Mad Style: In Care Of

Posted on June 26, 2013

Let’s kick off the final Mad Style of Season six with a short, punchy, visual comparison loaded with meaning, shall we?

The Persistence of Whitmanism:

Sally’s story this season has been in large part about suffering under the weight of her family history and how she and Dick Whitman (because it gets harder and harder to refer to him as Don Draper and have it feel truthful) are more alike than either of them want to be true. Across decades and vast class differences, Janie Bryant found a way to signal that in their clothing. She isn’t Sally Draper. She isn’t even Sally Francis, or “Beth Francis,” the Betty-esque name on her fake ID. She can try on any persona or name she wants (like someone else we know), but in the end, there’s no escaping who she really is.

Sally Whitman.

 

Onward:

 

Ever since the new D-less company logo was unveiled, orange and yellow have been exploding all over the offices of SC&P. Granted, it’s Thanksgiving week and that does tend to make a certain amount of real-world sense. But when they were pitching Fleischmann’s margarine everyone was wearing yellow and when they were debating the merits of Sunkist vs. Ocean Spray, we saw an awful lot of reds vs. oranges. Janie does like to take whatever colors are important to the story at the moment and have them play out in the costumes.

So here’s sudden Company Man Stan, decked out in his finest, with a touch of SC&P orange in his tie. Stan’s outfit is the first outfit this season that we’d wear ourselves today. It’s one of those rare moments where 1968-stylish and 2013-stylish mean the same thing. It’s hard for a costume designer to do that.

On second thought, we don’t think we could pull off a brown shirt paired with matching brown pants.

 

Margaret and Roger’s outfits are heavy with black. You can tell who’s related to whom in these pictures. Also notable is that the only real colors in the exchange to be seen are blue and yellow, which have been used as a color combination all season to signal a lack of connection among characters. If you’re new to Mad Style, we encourage you to scroll through the rest of the entries for this season in order to see examples of this color-combo motif playing out. They’re far too numerous to mention.

 

Bob and Joan are sporting the SC&P logo colors of orange and yellow, while Roger remains a colorless figure, on the outside of this relationship, just as he’s on the outside of any relationship with his daughter and her family.

 

That’s pure Mary Tyler Moore, circa 1970, which makes it extremely of-the-moment. Once Megan learned not to be so timid (for an actress) in her style, her career took off. She’s by far the trendiest person who ever appeared in the story. She was dressing like Sharon Tate in 1968 and she’ll be dressing like Mary Tyler Moore in 1969. She picks the very best, most iconic representations of the period, and tailors her style to them, very wisely. Of course, this is all being decided upon by Janie Bryant, who costumed Betty like Grace Kelly at one time and Joan like Marilyn (and then later, like Liz Taylor).

 

Company Man Bob was sporting orange in all his ties last week and yellow in all his ties this week. Roger is working a red, white and blue theme, which came up a couple times this episode. It tends to signal establishment power, as it does here, but it’s also historically accurate. Red, white, and blue became a persistent motif in fashion and design starting right around this time and lasting all the way through the seventies, fueled in no small part by a feeling that the country was falling apart, by the election of Nixon, who positioned himself as the man who was going to take back the country from the filthy people who stole it, and by the upcoming bicentennial celebrations in 1976.

 

Ted is also in red, white and blue. Jim Cutler’s grey suits and silver ties are downright eerie. It’s his signature look. He floats through the office like a ghost.

 

Just to answer the question of how deliberate color choices are, this scene is loaded with the same autumnal tones seen in the “present” day, even though Janie had no seasonal or story reasons to do so. It’s not Thanksgiving in the Whershey Whorehouse.

 

All she needs is a pair of wings and a halo. To Don, Megan is eternally the angelic figure who’s going to save him from himself.

When she’s not a whore, that is.

 

Clara demonstrates her company pride. Pete, notably, does not.

 

BAM. Miss Olson’s not fooling around anymore. She’s never worn a skirt that short before and never shown that much (if any) cleavage before. We’re reminded that Peggy is now the same age Joan was when the series started.

 

It should be noted that these are grownup clothes, for the most part. This is not youthful like something a 20-year-old would wear. In fact, it looks more like a costume from Sweet Charity. It’s sexy, of course; and more youthful than anything, say, Joan would wear. But compare this to Megan’s mini-dresses of the past season. She and Peggy are about the same age, but Megan stepped right off a magazine cover in the trendiest clothes imaginable. The Zou Bisou dress, which is somewhat similar to this, was something Megan wore over two years ago.

Peggy wore this on a date with some guy who worked in finance, which should give you some idea of where a dress like this falls on the youth/trend scale. Picture what a 30-year-old female executive would wear today on a date to look sexy.

Harry is wearing an SC&P company tie. Jim is in establishment red, white and blue – a surprise, given his penchant for pale, ghostly looks. And Ted is wearing blue and green, which is another color combination motif this season; one very persistently applied to people cheating or people dealing with the fallout of cheating. Again, if you’re new to Mad Style, we encourage you to look through the previous entries for dozens of examples.

 

Look at that bright yellow car. Look at Bob, in his bright blue suit and yellow shirt. Look at all the Chevy execs, wearing either blue or yellow. Look at Pete, wearing neither of these colors. Bob is tied both to the product in the picture and to the executives of the company. Pete is quite clearly not tied to or connecting with anything here.

 

Women wearing pink nightgowns or bathrobes was yet another persistent motif this season (again; feel free to cycle through the Mad Styles and see the examples), and we’re fairly confident it was meant to call back to the woman who took Don’s virginity while wearing a pink teddy. Betty looks pampered and mature and even a little silly here, while Megan serves as contrast in something boldly graphic, relatively simple in shape, and much more modern.

 

Animal prints are an extreme rarity for Joan. She prefers sticking with florals or solids. The most notable example of her wearing an animal print was when she spoke to Pete about the terms of her prostitution. Since that act (and his apparent assent to it) pretty much ended her relationship with Roger completely, we think the use of animal print here, in a scene where her resolve is thawing, is deliberate; especially since a similar costuming move was made with Peggy this episode.

Caroline once again stands as an example of how some people simply don’t keep up with the latest styles. Or even the semi-latest. She’ll ditch the hat soon, but she could be wearing that coat for another ten years.

 

Dawn is in SC&P yellow and orange. Even she’s a company girl now.

She’s definitely getting more stylish. Everything about this look is current, unlike many of her other outfits, which looked several years out of style. She keeps getting visually tied with Peggy, who wore a lot of plaids and a lot of yellow over the years, so much so that they both became her signature. We don’t think Dawn and Peggy really have anything in common, but they’re both trailblazers in their own way, and they did it by sitting outside Don’s office and doing their job to the best of their abilities.

 

We were very proud of our Mad Style minions for picking up almost immediately on the fact that this was the dress Peggy wore for her interview with Ted, which lends its use here some meaning and irony. In other words, like Joan’s animal print, this was Peggy’s “negotiating the terms” dress. Joan’s animal print ended her relationship with Roger and her re-use of it signaled her decision to let him back in her life. Here, Peggy’s dress is doing the opposite: putting an end to the relationship that started the first time she wore it. Both this dress and Joan’s animal print negotiating happened in the same episode last season, “The Other Woman.”

Interesting to note how much more cleavage she’s showing in this dress than she was a couple years ago. Since we doubt Peggy has a sudden growth spurt in her late 20s, we’re going with the explanation that she’s deliberately dressing more provocatively. You could say that all comes down to her affair with Ted, but we think it has more to do with her self-confidence and maturity. She’s just not that little Catholic schoolgirl anymore.

It should also be noted that clothes generally got a lot sexier post-Summer of Love. Not immediately, of course; but the sexual revolution changed the way people thought about appropriate dressing (See: the entirety of 1970s fashion).

