Yes, in fact, it was Harry’s initiative in reaching out to his friend and coming up with the pitch to Belle Jolie about the TV episode with the abortion storyline that made Roger, et al, sit up and take notice.

        • ConnieBV

          I don’t get that impression of Harry at all. I *do* get the impression that he is someone who does not spend a lot of time greasing wheels, so to speak. Harry is pretty much Harry with little or no artifice, and I don’t think Joan knows how to connect to someone she has no hope of seducing or invoking tender feelings in. I think Harry has proven himself in a business sense time and time again (remember the Stones?) and has often been used, both visually and in the storylines, to mark the avant garde or the counterculture. In short, Harry has always represented newness, and Joan, badly as she wants to be, CANNOT, by virtue of many things, really be new. She is not as eager to be seen as foolish, and therefore not as open to risk as Harry. Really, the female Harry is really somewhere between Bonnie and Peggy, although Harry did follow the status quo more than either (he married and had kids). The partners mock Harry because he must and does seem ridiculous to them all the time by sheer virtue of not giving a shit, but he IS loyal (more so than Joan), and he is smart about his area, and he did earn what he has through perseverance. Joan hates Harry not only because he now has what she does, but because he got it in a way she wishes she could have.

          • Aurumgirl

            I do remember Harry and the Stones–that was another “failure” on Harry’s part, only slightly redeemed by Don’s attempts to connect with their management, which was doomed not to happen by going backstage at a concert. At least Don made the best of it by trying to talk to the young groupie. As for Joan and newness–she did take huge risks to bring in a big account with Avon. She is way more open to risk than Harry’s ever been, and her risks actually pay off because she has the necessary skills to bring them off. In contrast, we already know Harry doesn’t have those skills at all.

            Harry’s the one who’s been jealous of Joan. But he has reason to be.

            • ConnieBV

              I don’t view that as a failure at all. It was his idea (however ludicrous in the execution) to approach a band as a brand sponsor, to use their image. That was freaking revolutionary at the time. Don, in his suit, was the failure with the groupie, and it was one of many times Harry fit in and he did not. Joan’s risk with Avon used the same toolkit as always, her looks. I love Joan as a character, but innovative she is never, has never been. This is the closest she has ever been to it. This is a woman who married her rapist so she could keep the status quo. I don’t share your take on her at all.

            • 3hares

              Maybe I”m remembering this wrong, but didn’t Harry mistake some other band for the Stones? I wouldn’t call that fitting in any more than Don who at least just owned that he didn’t belong there.

            • Aurumgirl

              Yup. Harry did mistake another band for the Stones. Don rolled his eyes and then tried to make the best of Harry’s failure. Again.

            • Mismarker

              Harry got high backstage and made that mistake. He later ate 20 White Castle sliders in Don’s car.

            • Aurumgirl

              Aw, you’re shortchanging her. Joan’s success with Avon was her using her connections and considerable skill, not “her relying on her looks”. Remember that her meeting with the Avon exec happened initially as a blind date that set up for her by her girlfriend. Joan saw the opportunity to turn that lunch date into something much better–it was her chance to bring in a big contract, a major score. Joan decided to “act like the partner in the Madison Avenue Advertising firm” that she actually was. Then, she really took massive risks: she decided she needed to act on her instincts to secure that contract, despite all the punishment she would have faced if it hadn’t worked….and she used her alliances (with Peggy) to help her try when she really wanted to. That was a risk that was close to the caliber of Don Draper’s risks. We’ve never seen Harry undertake anything at all like that–he does what he’s told to do and no more.

            • MartyBellerMask

              She THOUGHT it was a date. It was a business meeting.

            • Aurumgirl

              Well, it was set up for her by her friend…and whatever Joan thought at it’s beginning is really not that important because she did manage to wrangle a big account out of it, in the way she saw fit to do it, even if it was a massive risk.

            • Chris

              They do very different jobs so they aren’t really in competition in that way. Joan has come a long way but the Avon guy had to all but hit her off the head before she realized it was a work meeting not a date. I think Harry is far more business savvy that Joan in a lot of ways. I find it hard to believe after seeing Don in action for all those years, she thought he would just take what they dish out and go away. She backed the wrong horse.

            • Aurumgirl

              Well, they are in competition in that Harry is jealous of Joan’s partnership in the company. She has one, he thinks he deserves one, he doesn’t respect her authority as a partner and he wants what she’s got.

              As for Don, I agree that the players who really matter for him are Peggy and Pete, and to a certain extent, Roger. We’ll see what becomes of Joan in the future, where Don’s concerned, but I do think he knows Joan’s value better than the others do.

        • suzq

          Right. I think the cliffhanger this season will be less of what Don will do and more of whose side Joan will be on. She appears to be hitching her wagon to Cutler right now, even though Roger and Don think he’s an ass. Cutler gave her the office and the promotion and told her to act like a partner, yet she’s still getting bossed around by Cosgrove. It’s not an ideal situation, but up until now, Cutler has been her greatest champion.

          Cutler, of course, doesn’t know about the whole Jaguar deal.

          Cutler strikes me as being extremely impetuous and Machiavellian with all the ambition of Machiavelli and none of the strategy.

          • Aurumgirl

            That’s probably why he’s such a fan of Harry. They have that in common, lots of big ideas, but no clue as to how to make them happen. (But I think Cutler knows about Jaguar. Harry has made sure the word got around, after all).

      • MilaXX

        Nevermind. Topic was covered much better downthread.

        • ConnieBV

          Valid point, though, that Harry pretty much had the upward trajectory that Joan wanted for herself, that is to say the TV angle.

        • Dorace Afton Trottier

          i thought that it was Harry himself who requested help reviewing the commercials. There wasn’t enough budget to hire someone for it, so it was assigned to Joan. Joan actually enjoyed doing it and was very good at it – and it was a slap in the face when they hired someone to do it without offering it to her. It was telling that she didn’t speak up and say that she wanted to keep doing it.

          • MilaXX

            Yes but as others have pointed out. Joan didn’t expect to like it. I think she surprised herself at not only being good it but liking it.

      • EveEve

        It’s a variation on the hacknied adage. It’s either who you know, or who you blow, or what you know. Harry is definitely the latter.

      • ybbed

        Also, does Joan’s partnership percentage decrease with the addition of another partner?

    • 3boysful

      T and Lo, thanks for staying up late to do this! Such a treat to check the site knowing nothing would be up yet, and then a nice surprise. xoxo

    • JulieTy

      FINALLY! An episode that was poignant but not depressing. The Don and Peggy scene reminded me so much of the scene in which he went to her apartment and told her that if she left the agency he’d spend the rest of his life trying to win her back. Sob!

      The final scene at Burger Chef was perfect, and recalled the lovely Pete/Peggy/Ted restaurant scene, when Peggy and Pete came to peace with one another. Ted wasn’t unwelcome there, but he was the odd man out. The BC scene told us why– because it should have been Don sitting there.

      Excellent recap as usual, fabulous gentlemen, and thanks to the BKs for helping me figure out Roger/Buick/Chevy.

      • Teresa

        I still don’t understand the Roger Buick Chevy storyline except in a vague way. That scene in the steam room, then a light bulb goes on in Roger’s brain at the end with Joan? As for the Chevy Vega, that was my first car and what a POS it was!

        • Chris

          The other guy basically let Roger know they were vulnerable and thought SC&P were going to threaten the Buick account. Based on what Bob told Joan it’s very possible and it’s what put the light bulb above Roger’s head. He will probably try to land Buick.

        • suzq

          “You are about to lose something you have.” At first Roger thought it was Don. When it was announced finally that Chevy was dumping them, the light bulb clicked on.

      • SportifLateBoomer

        The final scene at Burger Chef was perfect, and recalled the lovely Pete/Peggy/Ted restaurant scene, when Peggy and Pete came to peace with one another. Ted wasn’t unwelcome there, but he was the odd man out. The BC scene told us why– because it should have been Don sitting there.

        — good catch! Thanks. Will rewatch this episode. So rich in meaning, beautifully done.

    • AndreasMD

      Joan is never going to feel confident as a partner. It’s not like her years of loyalty would have gotten her anywhere close to that position.

      • Victoria Ramirez

        Great point about Joan’s loyalty which is clearly being overlooked, while Harry’s is being rewarded

        • Dorace Afton Trottier

          but also telling in that Joan was not loyal to Don, and Don was the one who had the zinger about Harry’s loyalty.

          • Kit_W

            i think Don said that only because clearly the more ‘pro’ Don partners there are at the firm the better it is for Don. Whether the relationship between Don and Roger can survive the disagreement about Harry becoming partner remains to be seen.

      • DollyMadisonWI

        Remember that she left to get married. She’d always told them there was an expiration date on her employment.

    • Judy_J

      I loved this episode. “The Hobo Code” in Season 1 remains my favorite, but this one is a very close second. I was moved to tears when Don and Peggy were dancing and Don gently kissed the top of Peggy’s head, like a father comforting a daughter. He knows just how hard it is for her to be the “mom voice”, because he was there when she gave up her child. The final scene at Burger Chef was brilliant. Peggy, Pete and Don, sharing a meal and a history of shared secrets. Family, indeed.

    • Tony

      Just wanted to point it out, that there is only around nine months until Tobacco Ad law. So signing PM and get rid of Don as Cutler plans (by buying him out i assume), will cost that agency soon enough.

      • Black Doug

        SCP also dodged a major bullet by losing that Chevy account… that was the Chevy Nova, one of the worst cars of all time.

        • Tony

          They just threaten with all kind of signs that Don will leave. First – the episode title – Waterloo (Don’s Waterloo i guess), synopsis says “Don is troubled by a letter” (his anti-tobacco NYT letter) and the previews were built around whether or not Don will stay. “Why are you here? Do you think this is gonna save you?” etc..

        • fnarf

          Vega, not Nova.

          • L’Anne

            Four letters, two vowels, both crap buckets.

          • suzq

            Vega wasn’t that much better.

            • fnarf

              The Nova was one of the most successful cars of all time. The Vega was…not. Vegas were horrible little cars. A friend had a Vega in high school that I rode in a lot, and it was always a miracle to me how cramped and horrible the inside was considering how big it was on the outside (the opposite of the Corollas and Civics that Japan was coming out with at the time).

              Having the Nova account would be a major prize and cash cow for almost 30 years. The Vega, well, I suppose they would still get paid for the ads, but I don’t think anyone would brag about it — though the hit was to Chevy’s reputation, not the ad company’s.

              Mind you, Buick’s not exactly a glamour marque, then or now.

            • Travelgrrl

              Bruce Springsteen sang about Buicks. No one ever sang about a Vega!

        • Travelgrrl

          Chevy Vega. Even worse.

      • Edo Tokyo

        Oh my gosh – what an excellent observation! I would love to see Jim Cutler (and anyone who sides with him) have the proverbial rug pulled out from under him after all his scheming and willingness to accept mediocrity in his pursuit of what he thinks SC&P should be, mainly without Don.

      • suzq

        “I worked with the opposition and I know their strategy.” Don said this to the P-M execs in the previous episode. He knows what’s coming down the pike.

        • Travelgrrl

          You clever boots! I didn’t catch that.

    • Black Doug

      I just like the unspoken tension of Peggy and Pete sitting at a table talking about family… hey, Petey, remember the time you knocked her up and she ended up in an insane asylum? I kind of hope they’ll talk about that at least once before the series ends.

      • Chris

        Well I thought the fact that Stan mentioned Peggy wouldn’t see Ginsberg was a nod to her time there as well. I am not surprised she cannot face going to the asylum to see him there despite her tender spot for Michael.

        • sweetlilvoice

          God, I totally missed that. Excellent point. I assumed that she wouldn’t go because it upset her too much. I wonder if she’ll explain that to him when he’s out. Probably not, she’s buried that one deep.

        • Shoelover1512

          I totally didn’t put that together! I was just thinking that it was just too emotional but it didn’t dawn on me it was because of her own time there.

          Sometimes reading what people catch and I miss makes me realize I do not pay nearly enough attention while watching TV and am missing all the little nuances that make shows special.

          • Chris

            Oh, hearing other peoples comments are so helpful to me. I never would have figured out “mile high club” was the club mentioned in the previews Pete would be asked to join even though when it happened on the plane I thought “mile high club”. I was so fixated on Roger at his club I was sure that’s what they were referring to.

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        There’s a lot of things all three of them do not know about each other. When is Don going to tell Peggy about his Dick Whitman past, for example?

        • Chris

          Someone wrote on another recap that Pete knows Don’s secret, Don knows Peggy’s secret (but not the part about Pete) and Peggy pretty much IS Pete’s secret which I thought was a great little summation.

    • ktr33

      Wow, these comments are SO interesting, bc I didn’t like this episode much, except for the Don-Peggy through-line. It seemed like so many bits and pieces popping up here and there that I found it very disjointed.But I did love everything about the Don and Peggy show. And Stan’s “Thanks for the subtitles.”
      But reading all the comments — I have so much more to think about, and will re-watch.

      • MilaXX

        It didn’t feel disjointed to me at all. Quite the opposite it felt like they were tying up loose ends. This is my favorite episode of the season so far.

        • Chris

          Yes, all the threads of the stories all started to come together in this episode. I was wondering if Bob was going to attempt to use Joan as a cover wife ever since their friendship kicked off last season, I was waiting for Don and Peggy to reunite wholeheartedly and I couldn’t believe they still hadn’t made Harry a partner.

        • VeryCrunchyFrog

          “Tying up loose ends” is exactly what I found bothersome about it. While I enjoyed the pay-off between Don and Peggy, the route to get there felt awkward, even on second viewing. Also, I was excited when I saw Alison Brie’s name in the opening credits, but very disappointed in what little they gave her to do.

      • MartyBellerMask

        This is one of the few sites where the comments are actually enlightening. :)

        • ktr33

          So true!

      • ybbed

        I didn’t know where to put this comment, but apparently I am the only person who wasn’t terribly moved by the Don and Peggy dance. That whole scene was incredible until the dance. I really felt for Peggy in that conversation, “whats wrong with me?” but when Don held out his hand, I just thought, this is soooo ridiculous. And I am a super fan, but it just seemed so out of character for Don to do something that personal. I’ve been reading through the comments to find one person who feels like me and I haven’t found it yet. It was just too corny for me.

        • ktr33

          No, I agree with you. I loved everything leading up to it, but the dance elicited a groan of “come on!” More like a scene in a lost episode of “Friends.”

    • Shawn Taylor

      I saw almost a theme among the women characters of “what I’m going to do instead of be a wife” It seemed to be in every scene with a female character. From Bonnie showing Pete what else she could do instead of get married again and Trudy reminding him that she would no longer function as his wife in any capacity and Peggy’s realization that even if she ends up married with children, she’ll never be one of the station wagon women in the Burger Chef parking lot. I worry though that Joan will reconsider. I said earlier, she sure always seems to say no before saying yes to something that seems like settling for what’s practical in her mind.

      • Shawn Taylor

        And sure, as always, my thinking is about half cocked in this. “Do families even exist anymore” and these women saying you. Pulled the idea off near flawlessly.

      • Kit_W

        I saw that theme too. When Bob proposes to Joan, and when she gets up, he approaches her again and mentions “You’re nearly forty.”
        Also when Peggy tells Don that she kept her birthday kind of a secret and that “Now i’m one of those women lying about her age. I hate them.”
        Even though whether to have or don’t have any kids isn’t a concern for these women, especially for Pegs as she realized staring into those station wagons, Don was able to sum it up nicely when he said that his ”worry” is finding himself alone and realizing that he hasn’t accomplished anything.

        i don’t think that joan will reconsider Bob’s offer though. When she married her boyfriend and as her husband he decided to re-enlist and become a career military man, possibly spending months at a time away from home, she ended it in no uncertain terms. She’s had to play “second fiddle’ so often at work i don’t think she’ll stand for any part of that in her home life. i think that the ‘very core of her being’ would have to become pretty beaten down for her to agree to live the kind of a life that Bob Benson is offering.

    • Vanessa

      I was disappointed that Bob was so bitterly dismissive of Joan’s life (though I guess it was in character). That alone revealed more about his character than I wanted to know.

      • SportifLateBoomer

        True — I think what TLo said above is accurate. He’s being narcissistic, of course, but also pragmatic. Joan will be able to get by in her life as she is, but he really needs a wife to make it through his world of GM executives, etc. I think he’s really desperate and blinded by his own need to find a beard to survive in that Detroit world, in which he’s already a fake (in terms of real credentials, work experience, etc.), so he can’t see how hurtful that remark would be to her. So glad Joan set them both straight (no pun intended).

        • Travelgrrl

          He’s also stating a bald fact. Joan’s living situation is the worst of anyone’s – smallish apartment with nosy mother and toddler in it. Even Peggy has her cockroach ridden place to herself (and Julio).

          He was scheming for both of them.

      • Travelgrrl

        I’ll give him a pass because his feelings were truly hurt. Bob does care for Joan and he WAS offering her a better life in many ways (even indicating she would be free to keep pursuing her career). To have that refused, no matter how kindly, made him speak baldly about what he perceives as her reality.

        • ybbed

          How is Bob offering her a better life? He was being an ass.

          • Travelgrrl

            She lives in a tiny apartment with her horrible-ish mother (who is there to provide childcare – previously Joan lived alone or was married) and her tiny son. Easily one of the worst living arrangements of anyone at the agency, and I’m including Peggy’s roach motel, because at least Peggy lives alone.

            Joan has Roger’s baby, being passed off as her previous (dead? divorced?) husband’s kid.

            Marriage to Bob would provide financial security (two incomes,and he’s expecting a big one from Buick), a better way of life (no more Gail, she can go back to where she came from), Kevin will have a present father figure (who seems to pay more attention to him than his actual father does), and she can either work and afford childcare in a larger home or forgo working (while retaining her partnership) and stay home with him.

            Plus Bob seemed genuine in offering her lifelong support for those ups and downs in life. Yes, he’s looking out for himself, but there was a lot of truth to what he was saying and offering.

        • 3hares

          Why should Bob’s feelings be hurt by Joan in that scene?

          • Travelgrrl

            Because he offered her what he thought was a prize (his pleasing face, his rising fortunes, the chance to get the hell out of sharing an apartment with Annoying Gail, someone to be a present father for Kevin) and she refused it. Surely that would be hurtful, even if he was primarily thinking of his own ends.

            • 3hares

              He led off by pretending to propose to her as if he was a straight guy who wanted to marry her. If he starts out by trying to trick her I can’t see why he’d be hurt that she rejects his more honest suggestion. It’s completely about his own ends with very little personal for Joan to reject.

    • MsALVA

      This episode hit me right in the feels, for all the reasons you listed above. I am both afraid and so looking forward to next week’s finale. Mostly because someone on another blog pointed out that the diner scene at the end is almost an exact callback to the the diner scene at the very end of the Sopranos. Is Pete getting whacked?

      I’m pretty sure that the way the flight attendant snapped that curtain closed on the plane told us we’ve seen the last of Megan (and of Bonnie, for sure). I think I’m OK with Harry being a partner. I still, deep down, ship Roger and Joanie and maybe those two crazy kids can make it work. Maybe Roger can make up for Marigold with little Kevin.

      • nosniveling

        Roger is so sensitive to Joan that he realized immediately that she already knew about the loss of Chevy.

        • Elcie Dubbs

          That exchange reminded me of when Roger knew Lucky Strike had pulled their business, but didn’t tell Joan (or anyone else): “You KNEW about it?!”

        • dev

          don caught it too

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          That’s because Pete turned to her in the meeting and asked her how she found out.

      • MilaXX

        Harry has earned his place as a partner. He was the one pitching to television division and he’s the one who got them to get a computer. He’s been pretty forward thinking for some time now.

    • Mismarker

      The indelible image of Don, Peggy, and Pete at the Burger Chef table could have worked as a series finale cut-to-black, roll music situation. Loved it.

      I am re-watching the series and just watched season 5’s “Far Away Places” yesterday. It’s the episode where Ginsberg tells Peggy he was born in a concentration camp but he’s really a Martian. I was watching specifically for his story but had forgotten this is also the ep. where Don and Megan have that epic blow-out fight after he leaves her at the HoJo in upstate NY. Don finds Megan back in the apartment after spending all night worrying about her, they argue, and end up lying on the living room carpet after tripping down the stairs. Megan says, “Every fight we have diminishes us.” Four (three?) years later, they are so diminished they are merely going through the motions. Please, someone, put this lame horse out of its misery. Go back to that HoJo and break up over a nice, big bowl of orange sherbet. It’s not fun to watch. I would love to have the final episodes focus on a Don untethered to romantic love. His work life is far more interesting to me.