 

We don’t know if this indicates they have a future together, but it’s extremely notable that they match exactly, in shades of navy blue, grey, and white. Taken even further, her collar mimics his and her plaid pants mimic men’s suiting. Does this mean these two crazy kids might make it? We’ll only say this: we predicted right from the beginning of this season that not only would Peggy and Abe break up, but that they would break up over philosophical differences. And we did that solely by looking at the clothes they were wearing in their scenes together. Just looking at the pictures and tuning out the story, we see a couple here with a future together, more in tune with each other than they realize.

For comparison:

This is not a couple going in the same direction. Note that he’s wearing blue and yellow here; not connecting with anyone anymore. Completely free of all ties.

We think Ken Cosgrove and Bert Cooper are the only characters to not wear a turtleneck yet. It was the 1968 version of a pair of jeans; something that any man of any age and shape could wear in a casual setting.

 

As we noted in our initial review, this scene calls back directly to the scene in the pilot, when Don came home to Betty and the kids. Trudy’s looking pretty 1968-stylish, in that married-lady kind of way. She’s always been a bright, good-girl in her style; perkier than Betty ever was. Betty was the sorority girl who looked like a princess and waited for boys to fall at her feet. Trudy was the sorority girl who cheered at football games and everyone wanted to know because she was so much fun.

This look, with her hair pulled back and softly curled, the pussy bow, the heavier eye-liner, it’s all very much of the period for the stylish, upper-middle class housewife. A sunnier, 1968 version of the dolled-up housewife drag Betty wore in Ossining. Once again, as in almost all her domestic scenes with Pete, she is in a print that fights with the prints and patterns around her; an illustration of how Pete sees this irritating suburban-married world for which he was never suited.

 

Jim Cutler’s groovy Thanksgiving day turtleneck is a thing to behold. Interesting to note that Roger and Bert look more like father and son here; they’re dressed to match each other. Joan is wearing her “executive realness” suit, which we first saw her wear after the debacle with Scarlet and Harry, when she realized she had to put her secretarial mindset behind her and move forward. What makes this funny to us is that OF COURSE Joan would have an office-specific Thanksgiving brooch.

Note that she doesn’t wear it later:

 

Because she has a different Thanksgiving brooch for home. In fact, she changes her whole outfit, unlike Roger. She’s been working in product advertising for 15 years, which means she’s probably worked every Thanksgiving day in that period (because the following day is one of the biggest advertising and shopping days of the year). It makes perfect sense that she has a special “office brooch” for the holiday. That’s just so Joan.

Just as Peggy’s Polyester Pantsuit of POWER signaled a new day dawning for her, we tend to look at Joan’s dress here the same way. Granted, this is a hostess dress or a holiday dress, which she would consider to be something entirely different from a work dress. But everything’s so much more relaxed here, from her hair to her breasts to her entire body, freed from the restricting foundation garments she still tends to wear in the office, signaling the ways in which that look was going to be cast aside by entire generations of women in just a few years. She’s come fully into her own, both as an executive and in her relationship with Roger. Remember: Roger once gave her a caged bird to tell her just what he thought of her, back in the days when they only met in hotel rooms. The power has shifted completely, and now she’s the one setting the terms of when and how they meet.

But what about Bob?

Ah, Bob. What would this season have been without you? Matthew Weiner is still quite coyly claiming that he “doesn’t know” if Bob is gay (which is pure horseshit; as if we’re supposed to believe he doesn’t have all the characters completely mapped out), but they sure keep signaling it in various ways in the story.

There’s this; a man in a frilly apron. Does that make him gay? Of course not. Then there are the famous tiny little shorts. Do they make him gay? Again; of course not. Men wore much smaller shorts back then. Then there’s the time he rescued Joan and took her to the emergency room. In that episode, there was a repeating motif of women trapped in rooms (Dorothy in Pete’s apartment, Sylvia in the kinky hotel room; Joan in her office, too embarrassed to let anyone know she was in pain). The women were all dressed in shades of yellow, except Joan. In her story, it was BOB who was dressed in yellow. Does that make him gay? Again; of course not. But there’s some very subtle costuming choices made with him that upend gender expectations or tend to make a modern audience think “gay” subconsciously (as with the shorts).

Additionally, there’s Roger’s open disbelief that Joan would ever be “buddies” with a man in the office, which is honestly a quite reasonable thing for Roger to question. The fact is, she doesn‘t have platonic friendships with men that involve spending holidays together or taking the family to the beach. And we’d find it impossible to believe that she’d invite Roger to Thanksgiving dinner with a man from the office that she’s sleeping with. No, she and Bob are purely platonic, which serves as its own example that he’s not straight. She can’t allay Roger’s jealousy by telling him that Bob is gay (because Roger would probably fire him on the spot), which explains why she’s so evasive when she talks about him.

Further, there’s some subtle signalling in the dialogue that sounds like purely “culturally gay” conversation, from mentioning that Gail got her hair done to the good-natured teasing between him and Joan about how he’s so skinny and she can’t believe he’s complaining that he gained weight; pure “Gay and his “Fruit Fly;” so much so, that Matthew Weiner’s either full of shit or there’s a deliberate attempt to throw the audience off and get us to believe he’s gay when he’s not.

We find that latter possibility extremely hard to swallow. Anything’s possible with this show, but if they reveal that Bob only pretended to be attracted to Pete for some hidden reason, we’re going to call foul on that in a loud, obnoxious way. It’s so NOT 1968 for a man to pretend to be gay. It’s not even 2013, for that matter.

Of course Bob’s tie is SC&P yellow and orange.

 

The Polyester Pantsuit of Power. A couple years ago, we were doing some hardcore research into the styles of the late ’60s, because we knew big changes were coming on the Mad Men front once they passed 1966 and we needed to refresh our memories. Early ’60s clothing is easier for us to discuss, but late ’60s clothing requires some fairly precise knowledge of the time and the culture in order to understand how revolutionary it was and to place the sometimes difficult-to-look-at (in the modern day) styles in context. Our point is, we stumbled across a page filled with pictures of this suit and its many variants and immediately thought, “That’s how Peggy will dress in the ’70s.” We didn’t honestly think we’d ever see her dress this way in the office, in the ’60s.

As hard as this is to accept or believe, this is the trendiest thing Peggy’s ever worn. Not only that, it’s the most declarative, important thing she’s ever worn. We cannot stress just how seismic it is for a woman to come into an office in 1968 wearing pants. It’s only slightly less seismic than a man walking into his office job wearing a dress in 2013. She’s actually a little ahead of her time here, and anyone who went through grade school in the 1970s has countless class pictures with smiling teachers wearing this exact outfit. It’s HIDEOUS to most modern eyes, but it did become something of a standard for working women through to about 1975 or so.

Bear in mind that it’s Thanksgiving Day and the office is mostly empty. She’s not likely to get to keep this corner office and she’s not likely to continue to wear pants during work. But it is a HUGE signal of the world to come; the world that she alone, among all the characters, is perfectly primed to not only inhabit, but to rule. This is her world and we’re all just living in it. You want proof? Here; check out the eerie ways in which Peggy Olson’s ad campaigns are starting to come true:

lipstick
belle jolie

popsicleorange

Her ad campaigns are bleeding into the real world, people. SHE’S AFFECTING REALITY WITH HER SUPERNATURAL CREATIVITY.

Or it just made some cool visual callbacks and solidified the point that she’s rising while everyone else seems to be falling. We’ll go with that. But a super-powered, reality-altering Peggy in polyester pantsuits would be kind of fun for the final season.