      Not for nothing, Baby Kevin spoke more in 3 seconds than Baby Gene has in his whole 6 years. What’s up with that? And, as someone on Reddit pointed out last night, Bob giving Kevin an Erector Set was maybe a little too on the nose, ;)

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Bob giving Kevin an erector set was right in line with him giving Kevin a football when he was a baby; typically masculine and totally inappropriate gifts from someone who’s not good at buying gifts and is obsessed with appearing masculine.

        • Mismarker

          : ) Amen. That engagement ring was probably the most ill-thought “gift” he’s ever bestowed upon someone. Another thing that struck me about Bob’s pitch to Joan was the fact they could live in a mansion. Sadly, so many of those Detroit GM mansions are in ruins now.

        • MilaXX

          Bob really is Dick Whitman 2.0 trying desperately to separate himself from who he truly is. I still can’t believe he thought proposing to Joan was a good idea.

        • greenwich_matron

          I am waiting for the chemistry set and deer rifle.

        • http://www.bicyclemeditations.org cpetersky

          It paired nicely, though, with Pete giving his preschooler daughter a Barbie. Nowadays, we think of Barbie as being a reasonable toy for a girl aged three or four. Back then, Barbies were for girls much older – I remember playing with them at age ten. A four year old with a Barbie in 1969 would have been wildly inappropriate.

          • Bella Bluth

            I had Barbies at 4 in 1970. I guess my parents did not feel her wildly inappropriate.

          • Travelgrrl

            I got a Skipper doll when I was in the hospital circa about 1966 or 67; they were mainstream by then. (I was 4 or 5, depending on which hospital stay it was.)

          • Ginger Thomas

            All of my kindergarten friends and I had Barbies in 1961 at age 5.

        • Travelgrrl

          Kid is far too young for an erector set, but that was a nice, expensive gift in its day. And that was a great bunch of flowers he brought Mom, too. I didn’t get a gander at the ring he offered Joan, but I’m guessing it was decent, too.

          PS I just remembered he brought Kevin a toy car the first time he was back from Detroit, too. Another butch gift!

          • Kathy G

            My brother could take nearly anything apart at age 4. He was a quiet kid who didn’t make a lot of demands. Easy to forget about.

        • HiddenMickey

          Might also be a callback to when Roger gave Lincoln Logs?

    • Virgil Kent

      When is AMC gonna put this show down? Trash, pure trash.

    • BritneyE

      It felt like the writers had the idea for this episode and worked back from there when putting together the season. This was exactly what I needed to build up the Don and Peggy bond that was so central to the show for so long and get us back to the work. By letting things get so awful and depressing and by putting Don and Peggy in such a tense place they earned that dance. It was cathartic.

      • MilaXX

        I would kill for a gif of Peggy & Don. *wanders off to search tumblr*

    • Uncivil_Servant

      “Draper, Campbell & Olson” Love it. Though I think it could be different. Next week will be the showdown and the end game of Cutler’s Machiavellian machinations. If they force Don out, he’s free. (Draper, Campbell, and Olsen) But if they get Don into a position by abusing his allies (buying out Pete, Peggy being brought to heel by Lou, etc..) and get him to quit Pete can always remind him he is exactly who he chooses to be, and a way around the no compete clause should he quit. Campbell, Olsen, and Whitman.

      • MilaXX

        Never imagined them as partners, but I think Draper, Campbell and Olsen, or even better Draper, Olsen and Campbell would make a nice team. I think Don & Peggy are the perfect pair to keep Pete in line.

        • Chris

          Don was among the first people to recognize Peggy and Pete’s talents. When they recruited Pete for SCDP it was Don saying that he wanted Pete because of his forward thinking that really sold Pete on joining. When they stick together, those three do very well.

          • Uncivil_Servant

            Peggy – Creative Director. Pete – Head of Accounts. Don – Managing Partner/Strategy with a small creative team. Him and Peggy have weekly meetings challenging each other over best pitches making each other’s pitches better. Agencies have/had multiple Creative “groups” right? Now if they can lure in Joan for keeping the books and monies straight and Harry for his LA ties – Win win win.

            • bksalt

              not Joan. Dawn. She showed her loyalty to Don while Joan was happy to cut him loose.

    • MIBLIN

      Is removing comments you don’t agree with the standard here at Tom and Lorenzo? That’s why your hit count is so low? LOL

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Actually our hit count is enormous and many people tell us they love coming here because we moderate the comments and keep the losers out. And on that note… bye, now.

        • http://www.jaimieteekell.com/ Jaimie

          I didn’t know you moderated for quality! Everything makes so much sense now. The internet isn’t inexplicably better here. Thanks for your work, guys!

          • jilly_d

            Right? I thought everyone was just smarter/more respectful here but it turns out TLo have been pulling weeds the whole time! Thanks to the boys for creating and maintaining such a wonderful forum!

            • decormaven

              This is a very well-tended garden. That is mastery- doing such a good job that it looks like it comes naturally.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              Such a good analogy! The fact that they can stay up late, pull a well-reasoned analysis of a
              show together on the same night and still moderate for the dickheads is masterful gardening.

            • MilaXX

              and because of that weeding, the BK’s are able to have nice conversations with each other, even when we don’t agree.

          • sweetlilvoice

            I read in an interview (I think) that they don’t even leave the house if they post anything about the First Lady. It makes me sick to think what nasty things they have to delete about her! I tell my husband not to read the comments section on anything due to this very reason. It seems that most people are very stupid.

        • Kristin

          You guys are the best. The only good communities on the web are the ones that are moderated.

          Anil Dash wrote a great blog about it, titled “If Your Website’s Full of Assholes, It’s Your Fault.” I won’t link cause I don’t want have to be pulled out of spam, but yeah. So long, MIBLIN. You will not be missed.

          • aesteve212

            Code Swtich had one recently too and talked specifically about how they have to create a safe space for commenters. It’s not about all agreeing, rather about giving people a chance to speak up, disagree, and share respectfully. I have always always appreciated the amazing work that TLo puts in to creating that space for their BKs – it is a large part of why I come back again and again.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              In school we were taught to disagree without being disagreeable, so that’s what I look for in blogs/websites. I’m so glad I’ve found that here.

            • Mismarker

              NPR comment threads are some of the worst I’ve seen. Have never visited Code Switch, though. I love when Gene Demby and Kat Chow guest on “Pop Culture Happy Hour”.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Ooh, what’d I miss??? ;) Never mind, don’t wanna know. Thank you!

        • kuhopp

          I don’t ever comment, but I’m an avid reader, and I’d like to thank you guys for the amazing work you do. These Mad Men recaps feed my soul, and now, knowing that you carefully moderate the comments, I’m further in awe of your commitment. Thanks!

          • http://www.deborahwiles.com/ GoodSally

            Here-here. Thank you, uncles. I read religiously and rarely comment, but
            when I do, I feel welcome. It’s a smart community with funny, kind
            folks who can agree/disagree respectfully. No small feat.

    • decormaven

      Think that’s a Buick station wagon the mom is driving in the opening Burger Chef scene. Nice foreshadowing!

      • LaTrèfle

        Hadn’t noticed that! Good catch!

    • Angelfood

      I know you two already know this but you are truly amazing. A perfect review for one of the best episodes of MadMen yet. I would have been perfectly content if the series ended there. And I am amazing how John Hamm can say so much with just a facial expression. I didn’t think those two could top the scene when Peggy resigned, but this one did. I sobbed like a baby.
      Loved Peggy and Joan’s blue dresses. Can’t wait for Mad Style.

    • MilaXX

      This has to be my favorite episode this entire season. As I watched, I was wondering why we had to once again see Megan & Don dancing around the dying embers of their marriage. Then watch Pete once again screw things up with Trudy. Seeing the 3 of them at that table, making themselves a family of sorts, it all clicked. LOVED seeing Don pull back and let Peggy stew until she came up with the right pitch. Once again it shows Lou’s mediocrity that he liked that first just okay pitch that Peggy made. also liked seeing Don get that dig in with Joan. Sad to say she earned it. On the other hand I was sad to see Bob come to Joan with that proposal. Not because he’s trying to hid who he is from GM, but because he was so tone deaf with Joan who has always know who he was and was okay with it. When he said something to the effect of she wasn’t getting any younger so she might as well marry him, I knew he was toast. I’m just surprised she didn’t slap him for that.

      • MartyBellerMask

        That scene, all I could think was, “Poor Kitty.”

    • Chris

      I love to come here and read the careful, thoughtful recap that recalls every nuance of the past seasons and encapsulates perfectly why I watch this show. In my impatience last night I was bouncing around other sites and had to encounter ridiculous things like a comment on Peggy and Don dancing that asked “are they endgame?” Anyone who watched that sweet and sad and touching father-daughter type encounter (or any of the interactions between Peggy and Don over the past 6 1/2 seasons) and still could see a burgeoning “romance” there is really missing the Mad Men boat. Unless the “endgame” they were referring to was an agency with both their names on it.

    • sweetlilvoice

      Beautiful recap and before I read all the comments, I wanted to say that this was hands down my favorite episode this season, maybe even in the last 2 seasons. Joan and Bob….how sad they both were, how brave she was to turn him down. He’ll probably find a Kitty to settle down with and have a family. It’s obvious he would be a great Dad. Peggy and Don were incredible this episode…thank god we got that. You two are right, we really did need this episode. I loved Megan and Bonnie on the same plane, oh the stories those two could tell each other. I would love for them to be friends. Poor Pete, such an idiot. He looked as stupid as he did in that crummy bachelor apartment hitting a cereal box. He’s never happy when he gets everything he wanted. Bonnie is better off without him. I didn’t understand why Roger was happy at the end either. Harry should be partner, he’s the only one except Peggy who left SC to form the new agency that’s not a partner. He is loyal and he’s always idolized Don which Don’s ego needs right now. Megan really needs to call it quits, this marriage has dragged on long enough. And Don, remember Sylvia? You weren’t happy when Megan was still in NY either.

    • SassieCassy

      Looks like I missed something. What entrapment with the gm exec??

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        He was arrested for propositioning a cop. The cops used to walk the streets and parks, cruising gay men and then arresting them.

        • SassieCassy

          Shows my naivety lol

          I thought the poor guy had the misfortune of hitting on a random who happened to be a cop

          • marishka1

            That’s exactly what he did…but the cop wasn’t looking for action, he was looking to entrap.

          • suzq

            In the run up to Stonewall, things had gotten so bad that a cop (dressed in civilian clothes) grabbed his crotch and started moaning, then arrested a guy who asked him if anything was wrong and if he was ok.

        • http://mattalgren.wordpress.com/ Matt Algren

          Still do. There was a big bust locally a few months ago.

          • L’Anne

            Classic vice entrapment.

    • decormaven

      Wonder why Megan wants to meet Don in a place outside of LA/NY? While I get the idea of neutral territory, the way she said it almost felt like she didn’t want Don to come to LA. Wonder who/what she’s got going on out there? I love how she said “I miss my things.” She probably came to NYC to inventory her stuff.

      • otterbird

        I wonder if she has a special someone living at her place. She looked anxious when Don said he was planning on coming out at the end of July (a week before the Tate murder! Oooh! Rev up the speculations! Or don’t.)

        • Uncivil_Servant

          If it is the redhead from the threesome i’ll freak.

        • Mismarker

          It is a well-documented fact that Sharon Tate was *super* into fondue. Okay, I couldn’t even type that with a straight face. : )

          • Dorace Afton Trottier

            hee hee hee hee.

          • Fjasmine

            It seemed out of character for her to be in NY. Is my timeline screwed up or did Don spend another entire weekend working while Megan was visiting?

            • sweetlilvoice

              Nope, he pulled the I’m working all weekend while you are here again. I hope she was out having funny. I still want her to meet Bonnie. They’d tear LA up.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              He spent the day with her on Saturday and then spent Sunday in the office.

            • Mismarker

              I loved seeing her in NY. You could tell she didn’t fit there any more than Don fits in LA. I think she flew in on a Friday. She and Don spent all day Saturday (balcony breakfast, shopping, and spaghetti) and most of Sunday together (looking for fondue pot, seeing “I Am Curious (Yellow)”) until Don came into the office to help Peggy Sunday evening. She flew out on Monday morning.

            • http://www.deborahwiles.com/ GoodSally

              Megan said she was sorry the visit was so short. I had the idea that Don took Megan to the airport on Sunday, went to the movies by himself (as he likes to do), and then stopped into the office to see what was up with Peggy. Peggy assumes Megan wanted to see the movie and Don doesn’t disabuse her of that notion.

            • Mismarker

              The scene directly after Don and Peggy dancing to “My Way” is a daylight shot of Bonnie and Megan flying out. In the interest of timeline continuity this has to be Monday morning.

      • Chris

        Well their whole romance really took off on vacation and often only “works” when it exists in a bubble. I think Megan wants Don somewhere without any other distractions like work, pregnant, nieces etc. Everything is fine when she gets enough attention. When she was just taking acting classes and cooking she was happy to greet Don at the end of the day. Now that she is pursuing something she wants in L.A., his schedule and lifestyle doesn’t mesh well with hers.

      • MilaXX

        I think it’s wishful thinking. She knows the marriage is over or at least at an impasse. Don doesn’t fit in her LA world, she no longer fits in the NYC world with Don. I think she’s hoping someplace neutral will enable them to find that spark they once had.

        • leighanne

          Don is so removed from her world and neither one fits at all into each other’s lives. Megan’s hurt look when one secretary told her, I didn’t even know Don was married, ouch! It’s like she doesn’t exist in NY at all anymore.

          • L’Anne

            Yeah, but why should she? Don’s on a short leash at the office, she’s new (never saw her until last ep.) and works for Peggy,not Don. It took Don a couple seasons to learn Alison’s name.

            • leighanne

              I wasn’t too surprised the secretary didn’t know about Megan. I liked the inclusion of the line, it served as an abrupt signal to Megan, part of Don’s world doesn’t even know you exist!

            • decormaven

              I don’t think Megan understands the dynamics of the current office. She still thinks Don is in the corner office, which is now Lou’s.

            • Chris

              I agree, it seemed more like a hurt to Megan’s pride and a sign she isn’t a part of that place in any way anymore. She didn’t even know Don wasn’t in his old office.

        • Juvenile Sinephile

          It makes sense from her perspective when last season’s opener in Hawaii was kind of a heavenly event for them in their relationship. Even Don saw it as heaven at the time. Except, it was temporary. Megan had a miscarriage that Don seemed to be a bit relieved about and he went back to messing around with Sylvia Rosen.

          • Phaedra

            Except Don has always wanted her to be pregnant. He’s much more enamored with caregivers than sex-givers…

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        It sounded very “Souvenir”, in which case- not good. “Souvenir” was when Don and Betty were in a neutral territory, Italy, to spice things up in their relationship. Initially, it went great and then, back to reality, Don sees Suzanne Farrell and then touches the grass and collective groans ensue that he is going to cheat again.

        Megan seems to not want him in LA because he doesn’t really seem to want to be there for her. I could understand the thought process she is having, but it rang to me like the threesome: desperation.

    • otterbird

      This episode reminds me again that Pete Campbell is one of the truly great characters in television history. Within the course of one hour, I loved him for protecting and promoting Don, and hated him for being such a total dick to both his girlfriend and his soon-to-be-ex-wife.

      • Uncivil_Servant

        I enjoy Pete a lot. He can be an ass but he has grown some and become (slightly) better. I, also, think Pete is used as a vehicle for CA vs. NY going on. Pete is great, efficient, and on top when out west. Back in NYC he is meaner, crasser, and more self-centered.

      • http://www.jaimieteekell.com/ Jaimie

        And how he burned Peggy with that “compliment.” As a professional woman, I hated that the most.

        • otterbird

          Absolutely. That was such a gut punch. I just adore Pete Campbell on the show, because I never, ever feel neutral about him. I love him or I hate him. I love to hate him. :)

          • Fjasmine

            He’s like Christopher on The Sopranos.

        • L’Anne

          But entirely in keeping both with the tenor of the times and thinking about how middle aged men respond to assertive women. Remember Heinz and the Home is where the Heinz is pitch in Far Away Places? He knows how these kind of men respond to Peggy.

        • MilaXX

          Ironically it’s the same tone that Peggy used when speaking with her secretary in the Valentine’s day episode. Neither Pete no Peggy realized they were being condescending.

      • Fjasmine

        Pete/Vincent is one of my all-time-favorites, I’ve always thought he should be the breakout start of the show. Much better than Hamm. He could be a handsomer Kevin Spacey.

      • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

        It will be criminal if he never takes home an Emmy for the role.

        • otterbird

          I so agree with you. Kartheiser talked in an interview about his time on “Angel,” and how he never really got Joss Whedon’s writing. It’s so lovely to see how very, very good he is in the right role. That fall he took down the stairs last season is one of the great moments in Pete Campbell-dom.

      • MartyBellerMask

        This this this!!!

      • DollyMadisonWI

        I’m still laughing about “Not great, BOB!” in the elevator. Hilarious.

    • nosniveling

      what a great ep!! loved every second.

    • decormaven

      Great use of a song: “The End of a Party” is playing just before Bob springs the ring on Joan. And after he leaves, “Forever and Ever” plays. Will Joan ever find that everlasting love?

      • LaTrèfle

        The music has been remarkably on point this season! Totally nailing it. I want a MM soundtrack for 1969.

        • decormaven

          I wish we could make it to 1970. “For the Good Times” is a very appropriate song for the kind of mood that is being set in this season.

    • Sillysally

      All I can see in that Burger Chef scene is the final scene of The Sopranos! I wonder if Matthew Weiner intended that as an ironic callback

    • mcbishop

      The best episode I can remember, and a wonderful recap. Makes me want to put off work this morning and watch it again.

      • Chris

        It’s the first time Mad Men has sent me to bed in a good mood in a very long time!

        • Jo Bleaux

          I watched it twice in a row!

    • Edo Tokyo

      Is it me, or was anyone else struck by the “total pinkness” of Joan’s apartment? I get that the decor of her home would be feminine, but all that pink seems heavy handed, almost anti-male. Maybe I’ve just missed this in the past and just didn’t notice when her husband was still there?

      I think the series is boiling down to the survivalist theme often referenced here. It looks like those who are better able to embrace change will adapt and survive better than those who don’t. In his new environment in CA, Pete is able to throw off all the societal expectations he had hanging over him in NY, and he actually is pleasant and seemingly happy. But once he is back in “the old stomping grounds,” the preconceived ideals of what a successful life is supposed to look like come back and morph him back to old Pete. He falls back into a more traditional self and can’t help but play the role of the unhappy husband, even though he knows he wasn’t happy with Trudy in the suburbs.

      Peggy has a similar dilemma in sifting through the fall out of how her career and desire for success at her job affect her ability to play the traditional roles of wife and/or mother. Again, it is a question of adapting to the path she is carving for herself in this “new world” and letting go of expectations of what her life should be. [Although turning 30 does seem to have Peggy at a crossroad as she evaluates her life, I think working for Lou also contributes to her dissatisfaction. He doesn't really seem to respect her talent or ideas (a step backward despite her promotion), and he stifles creativity. How can she justify or appreciate her career choices if she doesn't enjoy her work?]

      The end of the show was very heartening, seeing Don, Peggy, and Pete together again – the mentor with his two (former) protégées. But I couldn’t help think about what Don said to Peggy after she had the baby, something like “you’ll be amazed by how much this never happened,” if she could set her mind to forgetting it. I thought they looked pretty relaxed together and a key part of this was their ability to forget what happened (despite all the secrets they shared) and move forward ….. to create a new ad agency in CA.

      • Mismarker

        Joan’s apartment has always been this Pepto pink. Pre- and during Greg. Greg’s influence was never felt in that home. He didn’t belong there. Literally and figuratively.

        • L’Anne

          Its also extremely dated. That pink and turquoise color scheme that dominates and much of the art and decoration is still late 50s and early 60s. That apartment is the same basic space it was season 1, when Joan and Carol brought some men home.

          • Mismarker

            I can’t think of another example of a character who has had the same home since the beginning of the series. Everyone has moved on or up. Interesting.

            • Shawn Taylor

              I just kind of assumed because she’s always wanted the marriage and family, she hopes she’ll be out of the 2 bedroom apartment soon and why bother. And she’s thought that since she decorated it in the 50s, hoping it was the web where she’d catch a man I guess, with no eye to living there permanently.

            • Mismarker

              Yes, whatever the reasons, it is certainly a deliberate and telling choice for her character!