And finally, a family portrait:

 

Honest to God, we can’t even look at that shot of them all looking up at the house, looking so small and confused. For all the complaints of wheel spinning and bad pacing this season (many of which we still hold to be valid), we can’t deny that it all led up to one hell of an emotional sucker punch at the end. There’s no story quite like a child coming to an understanding of who their parents really are for pulling the heartstrings. “The child is father to the man,” as Peggy pointed out in her Chevy creative rap session, once again proving her creepy psychic Peggy power.

Okay, costuming: Can we just say that we know dozens of grown men who would kill for Bobby Draper’s entire outfit here? Should we admit that we’re two of them? Seriously, the skinny green pants? The little Chuck Taylors? The cable knit sweater? It’s as 2013-trendy as Stan Rizzo’s outfit.

What’s interesting to note here is how the kids are all heavily tied together with the color red, but Don stands apart from them, a dark figure, consumed by his shadows and demons. The kid with the popsicle actually has more to do visually with the Draper kids than Don does. Of course the kid with the popsicle (which references motherhood, as per Peggy Olson) is really a Dick Whitman stand-in. Don isn’t just saying “I grew up here.” He’s saying, “See that poor little black kid over there, my children of privilege, living in your mansion and going to private schools and wearing pretty matching outfits? That’s me. That’s where you came from.”

So yes, Bobby Draper. It’s true. You’re a negro.

 

BONUS:

Because Clara really deserves a bonus after working for Pete all these years. And because her outfits are eye-popping.

 

[Photo Credit: AMC - Stills: tomandlorenzo.com]

    • sarahjane1912

      I’m back, babies, I’m back! Missed you guys … had a work trip out of ‘net range and omg have just finished a few hours of catch-up on the past two eps as well as your stupendous updates. Just had to say that before I dive back into the latest Mad Style. I can’t believe it’s all over. For a whole season! We’re done! Aaaagh!

      Thank you. A thousand thank yous for brightening my week with your updates. Monuments will be built etc etc.

      • AZU403

        I have a plaid jumper-and-blazer set that I got in 1967. I can’t fit into it but can’t bear to get rid of it, and man, is it vintage.

    • bawoman

      Incredible recap. Btw, was I the only one that caught the fact that in the Thanksgiving scenes between Joan and Roger, and Peggy and Stan, both Peggy and Roger wore red, black and white checkered, and both Stan and Joan are both in green?

      • MartyBellerMask

        Interesting! But what does it mean??

        • etselec

          I think that the red-and-black checkered clothes represent Peggy and Roger each coming into a more powerful position, with Peggy being the (effective) boss with the agency (at least for now…) and Roger finally being in the position of Papa to his only son. Stan’s and Joan’s green signifies their appreciative support of the person who has recently won this power (although for different reasons.) They each are being generous and open in the situation, not showing or feeling any sort of resentment.

          • MartyBellerMask

            I like that!

    • Joan Arkham

      Just noticed how that fussy pink nightgown ties Betty to that heavy, fussy bedroom while Megan matches her sleek, modern bedroom. Wonder what that says for the “Don and Betty get back together!” theory? (Personally, I’m against it – but can’t wait to be surprised.)

      • not_Bridget

        I really think that Betty’s night with Don reminded her that, yes, he’s really that good. But she’s better off married to Henry; she felt compassion for Megan.

        They will remain “together” in their parenting. But Betty has a good life now. And Don is starting over, again…..

        • Glammie

          Yep, Betty can manage Don’s behavior because she’s not in love with him anymore and won’t be. Her detachment and feeling of success (which comes from being married to a successful man) allow her to have some affection for Don.

          • Leah Elzinga

            yes, absolutely. The fact that she’s not IN love with him any more allows her to keep enough distance to be his friend. And when it comes down to it, Don’s best and, arguably only, real friends have been women, and without Anna he’s been adrift. To have a true friend is something that Don desperately needs.

    • Frank_821

      Yes love that suit of stan’s. he was rockin it. And I wonder. Clara must get a pretty decent salary being Pete’s secretary. Her clothes are pretty fabulous. That or she’s just a natural fashionista who know how to get a bargain

      • Eric Stott

        I wonder what Stan’s next new look will be?

        • MartyBellerMask

          I love the beard, but it’s time for him to lose it.

          • Eric Stott

            Entering the 1970′s the beard might have stayed – they were starting to go mainstream by then, in a few years you’d even see them at IBM. I think that the haircut will change – and a lot less product in it.

            • makeityourself

              Would that be V05 for men?

      • ldancer

        “But I buy at Alexander’s…” da dee dum…

        • testingwithfire

          memories…. those ads were still around in the late ’80′s as I recall

          • ldancer

            Yeah, that’s when I heard them. And my mom is a veteran sale shopping maven, being a tailor’s daughter from the Bronx.

            How’d the rest of that jingle go? “Meandering through Macy’s/Bamboozling through Bloomingdale’s/Bumbling through Bamberger’s”? Something like that?

      • urbantravels

        I checked and there’s no rings on Clara’s fingers. She’s still a single girl and clearly likes to spend her money on looking good. Remember that Megan was already plenty stylish when she was still just the receptionist. I think the ‘girls’ get paid enough at this firm that they

        • Heather

          And then, like today: a lot of 20-somethings in NYC from affluent backgrounds are getting help from Mommy and Daddy.

    • http://kburnell.livejournal.com/ kburnell

      Also worth noting is that in the Chevy scenes, Bob is wearing Pete’s old power color blue suit. It’s a nice visual cue that Bob is going to take Pete’s spot on the account.

      • Chris

        Great minds! Jinx!

      • Therese Bohn

        Yes indeed! First thing I noticed!

      • lilyvonschtupp

        yeah, I caught on to that, too

    • Chris

      I think it’s very interesting that Bob stole Pete’s signature bright blue power suit. How ironic and fitting that when he delivers the coup de grace to Pete and finally, in many ways, takes over Pete’s “life” as a very important top account man at Chevy headquarters it’s in that eye catching blue suit. Bob is “becoming” that man he loved.

      • leviramsey

        I can almost imagine Bob saying “that blue suit is very becoming on you…”

      • Little_Olive

        There is a Mr Ripley thing there, although Bob is thisclose to carrying and “I’m harmless!” sign on his forehead. That flan-like (sorry, can’t think of a better word now) quality is becoming too much.

        Then again, I don’t think it’s a cover for an evil master plan: he just want’s to move up while not being harmed by his sexuality so much that it comes almost natural to him and casualties will seem, even to hi, like mere coincidences –if that makes any sense.

        His nice-guy-Ken-doll thing exasperates me, though.

        • girliecue

          I was JUST thinking Bob is Talented Mr. Ripley or Single White Female-ish, but without the murdery impulses. He is neither evil nor a genius, but I can see him weaseling his way to the top or at least a position of great leverage and, mark my words, dismantling SC&P at the series end because it serves his ambition.

      • Jordan Wester

        Yes! I was hoping someone would notice that. Pete’s blue suits were so amazing the first 2 seasons. It’s been interesting to see him embrace both grey and 3 piece suits about the same time his hairline starting looking more like Roger. Pete’s life and arc borrows heavily from both Roger and Don.

      • girliecue

        Bob’s blue suit and yellow shirt combo was an especially smart choice given they are University of Michigan colors (although UM’s blue is navy blue) and GM execs, if they had attended college, would almost certainly have graduated from there. Subliminal advertising?…..

        • SonOfSaradoc

          That middle Chevy guy is definitely wearing the Michigan maize ‘n’ blue tie.

        • Elizabeth Buchan-Kimmerly

          Most of the execs would be engineers, surely?

      • Redlanta

        I can’t wait for Bob and Duck to meet up next season!!!

        • Chris

          I was thinking that- how interesting would it be to see that?! Duck has nothing to lose and no bias like Pete, he could really hold it over Bob’s head. Clearly the group at SC&P trust him as a head hunter so he has credibility.

    • maggiemaggie

      The sweater Sally is wearing in the first picture is THE iconic preppie sweater of my childhood

      • Janet B

        The sweater I so wanted.

      • AZU403

        I still have that sweater, in grey! (Plus a few moth holes.)

      • decormaven

        Is that what is called a Fair Isle sweater? Would love to have the ones I used to own.

        • 1carmelita

          Me, too! The were very popular when I was in high school (for our rare out of uniform days at my all-girls Catholic school!)

        • http://www.lindamerrill.com/ Linda Merrill

          yes, Fair Isle – popular for decades. It was the height of prep in the early 80′s when I was in h.s. and college.

          • decormaven

            Thanks for the confirmation.

          • yllas

            I had two wool Fair Isle sweaters in the late 60′s, early 70′s. One was pink, one was turquise blue, and they were both ‘heather’ if you remember. Oh, they were gorgeous! SO very hot to wear, but just beautiful. I also had a heather knit casual sweater in greeny-gray, just perfection for Fall. (Do they still sell heather knit sweaters, or Fair Isle? I’ll be combing the thrift stores when summer is over and they bring out the sweaters again.)

          • urbantravels

            Fair Isle sweaters, with clogs and a Nantucket basket purse. Yes, I was an adolescent in Massachusetts during the Preppy Handbook craze. Though I was in public school, so I wasn’t among actual to-the-manner born preppies – the look was just popular among upper middle class “nice” girls.

            I had a Fair Isle sweater but that’s as far as I got. No Nantucket purse. I didn’t carry a purse at that age! Hell, I barely carry a purse *now*.

        • Glammie

          Yep, Fair Isle sweaters were first popularized by the Duke of Windsor in the ’20s and originated on Fair Isle, which is one of those bloody cold places north of Scotland. “Fair Isle” refers to the technique of stranded knitting (you carry the colors of yarn along the back and knit them in alternately.) They. are. work. So I’m not sure how boy-Dick had one–cast-off maybe? Isn’t 1940 early for mass-consumer machine knitting?

          Fair Isle’s been having a bit of resurgence in knitting circles (though not the way lace has taken off). Ravelry has some amazing stuff on it.

          • makeityourself

            Thanks so much for the history-of-fashion lesson. That’s why I love this particular blog so much. The BK’s are extraordinarily knowledgable and willing to share their expertise.

            • Glammie

              Awww, thanks. I know very little about sewing, but knitting I know. One of these days, I’ll even give Fair Isle a second try.

            • Elizabeth Buchan-Kimmerly

              Again look at Etsy or eBay for patterns. Beehive, a Canadian make, are particularly good for these is all sizes from “bairn” (baby, note the Scots influence) to men’s.

              Some Etsy sellers will knit the sweater for you, but since they would like a living wage and the sweater can take upwards of 20 hours to knit, you are not looking at a cheap garment.

          • urbantravels

            1940? Yes, machine knitting was around for a long time before that!! Dick’s sweater might be a Sears catalogue item, or shop-bought now that he’s a city boy, or second-hand.

          • P M

            oh no – not another Raveler! I’m surrounded by this cult! :D

    • filmcricket

      So impressed you guys got this out today, figured you’d be glued to MSNBC or SCOTUSblog or something. Thanks for doing this for us in the midst of more vital RL things. Great analysis as usual, can’t wait for S7!

      • Scimommy

        You should check TLo’s twitter feed for some really amazing news. :)

        • Chris

          OMG! Just saw it! Congratulations!!! Can’t wait to see the outfits!!

          • MartyBellerMask

            “Designers. Your clients are opinionated and fabulous fashion bloggers. Your task is to create the wedding outfits of their dreams. You have 20 minutes at Mood. Please use the American Male accessory wall liberally. Your 6 hours starts NOW. And remember, DON’T BORE NINA. “

            • Scimommy

              Fab idea, as long as TLo aren’t obligated to actually wear whatever drek comes out of this challenge. (Can you tell I stopped watching PR a few seasons ago?)

              For the actual TLo wedding outfits, I’m thinking… Gant Rugger?

        • decormaven

          Fabulous, fabulous news! Pop the cork now, boys. A toast to your happiness.

          • ConnieBV

            Congrats, boys! I bet the suits will be KILLA.

        • MilaXX

          Just saw it and now I can’t get Moon River out of my mind. Of course it will be the most fashionable wedding EVER!

        • VictoriaDiNardo

          Thank you for the heads-up. I’m in tears, for TLo and everyone who has been denied for too long.
          Congratulations!

        • Lilithcat

          Hate to put a damper on the celebration, but TLo live in Pennsylvania, no? Which doesn’t recognize same-sex marriage, and the ruling in Windsor won’t affect that.

          • Scimommy

            Let’s hope that in the time it takes TLo to plan the perfect wedding PA will come around. Alternatively, what are the rules on getting married in another state? NY isn’t far.

            • Lilithcat

              Depends. Windsor didn’t strike down all of DOMA, just the section relating to federal benefits. The section that purports to allow states to refuse recognition to same-sex marriages contracted elsewhere is still intact.

              I’d say that Pennsylvania needs to get its act together, but since my state doesn’t seem to be able to, either, I won’t throw any stones!

            • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

              Basically, if you marry and live in a state that recognizes same-sex marriage, you have your rights and benefits. If you move to a state that does not, you lose them for as long as you live there.

            • Lilithcat

              I don’t think it’s as clear-cut as that. It’s true if you are referring to state-conferred rights and benefits. But I’m not so sure that the federal government would not still have to recognize the marriage and continue to provide federally conferred rights and benefits.

              But, heck, that’s what keeps us lawyers in business.

            • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

              I’m not attorney and was just repeating what I thought I heard on ABC this morning while I was getting dressed for work. I freely admit that I could be completely wrong.

        • MsKitty

          Congrats TLo! That is stellar.

        • filmcricket

          Awwww! I’m all verklempt. Congrats, guys!

        • Rose_H_Tyler

          Congratulations, I’m so happy for you TLo and all the other people that have waited so long for this :) What an amazing day!

        • susu11

          Many Congratulations guys! :) So happy for both of you!

        • MRC210

          That’s fabulous. Congratulations and very best wishes!

        • Glammie

          Congratulations! We’ll want pix, but maybe we’ll let you off the Mad-style analysis.

        • Tiffany Lee

          OMG. Cutest tweet ever. Congrats, TLo!

        • lilyvonschtupp

          THANK GOD! I’ve been waiting for them two to make honest women of each other!

      • formerlyAnon

        CONGRATULATIONS!
        I anticipate it’ll have to be on a date only revealed after the fact, lest too many Internet admirers be tempted to crash with their well wishes. Top quality photographs, please, you know we will crave a glimpse.

        (I am so full of vicarious excitement – I’m anticipating invitations to two long-awaited weddings amongst friends in the near future & several colleagues whom I didn’t know were ready for marriage were talking wedding today! It’s such a thrill!)

    • Chris

      Did anyone else catch that very brief glimpse of the suit Peggy had on when Nan came in with the boys? It was such a dull grey so colorless and unappealing. All while Nan swanned in in her fur trimmed “I’m married to the boss outfit.” I mentally dubbed it “Peggy’s sad grey suit.”

    • AZU403

      Two observations:

      I had a plaid vest-and-pants outfit in 1969 that was similar to Peggy’s, and it was wool, not polyester. The thing about Seventies styles that people hate the most is that they were commercialized and domesticated versions of Sixties exuberance, e.g. ethnic, embroidered motifs in cotton and wool being imitated by prints on synthetic fabrics. You undoubtedly have a larger and more HD television than I do, so you can see details far better, but I really doubt that Peggy is wearing polyester. In couple of years, yes.