      • Shawn Taylor

        Funny, I was thinking a lot about her apartment this morning. It’s been that color the entire run of the series and makes me think that she was on top of home decor when she was single and looking for a husband maybe, wanting to present herself in a particular way in general…and given I haven’t seen any appreciable change to her apartment in all this time, regardless of relationship status or income change, just doesn’t give a shit anymore? Interesting. Still, Joan’s always known what worked for her.

        • decormaven

          Maybe Joan feels more vulnerable about money now that she is a single mom, and chooses to bank whatever money would be used on updating home decor. She’s using some of her new money to update her wardrobe at work- part of the “battle armor.”

        • Edo Tokyo

          Thank you all for your answers. I’ve been trying to decide who the “sink or swim” characters are, I.e. those who can adapt vs. those who can’t. If I’m not mistaken, despite the changes in her life, Joan is thought to be a somewhat stagnant character and does not completely embrace change (I think this has been referenced in the past in some of the style analysis). If her apartment has not changed at all, I think she might be in the “sink” division. Although I realize there is a bit of an age difference, when I compare Joan’s apartment with Peggy’s, they are worlds apart. All that pink makes it feel like a teenage girl’s bedroom instead of the home of a single mother. I’m no home decor aficionado, but I really don’t recall seeing entire common-area rooms in that color, single woman or not (for the record, my reference is t.v. shows and movies from that era).

          I’m still not sure how it will pan out for Joan. I generally liked her character until she threw Don over, which now puts her on the (hopefully sinking) Jim Cutler team for me

          Also, I’m a little surprised at all the Harry hate. Although I don’t like him, he is one of the more benign characters. He is self-interested, but I don’t think he looks to undermine others while pursuing success. He seems aware of things that are going on but doesn’t participate in the scheming. To my recollection, he basically has kept his nose to the grindstone and requests that credit be given where credit is due. In his remark to Joan about becoming a partner, he basically said what others were thinking. Although it was callous, it was true.

          • ybbed

            I’ve always viewed her apartment decor as dated to the 50’s, I mean it was hip back then, but eventually (if she keeps it the same) she will become the eccentric lady down the hall with the crazy apartment. Sort of bohemian in a cool way. Maybe.
            It did seem uber pink last night.

        • Chris

          I think since her apartment isn’t being used for dating/entertaining anymore it’s not a priority for her. Her life has changed and her focus is on work. All of her stuff is relatively new and perfectly serviceable (since she and her Mom are the only ones seeing it mostly) so she just doesn’t spend the time or money on it. Clothes she wears to work are an investment for her.

        • suzq

          I was visiting a bunch of Wes Anderson sites yesterday and when I saw Joan’s apartment, I was getting Wes Anderson flashbacks. It’s like a little jewel box inside. Very Joan. My mother-in-law insisted on pink for the interior of their bungalow. It was a very light pink–with bright green and yellow in the kitchen. She NEVER changed it. Stuck in 1969.

        • T C

          It’s also possible that Joan’s parents decorated once and never changed anything (my MiL home was like that). Redecorating was not a high priority for those before the boomers. Changes happened only when repairs were needed or when the couch left with the youngest child. Her mother’s presence may also stifle changes.

          • VirginiaK

            That’s what I think too. People didn’t use to redecorate and renovate the way they do now. They got their homes furnished and lived in them. And Joan’s basic situation is sociologically not so fa

      • marishka1

        To me, her apartment feels terribly dated and stuck in the 50’s…almost the 40’s.

        • Aisling O’Doherty

          It does look very 50’s. Maybe it reflects the fact that Joan is now a working mother and so home decor is not a priority for her. Also it’s very feminine and reflects the fact that this is a household dominated by women.

    • MilaXX

      I was too tired to rewatch last night so I’ll ask you guys. Did Cutler’s response to losing Chevy sound like he was trying to take a page out of Don’t book with that writing a letter to the NYT’s thing he mentioned at the partners meeting just before they didn’t to promote Harry?

      • decormaven

        It is, in the sense of using an ad to pitch an agency. However, Cutler’s approach is more straightforward. He is showing that SCP is the Agency of Tomorrow, with its new-fangled computer and Harry as the Professor of Technology.

        • L’Anne

          also reminiscent of the partners pooling their funds to take EEO ad out to shame the other agency. They end up with a lobby full of eager African-American applicants.

      • suzq

        And it will blow up in his face. Corporations don’t like sore losers.

      • Juvenile Sinephile

        It was very, ‘Change the conversation’. It’s not Don flipping the bird at cigarettes in a letter, but it is his own passive aggressive, sore loser way of taking defeat by pretending nothing happened.

        Cutler wants to win the war but he comes off more as a war propagandist acting like nothing is wrong.

    • Crystal

      I still hate Pete Campbell.

      I love this episode!

    • Lady Bug

      LOVED the ending with Pete, Peggy and Don enjoying a family meal at Burger Chef. Poignant, and nice throwback to all of the history these three characters have together. For me, these three and their complex relations with each other has been the heart & soul of Mad Men since the first episode. As was pointed out, there are so many secrets between these three, and while there will probably still be plenty moments of tension, hurt and misunderstanding, they all “know” each other in a way that few others-Trudy, Betty, Stan, Roger, etc. truly do. Yup, the formation of a new ad agency-Draper, Olsen and Campbell sounds perfect to me,

      Loved the moment with Peggy pointing out the ketchup on Pete’s mouth.

      • Dorace Afton Trottier

        wasn’t it Don who pointed that out? Regardless, it was a wonderful touch!

    • Jo Bleaux

      This episode had me looking forward to the rest of the series rather than dreading it. The “I did it my way” dance served as such a pivot point! Whether or not Don and Peggy end up forming a new agency, I think their reconciliation will be very important to what comes next. I think it’s very important in terms of re-energizing them both personally and creatively.

    • LaTrèfle

      Loved, loved, LOVED this episode and love T-Lo! I’ve been replaying the episode in my head all morning and can’t wait to rewatch it, hmmm, every single night this week. Peggy and Don’s dance? CHILLS. Thank you for your always thoughtful and thorough analyses that make a fabulous show even better. Can’t wait for Mad Style!

    • http://jw452.tumblr.com/ The Sound of One Man Laughing

      I *never* thought Joan had any regard for Don – I just thought that she knew, as a bombshell and a work-until-you-marry girl, how to sit next to a man she didn’t like and make him feel that she did, without doing anything she didn’t want to do.

      • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

        I could not agree more. People cite that “Aren’t you one of the good ones” line as evidence of friendship/regard, but it seemed to me that she was telling him what he wanted to hear in that moment. Her favor for his white knight behavior. She knows better than most that he’s not a good one.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          Their scene in the bar after she was served divorce papers and in the emergency room after Guy McKendrick’s foot got cut off indicated and articulated a a long standing mutual respect.

          • LaTrèfle

            We must have cross posted :) That’s what I thought of, too!

          • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

            I agree about the mutual respect, I think each knows who the other one is as a person and admires their capabilites. I just never quite saw them as friends because (as you pointed out before) Joan doesn’t do emotionally messy men and Don doesn’t have place in his life for a bombshell he won’t be sleeping with. Joan’s behavior toward Don of late has been terribly petty, though, to the point where you would almost feel some emotion would have to be tied up in it.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              No, not friends in the usual sense. Neither of them are very good at making friends.

            • Dorace Afton Trottier

              Joan doesn’t “do” emotionally messy men? there, our paths diverge. If Dr. Rapey and Roger don’t qualify as “messy” men, i don’t know what does!

            • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

              We do diverge there! Roger rarely emotionally engages with anyone, it was what ended his affair with Joan for good. He couldn’t or wouldn’t say that he loved her. Dr. McRapey was very invested in being the man in charge with everything under control, and as that façade crumbled, so did his marriage to Joan.

            • Dorace Afton Trottier

              i think that it’s our definition of “messy” that doesn’t match.

          • Not applicable

            I loved the scene at the bar when she flat out asked him why he never went for her. And he said because Bert Cooper made him terrified to do so. :)

            • Chris

              Bert Peterson I believe it was. The one Roger loves to fire.

      • LaTrèfle

        What about the episode in season 5 where she gets divorce papers delivered to the office from Greg and they spend the night out together? They seemed to have a genuine connection and mutual respect for each other. There have been a few other moments, too — post-lawn mower incident (the way she touched his face), post-Jaguar prostitution (“You’re one of the good ones, aren’t you?”) come to mind.

        • leighanne

          I also thought of them holding hands right before Don wins a Clio award.

          • Ana the Hated

            One of my favorite moments.

            • leighanne

              I actually rewatched that episode this weekend…thinking back it shares some similarities to last night’s episode. particularly having to do with Peggy & Don’s relationship and her frustration over credit for her work.

        • MilaXX

          Agreed. They weren’t close but they appeared to have mutual respect for each other.

      • Travelgrrl

        Don was the only one of the partners who did not want her to prostitute herself for the company’s gain, and she knows that. There have been other times where they really connected.

        For Joan, the worm began turning in her regard for Don when he mouthed off to Jaguar Herb and lost the account after her winning it in such a hard way. After the Hershey’s affair, she was THROUGH.

    • Tracy Alexander

      Ken having to “keep an eye” on his kid.

      Ha! Once I was with an owner and her puppy (I’m a veterinarian) and the puppy was bouncing around the exam table so much I thought it might fall off and break a leg so I asked her to put a hand on it. THE OWNER HAD ONLY ONE ARM. I apologized immediately but I felt like such a jerk.

      • Not applicable

        The Ken line was so awesome!

      • MilaXX

        and the awkward looks all around. Comedy gold!

      • Peeve

        You weren’t a jerk–she still had a hand to put on the puppy!

    • TheBrett

      And can we just skip ahead to the part where SC&P is a smoking ruin
      and Draper, Campbell & Olson has just opened its doors to business?
      Isn’t it time?

      That’d be kind of awesome. Can you imagine Pete Campbell as the New Roger, Peggy as the New Don, and Don as the new Bert Cooper (apparently) in that situation?

      Seriously, though, you’re right that the dancing scene with Peggy-Don and the scene in the Burger Chef were amazing. I remember how in “Tomorrowland” you can just see the emotional and professional rapport that Don and Peggy built up over the season disappear with the look on Peggy’s face when she finds out that Don not only married Megan on impulse, but that he was making Megan a copywriter alongside her. It was a huge slap in the face for Peggy, probably bringing back to mind the way everyone in the office thinks she only got to be a copywriter because they think she slept with Don. And then all of Don’s travails and garbage through two more seasons – but now maybe mending once more, if Don can actually, finally be the mentor he should have been.

      • Uncivil_Servant

        Peggy – Creative Director. Pete – Head of Accounts. Don – Managing Partner/Strategy with a small creative team. Him and Peggy have weekly meetings challenging each other over best pitches making each other’s pitches better. People like Harry have gone unnoticed and under-appreciated as Burt and Roger have “mailed it in” in regards to running the business.

        • Lady Bug

          I like it! If there is ever a Draper-Olsen-Campbell agency at the end of the series, I hope they bring Harry on board as well.

          • Uncivil_Servant

            That would be ideal as Harry has ties with the Networks and Studios. They could even do work for the networks on advertisements for shows in exchange for ad time. Bring in Joan as junior partner (1/2 share) and you have dynamite.

        • suzq

          Well, since we’re being so speculative, remember how progressive Pete was back in season two, pouring over statistics about negroes and their television purposes? Imagine what Pete and Harry could do if they put their heads together!

      • tallgirl1204

        Except I don’t think it will be Pete. I think it will be Joan and Peggy. I have thought this forever– and even that (maybe) Megan would show back up somehow. Remember that Megan had real talent for the biz. this is how it goes: Roger dies and leaves his shares to his son, and puts them in trust to be managed by Joan until the son hits majority. Either Pete or Don dies and leaves his shares to Peggy. It all ends up being all-women. Just a fantasy, I know.

    • Josefina Madariaga Suárez

      “And can we just skip ahead to the part where SC&P is a smoking ruin and Draper, Campbell & Olson has just opened its doors to business? Isn’t it time?”

      YES!!!!

    • Not applicable

      I must be feeling used to the let down because I kept waiting for the other shoe to drop in this episode. Don & Peggy coming together- felt, I guess almost rushed.

      what I did REALLY appreciate was Peggy’s emotion- about her ‘failed’ life. This is SO important and so well done by this show. Peggy had the choice to be a wife and mother- she didn’t want those things (and said so on more than one occasion.) But now, as the age tacks on and she gets more frustrated with being cast as the ‘second sex’ at work, was the trade off worth it?

      As a woman from a later generation who chose career over kids, I can say this is still an major issue for women- and I can also say that no storylines I’ve seen get this right– accept this one. Working women are portrayed as the tramp or the crone. When Joan slept her way into partnership I was furious with this show- as many women are cast as sleeping their way in- even when it’s far from true. So I didn’t like that this show’s story ‘put it out there’ so to speak.

      But, with Peggy–she’s incredibly successful career wise- yet her family, her colleagues, hell society is a long way from ever seeing her as a failure. Despite Mary Tyler Moore and That Girl, much of the world just sees women like this as they did at the start of the decade: having a good time in their jobs until they find a man and get married. This will start to change more radically in the next decade of course (that we won’t see) but it’s important to realize that Peggy does realize the irony- that she got where she is for the ‘female perspective’ one that is a bit of a sham because (just like when we saw her in the Belle Jolie lipstick ‘research’) she has so little in common with those girls.

      • P M

        And all this time, it never occurred to me you were a woman (D’OH) (sorry).

        As for Peggy-Don, I thought this was a temporary detente. There’s room yet for a split between the two of them. I hope not, though.

        • Not applicable

          LOL!! I’m purposefully androgynous online. ;)

      • suzq

        Peggy had a choice to be a mother, without being a wife. Her choice of being a wife was with a man who would have ended up being her second child. Neither were good choices, in my opinion. I agree with you on that last point. She needs to become actualized as a professional woman. Right now, she’s a pawn.

        • Chris

          Has Peggy ever really had the chance to be a wife? She was Pete’s mistress, Duck’s affair, Abe only proposed living together (on her dime) and Ted offered to leave his wife-until he slept with her and crept home after to his own bed. Has anyone really proposed to her? Pete told her he was in love with her in the second season -but so did Ted and see where that ended up.

          • Fjasmine

            No she hasn’t. Last night felt like Peggy was saying things that all of us have been watching happen. Abe took advantage of Peggy’s insecruities. Mrs. Olson has always gotten a bad rap from people but what she told Peggy about their moving in together was true, in that era it indicated a lack of respect for her. Stabbing Abe was an accidental stroke of luck for Peggy–he could have stayed in that apartment and sponged off her for years until he met the young Jewish girl he always has meant to marry.

          • siriuslover

            Yeah, she dated that weird kid who thought she was a virgin and wanted the power over her of being her first. They broke up during “The Suitcase” episode where he invited her family to the dinner. I think he may even have been planning to propose.

            • MartyBellerMask

              Yes, that’s right. Mark was going to propose.

        • Not applicable

          but what I love so much about her story- is that she’s not the hard old crone that many single working women are portrayed to be. As a woman– particularly one who was raised Catholic– she feels the pressure, the judgement very acutely. It’s nice to see the facets and depth vs. the common stereotype.

      • fitzg

        Do you feel that Joan’s story was potentially not truthful for that time period? I completely agree that the way Joan got her partnership was repugnant, but I also feel like that was a valid story – that some women faced (and still face) that issue, and that some woman at least believe that “sleeping their way in” as the only avenue to advancement that’s available to them.

        • Not applicable

          well, I think what bothered me is to see it realized. We all know there are women who flirt/or even sex their way to the top– but I would say it’s more of a myth than a reality. Joan– who has used her sex appeal all along finally did a risk/reward analysis on this??? I dunno, even though she had been sleeping with Roger, I thought the one night stand for the partnership seemed out of character.

          • Phaedra

            She was extremely pressured into it, though. It read to me as less of a choice and more of a moment where it was all-of-the-men-versus-you.

      • siriuslover

        Well, they say that love is just this side of hate, right? And that’s what I have always felt about the Peggy / Don relationship, so I don’t really see it as rushed. Rather, I saw it as cathartic. Both of them have spent the last couple of years (seasons of the show) at odds with each other and now they’ve finally resolved those differences. Someone upthread said something about figuring out Don’s face when Peggy leans on him during the dance. I’ve seen the scene about 6 or 7 times now, and I think it’s the realization that he is loved. A deeply profound love–wholly platonic–but love nevertheless.

        • Not applicable

          lovely sentiment. I was thinking about it last night (God, why??) but I realized how I was falling into this Peggy hate when her frustration is really justified. HOW many times has Don misbehaved toward Peggy and how many times has he left a mess for her to clean up? Life cereal comes to mind… So, you’re right- maybe not rushed, maybe just needed.

    • leighanne

      We never see Ted anywhere in CA except behind that desk. the picture of loneliness, all alone in his office keeping up with the NY counterparts. The ones who went to Los Angeles seeking fresh starts never really found them- Pete will always be New York Pete.

      • Lady Bug

        I know, poor Ted, he just seemed so despondent since moving to California. I wonder if either Pete or Ted will permanently move back to NY and have newly minted partner Harry Crane take over the L.A. office? Harry already did the grunt work in setting up the L.A. office, and personally I just want Pete back in NY with Peggy, Don etc.

        • Chris

          I think it will go the other way. I think Peggy and Don eventually go west.

          • MartyBellerMask

            I don’t think Don would leave his kids.

            • Chris

              I don’t get the feeling he sees them much anyway though. We have only seen Sally with him once in six episodes and that was because she lost her purse. We haven’t seen him with Bobby or Gene at all.

        • Dorace Afton Trottier

          I’m wondering about the CA vs NY offices as well. If there *is* a Draper, Olsen and Campbell, what are the chances that they would stay in NYC versus moving out to California? I can’t envision there being a bicoastal presence with what would essentially be a smaller firm, although both Harry and Pete seem to do much better in California.

          • Aurumgirl

            Would Don really be happy starting yet another small firm? I have this idea that he wants the firm he built. That he wants to take what he’s in now and keep that, while eliminating everyone else who’s “been disloyal”. I don’t think this rules out moving everything west, though.

      • http://www.deborahwiles.com/ GoodSally

        And he always has food at his desk! A bagel, orange juice, lunch…

    • tallgirl1204

      Maybe this is already out there, but I think that Joan is acting within character to not see which office ‘team’ to be on. She has always appeared to have everything under control, but really, not so much. From Roger to Dr. McRapey, she has made choices that have hurt her in the long run. Even now, she doesn’t see who is really on her side and who is really loyal to her.

      • P M

        And she doesn’t seem to see the big picture, and how computers fit in. Joan, WAKE UP.

    • Lady Bug

      Loved that Stan visited Ginsberg in the hospital.
      About the Trudy-Pete divorce, was it typical for divorces to take this long? They’ve been separated and in the process of divorce ever since Pete left for California Thanksgiving of 1968.

      • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

        Trudy didn’t want to actually divorce and “be a failure.” She just wanted Pete gone.

        • Not applicable

          I think too that divorce still carries a heavy stigma at this time. Likely neither would rush into it- or that it would be easy/quick unless you did the Reno option.

          • Chris

            Yes, that’s one thing I think isn’t being handled so realistically. I don’t think Trudy would be in such a great position as a future divorcee in the suburbs with a small child. Remember how Glen’s mom was looked on not so long ago? I find it hard to believe she is so sanguine about it all and that she is dating (assuming that’s where she was that night) as an un-divorced woman in her social set. Trudy runs with a very conservative crowd so I wouldn’t imagine she is having an easy time of it.

            • L’Anne

              I wouldn’t be surprised if the ‘hood would “have her back.” After Pete slept with the neighbor’s wife last season, and their rather loud blow-up, I think it could be very likely people see Pete as the neighborhood lout.

            • 3hares

              People don’t have a great track record for blaming the man for a neighborhood affair.

            • L’Anne

              In general, I agree. But I think in this case, he’d get the blame. Trudy seems more connected to the neighborhood, if anyone knows the Dawes, he isn’t about to say anything nice about Pete at all. Remember when he raped the au pare– the neighbor’s husband clearly treated it as he slept with the wrong girl, not as assault. As he said, you keep it out the building/ neighborhood. Even Trudy noted after she confronted him about the neighbor she took to the hotel after he beat her- keep it out of my area. Affairs were tolerated, you just didn’t bring them so close to home.

            • 3hares

              But I’m not sure that would translate into the neighborhood rallying around her and not seeing her as a divorcee and making all the judgments people make about that sort of thing. Like that she couldn’t keep her husband in line. Dawes might or might not have anything nice to say about Pete (Dawes’s own wife apparently has a habit of picking up men) but plenty of people would still see Trudy as a threat, I would imagine. Certainly they’d probably see Debbie as at least equally responsible for the affair anyway (as they should).

            • L’Anne

              I think it will depend on the relationships she has in the neighborhood. Betty came out looking good, while Don was that “sad bastard.” Some women may see her as the threat because she’s single, others will likely relate to her, seeing themselves in her: young wife, devoted and loving, keeps the home, raises the kid(s), and despite “all this,” he strays, even though she gives him everything he should want or need. Think about how Betty, Francine and even Betty and Helen bonded over infidelity.

            • 3hares

              I don’t claim to know anything about what Trudy’s status in the neighborhood is, but the comment above was talking about conservative viewpoints about divorced women, and I don’t see any reason Trudy would be exempt from that if she would have gotten it otherwise because her husband cheated on her with a neighbor. Presumably plenty of women who were ostracized for being divorced had husbands who cheated.

            • L’Anne

              Both in my experience growing up right after this period and as an historian, a lot of a divorcee’s status depended on her connection to the people she was around. Definitely behind her back, other women would make speculations about why she couldn’t keep her man. Men would wonder if she’d be lonely and “available.” Of course, that’s rude and cruel. But those very same people could just as likely be helpful, generous, and extremely supportive at the same time. by the late 60s, divorce was very common and would only get more so as more states passed no-fault divorce laws. Conservative politicians who’d been divorced got elected with no problem. Celebrities got divorced and stayed in the public’s good graces. It was different for “the common folk,” true. But having a few divorced families in a neighborhood was not uncommon.

              Divorcees who stayed in their neighborhoods were known entities. Despite any behind-the-back speculation, they were part fo the neighborhood and planned the block party, joined the PTA, worked the Jr. league, helped baby-sit for the lady down the street, or did the car pool. The women at real risk of mistreatment were “interlopers,” women who moved in after the divorce to a new community. They didn’t have existing connections, they didn’t know people, people didn’t know the circumstances of the divorce (easier to blame the woman), they hadn’t done things to “pitch in” with neighborhood projects, etc. I’m trying to remember what book I saw it in, but one comment was that in even affluent neighborhoods, there was a concern that the divorcee who moved in say herself as moving down, since divorce negatively impacts a woman’s economic status. The idea was that they figured she’d be a snob, who was settling for a lesser community because she couldn’t afford to stay in her more elite neighborhood.

            • 3hares

              That makes sense.

            • L’Anne

              Happy to clarify my stance. I don’t really know her integration in her ‘hood, but there’s no sign she isn’t involved and liked. I’d worry for more Debbie.

            • sweetlilvoice

              Trudy was planning the Easter event for the neighborhood last season (before she kicked Pete), so I think she’s plenty tied in. She also has great family connections and her parents have always taken care of her. Yeah, her Dad was a jerk for pulling his business (twice!) because Pete upset him but his daughter has always been #1. Tammy won’t get to say the same (and that’s both good and bad in my mind.)

            • Chris

              Her Dad is also a jerk for visiting prostitutes just like Pete did. Trudy ended the marriage when Pete told her the truth about her Dad, which was apparently worse than Pete cheating in her eyes.

            • LuluinLaLa

              Thank you for this excellent, informative comment.

            • VirginiaK

              Great info and analysis!

            • VirginiaK

              Great info and analysis!

            • VirginiaK

              Great info and analysis!

            • VirginiaK

              Great info and analysis!

            • VirginiaK

              Great info and analysis!

            • VirginiaK

              Great info and analysis!

            • VirginiaK

              Great info and analysis!

            • VirginiaK

              Great info and analysis!

            • VirginiaK

              Great info and analysis!

            • http://www.deborahwiles.com/ GoodSally

              Those interlopers at risk of mistreatment were also seen as women on the make for a husband. “Not in my backyard!”

            • Chris

              Plus a pretty divorcee is seen as a threat by the other women in the neighborhood. Remember how they watched Glen’s Mom to see if she was talking to anyone’s husband? Trudy’s best bet is if Mommy and Daddy have a new guy lined up for her.

            • Travelgrrl

              Her Dad just died so I doubt she’s worried about money.

            • 3hares

              Trudy’s dad is alive and well.

            • Travelgrrl

              OK, I might have heard it wrong, but didn’t the guy from Burger Chef tell Pete that Old Man Large Black Whore Banger had died? That was why he was now off Vicks and on Burger Chef, and gave Pete the tip? Then Pete said something to Trudy last night about “Thanks for telling me about your Dad.”

              Perhaps he just had a heart attack and I’m remembering it wrong. It seemed like his demise was discussed on a previous episode and also on this one.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              He’s not dead.

            • Travelgrrl

              Please tell me he at least had a major heart attack – it seems like that was a rather large plot point I may have dreamed up, if not.

            • 3hares

              Nope, it was just heart attack. It wasn’t the reason the guy was off Vicks. He just brought it up because he happened to have left Vicks soon after Tom’s heart attack. He said her dad had recovered and was fine now. That guy happened to now work at Burger Chef and wanted to work with Pete.

      • Travelgrrl

        It’s only spring of 69…

        I’m pretty sure divorces took about 6 months back then, unless you went ot Reno like ol’ Bets.

    • Not applicable

      Speaking of Joan’s relationships…wonder what ever happened to Joan’s roommate Carol (I think that was her name) who was in love with her since college?

      • L’Anne

        I’m still trying to figure out what happened to Greg. I get they’re divorced, but is he still in Vietnam? POsted stateside, but far away? Dead? Do he and his family have any contact with Kevin? If he’s still overseas, that’s one thing. But I can’t imagine that he and his family completely gave up contact with his son, and as far as I can tell, they still think he is Greg’s son.

        • Not applicable

          yea- he sort of shipped out didn’t he? I don’t think Greg questioned his paternity- but I do think it’s (assumed?) that he’s overseas being a super-surgeon.

          • L’Anne

            Super-surgeon! He has a scalpel and a cape!

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            Or Vietnam’s answer to Frank Burns.

            • Not applicable

              bahahaha!! he’s got no brains in his fingers, afterall!

        • jen_wang

          I think he’s still in Vietnam? When he came back for his last visit, they separated because he’d signed himself up for another full year. Is that year up yet?

        • Travelgrrl

          I wondered that too – if he’s not dead (which I don’t believe they said he was) – how would she be able to marry Bob Benson in any case?

          • L’Anne

            their divorce could be final. She got papers from him in “Christmas Waltz” (s. 5), so closing in on 2 years. Entirely possible he has been in country all that time

    • Joe Mitstein

      Didn’t Peggy also have a birthday in “The Suitcase”? That was a nice parallel.

      • Not applicable

        yes, and Don totally mocked her for it…. ah, another time.

        I think it was her 26th bday– I recall she ran into a very pregnant Trudy in the bathroom, who told her that was ‘still very young’ :)

        • SylviaFowler

          He didn’t mock her for having a birthday. He was annoyed that she spent the evening silently fuming about being at work without bothering to say anything about her birthday or having plans. He couldn’t read her mind and KNOW that she had birthday plans. That’s also what she spent 95% of this episode doing, by the way: expecting all of the men around her to read her mind and just “know” exactly what she wants or thinks.

          • Not applicable

            Yes- she was being a ‘victim’ so to speak, but I did feel like he mocked her- like she was acting like a baby for wanting to go out for her birthday. Don has issues with birthdays… as his is all messed up from having 2 identities and again, nobody loves Dick Witman… But I think these 2 episodes were clearly aligned to show the parallels in both time of year, behaviors particularly with the flipped roles.

          • siriuslover

            He did mock her. he said something like isn’t she an adult now? why does she need to celebrate her birthday.

            • MartyBellerMask

              Which we know was actually kind of jealousy because he can’t celebrate his (real) birthday.

        • Kit_W

          There were a couple of (old) age related mentions, regarding the women this episode..
          When Bob so over zealously woos Joan by saying “Aren’t you near forty?.”
          And of course when Peggy says “I just turned thirty”……”I kept it a secret and now I’m one of those women lying about her age. I hate them.”

      • sweetlilvoice

        Great catch!

    • NeenaJ

      Aside from the spectacular Don/Peggy scenes, here were my favorite moments:
      Don putting that crazy glass thing back on the dining table after clearing off his work stuff.
      Pete, “I’ve always wanted to do that.” He really is living the Don Draper life – for the moment, anyway.
      Meredith, “Want me to come get you in 5 minutes?” **WINK** Translation: Back off bitch – he’s mine!
      Peggy’s secretary telling Megan that she didn’t know Don was married – and the look on Megan’s face!
      Don waking shirtless, watching Megan on the patio – he thinks he has a chance to get her back to NYC. Then, fondue pot. Not so much.
      Lou, “Did you need something, Don?” Sweetie, you have no idea what this man needs.
      Ken, “You’ve got to keep an eye on him.” I actually guffawed at my TV.
      Bob and the GM VP using Joan as their beards in that moment in front of the other GM Exec. (how I read it anyway).
      Kevin’s love for Uncle Bob.

      Joan’s hairdo (at home).
      Pete being Pete – smushing his beer.
      Harry makes partner – long overdue – and with Don’s support.

      • Mismarker

        Joan’s hair was so much yes. What a fabulous wig.

      • par3182

        Stan (to Peggy): “Thanks for the subtitles.”

      • P M

        Bonnie to Pete: ‘Don’t try to fuck your way out of this’ (or something to that effect’.

      • Lilithcat

        Meredith, “Want me to come get you in 5 minutes?” **WINK** Translation: Back off bitch – he’s mine!

        Wrong translation, I think. Execs would often (still do!) have their secretaries remind them of another meeting when they are with someone they’d rather not be with. That’s how her remark struck me – a typical ditzy Meredith move, since a competent secretary wouldn’t blatantly reveal that ploy. It’s consistent with how she’s been portrayed.

        • Kit_W

          I didn’t know how to read that either until I saw Don’s reaction. Him cramming his hands into his pockets and with a heavy exhale dismissing her saying “Meredith……that’ll be all.”
          It turns out that neither one of them were subtle in their actions, I just don’t think that she realized truly how unsubtle or sly she was being.
          Meredith being more Meredithy than i care to witness.

        • NeenaJ

          I totally get that but, she’s been coming on to Don pretty hard lately. Her first reaction to Bonnie would be jealousy – in my mind.

          • Kitten Mittons

            I thought it was both. Meredith was jealous and hoping Don would see Bonnie as a nuisance to get rid of, and she went about helping him in her typical Meredith way, which completely lacked finesse. Either way, though, the scene cracked me up.

        • aesteve212

          I just love that this is Meredith’s attempt to be a super-competent-secretary-type. Go Meredith!

      • Kit_W

        Heh! Yes! “That crazy glass thing”. That thing be glass grapes, and they be ubiquitous for that era. Sometimes found these days in miniature form. :)

        • Ginger Thomas

          Found full-size in my 85-year-old mother’s house. She just can’t bring herself to get rid of them.

          • T C

            My mother dispensed with hers by 1969 as she had acquired too much art from her trip to Bali. Found the rest of the family trove when the last aunt passed in 89, fortunately her son adored them.

        • decormaven

          And they’re a pain to dust. Thank the heavens that trend passed.

        • DemmeFatale

          My folks had two “bunches” made of dyed marble, that they used as doorstops.

      • MarinaCat

        When Don was watching Megan on the terrace, it sounded like Sad-Megan-Music; the same music that was playing when Don and Megan were falling in love on Megan’s hotel terrace in California, but with a sad twist to it.

      • Travelgrrl

        “Crazy glass thing” was one of those oversized bunches of glass grapes! In amber!

    • Valdri8

      I loved Ken’s line, ” you’ve got to keep an eye on him. It felt like classic MM

      • MartyBellerMask

        The look on Bob’s face. “Is it okay to laugh at that, or… ??” Priceless.

      • Kit_W

        Yep. And how uncomfortable everyone looked after he said it – all staring at their shoes and not knowing which way to look -…or maybe that was just me projecting because it made me uncomfortable too!

    • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

      Definitely time. And definitely a much needed and appreciated episode. Thanks for the wrap up TLo!

    • Joe Mitstein

      I loved the ending for many reasons, one of which is it exemplified the show’s truthful message that the late 60s weren’t all about revolution and hippies and chaos. Suburban families dressed in bermuda shorts and had short hair and ate quiet meals together outside in the summer of Woodstock. The world contains multitudes, and a cookie-cutter history of the 60s as being all one thing serves no one.

    • Ana the Hated

      Also, shout out to the shitty mattress Peggy sleeps on. Definitely brought back memories of staying at old aunties’ houses and sleeping on the springiest mattress ever.

      • P M

        Okay, now I have to go back and watch for that.

      • Travelgrrl

        Lots of peole shown getting out of bed in this episode. Don, Bob, and Peggy.

    • Daphnemcl

      I think “The Strategy” told us just how the “Core” team is going to regain control of the business. I think good ol’, smart, savvy, Monkey Boy, Roger is going to use the information about Buick and Bob Benson to capture that account and dupe Cutler in a way that will eliminate Cutler from the business. The end is being formulated with Don leaving Peggy and Pete in charge (Peggy’s wish to make the “decisions” coming true) whiile he leaves to go back to the suburbs to be a real father to his kids and hook up with Lee (Neve) again.

    • Girl_With_a_Pearl

      This was one of Mad Men’s best episodes of the entire run. So many characters and their stories were packed in last night, but the pacing wasn’t overwhelming either. Bob Benson was back, Pete was on the East Coast with Bonnie, Meghan was in New York and everyone else from the agency seemed to make an appearance. The last scene was ironic and sad with Peggy, Pete and Don sitting together at Burger Chef coming up with a campaign where Burger Chef is the place for families and of course, where none of them has the kind of family they’re describing. The camera pans out and all around them, they are surrounded by happy, traditional families. I was reminded too of the fact that Peggy and Pete are the parents of a child and might have become a family under different circumstances.

      For a split second, it seemed that Joan considered and then rejected Bob Benson’s proposal. I actually think that that was a positive thing for Joan. No, not that she should have accepted Bob’s proposal, but it’s probably been a long time since she had a proposal, especially since she was close to 40 as Bob not very tactfully pointed out. A proposal for Joan would be a nice ego boost.

      It looks as if Bob is being written out of the show. It would never happen, but I did think of Sal as a possible partner for Bob. Nope, not going to happen.

      When this season began, everyone was miserable, except Pete. I wouldn’t be surprised if it flips in next week’s episode. Pete’s life seems to already be taking a turn for the worse with Trudy and with Bonnie. I think the reason that Pete didn’t take Bonnie with him to Cos Cob (love when he says “Cos Cob”) is because he may have been hoping for some kind of reconciliation with Trudy. It didn’t work out, of course since Trudy was out. Only Pete could then manage to blow up both whatever good feelings were left between him and Trudy and his new relationship with Bonnie all in one day.

      One more thing, suddenly Don’s apartment looked much brighter when he was expecting Meghan to arrive. I have to say, I was confused for a minute when he said something to the effect that it was all a dream and Meghan had shorter hair and looked like she used to when she was in New York. (She was wearing a wig when she arrived I guess?)

      • LaTrèfle

        I loved the final shot of these 3 people who never quite fit in to the families they were born into, and who never really succeeded in creating the traditional nuclear family of the time, who ended up as this de facto little family unit, bonding over fast food they’re campaigning to earn for the agency that threw them together in the first place. Despite all their interpersonal drama and fraught history in pairs and as a group, they are the new family.

        • P M

          Pete definitely seemed like the little brother, a young upstart who needs to be shown how he fits in. Oh, Pete, you disaster of close personal relationships.

      • Teresa

        I loved how Don gathered up all the stuff on the dining room table before Megan arrived, and replaced those kitschy lucite grapes in the middle.

    • decormaven

      When Don hands Peggy the drink in Lou’s office, I keep thinking that she is “drinking sad,” as Kurt called it.

    • KayEmWhy

      I know this will be commented on later this week, but Joan looks fantastic.

      • LaTrèfle

        She’s never looked better!

      • Lady Bug

        She’s been looking amazing all season. There’s been a lot of mention of Peggy’s poor fashion sense especially this season, but at least at this point Peggy’s career seems to be on the up swing. While Joan, despite having the outward appearance of being completely in charge and in control, is somewhat floundering this season as a partner.

      • P M

        Joan never looks lovelier than in the scenes when bad shit does down.

      • Lilithcat

        I think she has a portrait in her storage locker, because she seems to get younger-looking each season, particularly this one. I think the more casual hair and make-up at this period suits her very well.

        • KayEmWhy

          I agree, actually that’s what I meant. She does look younger (I get the Dorian Gray reference).

      • MilaXX

        Yes TLo called it her Ginger Grant look in the recap. The longer hair really suits her.

    • Hilda Elizabeth Westervelt

      This episode made me deliriously happy! Don and Peggy, together again. I was cheering from the couch. I actually wondered if they might end up as a couple in the end of the series, something I have never really entertained as a serious possibility. Thoughts?

      • Lady Bug

        I can’t really see them ever becoming a romantic couple. But, as part of a business team with Pete? Absolutely.

      • Daphnemcl

        Absolutely not. Don’s true love is going to be Neve Campbell (Lee). He’s never looked so blissful as when he was sleeping with her on that plane. He’ll run into her again. My vision is that Don leaves the agency to open a car business (Cadillac or Lincoln) back in the suburbs nearby to his kids. And at the car lot he’ll run into Lee.

      • MilaXX

        I don’t see their relationship as romantic ever. They are close. As close as Don has ever been with a woman other than Anna Draper. I think (hope) they will always have that.

        • Gatto Nero

          Yes. Matt Weiner would never go there. And shouldn’t.

      • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

        I’m against the Don/Peggy pairing. While I got teary during My Way, I also felt very worried they were going to kiss which would have ruined their reconciliation, at least for me (literally muttering at my tv, Don’t kiss don’t kiss like a crazy person). I was relieved at the platonic kiss on the head.

        • Hilda Elizabeth Westervelt

          I am also against their romantic pairing and was hoping that the dance would not lead to more. There is something too perfect about the relationship that Peggy and Don have; almost like a father/daughter, brother/sister. And neither of them is particularly good at romantic relationships, so I would hate to see that platonic relationship ruined. I can’t wait to watch this episode again.

          • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

            For Don, it’s a Platonic relationship in the Socratic sense – ideal, once he gets past his hang ups about women.
            And also ditto on rewatching.

    • Joe Mitstein

      We’re now to the point that someone realistically could start calling Stan Rizzo “Ratso.” Midnight Cowboy came out in May 1969. (Yes, I know it was a book before that, but vastly less popular than the movie.)

    • disqus_Lw45zqx2ae

      I’m still hoping for a late-season dream sequence (or, drug-fueled trip if Roger), where the Mad Men cast are popping in and out of the door’s on the Laugh-In wall. Because that would be awesome.

      • Chris

        I’m still betting there is some kind of flashback in the next episode based on Peggy’s clothes in some ‘behind the scenes” pictures that were released by TV Guide before the season started.

    • Daphnemcl

      One thing about Don is that he is a true lover of women. There are a lot of misogynists out there, but Don isn’t one of them. He’s genuine in his support of Peggy and when he danced with her all his emotion and care for her came out. Peggy even said it “Don has the emotion.” It was a beautiful, beautiful moment and that shining element of Don’s character has really been consistent throughout the show.

      TLo your write up was spectacular.

      • JMWilder

        That line of Peggy’s stayed with me for a while. “I have the authority. Don has the emotion.” Or something like that? In the light of day, I feel a little more cynical about the dancing… I’m wondering if that was 100% his love (not romantic) for her coming out, or his need to be needed. Obviously they have a long history together, but I think she just might have been the right person at the right time.

        • Daphnemcl

          I definitely got that he loved being needed too.

        • fitzg

          I don’t think those two things are inconsistent. Part of what spurs him to affection is a sense that he is needed – that he matters to the woman and fulfills some emotional need she has. The complete antithesis to the prostitutes and stepmother he grew up with; his presence made no difference to the former, and the latter affirmatively wished him gone. His problem with his wives is that he encourages the neediness to the point where they get too dependent, and then his inevitable betrayal is that much worse, whether it comes in the form of affairs or emotional distance or lying (including about, you know, his entire identity).

          • JMWilder

            I think you’re probably right that the two things might be consistent with each other. Peggy needs love and approval (and maybe a sense of mental challenging) as much as Don does, and they offer each other those things without the messiness of romantic entanglement. A Don/Peggy coupling is inconceivable. I’m wondering if the show thinks that friendship is better than romance? I’m trying to think of a romantic relationship that hasn’t destroyed itself in the show. It seems like romantic relationships almost always become angry, ugly things which betrayal, infidelity, and lies eventually destroy… But there seems to be hope that friendships can survive all that.