      My other observation is that Kiernan Shipka is being dressed for her age, but much too young for Sally’s age. Sally just turned 13, or is it 14? (makes a big difference). The knee socks are appropriate, but the plaid dresses with the bows and collars look too little-girl to me. It’s 1968 – she should be reading Seventeen.

      Fantastic work, guys!I hope I can develop a new obsession to keep me going until the return of Downton Abbey!

      • something

        I think you’re right about the wool. I was nine in 1968 and had a spring coat in a navy and white woven hounds tooth, and also a chocolate and white woven hounds tooth culotte jumper that I always wore with a chocolate brown turtle neck and tights. I remember the fabric was very scratchy and I wouldn’t have been able to wear it without the underpinnings. I’m pretty sure they were wool or maybe wool blend. The hounds tooth pattern really resonated with me when I saw it onscreen because my family was in the men’s tailoring business and my mother never missed an opportunity to buy her girls menswear classic patterns like hounds tooth or herring bones, which I loved and still do.

        • something

          Clarification: I know Peggy’s pantsuit isn’t technically hounds tooth, but it still read that way to me, and was a evocative of outfits I had 45 years ago.

        • yllas

          Ooo! I had a wool blend herringbone jumper! I thought it was SO classy! To this day I adore herringbone. I also had a pebbly black-and-white with tiny color flecks wool skirt and a cream colored vest-and-skirt with a brown windowpane plaid design. Such memories coming back! :-D My old lady teacher wore tweed Chanel style suits, rather heavy looking wool, in bright colors, pinks, greens, blues. She said the material came from Ireland. I loved those suits but of course they were light years from being suitable for a teenager to wear, with their bracelet sleeves and slim skirts.

      • VictoriaDiNardo

        Re: Sally, I think the earlier in the season outfits were more on the mark: the mini skirts and last season’s go-go boots. I was 12 in 1968 and in Ohio, not NY, and was wearing leather vests and “love beads” and painting little daisies on my cheek. Of course, I wasn’t attending a prep school, and my mom was wearing bell bottoms, so there’s the difference in maternal input ( I just realized – my mom is a Betty too! ). I was lucky to have a fun Betty!

        • Glammie

          I wonder if Sally’s back in her school girl plaid because playing “grown-up” just blew up in her face, so she’s retreating a bit back to her safer childhood look. I remember being a bit betwixt and between as a young teen. Sally’s also had a big reason to be completely freaked out by sex–another reason to downplay her own move toward womanhood.

          • AZU403

            We also have to bear in mind that Sally’s is still growing. I remember trying to wear 6th grade dresses in 7th grade, and having to concede that they were too small.

          • VictoriaDiNardo

            Very good point. A bit of regression would be natural under the circumstances.

      • AudreysMom

        I agree on both counts. Peggy’s pantsuit is striking and a yes pants a BIG deal then in the professional world. But it looks very high end (the plaids match) and for the time of year wool would be appropriate. Also, to signify Peggy’s boldness and her upward movement, something richer in cost and feel and fabric than poly would fit.

        I’ve thought that about Sally for a while now – that her clothing was a little young for her age. She stood out during that trip to the private school compared with the other girls, looking ‘delayed’ in not keeping up with what other girls her age would be wearing. I think about now she’d be spying Bobbie Brooks clothes in Seventeen and if no one else, guilting Megan into buying her more fashionable duds.

      • Kathryn Junior

        Peggy’s check pantsuit is wool, not polyester.

      • charlotte

        Sally is supposed to be 14, Kiernan is 13. I agree that the clothes make her look more childlike, but I think TLo pointed out that Betty is largely in charge of Sally’s preppy dresses. While Betty is morphing into the perfect Republican wife, she wants Sally to be the perfect Republican (step) daughter.

      • ybbed

        I agree, that is not polyester, it is probably a wool or maybe a wool/polyester blend. You can tell by the texture and lack of sheen that it is not a polyester pants suit.

      • AmeliaEve

        Absolutely not polyester. You can see even in these screen caps that the pantsuit is woven, not a knit. Double-knit fabric was the way polyester was introduced in that era. My mother was an avid seamstress, and I remember her taking Stretch ‘n’ Sew classes in this period. She and her friends were so thrilled about dressy clothes that didn’t wrinkle. But the early polyester knits were SO wrinkle proof that it wasn’t possible to press any sort of fold into them, including hems. My mom actually had a 2 x 4 that she used to beat the hems and break the fibers so they would lie flat.

        If Peggy’s suit were not 100% wool, the fiber blend was more likely to be acrylic. From that time, I particularly remember bulky winter fabrics (wool and acrylic) that were “bonded.” A thin layer of acetate tricot was fused to the back of the heavier fabric to stabilize it and reduce wrinkles. It could make things extremely stiff. The way this suit fits Peggy, I think it is a better quality fabric than that.

        As far as the red-white-blue color scheme, that really peaked for the Bicentennial in 1976, but there was a big bump in those colors for teen clothes around 1972, because that was the first presidential election where 18-year-olds could vote, rather than waiting until they were 21. Around 71-72, I remember Henley shirts (then known as “Wallace Beery” shirts) that had a tricolor jacquard knit pattern spelling out VOTE in tiny letters all over the shirt.

        • mcpierogipazza

          Thanks for all the interesting info! And my mom took Stretch ‘n’ Sew classes in the early 70s. She made matching tops for the two of us.

          And for anyone too young to remember the Bicentennial: red, white and blue was on EVERYTHING. Even fire hydrants were painted those colors.

          • Lanus

            Yep….and every house had at least one room in RWB colors and a framed “Spirit of 76″ print on the wall…at least in New England!

      • yllas

        The knee socks and little girl dresses strike me as costume-y. When I was that age in the 60′s I was in 8th grade ready to go into high school the next year, right in the middle of the Beatles mania…it would make your head spin to see how fast I went from ‘whatever Mom set out for me to wear’ to swingin’ 60′s styles – at least I dipped my toe in. I ditched knee socks long before Sally did.

        • Bonjour

          I read somewhere that Miss Porter’s required knee socks (not tights or trousers) unless the temperature dropped below 10 degrees F.

      • makeityourself

        When I saw it on TV it read as polyester, for the exact reason you described. On my iPad in a still shot, I immediately saw that Peggy’s outfit is not poly, but a lovely wool. Good catch.

    • Kit S.

      I thought what Megan was wearing in the scene where Don tells her they aren’t going to California was a callback to Betty’s outfit when confronted Don about what she found in his locked office drawer: they’re wearing very similar plaid pants and a dark sweater when they realize their marriages are pretty much over.

      • susu11

        I thought the exact same thing when I saw her plaid/sweater outfit, Kit! I don’t know if Megan will still want to work it out , but it is really telling that the outfits are so similar within the context of Don having a serious relationship confrontation with his significant other, and having to come to terms with “being” Dick Whitman.

        • Kit S.

          I certainly got the impression that Megan is done with him, but I don’t know how much of that is from my interpretation of the outfit. It seemed similar to the scene with Betty, too, in terms of how much the balance of power was shifted. Betty was demanding answers from Don in those Dick Whitman scenes and he basically submitted to her. Megan didn’t necessarily have all the power in her plaid pants scene, but shouting “Fuck the agency!” at him (and not wearing pajamas) was definitely a change.