            • fitzg

              That’s an interesting question. Peggy and Stan definitely prove your point, since they are about as close as anyone on that show without romantic entanglement. I can only think of Ken and his wife as a couple who have lasted without ugliness, but we haven’t been privy to whether his increased responsibility and stress have affected that relationship.

        • Chris

          It was her rebutting Pete’s statement that they needed Don to bring authority and her emotion to the pitch. She said “I have authority, Don has emotion.” I loved that moment.

          • Juvenile Sinephile

            Frankly, the idea of authority over emotion for a woman in the office is kind of the rules working women had to follow in the following decades.

      • Fjasmine

        it was a perfect line

    • Sean

      ‘Living in the not knowing’ is that time between the end of the episode and the TLo recap going online.

    • Daphnemcl

      Kudos to the writers again for historical subtleties. I do remember that year and “My Way” WAS playing all the time! Also, I remember people starting to say “Shit” and “Crap” more often in casual conversation.

    • NMMagpie

      This episode is what you watch Mad Men for. I was out of my mind when Don and Peggy got down to work and brilliance erupted.

      I was annoyed by Roger completely missing a harbinger of impending disaster and “of coursed” loudly when it came out that people do not know Don is married.

      I laughed when Pete was pitching Don to Lou. Lou has seen the full Don Draper and man, he was not ready for that. Fantastic.

      • P M

        “You haven’t seen Don at his best. Tears will flow.” Oh, Pete, how little you know :D

    • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

      I have to say I have an irrational dislike for the Don-Peggy father-daughter comparisons. They are PEERS, now. That’s the whole point.

      • Chris

        Even when a child becomes an adult or someone you mentored matures, it doesn’t alter the essence of the relationship. Bert doesn’t look on Don the same way he does Cutler or Roger (and not just because of his behavior). Don was an essential part of Peggy’s growth. He wasn’t always a good or kind father figure but to the girl who had lost her own many years before, he was the closest thing she ever had.

      • girlsaturday

        I don’t mind the father-daughter thing because I think the way Mad Men is doing it takes a much broader view, the show’s been following Don and Peggy for a long time now and I think It’s now getting to a point where most depictions of surrogate father-daughter relationships don’t venture: that eventually children end up taking care of their parents, that as parents age children will often look to their parents less for guidance, but still see the relationship as a source of support (“I have authority, Don has emotion”).

        • 3hares

          Don’s telling Pete about the ketchup on his face at the end also gave me a father/son vibe.

          • Lady Bug

            I also saw a child/parents vibe at the diner. Peggy & Don sharing a bench sitting across from Pete with the ketchup on his face. For at least that moment, these three characters who have all had issues with their family/personal life, are a family.
            Pete may have ketchup on his face-but he’s accepted and appreciated for who he is. Peggy may feel that life has passed her by, but she’s a pioneer in her industry, a figure of authority and respected by her mentor. Don is still inspiring his colleagues, although now more as equal partner than a mentor/authority figure.

            • 3hares

              Also nice that Don and Peggy had had their moment, and were on the same side of the table like parents pitching to Pete who had to be sort of coaxed onto the right page. Don and Peggy walked in in a good headspace; Pete was sulking and seeing everything as bad. So it was like Don and Peggy, having made a connection to each other, this time went out and drew Pete into it–Pete who’d spent the episode getting the exact opposite reaction to his bad mood.

              That’s one of the main things that tends to stand out for me about the group that was highlighted in the episode, that there’s a difference between things going the way they’re supposed to go and looking right and family who sticks it out even when things are going terribly. There’s the people who are willing to deal with the mess and those who aren’t. It even reflected in Joan and Bob–Bob’s always Mr. Perfect and was offering the perfection without the genuine love and interest. Real families on the show often spend most of their time hurting each other, but the real test is whether they come back together anyway.

          • girlsaturday

            Yes! That whole scene at the end with Don, Peggy, and Pete had a very ‘divorced dad out with his kids’ vibe.

      • P M

        But then, this is an episode about family-like relationships and about strong ties that go beyond a role. Peggy-Don definitely fits that bill.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          That’s a good point. Like I said, it’s an irrational dislike. :) I have a kneejerk reaction to that framing of their relationship.

          • fitzg

            To me, it seems like they are at the “transition” point where the mentor is beginning to cede control to the protegee while still having her back. Interestingly, I think Don has been pretty graceful about it.

          • http://www.deborahwiles.com/ GoodSally

            I agree. I dislike it, too. The father/daughter comparison is not nearly as strong and apt as big brother/mentor and younger sister. I think of Don and Peggy’s relationship — if we must use family titles at all — is (to Don, at least) like the relationship Don had (or wanted to have) with Adam.

      • MilaXX

        That may be, but Don will always be Peggy’s first mentor, and in a sense he was still acting like her mentor in the way that he coached that Burger Chef pitch out of her. I don’t think the the father/daughter comparisons are meant to dismiss any of the kickass work she does, rather it distinguishes the closeness of the relationship. They have a more father/daughter relationship than a romantic one.

      • Fjasmine

        I see them as older brother and younger sister. Remember Peggy entertaing Bobby and Sally with chocolate in season 1….

      • Fjasmine

        Their arguements are much more like kids arguing then parent child

    • Girl_With_a_Pearl

      This episode was about the contrast between the version of “family” as defined by Peggy’s first pitch and the reality of the lack of the traditional family life for Peggy, Don, Pete and Joan.

    • MartyBellerMask

      Tears. The sad kind, and the good kind. Damn, what an episode!!!

      • Lady Bug

        Agreed! The scene between Peggy & Don, and the scene with Pete, Don & Peggy in the diner had almost a ‘series’ finale feeling to me.

        • P M

          It really felt like an incomplete, but almost perfect, ending for the show.

      • Lady Bug

        and how prefect was the song “My Way” for Peggy & Don?

    • Travelgrrl

      T & L: I think Roger ‘laughed off’ the Chevy news once Joan told him that Bob Benson was being wooed by Buick. SC&P still ‘own’ Bob, and I thought Roger’s wheels were turning – perhaps Bob too will be offered a partnership to bring Buick in to SC&P rather than Bob leaving for Buick?

      • Daphnemcl

        I think Roger is going to use the info to regain control of the agency and eliminate Cutler.

        • P M

          And unfortunately, eliminate Bob Benson. I don’t see this ending well for him.

          • Daphnemcl

            I agree! He’s such a user and soooo creepy! When he told Joan that his offer would be the best she’ll ever get I was outraged!

        • Travelgrrl

          Hear, hear!

        • Jo Bleaux

          One can hope.

        • suzq

          Roger had info Cutler didn’t. He’s more patched into the business than Cutler is. I wouldn’t be surprised if he surreptitiously scuttled the “deal” with Philip Morris.

    • VermillionSky

      I know when Sal Romano left Matt Weiner said he wouldn’t be back because that’s how the real world worked, but I’m really hoping we see him one more time before the series ends. We saw Kinsey become a Hari Krishna, why can’t we have Harry run into Sal as a hollywood art director? With Bob Benson’s story line and all the foreshadowing of the Stonewall Riots, I’d even settle for seeing him involved in that event, even though I really hope he escaped gloomy NYC to Hollywood. One of the themes of the series is the decline of NYC and the rise of CA during the 60s. Why not show Sal finding some sunshine after so much rain?

      • Joe Mitstein

        When will people let Sal go? It’s been YEARS.

        • VermillionSky

          Never. Sal was one of the most interesting, memorable characters, and even though his tenure with Sterling Cooper was over, I really want to hope that his life wasn’t, that he pushed past his problems the way Freddy Rumson, and Peggy, and so many others did.

          • Danielle

            Exactly. We’ve seen plenty of people come back who were gone for years – Freddy, Paul Kinsey, Midge… why wouldn’t fans keep up hope that we’ll get to see one of our favorite characters again before the show is over?

            • Daphnemcl

              I think we’ll see him again. So much is happening in each episode. It possibly is just one more relationship that Don has to mend, too.

            • MartyBellerMask

              Because when they come back, it’s depressing. Fred is happy & sober, but unemployable. If they bring Sal back, just to show his life has gone to shit, I’ll pass.
              I’d rather keep it the way it is.

        • Fjasmine

          I don’t get it either. He had a small piece of the plot and it ended. He was never an important character. I hope Stonewall doesn’t show up, I don’t like when dramas try to build on historical events. They have their own story to tell.

          • Jaialaibean

            He also wasn’t very nice, frankly. Sal was trying so hard to keep that closet door shut that he didn’t mind slamming others’ fingers in it. I can’t name a specific instance, but when I rewatched the first seasons a while back, his callousness toward anyone in a weaker position than himself, including the guys in his own department, stood out.

            • L’Anne

              He was one of the people who ridiculed Freddie over the drunken pants-peeing, and he made fun of Peggy as she gained weight. As was Ken.

          • Joe Mitstein

            I don’t think it will. I would be disappointed if it did too. The significance of the event was not fully appreciated at the time, unlike the other major news events that have been referred to in MM.

        • VeryCrunchyFrog

          I think it would be much more realistic for Don (or Peggy) to run into Dr. Faye again.

        • Travelgrrl

          If we can have Francine back, we can jolly well want Sal back!

      • katiessh

        I kind of thought he was dead

        • VermillionSky

          I like to hope he wasn’t.

      • 3hares

        I haven’t seen any foreshadowing of the Stonewall riots at all. The Chevy guy getting arrested was just the way things were at the time.

        • VermillionSky

          TLo point out that this episode took place about a week before the riots happen, so it’s a pretty good indication bringing up this particular storyline around the same time is at the very least an allusion to that event. The actual event might not make it into the next episode, but this episode is clearly alluding to it.

          • 3hares

            Ah. I can definitely see the connection between the two. I thought you meant they were foreshadowing a story about it, which I didn’t think would happen. You’d think I’d remember the reference in the actual recap that I just read, but I totally didn’t!

            • VermillionSky

              hehe, no worries. I had no idea this episode was right around the time of Stonewall until TLo brought it up in the reiview. That made me think about the last time we saw Sal, and wondering where he will be when the riot occurs.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              Not there. He would have been far too old to be at Stonewall.

        • MilaXX

          The Chevy guy getting arrested was just the way things were at the time.
          That’s the point. The riots, like all revolutions occurred because “that’s the way things were at the time” and the people being mistreated finally had enough.

          • 3hares

            Right, but I thought they were saying that it was specifically foreshadowing a story about Stonewall rather than just having an ep that highlighted the way things were that led up to Stonewall that took place a couple of weeks before. I saw the connection between the two things, I just misunderstood what they meant by “foreshadowing.”

            • P M

              I really doubt we’ll see Stonewall – this show has never been about people being at pivotal events, just them being on the periphery.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              I think the Chevy exec’s arrest is what we’re getting instead of Stonewall, and I’m okay with that. In a way, I think it works better.

      • Chris

        I always thought it was odd there wasn’t some throwaway reference to Sal because they work in such an incestuous industry. If he were working in advertising surely someone would have run into him at a pitch or someplace? Surely he had some friends at SC he would have kept in touch with? i took it to mean maybe he went to work in some other industry.

        • NeenaJ

          I assumed he went on to directing. Perhaps he’s in La-La land by now – he could run into Pete when he picks up a bagel at the deli!

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        I heard that he was pushed out because of a disagreement with Matt Weiner over salary. :/

    • Froggae

      I LOVE that you guys picked up the Stonewall references! I also love the contrast between the scene of this makeshift family at the end and Lou’s earlier comment when he was so impressed by Peggy’s pitch “It’s nice to see a happy family again” (paraphrase). Don and Peggy are so unhappy now because they are in the middle of this storm of changes–political and personal–but, unlike the Lous of the world, if they are willing to embrace them they have a chance to weather them and piece together some semblance of happiness.

    • Penelope Fox Parkin

      Olsen, Draper, Campbell! Please!

      • Daphnemcl

        Yes! But Roger has the strategy! I think Roger is going to kick the bucket in the end, but he’s on to something now that they are going to use to regain control. He’s never really been disloyal to Don – he just had him take a break.

        • Alice Teeple

          There’s definitely something in the works for Roger, now that he has intel on Buick, but it’s hard to say whether or not it’ll actually happen. The word “Waterloo” could be a bad sign.

          • Chris

            Well in every war there has to be a winner and loser. We just have to wait to see who will be Wellington and who will be Bonaparte when it all shakes out!

          • Glammie

            Depends who are the English and who are the French. If Draper’s Wellington, he’s in good shape. Were there *any* new shots in the previews? Didn’t seem like it. Maybe 2.

            • Lady Bug

              I don’t think there were any new shots in the previews for “Waterloo” just clips of previous scenes this episode-making the previews even more frustrating, confusing and ambiguous than usual.

            • L’Anne

              Most of which emphasize Don as the loser. If that’s about the history going into the final showdown, he’s Wellington.

            • Glammie

              There would be no point in re-dumping Don, I think. Plus, the music’s on his side–at least as far as his business goes.

              His marriage, on the other hand, not so much.

            • T C

              There have never been any new scenes in the previews of “season finales”. I had forgotten AMC’s pattern until I looked and felt the same disappointment from years past.

          • siriuslover

            I think what worries me is if they take a direct correlation with Waterloo. Waterloo happened after Napoleon’s escape from exile and his 100 days back on top of his game. This led to his ultimate loss (at Waterloo), his permanent exile even further away, and his death (stomach cancer?). A literal interpretation would suggest that Don is Napoleon here, escaped from his exile (his approaching Roger and getting support in the form of offers from competing agencies), has gotten back on his game (the Philip Morris invasion, the Sally and Peggy makeups), and will now face his Wellington…the thing is, the only person who might possible be Wellington here is Ted and look at his sorry state. I can’t imagine anyone else serving in that capacity. Then again, it’s not like Weiner has ever been literal. Waterloo could be the name of a new toilet the agency scores a big deal off of based on Don’s creativity.

            • Alice Teeple

              HAHAHA! I would buy a Waterloo toilet.

              That said, I could see the company itself finding its own Waterloo. The administration thinks it’s on top of its game with the IBM technology. The fact of the matter is, for all the company’s supposed advancement, it’s about to lose one of its larger clients, and its creative team is unified in discontent. Without a solid creative team to execute the actual advertising, SCP may find itself in the Napoleon position. In season one, Don said that he turned down a job with (was it Grey? McCann?) because it got too big for itself and sacrificed creative. That has come full circle for SCP in the nine years since: they’ve sold their soul to the devil multiple times and got rid of the soul of the company. I don’t necessarily think it’s Don, but he is certainly the biggest cog.

              Don’s allies might not all be stockholders, but they are the people who execute the work. It’s beginning to look more like Metropolis: “they’re driving us underground” was a great allusion to the idea that without the skilled labor (and now their star copywriter in the nuthouse), they are about to collapse as a company.

    • Travelgrrl

      When Don and Peggy were dancing, she first demurs, the reluctantly takes his hand and stands up, then very stiffly enters his arms, But eventually as they twirl, she sort of slumps and rests her head on Don’s shoulder. She RELAXES, for the first time in ages.

      Little Peggy with the Mom and the sister and the church and her girlish dresses has morphed into someone who (like the men she emulates) thinks nothing of smoking and drinking and barking orders all day long. She is never, ever relaxed.

      Moss and Draper’s acting in that moment (his somewhat surprised reaction, then his face before he kisses the top of her head) was wonderful, and I truly thought it was the end of the show. (Did you see that Bob Benson was in his office alone, facing the wall in the wider shot?) but the final scene made a fantastic one-two punch.

      • P M

        I thought that was just their reflection!

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Yeah, I thought it was another couple doing the same dance next door, but the next re-watch confirmed it was their reflection.

        • Travelgrrl

          Screenshot, anyone? I may just have Bob Benson on the brain.

          I lurve him, and I hope he gets that mansion and fabulous beard and a terrific partner!

          • P M

            Where does that leave the beard?

            • Travelgrrl

              Better off than many a gal in those days, what with the domineering husbands and whatnot.
              And as he says, he does have a pleasing face! I wouldn’t mind waking up to that every morning, even if I wasn’t getting down with it every night.

          • Gatto Nero

            Check out the “Inside the Episode” video on the AMC website. It’s not a reflection.

            • FibonacciSequins

              I just watched it. It’s clearly their reflection. Pause the video as soon as you see the long shot and you’ll see it’s Don and Peggy, dancing.

            • Gatto Nero

              I’ll have to rewatch!

            • Travelgrrl

              Oh I will! Thank you.

    • Doris Allen

      I’m so pleased that Bob Benson is doing well. I like that the auto executive spoke of having Detroit “wired.” I imagine that means that auto execs there are like kings and the cops don’t interfere with them. Bodes well for Benson’s love life.
      Bob is going to Buick and Roger is thinking of courting Buick, so Bob could become a valuable inside man for SC&P and Roger may be forced to make a rapprochement with him.
      Joan’s dress was seriously bad in that scene. The fashions back then were so bad, so toooo much. Too much fringe, too short — Pete’s girl looked like she was channeling Shirley Temple in that walkaway in her baby doll look — too much of the wrong color.
      The clothes all look like bad costumes.

      • Daphnemcl

        Bob Benson is a user. I was glad to see the story line, but he’s creepy.

    • appliquer

      Great episode and great review!

    • girlsaturday

      As soon as Bob pulled out the ring I shouted ‘No Joan, don’t spend your life as somebody’s beard!’ …and then I had to explain to my boyfriend what a beard is.

      • MilaXX

        I never expected Joan to accept that offer for one minute. Frankly I was surprised that Bob thought she would.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Bob, sadly, doesn’t always have the best social judgment. Like TLo said in their essay on him, about how you end up emotionally stunted if you can’t come out of the closet.

          • Gatto Nero

            It seemed like a desperate act. He’d just come from rescuing the beat-up GM exec from arrest by entrapment. And he’s worried about his future in the business. I think he cares for Joan and her son, but this was a sad and misguided move.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Yes — and his “I am offering you more than anyone else ever will” line was just appalling.

            • L’Anne

              I cringed at that, but in a certain way, he is. Even if she were to meet someone, fall in love, he’s thrilled to be a father to Kevin, they marry, there’s a good chance he won’t want her working. There’s a good chance he’ll expect to assume her wealth as family assets. Bob out and out told her she could keep everything– her job, her money, her property, and he’ll help support her, help parent her son, she can keep her job (or not) as she desires, stay in her place (or not) if she desires, be with him if she desires. In exchange, she gives him respectability. They both can give each other companionship and friendship and support. I think it seems he does love her, just not passionately or romantically. He sees her situation through realistic eyes and views it rather similarly to his own. Two people who just don’t have that many realistic choices for finding that romantic love partner they deserve and are best served by a companionate, supportive relationship.

              I felt sadder for him. She tells him he deserves better– to make that love match. She has to know that in meaningful ways, he CAN’T.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              I don’t agree. When it comes down to it, he was telling her, in absolute terms, that no one will ever offer her genuine romantic love/devotion with respect. It’s not an outlandish thing for her to look for that — yes, even near forty. It’s insulting, in fact, to say that it’s impossible.

            • L’Anne

              I think you have to consider it through his eyes. I think he’s seen her as someone who likes him and enjoys being with him for who he is. And how he reads her situation– older, striking out at love with respect, a nice but small apartment cramped with a toddler and 2 adult women. I think he thinks that maybe the best partnership is one that’s supportive, friendly, stable, and (yes) respectful. I think he does respect her, even if how he expressed himself says otherwise.

              And historically speaking, a woman in her position really did have little chance for making a relationship with all of the following: love, respect, unconditional support for her child, ability to keep her own wealth and property, ability to keep her job or leave it by her own choice, and being able to determine for herself where she’d live. With Joan being so much about control, that is the biggest thing, next to support, that Bob is offering to her. The one thing he can’t give her is romantic, passionate love. And that is the one thing she notes that she wants that he canNOT provide.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Oh, I think that’s definitely how he sees it. And it’s really sad he can’t fathom anything better for himself or her, that he doesn’t see the insult.

              I was deliberately focusing on her reasonable expectation of “love and respect,” not everything else you listed as one big package. I don’t think Joan would refuse to settle for anything less than all the things you mentioned. Yes, control is important to her; but if she’s really worried about dying single (the way Peggy is, and we haven’t seen the same signs of major unhappiness with Joan), then she would settle — not necessarily for Bob, but if it meant maybe giving up her career or moving somewhere else, then that’s a consideration she can make. But she said clearly “I want love” — not everything else you mentioned.

            • L’Anne

              Part of why he can’t fathom it for himself is that it is illegal. NY had sodomy laws until sometime in the 70s or 80s.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Yeah, I’m not blaming him for a lack of imagination. He just wants to toe the line and succeed according to the rulebook. I really understand that.

            • L’Anne

              Yeah– they’ve done the gay characters very interestingly. Sal’s deep closet life who tries to live the standard heteronormative narrative. Kurt gets a pass because he’s from Europe so he’s already an “other.” And now Bob– kind of out, but still unable to “be.”

            • FibonacciSequins

              And to be fair, I don’t think Joan has acted in the past like someone whose priority was romantic love. It’s not outrageous that Bob would think Joan too would see this as a beneficial arrangement.

            • L’Anne

              Absolutely. I do think there was a haze in s. 2 that she was in love with Greg, but I was never sure what the foundation was about with them. Did they love each other? Was he entranced by her sexiness? She with his MD? Of course, after her experiences, I wouldn’t be surprised if she decided to switch from the right moves to get to the suburbs as a housewife and instead look for love. But she is so often played as pragmatic and in control, so I can see why Bob would think she’d find his offer of support, friendship, and a kind of companionate love appealing, especially since he can’t have the romantic passionate love for himself.

            • tallgirl1204

              Absolutely. She has always been strategic in her personal alliances.

            • VirginiaK

              I’ll have to watch it again but as I remember it, his proposal is more ungracious than it has to be — does he ever say he cares for her, loves being with her, loves her companionship, anything like that? doesn’t he mostly point out the career needs of his own the marriage would fulfill, and tell her she’s not likely to do better? AsTLo have pointed out, his narcissism shines through too much, which includes the idea of not really valuing the other person for her separate personhood.

              One can imagine, or knows about, or has even experienced, a gay man expressing deeply loving, caring, valuing feelings toward a woman, even if he does not respond to her sexually. This wasn’t that.

            • P M

              I thought of it as a knee-jerk reaction: he faces (or thinks he’s facing) a threatening situation, and does some social engineering to handle it. Also, I’m really sad for Bob that he couldn’t think of anyone else to ask. Even Sal had Kitty, a sweet, naive woman that he’d never felt he could confide in.

              I wonder what gay men in particular would have thought of a woman like Kitty: would they feel guilty that this person was being decieved? Or would they shrug and call it a necessary farce?

            • Gatto Nero

              That’s like asking what straight women would think about a particular thing.

            • P M

              I know, I know, my bad. ETA: I really regret asking that. I apologize.

            • Gatto Nero

              No need to apologize! I was just commenting.

    • http://jw452.tumblr.com/ The Sound of One Man Laughing

      Seems like Don got into advertising and selling from having to lie to everyone about who he was. Would a “happy ending” mean he gets into work that has some meaning?

      I would love it if Matt Weiner would film two finales: one the real one, and one a fan-service happy ending to air before it, where Joan and Roger are together with her mother raising the baby, Don reunites with Megan/Betty/insertnamehere, Harry is president of NBC, the Army sends Don a letter says “Don’t worry, we laughed off that Dick Whitman stuff on the day of, happy landings!”, Sally’s Grandpa comes back (No, I was just taking a world cruise!) and marries Peggy’s mom happily, etc. I know he’d never do it, but Matt could do a great send-up of TV drama conventions.

      • P M

        You know what that reminded me of? Tim Burton’s film ‘Big Fish’, the only Burton I have any great liking for. The end of the film has the son carrying the father in his arms as he’s dying, naming each and every person the father has ever loved, surrounding the man as he dies. What a lovely way to go.

    • P M

      Joan got a beautiful moment alone, being framed by her door. She had an awful moment, but the photography was so beautiful!

      • Daphnemcl

        That was an awful moment for her wasn’t it! Bob Benson telling her that he’ll be the best thing she could ever hope to get. OMG! His arrogance is unbelievable. I don’t know why she ever bothered with him. Hopefully she’ll return her loyalties to the Core group.

        • P M

          She told Roger ‘Please don’t hurt him’. Yeah right, Joan. There’s no way Bob isn’t going to be hurt.

          • Daphnemcl

            I don’t have a feel for what is in store for Bob. I know he’s a user, creepy, hurt Pete and was involved with Pete’s mother getting killed, but I’m not sure how his association with Buick can both benefit the Core team yet hurt him at the same time.

        • Gatto Nero

          I took it to mean that Bob thought this was the best *he* could hope for, too, given that he can’t come out as a gay man and succeed in his chosen career. His options are limited, and he sees Joan’s situation (living with her mother in a small apartment) that way, too. He clearly cares for Joan and her son, and though the proposal was sad and misguided, I didn’t think it was driven by arrogance.

          • not_Bridget

            Yes, Bob really cares for Joan. Just not the way she needs….

          • Daphnemcl

            He said two things back to back that made me cringe. It was arrogant when he insinuate that no one will ever love and respect her enough to marry her.

      • L’Anne

        And it mirrored Trudy’s… two women in fancy dresses with blue tones are framed by the home spaces as a man in their lives walks out.

    • Not applicable

      Uncles: I thought Bonnie’s dirty feet (from wearing sandals in the city) was almost like a shout out to this blog, as you’ve mentioned this more than once in the fashion blog. You gotta think the producers of this show know about you… :)

      • MartyBellerMask

        I loved that! Haha!

    • Janice Bartels

      Two more thoughts today, Peggy in a pink nightgown, changing the status quo (for the better…please) and Roger. I hate Cutler’s methods, but he brings out the best in Roger’s business instincts.

    • Jo Bleaux

      Have we seen this hairdo on Joan before?

      • MilaXX

        It’s a very pretty look on her, no?

        • Jaialaibean

          Well … to be honest, I think it makes her look old, in a scene in which another character is baldly pointing out her advancing age.

          • Glammie

            Yeah, she did look older, but I’m not sure it was the hair, per se. I think she was filmed to look that way and it looks like she’s also lost weight and her face is looking thinner.

          • MilaXX

            Odd, I thought it made her look much more youthful than her tight updo she wears to work. This was much more youthful and softer looking.

        • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

          I love it, but I’m biased. I’ve been styling my hair like lately.

      • P M

        Kind of – look for Joan in her thanksgiving with Bob and Roger episode. Much the same hairstyle .

      • ashley

        and when she had her hair down for that weekend chat they all had (minus don) about going public

      • Jo Bleaux

        In any case it looks great on her!

    • beebee10

      You guys….thanks. It’s like sharing the show with my best friends: we agree almost ALL the time! And we don’t agree, it’s fun.
      That last scene with Pete getting ketchup on his face and Don and Peggy tolerating and appreciating him, was so perfect about how these relationships are long and steady.

    • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

      Yep, I teared up during My Way. Also, I love that the framing of the final scene made Burger Chef look exactly like a cutaway view inside a child’s drawing of a house. Perfection.

      “gay men like him (status-seeking, a bit narcissistic -”Does my face please you?” – and conformist) are notorious for never really seeing their gal friends as fully realized people.” This scene/analysis made me especially sad because I had a falling out with a friend who had this type of personality/life experience (corporate, repressed atmosphere, surrounded by gym bunnies) and part of him blowing up at me was him saying, “You used to be just as shallow as I am!” and I realized he’d never seen me as my own person. To quote the emcee – life is disappointing- forget it.

      I was surprised Roger wasn’t more affected by Joan mentioning Bob’s proposal. I think she was hoping for some slight response there. Her response to Bob was perfect though, because Bob said some shitty things to her before she turned him down (can’t remember the exact phrasing but something along the lines of not being able to do better which one simply does not tell the beautiful Joan Holloway Harris).
      One episode left this year. Oof.

      • AndreasMD

        Great point about the child’s drawing. Peggy drunken-stumbling idea can only be a breakthough (and like any solid Draper strategy, it is born out of personal experience), I mean, is there any traditional family left on the show? Cosgrove’s? Ted’s? I’m not so sure. Even Betty is abandoning the idea and talking politics!

        • FibonacciSequins

          Lou’s family, perhaps? Which kind of says it all.

          • Jaialaibean

            But his wife is such a card!

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          Ken and Ted are still in traditional families. Betty saying something during an angry fight and actually taking action are two seperate things

          • AndreasMD

            That’s very true. It is still a facade though. Henry isn’t the father of those kids, after all.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              That’s whey I didn’t include Betty in the list of characters still in traditional families. I still don’t think Betty is going to run for anything. She’s too traditional to take on that kind of a role. She talked about it, but until she actually does something, what she said doesn’t mean anything. We’ve all said things in anger we don’t mean/don’t actually intend to do.

      • P M

        I actually had a different response to the ‘face being pleasing’ line you mentioned above. I was on the arranged marriage circuit a few years ago (and got on that 3-ring circus – a different story) and this line used to come up: Do you like the way I look? The way I interpreted it, and the way I interpreted this line, was that men were insecure about people liking them, about people finding them attractive, particularly in a situation (arranged marriage or sham gay-beard marriage) where attraction wasn’t the primary focus / reason for people to get together. I was asked quite often to consider men whom I frankly didn’t consider attractive, and was in fact criticised for taking looks into consideration for a prospective partner.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Joan mentioned Bob’s marriage proposal to Roger? I missed that line. Are you sure?

        • SunDevilWitch

          No, not at all from my recollection. It was all about business.

    • Jaialaibean

      Draper, Campbell & Olson … I love it. That was a sweet, sweet ending, but it made me wonder if the show is moving us out of an era in which people found their center of gravity in their homes (as Duck once recommended that Pete do) and into one in which the workplace replaces both home and family, a la “Murphy Brown.” In that way, it’s also kind of sad. None of these people has a viable home life, or probably ever will. We can hope for that for Peggy and maybe even Pete, but in all likelihood … nah.

      • Jaialaibean

        And going back to the home for that sense of personal fulfillment sure isn’t doing the job for Ted, who has tried the hardest at it.

        • SunDevilWitch

          Do you think Ted will come back for Peggy? It sure seems like he’s totally broken without her. That’s the 16 year old in me talking.

          • Jaialaibean

            I’m secretly (well, not so secretly) hoping for that, but it’s hard to think of a way he could do that that wouldn’t be cheesy or too much of the traditional “riding in on a white horse” role that she (rightly) despises. Maybe Peggy will instead rescue him.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Co-workers as surrogate family on television really gets going in a big way in the 1970s “Mary Tyler Moore,” “Taxi,” “M*A*S*H,”

    • Yolanda

      That last scene of Don, Peggy and Pete at the Burger Chef table made me remark, “They ARE a family.” What a great ending if they do forge ahead with their own agency. A mighty force indeed. And I, like so many, still hold out hope that Sal will make one last appearance before the show’s finale.

      • cateinTO

        Loved that scene.

      • Jaialaibean

        It’s also a callback to the scene with Peggy, Pete and Ted celebrating over Ocean Spray last season … but it appears that nexus has crumbled. Even Pete and Ted no longer relate to each other the way they once did.

        • Chris

          Pete, Peggy and Don have all taken their knocks and come back up fighting. I understand why Pete can’t relate to Ted now, he has just folded. That “family” at the Burger Chef table are all survivors. I really hope Ted turns it around. I used to enjoy his character so much. It was nice to have an optimist in the bunch.

          • Jaialaibean

            Me, too. Ted’s positive energy (when he had any) could make things seem so exciting and fun.

    • Christopher S. Johnson

      I’m going to have to say that Don and Peggy scene could have been great, but, for me, it was irretrievably marred by the choice of song. Sinatra’s ‘My Way’ is sung not by the young, callow Sinatra, but by the older and viler Sinatra, and the attitude of the lyrics will always exemplify the anti-community, solipsistic individualism that eventually became acendant 11 years later with the onset of the Reagan era.

      • Joe Mitstein

        Well, there you go. Ambiguity in Mad Men. Who knew?

        • Christopher S. Johnson

          Yes, I could be more generous, and allow for the possibility that those unpleasant associations were intended. No one else seems to have even brought it up, though.

          • brooklynbull

            Yeah, I think the unpleasant associations were indeed intended. I was in my 20s when that song came out, and I remember loathing it – self-satisfied grandiosity, to me very much in the Sinatra mold – and yet always getting a kick out of the ‘finale.’ But it also has some strange power – all kinds of singers have been drawn to it, without parent attention to the implications of the lyrics.

            • 3hares

              I swear I just read recently that Sinatra himself hated the song.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        I think that was kind of the point. Weiner has been talking for years about how the ’60s ended with “My Way” as the #1 song, putting the lie to the idea that the decade was all about the baby boomers and their effect on politics and culture. The conservative part of American culture reasserted itself after the Summer of Love and the show has been subtly addressing that.

        • decormaven

          Yes, for every hippie protest song, there were performances from groups like Up With People. “My Way” was completely appropriate for this time period.

          • Joe Mitstein

            The Cowsills were more popular than Jimi Hendrix, e.g.

            • L’Anne

              A shondeh.

            • decormaven

              Remember that Jimi Hendrix once was the opening act for the Monkees. Mr. DM was there!

          • Christopher S. Johnson

            Of course it was appropriate. It may have even been brilliant. I merely point out that I just can’t be weepy-eyed, like so many others in these comments are, for a scene with that song as the backdrop.

            • L’Anne

              I wasn’t weepy either. Hate that song.

            • ybbed

              I thought “corny”. My husband said, “Anything done to that song is corny.”

            • suzq

              There’s a delicious irony with that song. It didn’t make me weepy at all. I began chuckling. On the surface of things, Don and Peggy appear to be doing things “their way.” But really, they are just responding to stimuli at this point. Neither one has really taken charge of life.

              Also, “Have it Your Way” = Burger King. I remember Burger Chef but I don’t remember their tag line. I just looked it up. In the 1970’s, it was “We go all out to please your family.” Peggy’s is better. Much better.

            • FibonacciSequins

              I immediately thought of Burger King’s “have it your way” campaign, and decided in my head that at some point in her future, Peggy came up with it. :)

            • P M

              Which is a campaign that probably sprung up after an argument Peggy had.

            • FibonacciSequins

              Probably!

            • not_Bridget

              “The thing about irony is that not everybody gets it.” (Ray Wiley Hubbard, introducing his “Screw You, We’re From Texas.”)

          • Pennymac

            OMG–I totally forgot that I saw Up With People live in person!

            • tallgirl1204

              one of my co-watchers was a member of Up With People!

            • SunDevilWitch

              So did I! They played our high school when I was 8 or 9 years old. I felt so grown up in my side-button, high-collar lavender ruffled shirt and prairie skirt! God, that memory just flooded back from 30+ years ago.

      • Daphnemcl

        You’re getting way ahead of what’s actually happening here. This scene is a moment in time, and it has some historical accuracy. There was a dichotomy in music on the radio back in 1969. There were the sentimental songs of our parents generation mixed up with rock and roll from the younger generation. And “My Way” was a song that was playing alot. It was appropos to see Don and Peggy respond to the emotion and message of that song. Sinatra, Peggy, Don all experienced the life of hard knocks.

        • Christopher S. Johnson

          I suppose if I were capable of shedding a tear for Sinatra, I’d be capable of shedding a tear for that scene. But I’m not. And as far as historical appropriateness, I’m sure you are correct, but we are watching the show in 2014, not 1969. We can’t unknow what we know about subsequent decades.

      • Ginger Thomas

        It’s always seemed a bit silly to me for a young person to sing “My Way.”

        • Christopher S. Johnson

          Oh, absolutely, and it was the perfect song for Sinatra at that age.

    • MarinaCat

      Mad-fact-after-binge-rewatching: It was Lou Avery who dropped the bomb on Roger and Don that SCDP lost the Vicks account, in the airport on their way to Chevy last season.

      • suzq

        Losing Vicks on account of Pete, if I’m not mistaken.
        Avery probably thinks this is the gang that couldn’t shoot straight.

        • MarinaCat

          Yes, it was right after Pete ran into his father-in-law at the “party house” with Bob Benson.

      • sweetlilvoice

        Wow….good catch!

    • greenmelinda

      In the beginning of the show, Joan was someone who defined herself by men, and their desire of her. We’ve seen her gradually shed her need for male approval as she takes ownership of her life.

      In order to get the partnership, she prostituted herself to a Jaguar dealer. She’s blossomed into an account exec on her own accord—beginning with Avon, a definitively female brand. Last night, we watched as she turned down Bob Benson’s marriage-of-convenience proposal designed to help him rise through the ranks of General Motors. The automobile is definitively male, as drilled into us through advertising, through the toys given to us when we are young. Not to mention, here is Bob Benson rising through the ranks of Big Auto, a “lady” playing (and ostensibly winning) in the most male-dominated of all the male-dominated industries.

      Joan is done putting her fate into the hands of a man, any man. For the first time, she may really truly believe in love as love, not security, or as a means to an end. She’s doing it her way, on her terms. Screw the car. She’s going to walk. She may not know where she’s going, but that’s ok. No one does. But she’s no longer looking for some dude to lead the way.

      • suzq

        This may have been the first time Joan has really articulated what she wants in a relationship.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Possibly even to herself. Go Joan with your sudden self-realization!

      • DollyMadisonWI

        It goes back to the comment she gave to Don “I was raised to be admired” (something like that). Admiration is pretty much hands off. It’s removed. Now Joan wants intimacy, not the “appearance” of a marriage like it was with Greg.

    • Paula Pertile

      So much to process in this episode.
      I’m totally confused about the whole ‘car’ client thing, and who’s played who and where it all stands. Just can’t keep it straight.
      The last scenes – wow. wow.
      So much to talk about in the style post! That blue dress, Trudy!, Peggy’s fab sleeveless orange thing, … can’t wait.
      And DCO, YES!!

    • cateinTO

      I love the way the feel of the show has shifted so much to that gritty 1970s cop drama feel — the emotional grime of the scene in the cop car echoed by the feel of the cos cob house with Pete’s regret and ire.

      • Alice Teeple

        Yeah, it felt like an episode of Kojak! I like the shift.

    • Gatto Nero

      That pivotal scene with Peggy and Don brought me back to “The Suitcase,” too. Stunning all around.
      And I know I’m jumping the gun here, but as soon as I noticed Peggy’s orange dress and Don’s orange striped tie, I knew they would patch things up.

      • siriuslover

        In my sleep last night (I know, this is how obsessed I’ve become), I remembered that Peggy had nothing in the dry cleaning bag on her door. I wonder if that has any meaning, or if it means simply that she had an accident and had to wear a different dress.

        • T C

          Need a screen shot, it looked to me as either transparent/empty or something white, perhaps a white shirt. Not certain why she would not have discarded the empty as recycling was not done. The moment was too short to fully capture.

          • decormaven

            There’s a bag over a hanger. Nothing is on the hanger. [Saw this on replay.]

    • MilaXX

      OMG! I’m rewatching now. The scene where the guy ask Kenny about his kid and he says, “…you really got to keep an eye on him.” and everyone looks around the room awkwardly trying noto comment on his eye patch. I died. Nice little comedic touch there.

      • brooklynbull

        I noticed that also, but I saw Ken’s reaction differently. He wanted to be a writer, he has a wonderfully warped sense of irony – that tap dance! – and he made the “eye” reference deliberately. He’s working and doing well at a job that ruined his vision.
        That’s a hell of a tap dance.
        MM writing is, simply – wonderful.

        • girlsaturday

          I saw it as Kenny taking the (very well deserved) opportunity to make the Chevy people squirm.

          • brooklynbull

            Yes to this’

    • golden_valley

      Was it only me? I thought the discussion of families was forced and a little untimely. I thought the whole Don & Peggy scene was also forced and was a very conscious attempt to re-enact the wonderful scene of “The Suitcase.” It just seemed to me like Weiner was thinking “OMG I’ve got to get my points across right now in case people decide not to watch the second half of the finale season.”

      • not_Bridget

        It’s just you…

      • Gatto Nero

        I think that family has been a key underlying theme for much of the series, so I didn’t see this as forced. The last episode had similar overtones, and Weiner said (in a video on the AMC website) that it was about the question of who makes up a family. In fact, since so many characters have been through a crisis concerning family, and the concept of “belonging” (Don, Peggy, and Pete primarily, but others as well), it seemed fitting to me.

      • Daphnemcl

        Well it is a story. And stories flow. So the development here is to create and/or re-establish the real bond that these people have with each other. Then through this very real bond, they forge a new agency (or takeover of the current one). And of course the theme of family has been driven home each episode, which I think is leading to Don finding his way back to having a real family in the end with his kids and a new wife (Neve).

      • VeryCrunchyFrog

        It’s NOT just you.

      • ybbed

        Its not just you.

    • MarinaCat

      I’m finding Joan and Roger’s relationship particularly interesting. I never would have imagined Roger to take that tone that he did with her (regarding Chevy) and be so dismissive of her in a way he might be with Pete. He treated her like just another under-partner, telling her to either spill or get out of his office. Maybe it’s happened before, but I’ve not seen Roger act that way with her.