          • susu11

            I definitely had the same interpretation you did in regards to her outfit and the way the scene played out. The only reason I think Megan may still want to work it out is because I have a feeling that Matthew Weiner still wants to keep her a part of Don’s life, romantically. I think it would make complete sense both from the stylistic interpretation you gave and the strained dynamics of their relationship all season for Don and Megan to call it quits already, but I guess we’ll have to wait and see…

          • Glammie

            Hmmm, but the way things are–he’s out of the agency and she’s free to go to California. Megan’s a peacekeeper, so until she falls in love with someone else, I’m not sure this is enough to leave Don. I think it’s worth noting that in their scene he didn’t tell her not to go–he said that they’d be “bicoastal.”

            Meanwhile, Don affords Megan a cushy lifestyle for a young actress.

            I think it could go either way. Megan, after all, doesn’t know about the affair with Sylvia.

            • HengRu

              Ooh, now I’m imagining Sylvia catching the same confessional fever that overtook Don, and making a clean breast of it to her friend Megan…

            • Glammie

              Ugh, I hope not. No offense to the actress, but the Sylvia affair was pretty grim.

            • Aurumgirl

              I don’t think it matters to Megan to know the specifics–those would be hurtful details, especially since she’s aware early on that “she doesn’t know where Don is but he’s not there, with her”. I think it was troubling enough for her to know that he just wasn’t “in” the marriage even though they were still married. That’s why the whole “bi-coastal” thing bothers her so much–it signifies that, to her, he’s so far removed from their marriage he’s actually not even planning to live with her anymore, but just visit with her now and then. Finding out now that Don had an affair with Sylvia would be devastating, but it wouldn’t be the straw that broke the camel’s back.

          • SylviaFowler

            Well he is probably on the exact same page with her now re: “Fuck the agency!”

            • Kit S.

              Good point!

      • Danielle

        I loved those little plaid pants of Betty’s.

    • MsKitty

      I’m just on this side of 50 and I have 3 pairs of Chuck Taylors in my closet, just sayin’.

      I don’t know what I’m going to miss more, the show or my Wednesday Mad Style fix. Thanks TLo for doing such an awesome job this season.

    • JulieTy

      Interesting that you see the last Megan outfit (plaid pants, white blouse, sweater) as tying her to Don in a way that signals “a future together.” To me, it looked like a Sally schoolgirl outfit — so different from her cutting edge fashion choices. She looked so young here, especially compared to world-weary Don. Even though the colors are linked, it seemed to me that the costuming highlighted the huge gulf between them.

      • Chris

        I think it can be that you both are correct. The color and style are tying Megan and Don together as TLo said, but the childlike quality is showing the power imbalance. Don still thinks he can come home and announce L.A. is off which finally enrages Megan. There’s a gulf now, but hope it can be breached.

        • 3hares

          I wonder if it could also signal that when Don walks in Megan thinks they’re completely on the same page. She thinks they’re off to California so she greets Don dressed like him, only to find out them being in synch is purely superficial.

          • Chris

            Yes, that’s a good interpretation too.

    • sarahjane1912

      “All she needs is a pair of wings and a halo. To Don, Megan is eternally the angelic figure who’s going to save him from himself.”

      Correction: a SEXY angel. No angel I’ve seen spills out of her gown the way Megan does. Despite the virginal accoutrements, Megan still wants to be the yin to Don’s yang … at least until she storms out in a huff when she discovers [as IF she was really surprised!] that Don’s backing out of their New Deal.

      • czarina

        Awesome mad style, TLo!

        Not only is Megan a SEXY angel, but yet another example in the Draper apartment of one person fully dressed and the other in sleep attire (you’ve trained me well, TLo!)

        And, not only does Megan storm out (finally), but so much for the “on the path to redemption truthiness” Don because he LIED to Megan by saying the firm decided to send Ted to LA, when it was Don that decided.

        Thank you for a wonderful season…Wednesdays will not be fun again until next spring!

        • sarahjane1912

          Ohhh … *TRUTHINESS* Love it. :)

      • decormaven

        Megan Draper has more nightgowns than I think I’ve ever owned. The shopgirls must clap when she comes in the store. She hits all the departments!

        • bxbourgie

          okay! I just wear old t-shirts and shorts to bed. I don’t even think I own a nightgown.

          • czarina

            Well, I don’t wear t-shirts or nightgowns to bed!

        • sarahjane1912

          *Chuckles* But it’s not as if ANY of those nightgowns have the power of seduction, amirite? The only times we see the Drapers gedditawn are when she’s hoovering in her knickers and bra, or in her day or evening ‘going out’ clothes. Correct me if I’m wrong.

      • Lilithcat

        Actually, that negligée reminded me more of the sort of thing women bought (still buy?) for their trousseaux.

        • sarahjane1912

          Women still do that? Really? Wow! When I got married — a decade ago — negligees etc were least of my concerns. The only fabric I acquired was in the form of napery/linens for the table! Interesting to know. :)

          • DeniseSchipani

            It’s still a bit of a tradition, depending on your family. When I got married 13 years ago, my mom and sister got me that sort of gift. But it used to be that you’d get a whole bunch of that kind of nightwear. Of all the fashion choices on MM, I have to say I drool over those gowns. That one Trudy wore a few episodes ago? Yum.

            • sarahjane1912

              The cerise one? The Sunday-morning-coy one? I hearted that big time! :)

              PS. The only slightly-negligee-ish thing I got for my wedding was the garter my mother hand-sewed for me! Still nestling in its original tissue paper even now. *Smiles*

            • yllas

              Those fluffy negligees surely are beautiful, but uncomfortable to sleep in! Though the fluffy part is generally a robe over a more streamlined nightgown.

            • Ashes Laree

              ever since trudys nightgown ive been obsessed with these sets, i even own one almost exactly like bettys.

          • not_Bridget

            Well, now couples have usually been shacked up for years before the wedding. Some sexy nightwear will make The Wedding Night special–because everything else is the same old same old….

            • sarahjane1912

              That’s kinda sweet. I hadn’t lived with my other half before we married but we still fell into bed half-dressed [in our wedding clothes] at 3am with seduction very VERY far from our minds! ;)

            • formerlyAnon

              I fell asleep with the alarm clock I was supposed to be setting balanced on my stomach. Woke up when my husband walked in the room and *fell out* laughing. (A good memory, everyone should have memories with laughter in them even if things don’t work out.)

        • mapmakerscolors

          agree–that nightie read as pure bridal to me.

      • something

        The first thing I thought when I saw that gown was bridal – they were “starting over” in that scene.

        • Chris

          Matthew Weiner did mention that scene as being Don “re-proposing” or words to that effect.

          • something

            Oh, I’ll have to watch that!

            • Chris

              I think it’s in a written interview somewhere.

        • sarahjane1912

          It was extremely ‘bridal’, yes. I didn’t get any sense that there was going to be a deflowering in the offing though. ;)

    • Stratos Bacalis

      Once more a brilliant article about Mad Men and its style – congratulations for doing this. Looking forward to next year’s final season and your recaps/mad-styles

    • Emily Dagger

      Did anyone else hate Peggy’s date dress, or am I alone in that? To me it didn’t look sexy or confident — it looked like desperation in dress form.

      • MsKitty

        I liked it, but no way I would have felt comfortable wearing it in the office (though I know why Peggy did). Would have changed into it at home.

        • MilaXX

          I agree. I liked it but when I realized it looked like a costume from Sweet Charity, I got worried about the whole prostitution angle.

        • ybbed

          I think by showing her prepping in her office mirror it implied that she was changing into it BEFORE her date, hence the looks from the guys in the conference room. She wanted Ted to see her in it before she left.

      • Chris

        It was tacky and too old for her. Plus it’s like she always needs a bow to feel feminine. It was as unsuited to her as the pink “proposal” dress was.

        • Little_Olive

          ^ This!