      • suzq

        Not really. He found out Joan knew the source of the info and then realized he had been tipped off as well (in the steam room.) His dismissiveness was really just him putting two and two together.

        • DeniseSchipani

          Is that what it was? The McCann guy knew … what? They’re not getting the business, are they? I thought the exec told Bob that GM was taking it “in house”?

          • P M

            It may be the case that McCann was also part of the ‘audition’ so to speak: they think they’re in the running too. So now, the clock may be ticking on who gets to Buick first. I think.

          • Zoey

            The McCann guy was worried that they(SCP) could wind up with Buick – I think is what he said.
            I didn’t follow why McCann would be worried about that if Bob went in house. Or how Roger could have ruined that for Bob.

        • MarinaCat

          Hmm, I don’t think that’s exactly right (or my statement wasn’t clear.) When Joan went into Roger’s office, he was immediately angry and dismissive because she knew about Chevy and she didn’t share it with him, at which point, he told her to tell him what she knew or “get out.” That’s the conversation I’m referring to. It was *after* that, that Joan shared the details and Roger put it all together. THAT part of the converation wasn’t really the point of my comment.

      • NeenaJ

        She ran to tell Cutler first, instead of him. That had to hurt. His delivery was everything.

      • Daphnemcl

        Yes, they’ve reverted to this business or even brother-sister relationship. I can see the resentment justified on Joan’s part and why she might be a little cold to Roger, but I don’t see why Roger should be so cold with her.

    • Tee

      Olsen, Draper and Campbell.

      • L’Anne

        How ’bout Olsen, Campbell and Draper for the logo?

        • Zoey

          OCD? We care about every little detail!

        • Victoria Ramirez

          Gotta be Draper, Campbell, Olsen. Ain’t no way Petey’s letting a lady’s name go before his.

    • Joanna

      Few things- Megan on the plane, flying away from her marriage mirrors Betty flying to Reno. All that was missing was Roy Orbison and baby Gene.

      Part of me thinks the Manson stuff is not going to be a direct thing, but perhaps a violent catalyst that breaks apart the marriage, like the Kennedy assassination did for the Betty marriage.

      I thought the Bob Benson stuff was very interesting. The Chevy exec said his wife was “understanding”, which I assume means she knows, so Bob was basically looking for a wife who understood him, too. And he went after the best darn beard he could find, a paragon symbol of heterosexuality. Stan Rizzo couldn’t grow a beard that’s as good as Joan.

      Also, Kartheiser continues to be a gift. “Will you try on your wares…slowly?”

      Also, the Don/Peggy scene is the best. They have the best chemistry on the show and their scenes together are always great.

      • Joe Mitstein

        >The Chevy exec said his wife was “understanding”, which I assume means she knows

        See Craig, Larry.

        • Joanna

          Craig quote of choice: “The American people already know that Bill Clinton is a bad boy – a naughty boy. I’m going to speak out for the citizens of my state, who in the majority think that Bill Clinton is probably even a nasty, bad, naughty boy.”

      • Janice Bartels

        Stan Rizzo couldn’t grow a beard that’s as good as Joan.
        Best comment of the day! You win the Internet!

      • P M

        “Stan Rizzo couldn’t grow a beard that’s as good as Joan.” LOL

      • ItAin’tMe

        Especially because he said “wares” instead of “purchases.” Wares are what you have to sell.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        “Part of me thinks the Manson stuff is not going to be a direct thing, but perhaps a violent catalyst that breaks apart the marriage, like the Kennedy assassination did for the Betty marriage.”

        Yep, you’ve got it. Don orders her to come home after the murders and she refuses. End scene…and marriage.

    • http://www.nouvellegamine.com Jordan Wester

      “And can we just skip ahead to the part where SC&P is a smoking ruin and Draper, Campbell & Olson has just opened its doors to business? Isn’t it time?”
      Yes, absolutely. Pete and Peggy have looked to Don as a father figure from the beginning. In fact some of the best foreshadowing that Don was a terrible father was from how he treated them. It would be great to see those two relationships salvaged and forged into another family for all of them. All three of them might even fill the holes in their souls a little instead of just, as Pete put it so wonderfully in season 5, “some temporary bandage on a permanent wound.”

    • Joe B.

      Perspective – I’ve watched the series (as I’m sure everybody on here has) since season one. But something resonated about last night’s episode and it took me a second viewing to figure it out. I was born in 1965, so I would be more or less the same age as Tammy and Kevin. That’s one thing. Although I do remember the 1968 Democratic convention from last season – There only three TV channels – so but I’m starting to really remember some other things so looking forward to the moon landing. …. Anyway When Peggy told Don that she just turned thirty, I realized that my mother was 26 in 1969 and that would make Peggy 75 today. And when peggy suggests that the BurgerChef ad could be about a working mom and Don asked “but what profession?” and Peggy said you are around working women all of the time (something like that) I thought of my mother who started as a telephone operator at AT&T and eventually was in Senior Management at SBC. And my dad would have been the type to minimize her job, because he was a professional (ironically, working the computer room at his company) she eventually earned a salary twice his. This is the monumental moment, Peggy will be the Boss at some point, but there are growing pains.

      • P M

        To your mom: Well done, ma’am. Well done!

      • suzq

        My mother worked at GE. She took two months of maternity leave (one month before, one month after) and then it was back to work until 1975, when she went on disability.

      • Mismarker

        Yep. My mother was 29 in 1969. She stayed at home with my oldest brother until he started school and then she went back to work as a receptionist. She had two more children and, while working and raising us, went back to school to earn two advanced degrees, eventually ending up as chair of the business department for a large community college, until retiring for health reasons. While I love my mom’s story, I realize it is not so unusual. We all have the benefit of hindsight when discussing the role of women (specifically, mothers) in the workforce. Don will have his eyes opened eventually, right?? Though, I think Peggy is already helping him in this regard.

        • T C

          Perhaps. I encountered old-school execs who hired women based on their fluff factor well into the 1990s. And I knew women who used their non-office skills to attain VP slots under these same men.

      • ItAin’tMe

        Oh! Did he say, “but what profession?” I thought he said “that’s depressing.”

        • Joe B.

          Wow. You may be right – Maybe I was projecting.

          • ItAin’tMe

            Not sure. I thought it would be typical for Don to think that mothers, or maybe even women, working was depressing.
            Guess I need to rewatch.

          • Mismarker

            No, he said, “What’s her profession?” You weren’t projecting!

        • ShaoLinKitten

          Didn’t he say both?

          • ItAin’tMe

            Not sure. Need a rewatch.

          • VirginiaK

            yes

      • ItAin’tMe

        Joe, I watched the show again. He did ask “What profession?” So you are correct. Peggy answered that Don is surrounded by women who work, and then Don said that was too sad to use (as the strategy). So I guess that’s where I got “depressing.”

        • Joe B.

          So we were both right. lol

    • asympt

      A little detail I didn’t see anyone mention (maybe I just missed it): the show Pete blows Bonnie off for in favor of stewing at Trudy’s house is “Oh! Calcutta!”. That’s a very specific show, known in its day pretty much entirely for being That Show People Are Naked On Stage All The Time In, a show about and catering to people’s interest in sex. (Not really all the time, but a lot, and very much the selling point; reviews were tepid and tended to call it sophomoric. Unlike “Hair”, which had one famous scene with brief nudity that wasn’t primarily sexual, though it did give people an excuse to see naked actors.)

      Going to see Calcutta would have been pretty much an act of foreplay, and standing Bonnie up for it was different than standing her up for just any show. That’s why she was so incredulous when she said “You want me to see ‘Oh! Calcutta!’ by myself??”

      • NeenaJ

        Just like Don & Megan went to see “a dirty movie” – in Peggy’s words.

        • Joe Mitstein

          Not just any such movie. The very famous (at the time) “I Am Curious (Yellow)”!

          • Mismarker

            So, instead of taking his wife home to “bone” (yep) after seeing such a movie, Don goes into the office to help Peggy. Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes.

            • L’Anne

              But there was a lot of not sexy at all stuff in it. Like castration and shooting. No wonder he’s still “scandalized,” a fave Francine or SaraBeth line from s. 1 and 2.

            • Mismarker

              I just found Roger Ebert’s review. In part, “It is anti-erotic. Two hours of this movie will drive thoughts of sex out of your mind for weeks. See the picture and buy twin beds.” So, fitting that he ran straight into the arms of Burger Chef and Peggy!

          • Columbinia

            The film was banned in Massachusetts as obscene. It became a court case that went all the was to the US Supreme Court. It was famous in the 1960s battle to end government censorship of books and movies.

    • Lady Bug

      Oh Meredith, “do you want me to get you get in five minutes?” priceless.

      • FibonacciSequins

        Followed up by her winking!

      • Vegas Girl

        Her scenes have quickly become my favorite! Comic relief just when you need it.

        • Lady Bug

          Mine too. Somehow I have a feeling that no matter what happens to the agency, Meredith will outlast them all.

          • Jaialaibean

            … like a cockroach. A big, cute cockroach dressed in baby-doll clothes.

            • L’Anne

              A Meredith Cockroach transformer toy. Complete with oversized barrettes. Coming to a Target near you, Holiday 2014!

            • TheDivineMissAnn

              How very Kafkaesque of you :)

        • aesteve212

          “surprise! There’s an airplane here to see you!” Ok, not a Meredith line, but my favorite Meredith scene. Not a thought in her head, bless her.

          • SunDevilWitch

            I say that anytime I can wedge it in. Fabulous Joan.

    • FibonacciSequins

      “Draper, Campbell & Olson has just opened its doors to business? Isn’t it time?”

      Yessssssssssssss please!

    • ShaoLinKitten

      God I loved this episode. So happy to see Peggy and Don repair their relationship. They need each other. She’s his Work Daughter (in the way some people have a Work Spouse). I hope they remain united. As allies, they could take over the world.

      Also loved how Joanie handled Bob. She was loving but firm with him. It broke my heart a little to hear her say that she’d rather die alone than settle.

      Wondering about Mad Style: Joan, Megan, and the computer lady in the same shade of purple, Bonnie and Peggy in powder blue, Don and Harry in windowpane plaid.

      • ybbed

        Joan and Trudy also in blue.

    • MartyBellerMask

      And once again, casting NAILED IT. Matthew Glave (aka Glen Guglia) was so damn perfect.

      • L’Anne

        He’s brilliant. He did a guest run on NYPD Blue as a mentally ill who confused reality with his fantasies and fractured memories. It was haunting how people could manipulate him and how sympathetic a character he was.

    • joancarol

      Re: The stewardess yanking the privacy curtain at the end of the show gave me chills. It had an ominous finality to it.

      • decormaven

        I got that feeling as well, and thought, “Wait, is the plane going to crash?” I then Googled 1969 plane crashes; how strange to see that in November 1969, there’s a Mohawk Airlines crash in NY. Is that ahead in the story? Just a thought.

        • joancarol

          Oy!

        • DoneAgain

          They were on a TWA flight. You can see the logo. There were no domestic TWA plane crashes in 1969.

          • decormaven

            Yes, I recognize that. I just thought it was coincidental that later in the year, there will be a Mohawk crash- one of Sterling Cooper’s old clients.

      • Laylalola

        Oh, I just thought it was to draw attention to the fact that Megan was sitting in first class.

      • FibonacciSequins

        I thought it signaled finality as in the end of Don and Megan’s marriage.

    • smayper

      I loved the episode, and reading both TLo’s analysis and the insightful discussion here is the highlight of my computer time-wasting relaxation week. I was cringing at Peggy’s nasty smug smiles, so the scene with Don was even more welcome. I know it’s not a romance, but it had so much tenderness — the same quality every other couple in the episode (Joan and Bob, Pete and whatshername, Pete and Trudy (!) Don and Megan – lacked entirely. Like a warm chord surrounded by screechy dissonance. PS, anyone else notice the Hemingway reference? “A Clean Well-Lighted Place” is one of his most nihilistic stories; all about suicide, isolation, drinking, and despair. Also contains the famous “It was all nada,” and lots of repetition of that word….nothing, nothing, nothing — calling back to Don’s “I have nothing and nobody.” Wow.

      • ItAin’tMe

        I noticed the reference to Hemingway’s story, and thought at first that she couldn’t have possibly read the story, or she wouldn’t have referred to it for Burger Chef. Then I thought, maybe she had, after all.

        • smayper

          Good point. She’s not terribly well educated. Maybe it was the writers who just couldn’t resist. But I like to think of her as having a secret reading life, that she can’t share with anyone.

          • L’Anne

            Back in season 2, Bobbie mentions how many books Peggy has, and Pegs regularly did library runs for her mother. But we never actually see her reading– unlike Don, who isn’t terribly educated either (HS drop out, put together some time at City College) but does read (Exodus, Meditations in an Emergency, James Bond, etc.).

            Speaking of Peggy’s family, I’d love to see her sister again.

            • ItAin’tMe

              Yes, Don is an opportunist kind of reader. Whatever he comes by easily. Best of Everything was Betty’s, Exodus was given to him. Portnoy’s Complaint, James Bond, would’ve been at the newstand.

            • Chris

              I thought it was because of his job Don always sees the latest movies and reads the latest books. He needs to know what the public taste is at all times.

            • ItAin’tMe

              That too. I just meant that I don’t see Don Draper haunting bookstores.

            • T C

              Most highrises had a newsstand in the lobby which also sold best sellers, gum, candy and cigarettes. No need to make a separate trip to a bookstore or send a secretary.

            • ItAin’tMe

              Yep. That’s what I said.

            • Glammie

              Yes, I think that’s sort of the excuse, but I also think it’s also meant to be part of Don’s self-made autodidact personality–it’s part of how he’s learned about the world and how to create a persona that fits into it. Another version of reading the hobo code.

          • ItAin’tMe

            Stan, maybe, lent it to her .

          • not_Bridget

            Hemingway was a celebrity author, not some weird arty outsider. I could see Peggy having read some of his stuff….

        • L’Anne

          Actually, Pete says something to her about Hemingway. I didn’t catch Peggy’s face when he said that, because he followed it up with a line “as long as its about mothers.”

          • ItAin’tMe

            I really need to watch this episode again. I remember Pete’s “mothers” comment, but missed the Hemingway.

          • ybbed

            Pete says right after that, “Okay Hemingway…”

    • Tiffany Birch

      Why were Peggy and Don working in Lou’s office (tiki bar!) instead of Peggy’s or Don’s offices? Was that ever addressed or did I miss something?

      • Jaialaibean

        Peggy may have been working there because it was more comfortable, and because that’s where all the liquor was. But symbolically, it probably means that the two of them are working together to take down The Man. They belong there, and he doesn’t.

        • L’Anne

          Sometimes you just want to be around a tiki. (See Vincent Price, Oliver, and Brady Bunch.)

          • Glammie

            There’s a mild Tiki theme this season–Betty’s rumaki is a Tiki bar food. We just need Pete to pick up the Trader Vic’s account.

      • http://www.flickr.com/photos/divine_aphasia/ Constant Cat

        Oh ho! Foreshadowing? Back-shadowing? It IS Don’s old office after all…

      • Malia C.

        Some people (on other forums) think the “no drinking in the office” rule break will come back to haunt Don from that scene. I don’t agree – a month will pass by the time the next episode begins and I doubt Lou Avery will have taken the used glasses to a CSI team for fingerprint and saliva analysis. I think, as others have replied, it’s about setting and symbolism.

        • siriuslover

          I don’t know. This was during work hours (and I think a weekend, too, right?), so the partners would really have to stretch it out. And Peggy doesn’t have to tell anyone anything.

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            Peggy could say she was the one drinking.

        • MarinaCat

          Some people get a bit carried away. Rather than see the scene for what it was, they jump on “Don was drinking in the office on a Sunday and he’ll get fired!” It sort of reminds me of when some folks immediately speculated that Faye Miller’s connected father was going to harm Don after he ended their relationship. It’s not *that* show.

          • Malia C.

            Well said. I won’t deny the thought *initially* crossed my mind but once the scene started to reveal itself, it was so clear that was the least important thing to take away from what we saw. And if you want or need proof of what you’re talking about, oy – go check out the UPROXX post about the closing scene at Burger Chef, where Dustin Rowles painfully tries to connect it to the finale of The Sopranos (three people were sitting at booth in both!). Those people just need to STOP. This show is so nuanced and layered; it will be sorely missed when it is gone.

            • MarinaCat

              Of course Don standing in the office with a glass of booze makes the viewer momentarily shift uncomfortably in their seat. But in retrospect?

              I get itchy when the conversation starts to derail into over analysis. “In season 1, there was a button on Midge’s blouse that ties in with Sylvia’s brooch that mimics Lou’s tie clasp…”

            • Glammie

              Yeah, I hang out here, in part, because a lot of people in a lot of MM forums kind of go off the deep end–I’m sooo sick of hearing about Manson, which I expect to play a fairly minor part in the show when it appears.

      • T C

        All the creative materials for Burger Chef were in Lou’s office. Easier to work in there than to move it all to another office, especially since there is no creative lounge.

      • Uncivil_Servant

        UNLESS – Let us say Peggy lets it slip that the new idea for Burger Chef was made up with her and Don working night/weekend knocking back a few – to Lou when pressed on where the new idea comes from. Then Cutler uses that to remove Don causing the Waterlou watershed moment where people pick sides and the agency then crumbles paving the way for Campbell, Draper, Olsen & Sterling……….

        • Glammie

          Does Peggy ever let anything slip, though? She’s a sphinx.

    • NeenaJ

      Pete drinking rum from that stupid tiki bar in Lou’s office. Lou, “My wife’s a card.”

      Oh Lou, hahahahaha. I’ll pack your bags.

      • Victoria Ramirez

        I could definitely be wrong but I thought he was saying “My wife’s accord.” As in, she picked out the tiki bar.

        • L’Anne

          “A card” is slang from 1911 for a character, a person with a quirky sense of humor, or was prone to jokes. So, yeah she picked out the bar as a joke.

          • Victoria Ramirez

            Thanks! I’d never heard that before.

            • L’Anne

              Every once in a while, being an historian pays off.

            • MarinaCat

              OMG, I’m officially old.

          • decormaven

            I use that term a good bit. Interesting that it is seen as an anachronism.

    • Madwonderwoman

      good ole’ sal and kitty…. I wonder what ever happened to Sal.

    • Jimmy Moriarty

      The real question is what are you lames at SLOB and WHOREnzo gonna do when this highlight of racism and sexism is cancelled?

    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/divine_aphasia/ Constant Cat

      My second favorite scene, beyond the Peggy/Don dance was Joan telling Bob, “I want love, and I’d rather die hoping it happens than make some arrangement.” (Or words to those effect.) The theme seemed to be ‘don’t give up’. On love, career, the ideals that drive you to create your best work and for a better relationship.

      Also: Meagan with the red wine and cig on the plane back tooootttallly made me think of end of marriage Betty. Those were her daily props.

      I didn’t find the dance so sad or hollow, really. Dancing to Sintra’s “My Way” seemed to comment on the double helix of success/failure, failure/success: nothing can really be written off, so long as you stay true to yourself along the way.

      The final shot reminded me of the final shot of the original Burger Chef ad, though tweaked and more open to various ‘families’.

      • Madwonderwoman

        When Betty ends the marriage to Don, the last we see of her is a scene on an airplane, flying off to Nevada for the divorce. Except in that scene, she is holding baby (Eu)gene.

        • L’Anne

          And she has Henry.

          • Madwonderwoman

            Megan has Amy from Delaware.

            • L’Anne

              Was Amy on the plane? I was meaning that Henry actually goes with her to Reno.

            • Madwonderwoman

              Sorry, I misunderstood. I meant simply that they both had a liferaft. The two scenes were eerily similar, I am hoping Megan is out of the picture for good though.

            • L’Anne

              Oh, absolutely. I was just thinking that those scenes were framed so similarly, with the most notable differences being Henry and Gene being in frame. I think we may have a few more eps with Megan, especially if it is over. I wonder how hard she’d push for alimony.

            • ItAin’tMe

              Hard. She likes sipping wine in first class.

            • L’Anne

              Without children, she’s on shaky ground. Don’s affair won’t help him at all, but if her sexual past makes it into court, she’s likely doomed to be cast as a gold-digging failed actress trying to use a successful man to live the life.

            • ItAin’tMe

              She quit a steady job in NY to go to LA with Don. She could use that. In any case, I doubt Don would make her fight for money, unless she’s vindictively tries to take him for everything. And I kinda think she’s done with him anyway. She wants to meet him someplace other than LA? And who’s dipping into her fondue pot?

            • L’Anne

              I wonder about why her acting career hit the skids in CA. Her soap seemed pleased with her and expanded her role. What happened that now she can’t get roles and is acting inappropriately?

              Her moving can be used in different ways. Once he decided to stay in NYC, she could’ve stayed and either talked to her soap or approached the network it was on for another. Her decision to go to CA anyway could constitute spousal abandonment. Its not like they had no home anymore in NYC or that she had a set job in CA lined up.

            • Glammie

              Once there a hint that her role on the soap was expanded because the lead actress was married to the head writer or producer who were interested in swinging with Don and Megan.

              Also, soap-opera acting was kind of well-known for being “bad” and relatively low-paid, though I’ve also heard it’s tough–tons of fast memorization, very few takes. There are some famous actors who came through soaps, but the majority of them plateaued on daytime TV.

            • MarinaCat

              It kind of bugged that she was so happy with herself and her wine in her first class seat. I was never a Megan-hater, but that smugness rubbed me the wrong way.

      • tallgirl1204

        Isn’t it interesting that Joan’s past loves have been arrangements of one kind or another? She wanted the partner, she got him (Roger), she wanted the doctor, she got him. And now she wants love? A big change for our Joanie.

        • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

          I’ve always seen Joan as Lily Bart type, maneuvering for a secure position in life and access to all the finer things but always sabotaging her work at the last moment because she does want love. She wasn’t about to suffer along with Greg when it became clear she’d have neither money nor love. She rejected Roger and all he was offering because he couldn’t just say he loved her. Bob just offered security, status, and respectability but she wants love.

          • Glammie

            Though, unlike poor Lily Bart, Joan is able to work. One of the saddest parts of House of Mirth to me is Lily being unable to hack working in a milliner’s shop–she really seems to have no wherewithal to earn her own living. But it’s an interesting comparison.

            • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

              Well, Joan wouldn’t have turned down working the counter! She worked the counter at that department store even though she was mortified when Pete came skulking in. It was very sad that Lily showed signs of wanting to adjust to her station and develop useful skills, but not really being able to hack it. Joan could hack it.

            • Glammie

              Yeah, Joan has grit. She’s a survivor.

              Hmmm, another Lily Bart comparison–Lane Price–he couldn’t deal with the loss of status and shame. Don, on the other hand, just kind of guts his way through and while he hasn’t revealed *everything* to everybody, he’s come clean in many ways. Presumably everyone knows, after the Hershey’s pitch, that he grew up worse than dirt poor.

      • DollyMadisonWI

        When Joan said that, I could only think of SATC and Carrie telling Mikhail Barishnikov the same thing.

    • Madwonderwoman

      Like most people, I really did enjoy this episode more than all of the remainder of this season and last two seasons. I think the reason is it closed the arcs between the first half of the series, the half where Don was still married to Betty, and the present. It’s as if the every thing of the last six years, since the Kennedy assasination, has been a failure. The new agency is broken, every family bond is broken, every professional relationship is broken. Now that the bonds between Peggy, Don, Pete (and I think Roger) have been healed, I wonder which of the other breaks will heal as well.

      • Jaialaibean

        I’m wondering the same thing. It seems like people are being sorted into life’s relationship winners and losers by the unseen Hand of Weiner. Will Roger be on the loser side with every one of his relationships, or will he find a way to be part of his son’s life? What about self-centered, flawed, but not entirely unloving Betty? Will Ted and Peggy reconnect? What about Ted and Don? Don and Joan? Mainly, though, I’ve thought since the beginning of this season that it would have to be about Don’s effort to re-establish the relationships he has damaged. He’s salvaging some of them, but others may be beyond repair. His reintegration at SC&P is about interpersonal connections more than about the advertising work itself, which he’s been continuing to do (in secret, with Freddie’s aid) all along.

        • ShaoLinKitten

          Funny you should say that… the scene after the Joan/Bob one was Joan and Roger. He said, “Spill the beans or get out!” Not a romantic interlude, but it made me wonder if there is still hope for that relationship. Of the myriad romances we’ve seen them both in over the course of the show, their romance was the most passionate. Yes, he was a shit to her, but maybe he learned something? This show appears to be about redemption. Perhaps this too could be redeemed. Or maybe I’m indulging in wishful thinking.

          • Qitkat

            I hope there’s some redemption for Roger, but I’m not thinking it will come in the form of reconnecting romantically with Joan. Too much water under that bridge. They burned up the screen with their passion in the early seasons, and do know each other very well, but I think Joanie felt burned by both Roger and Don in different ways with the Jaguar debacle. It may have led to her partnership, but relations with Roger have been somewhat strained ever since, haven’t they? With the failed IPO, wasn’t it her, Bert, and Pete, but no Roger, if I recall correctly.

            • ShaoLinKitten

              Yeah, Roger’s arc has been pretty depressing this season. He’s still my favorite character, though. He gets the wittiest lines. The one bright spot in his life seems to be his relationship with Kevin.

            • Qitkat

              Absolutely agree with you, Roger definitely does get the wittiest lines, and it’s always special to see him with Kevin. I just wish there were more of them, but then when did we see Don with his youngest son at all in this season? It’s probably challenging to do much with such young kids. Kevin was so cute with Bob though, such a silly inappropriate gift for that age.

          • Jaialaibean

            Has Roger ever fully realized how he’s been a jerk about anything? For him to get Joan back, it would take that kind of personal leap, and I don’t know if he’s emotionally capable of it. He loves her, but does he ultimately value her that much?

            • ShaoLinKitten

              I think his faceoff with Margaret at the commune may have prodded his conscience a bit. I don’t know if Joan would be bothered with him, though I would love it if he had a realization about his love for her. I fear that Roger is going to die before the series ends. He is not taking care of himself and seems on the fast track to self-destruction. However, I would have said the same about Don last season, and now he seems to have course corrected, so who knows.

            • Jaialaibean

              That would be too sad (but not unlikely)! But at least he has good genes: His mother lived past 90.

    • banga

      Best recap out today, hands down. Thank you.

      • Lady Bug

        Agreed. So glad I found this site!

    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/divine_aphasia/ Constant Cat

      Oh, one more thing I noticed: Bob Benson did a nice little backcheck into biiiitchery. “You’re so lucky” to Joan. ‘You’re fortunate.’ Then, post engagement denial, “Do you want to be a single woman nearing 40 living with a little boy and her mother?” WAY manipulative, weird turnaround. I love me some Benson, but damn that was a harsh turnaround. I can see why he said it… and that produced her amazing speech on love. Great scene.

      • P M

        It was a desperate, heart-breaking scene. And I love Joanie for not being a bitch back to him, and instead being a goddess of wisdom.

        • MartyBellerMask

          YES, THIS.

        • SunDevilWitch

          She handles crazy from men in the absolute classiest, most respectful way. Remember when Lane kissed her and she politely got up, opened the door to the office, then sat back down? Or even the night with the Jaguar exec when he was trying to grab her boobs and she paused him to finish her champagne? WWJD indeed.

      • brooklynbull

        Maybe I am over-interpreting, but did Bob’s expression seems somewhat … ominous as he exited Jones apartment after being turned down? I loved the character/ actor, but Bob has always seemed pretty nuts, even at/his most cheerful/charming. I would hate to see him get into some sort of trouble due to his desperate need to stay in the closet.

        • ybbed

          YES! I noticed his dark expression, really troubling. Ominous is a good word for it.

        • TheDivineMissAnn

          Meredith would marry him in a heartbeat!

          • brooklynbull

            Yes, she would – but good ol’ Bob has always aimed high. Joan is a partner on a profitable business, and a major looker. I read Bob as wanting a more spectacular beard.

            Interesting we’re spending so much time on a character we haven’t even until this late in the season

            • TheDivineMissAnn

              It is interesting! The man is an enigma.

      • Kit_W

        So true. i immediately thought of their previous scene together, where he’s – once again – handing out gifts to her kid an her mother. Flowers for her mom which she, while BEAMING, holds and fondles as if it were a baby in her arms. WAY manipulative is right. It made me question everything he’s done for her, including just hangin’ at the beach with her and her kid way back when.
        He seems to be a clear cut case of ‘To Good To Be True’.
        Even to have as just a close gay friend. I now feel like he recognized Joan’s close proximity to all the partners and was working that aspect from the get go, and then THIS.

    • banga

      I also loved the steam room scene with Roger and the guy from McCann. Do you think that “When we grow up we’re going to kill you and marry your wife.” is foreshadowing as well as witty?

      • greenwich_matron

        Claudius or Oedipus?

      • DeniseSchipani

        I have to watch again. WHAT was the McCann guy trying to tell Roger — what did Roger take away from it? (I’m thinking not much, but he puts it together at the end, when Joan tells him what’s going on with Buick).

      • Qitkat

        So, [kill] SCDP is absorbed or ruined by McCann; [marry] Don is hired by McCann???

        • banga

          I’m thinking McCann acquires SC&P, but Don, Roger, Peggy and some other subset (Pete?Stan?Harry?) break away and form their own agency taking Buick (the wife) with them.

          • decormaven

            Even if Don has to gnaw off his leg to escape the shackle, there ain’t no way he will go to McCann.

            • dalgirl

              Love this visual.

          • Qitkat

            The only reason I thought of Don as “the wife” was the reference a couple of episodes earlier about him being referred to in a partner’s meeting as the one they were paying alimony to (his being paid while on hiatus). But Buick makes more sense in this context maybe.

        • Columbinia

          Roger said when we grow up we’ll kill you [McCann] and marry your wife [take their clients]. It’s not about McCann killing SC et al.

          • Qitkat

            Thanks, this is where a rewatch would have helped, I didn’t recall who said what ;)

            • Columbinia

              I have to watch it twice. Conversations are truncated, one sentence is supposed to limn an entire state of mind or experience and it all happens rapid fire. It took me two or three watchings to figure out the family discussion about Janie running away to the hippie farm and two viewings to half figure out the Crane – Cutler exchange over the agency’s data services. The latter scene seemed to start mid-conversation and I never caught every word. I turn on the closed captioning when I watch. The Roger – McCann exchange was also tough since I didn’t immediately recognize McCann.

      • Columbinia

        That touch of Oedipus was Roger’s contribution to the family theme I think.

    • Aimee_Hackerling

      Hopefully it’ll be Olson, Draper & Campbell. Mea culpa if someone’s already beat me to it!

    • bigeasybridget

      I hope when you review the clothes you address the multitudes of exposed bellies. Between post-coital Don, pre-date Stan, post-shower Don, bare midriff Megan denim outfit. And Clara’s belly was not exposed, but suddenly expectant. And, although it wasn’t exposed, Pete’s belly was very present – kind of accentuated in every scene. Also, most of the featured/taking care of business women were in all solids, where so many men in flux were in plaids. The peripherial women were in florals – but Bonnie’s “last straw – you’re either with me or without me” outfit was floral, but in black-and-white. Look y’all have totally influenced the way I watch this show with an eye for costuming!

      • Susan Velazquez

        Re: Clara! Whoa, that was a surprise for me. I rewatched the scene to make sure she was pregnant and I wasn’t just imagining it. I don’t know if the actress is in RL or if it was a random “even the background characters have lives outside of this”

        • Jaialaibean

          Wasn’t Clara described as being consistently “under” one of the account men in Ken’s rant in a previous episode? I wonder if that might explain her current situation. (I didn’t notice her appearance in this ep, however; I’ll have to rewatch.)

      • Linlighthouse

        Showing Clara pregnant fits into the theme of family, and also Peggy’s statement to Don that he’s surrounded by working mothers.

      • SunDevilWitch

        Ah, and Roger Sterling FTW.

        • bigeasybridget

          Right! I KNEW there was someone else…..

    • janet

      Joan’s hair was hideous .. I am sorry. It is so less red — she has lost yer vavavavoom. In so many ways.

      • ItAin’tMe

        I agree, bad wig. And I hate that dress. Can’t wait to see what Mad Style says about it. But for the first time, I thought Joan was looking old.

        • L’Anne

          Dotted swiss, isn’t it? No one over 13 should wear dotted freakin’ swiss.

          • ItAin’tMe

            Yes, dotted Swiss…with ruffles, no less! And in Virgin Mary blue!

            • L’Anne

              Maybe she couldn’t get a better dress because the Jews close everything on Saturdays?

            • Linlighthouse

              I laughed at that line :)

        • verve

          I liked her hair and the dress (mostly), but it was definitely a lot of Not What We Expect From Joan. Bad hair color…for Joan. Bad dress…for Joan.

        • janet

          SO Little House on the Prairie … I know that “falls” were huge in the time frame (explains Megan’s ever-changing hair….) but the fact taht she sedated her hair (after getting her partnership via sex) is so telling. Loved her reaction to Harry Crane getting a partnership, though … all he did was eff everyone in the place w?his attitude (Harry is such a … a … an a**hole) where as she had to literally eff a client.

    • Dan Wheeler

      I liked seeing Harry Crane finally get a well deserved partnership.

    • jemerson

      Yes! (But that should be Draper, Olson & Cambell, don’t you think? [EDIT: I see I'm not the first to make that observation.]) Love how the receding track of the final shot (with the “family” of Don, Peggy & Pete framed in the Burger Chef window) reprises what we THOUGHT would be the final shot — of Don and Peggy dancing, framed through a doorway and with their reflection on the far left, an image of what might have been in some alternate universe. Also: I want Bob Benson’s multi-colored (madras?) plaid “proposal” jacket.

    • Larry Bouchard

      Best episode of the season.

    • FibonacciSequins

      I like that in his attempt to humiliate/ouster Don, Lou has unwittingly provided the opportunity for Don and Peggy to reconcile their differences, and become a more formidable opponent. Hopefully Lou will end up hoisted with his own petard!

      • Victoria Ramirez

        WaterLou is imminent

        • Cheryl

          WaterLou….that is great!

    • Maryanne525

      Man. When he kissed her on the head when they were dancing…that was perhaps the most intimate act I’ve ever seen Don Draper perform.

      • L’Anne

        Up there with the hand kiss when she initially leaves for CDC.

    • E M

      I’ve a question. Peggy’s hair is definitely becoming darker. Would she have likely been dying her hair during this time period?

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        Sure, why not? I certainly had been doing it for years.

        • not_Bridget

          In the late 50’s, one of my father’s 3 sisters had prematurely white hair–quite striking & lovely on a youngish woman. Years later I realized that the dark haired sisters had white hair, too. But they dyed it!

        • E M

          For some reason I didn’t think it had become commonplace until the later 70s…

    • ItAin’tMe

      So, who is dipping into Megan’s fondue pot?

    • Qitkat

      I don’t dislike Megan, she has tried to follow her dreams, Don has tried to support her in those dreams, they really are two people who never ought to have been married, but found themselves in a situation together where they thought they were meant to be together, regardless of how little they really knew about each other, not an uncommon mistake that people make; I think Don is really sad that this marriage has failed also. The fondue pot thing was funny, not because it has anything to do with Sharon Tate, but because fondue was a huge THING in the late sixties and seventies, I got one as a wedding gift in 1970. It was an important element in entertaining, which speak volumes about Megan considering that California will continue to be her home.

      I loved Don and Peggy’s reconciliation, the journey through arguing, being abashed, finding humor and reconnection of creative minds, and finally the tenderness of the dance scene, but I’m not yet willing to believe it’s better than The Suitcase moments, not without watching both again. It could have been a series ender though, as could the scene in Burger Chef that included Pete. It’s the supreme irony that Peggy is writing commercials to appeal to moms. The table scene with the three of them is monumental in referencing all these people’s secrets, many but I don’t think all of which are known to each other. But I can’t help but feel that Don and Peggy are the ones who have grown, so much more than Pete has. Pete is still petty, vindictive, bitter about his life without his wife and daughter. He let the California sunshine bring out what sunnier personality traits he had, but it was all illusion and temporary, once he is back in the real world, the darker world of NYC and the rest of the agency, he reverts rather quickly to form. I’m not so sure he would be a good team member if Don and Peggy break away to form their own agency. Peggy looked so stunned in the scene where she realized Ted was on the phone, it is clear she has quite a way to go to deal with her emotional attachment to him. He doesn’t belong in a new agency with D&P either.

      As for Joanie, good on her for recognizing what Bob intended, and knowing she has needs he would never meet, what an untenable compromise it would be for her to go along with his scheme. I doubt and don’t care if we see much more of him. I don’t know what I hope happens for her character, I think it would be a huge mistake for her and Roger to marry, he is even more the unfaithful type than Don is, these days. She deserves better. But the way she ‘earned’ her partnership is like an albatross, she can never shake it, or the memories of those who know about it, I can’t even see that it has done her much good professionally, other than keeping her and Kevin and her mom in a healthy financial position. I really don’t know how much of an asset she would be to Don and Peggy in a new venture; she’s been much too much of an ass to him. I think she has some basic business smarts, learned on the job, but her business acumen is not highly refined. She doesn’t always read clients well, her decision-making is emotionally based, more often than not. She’s not particularly clever, relying on her looks, even subconsciously. She needs to evolve more IMO. I’m torn about her basically, I despised completely her sleeping her way to her partnership and the way she has been treating Don; OTOH, she is a successful career woman, who is quite lonely, no prospects for a future that she most certainly once thought of herself as married and happy. I don’t want to say she needs a man to be complete, not on this blog!, but maybe SHE BELIEVES she needs a man to finally be complete. She doesn’t want to settle but she still has that dream of perfect love waiting out there somewhere for her. It might not happen.

      • 3hares

        I think Pete’s shown himself to be a pretty great team member–last season he was dealing with his mother and the end of his marriage and he was still focused on trying to save the agency while Don was checked out and drinking himself to death. I really don’t think Don and Peggy have that much on Pete in the growing up department. He just happened to be in a darker place this episode than they were.

        • Lady Bug

          Agreed. FWIW, MW stated that Pete has grown the most out of all the characters. He’s also proven his commitment and loyalty to Don and the company several times, and likewise Don has paid him back (literally: paying his $50,000 to keep the company afloat after Roger lost Lucky Strike and asking him to join SCDP at the end of Season 3).

        • Qitkat

          He can be a terrific team member professionally when he wants to be. But personally, being a lot younger than Don, and just starting his sad journeys with a daughter who never sees him, and an almost ex-wife with whom the bitterness is very fresh, he has a lot of personal evolution to grow through, that Don has already, been there, done that, learned some lessons that Pete hasn’t yet learned.

      • Bob Ross

        I agree that Joan burned her bridges with Don, if they go off it will probably be Pete, Peggy, Don and Roger. (Roger probably only brings money, and Don is indebted to him because he got his job back and Roger clearly hates Cutler and Lou and Harry so why stay?) I know everyone loves Joan, but I cannot see her reconciling with Don like he did with Peggy. He clearly let himself be known that he felt betrayed by her with the conditions he has to live under now and she has shown so far none of the doubt Peggy showed a about Don and how mad should she be at him.

        I did not quite get the Bonnie and Megan stories this episode, although the rest was a plus. Pete was there to work and see his kid, so I really did not think Bonnie’s freak out was justified. Maybe being a little miffed..but breaking up seemed over the top. Megan was basically play acting pretending to still be in a relationship to get her “stuff”, which seemed rather under-handed. I can buy after doing the threesome thing and it not working she resigned herself to the relationship being over, but I feel Don would let her get her things without the ruse.

        If they were going to stay together, Don actually has the high ground. He has a partnership in NYC to protect and they have a house there. Megan went out west to try to be an actress and it has not panned out. So why would she be so against staying in NYC at this point? She clearly still loves him, and he does her, so why the battle of wills in the bi-costal thing?

      • Uncivil_Servant

        “But I can’t help but feel that Don and Peggy are the ones who have grown, so much more than Pete has. Pete is still petty, vindictive, bitter about his life without his wife and daughter. He let the California sunshine bring out what sunnier personality traits he had, but it was all illusion and temporary, once he is back in the real world, the darker world of NYC and the rest of the agency, he reverts rather quickly to form. I’m not so sure he would be a good team member if Don and Peggy break away to form their own agency. ” I strongly disagree. Pete, of all the MM people, has changed and grown. But, he is very much a one step forward, one step back then two steps forward and one back pattern. When in his “old life” and soon to be ex he shows off his negative qualities. Ex’s tend to do that – especially ex’s where it is your own fault but you still need to blame then anyway – you invent things/change the rules so they are at fault. Pete has been invaluable. His account kept the agency going and in a Lou driven creative era they are not getting much new business except for what Pete (and Joan) brought in. If Pete had not changed any he would be with Cutler doing his businessman shark impersonation.

        • Qitkat

          Hmmm. Well, I think both of us can be a bit right in this case. I appreciate your interpretation.