          • bxbourgie

            and the dress she wore to that awards show, the one where they announced MLK’s assassination. Wasn’t that one pink with a bow as well?

            • Chris

              Everything that’s even slightly feminine or dressy has some kind of a bow. Her Zou bisou party dress had a ruffly bow. It’s her go to thing.

            • yllas

              That thing was rather hideous, I remember thinking : “missed it again, Peg”. Though the colors were pretty.

        • AmeliaEve

          Yes, that is why I called them her Disappointment Dresses in Monday’s comments. She hoped something romantic would happen, but it went a different way both times. But the change from the fluffy pastel to the chic black shows how much she has matured since then.

      • bawoman

        I hate how she seems to think how short, pink and bows are the way to go (note, Pegs outfits when she thought Abe was going to propose)
        Without thr pink trimming and the bow, (and with less make up) it could have worked better. But I honestly think she looked sexier in that pantsuit than in any short baby doll dress.

        • something

          Yes. And it’s interesting to compare how grown up, sexy, and sophisticated Megan looked in her micro-mini and boots combo with Peggy in her tacky, infantilizing micro-mini. Of course, Megan has a very chic mother and Peggy was stuck with a frump extraordinaire as her primary fashion example, so she has to figure these things out from scratch. In any case, that ridiculous get-up worked for Ted, so I guess Pegs knew what she was doing, but in my straight-woman opinion, Peggy never looked sexier or as much herself as she did in that pantsuit. I hope we never see her in a skirt again.

      • sarahjane1912

        I didn’t … *hate* it. But it was overly obvs for Pegs, I thought. The reference TLo made to ‘Sweet Charity’ certainly rang a bell for me. Charity — a dance hall hostess [but really, a hooker for hire] — wore equivalent ensambles, and it made Peggy look somewhat cheap to me. Sure she worked it, but she wasn’t exactly in her comfort zone, if that makes sense. Smacked somewhat of desperation, but it also showed that she Knew What She Could Do. ;)

      • DeniseSchipani

        I didn’t love it. I liked it for the dress itself, but it was wrong for Peggy, and she knew it. She was playing a part. She’s much more herself in that power suit at the end.

      • MyrtleUrkel

        She looked ridiculous. I’m not a fan of that dress and I can’t look at it without thinking, “Chanel No. 5?”

      • Scimommy

        I didn’t hate it. Peggy still has no idea how to dress ‘girly’ or ‘sexy’, but it got the job done, didn’t it?

        • Aurumgirl

          I thought it was just a little “slutty” as the Sweet Charity reference implies. Cleavage, showy stockings, heels, big, bright bow leading the eye to exactly “there”. But Peggy’s operating on signifiers: she knew exactly what role to play to communicate to Ted, which included her reaction to the “Is that Chanel No. 5?” question (“It’s ALL I wear”). She was like her own ad visual, complete with effective copy, broadcast directly to Ted.

          • testingwithfire

            I think there’s something very ’50′s American Catholic about Peggy’s choice of dress – “sexy” is a vibe that only prostitutes broadcast. Megan is also of Catholic origin (viz. the abortion conversation she had with Sylvia) but, different country/ethnicity, different person/priorities, so she handles her sexuality in a different way. Peggy is sort of a nerd in the end, I think.

            That being said I thought Peggy’s dress was actually one of her cuter clothing choices, but I agree that the pantsuit beats out everything. Somehow I can see a 500-foot Peggy Olsen towering over midtown in that pantsuit, and I would be OK with that.

      • sekushinonyanko

        I felt like she was doing a lot. I feel like she was doing a lot for a first date, much less something she’d be seen even for a moment in the office in. I wouldn’t wear that for a first date now, in 2013. Especially not with a guy that’s going to be showing up in a grey suit.

        • Girl_With_a_Pearl

          Agreed that the dress was too much for a first date. But Peggy didn’t wear the dress for her date. She wore it for Ted.

          • urbantravels

            Yup – and it worked on Ted. Mission accomplished. She didn’t really have to do *all* that to turn his crank, but she wanted to come out guns blazing.

            This was her “Time to fish or cut bait, Ted” dress. [insert some kind of fish-sex related pun here which I'm too tired to think of.]

      • dickylarue

        As a straight guy, I’m a sucker for when a woman dresses herself up like a present which is essentially what Peggy did in that scene. There’s something on a subconscious level that just kicks in which is probably fueled by years of TV, Movies and Advertising. While it did look & was somewhat desperate, she wrapped herself up for Ted like a gift. I had an ex g/f who would do stuff like that and it drove me insane. Of course, she was insane, but we won’t go there. She’d tie a pink or red ribbon around her neck and go black, red, pink in her clothing choices and I’d be done for.

        • ailujailuj

          I have often wondered about that… what triggers that reaction in men. women say they dress for men but I think women generally dress for other women. but in a sexual context, there is something very intimate in what you’re communicating when you’re presenting yourself in a particular way that you know triggers a carnal reaction and foreshadows what comes next! the psychological and physiological science of foreplay.

          • dickylarue

            Like I said, I think it comes from years of TV, Movies and Advertising. Playboy Magazine also created a lot of what makes men tick. In fact, I thought the dress was Peggy trying to go Playboy which I’m pretty sure was of the moment. Weren’t there Playboy clubs in the big cities around that time? I know when I first was with a female partner who wore real lingerie, dressed sexy and put time and effort into that it blew my mind as a man. That look she shot Ted before going out was everything. She ramped things up and that was the outfit to do it in despite it not being “Peggy”. Kind of a sad commentary in some respects although without being creepy, I thought she looked really sexy.

            • urbantravels

              We’ve already had the Playboy Club prominently featured a while back, including Lane falling for a Bunny.

            • dickylarue

              Forgot that. Good catch.

            • ailujailuj

              yes – totally get the seduction of mass media – certainly how it “trains the brain”. But I was meaning more – what is the psychological trigger a man experiences – like you’ve described. And then you mentioned Playboy and I think it all kinda gelled for me. My theory is that little boys grow up with Playboy mags as the forbidden fruit that does more to teach them about sexuality than any adult – didn’t every dad or uncle have a couple mags hidden that boys always find? And I think it’s fairly well understood how experiences young in life inform the psyche and its development – especially sexually (just ask Humbert!). Playmates pose in that “my body is here for your enjoyment – for your eyes only” manner, perhaps developing a sense of desire for that “surrender”. So it then becomes a memory trigger. Of course, as a young girl I received a different message when I would find those mags hidden under dad’s bed or in the bathroom cabinet… took awhile to unlearn that. I was always fascinated by the boobies, however. heh

            • dickylarue

              I actually can’t imagine what it’s like to grow up now with internet porn being so prevalent. There was such a dance that went on when I was a kid when it came to getting a Playboy or even seeing one. If you’d luck into one, you’d hide it, but parents eventually would find it or you’d pass it on and lose it. Such a bizarre ritual when I look back at it. It definitely shapes or shaped a lot of Men’s expectations of what is sexy. I think the first time an ex g/f wore black thigh highs, I almost had a heart attack seeing that come to life in the bedroom. My Dad never had any, but a Father of a close friend of mine had hundreds of them in boxes in their garage. It’s just very bizarre thinking back on all of that and realizing my tastes & many others were heavily shaped by Hugh Hefner’s fantasy. Crazy.

            • ailujailuj

              poor porned kids. they are likely so misinformed and overstimulated yet numbed at the same time. hardly a chance to develop their own ideas or neuroses of their own!

        • HengRu

          That dress is definitely a form of gift-wrapping. When I saw the picture here, I thought, “Look, Ted, I’ve brought you a present…it’s my boobs! How do you like ‘em?”

        • Chris

          That reminds me of Roger’s reaction to Joan’s red dress he asked her to wear to the Christmas party they had to throw to impress Lee Garner Jr. He said it had a bow on the back like a present he wanted to unwrap.

          • Glammie

            Funny thing is that Joan’s present dress totally worked for her–Joan owned it and Peggy never does–particularly when dressing up. Closest I’ve seen with Peggy are her copy chief outfits.

            • Chris

              Yes, I think they push it a bit too far with Peggy. She is always a little awkward with her hair, makeup etc. in addition to her dressy outfits. I know she is supposed to be most at home with her work, but a young woman with her eye for things, making good money and living in NYC would probably have developed a more flattering style in general. But I also think someone who was so admired for her looks for so long like Joan would err on the side of dressing too young rather than too old sometimes as Joan has done off and on for years.

            • Glammie

              Hmmm, from what I’ve seen, most women either have a sense of style or they don’t. Often, not always, a woman with a sense of style has a mother who had a sense of style. I think a lot of it comes from learning how to assess what looks good on you and works from an early age. I remember a lot of discussions in the dressing room with my mother–she taught me to not wear ruffles and such around my face. And she was right–that look still is awful for me.

              Think what Peggy’s upbringing was. Blue-collar Catholic girl. She probably went to a Catholic school, so she always feels a bit more at ease in a uniform and plaids and doesn’t have a lot of skill choosing clothes outside that. And given the messages she would have received about female sexuality, there’s no way she would feel comfortable dissecting which sexy look is her best sexy look.

              Joan, on the other hand, was clearly raised with the idea that she would know how to play up her attractions, but also at keeping it professional. She’s not caught in a rut (though her body type limits some of her choices) because the character’s moving with the times. I’m convinced that the coral she wears this episode and the hot pink in the last episode are Jane Bryant’s nod to Joan’s snagging Avon. (Still mad at Matt Weiner for not making Joan’s triumph clear.)

            • Joan Arkham

              Agreed. I don’t think Peggy’s outfit was “desperate” so much as the idea of what sexy would be to someone who didn’t really understand fashion or think it was important. A little girl’s idea of sexy.

            • yllas

              Peggy’s mother always struck me as the living embodiment of a Gary Larsen cartoon lady – beehive and pointy glasses, rotund and frumpy! Peggy never had a proper role model. I went to high school in the mid-late 60′s and was a super-fashionista for the day, but a lot of my classmates were children of frumpy immigrants and wore white shirts and dark just-below-the-kneecap skirts, and penny loafers. They were there to learn, dammit! Either that, or they dressed in a kind of uniform reflecting Catholic school outfits (plaid didn’t figure in all Catholic school outfits).

            • Glammie

              Gary Larson! Perfect–she just needs some horn rims. Her whiny voice is just how the GL woman ought to speak.

            • Chris

              Peggy works in a very visual medium with artistic people and is presumably around well dressed sophisticated people a great deal.I think at her age 30, or almost 30 living in the heart of NYC they push too hard on the side of gauche sometimes. But that’s my humble opinion.

              I think Joan is so savvy about looks and would be afraid of aging so much she wouldn’t err on the side of dressing older as she sometimes does. That animal print blouse looked fabulous on her and seemed more “Joan” to me than those all flowered blouses she has taken to wearing the past few years. Until recently we never saw her in those prints. Her black dress with red roses along the neck were as close to a print as she used to get.

            • Glammie

              Working in a visual medium and knowing how to dress yourself are two different skill sets. Plus, Peggy works on the copy side of advertising. I’ve known a number of creative and talented women who couldn’t figure out the style thing–and mostly it had to do with how they felt about themselves *as women*. Peggy’s still figuring out who she is, so she tries on different things and, not having a strong personal style, overdoes it.

              Again, you know her mother taught her a damn thing about how to dress in a way that was flattering. A good Catholic girl shouldn’t even think about those things. It’s also, to me, tied into Peggy’s funny little lack of awareness about some things–she’s so focused that she doesn’t see things–i.e. that she and Abe were never going to work, that going after anyone as conflicted as Ted was a bad idea. And then there was Pete . . . well, live and learn Peggy. I’m convinced, though, that she’ll get there and at some point will rock a truly great pantsuit.

              Joan’s a mother and that changes many women’s self-image. Well, that and Joan wants to be taken seriously, which means a certain amount of decorum.

            • Chris

              Joan has always dressed with decorum, there are very few instances where she ever showed any cleavage even when she was younger. Sometime around the whole Joey incident they started (deliberately) putting some frumpy looking tops on her now and again. Most of the time she does great. I love her suits, particularly that aqua Avon one and the purple one. Just gorgeous on her, contrasted with the floral dress for the Avon lunch she looked younger but age appropriate and stylish.

              My complaint about Peggy, and it’s a minor one, is they pick up and drop the whole Catholic schoolgirl thing at will. Any Catholic schoolgirl (and I was one) would be more horrified at adultery than breaking out of the plaid skirts etc. and Peggy jumped in almost her first day at SC.

              I do think you can learn style if you want to. My mother taught herself, whereas her Mom was all about ruffles, fluffy etc. My Mom is a huge fan of the princess line, classic styles and well made suits and dresses.

              It’s clearly a storytelling decision with Peggy and Joan and it’s totally their choice the same as Don and his many grey suits tell a tale about him.

            • Glammie

              Oh I think women learn all the time, but, yes, it’s telling us something about Peggy that she tends to not get it quite right and, at this point, is more likely to get her workwear right than her evening wear.

              I was not a Catholic school girl, but I’ve known some seriously rebellious ex ones. I assume Peggy’s meant to be a quiet sexual rebel, even if she doesn’t go the Madonna route as far as clothing goes. (Or to be more period, the Andy Warhol Factory route.)

        • Orange Girl

          My thought was, as a straight woman, I don’t love that dress, especially on Peggy. But that is a dress many straight men would like since it is short, tight and shows cleavage. And it worked. Took Ted about 5 seconds to unwrap that “present” once he got near her.

      • SylviaFowler

        I hated it too. It’s freakin lingerie!! I am serious you could walk into any Victoria’s Secret right now and buy something almost exactly like it, hosiery included.

      • pattie capet

        I hated the dress but hated more that she showed it off at the office. I don’t know if it read desperate so much as pushy. Peggy isn’t one to back down when she is going for something, which is often a good thing. But I guess I didn’t have a lot of sympathy for her here, I wasn’t rooting for her to break up this marriage, so that didn’t help me like the dress either.

        • formerlyAnon

          Forgive me. This hijacks your comment, but it’s one of my buttons. I’m not berating you, I think I get what you mean. Nonetheless:

          Peggy can be the person with whom Ted breaks his vows, but she can’t break up the marriage. Only Ted or Nan can. I’m not saying that she is not making a moral choice, but it makes me insane that we often speak as if the only person in the situation who DIDN’T make any promises is the person who is responsible for the infidelity. The whole damn world is not responsible for the promises I make. *I* am.

          • pattie capet

            I didn’t mean to imply the other person isn’t at least as much responsible for an affair. I totally agree with you here. It’s more like, Peggy is a major character and we are kind of conditioned to root for her whenever she is going for something. But here, she is actively working to grab Ted for herself. This isn’t at all to say he’s a victim or not as responsible. And he’s a jerk for sleeping with her and then the next day “realizing” he needs his family. I just wasn’t rooting for her in this storyline.

            Not really related to this point, but I’m gonna add that, sad to say, for me anyway, I didn’t buy this affair. I didn’t feel the chemistry. I didn’t buy that this guy would come to her apartment all upset over this dress, sleep with her and then have to run clear across the country and uproot his family just to avoid her. It seemed overly romantic and even a little silly to me. And the dress is kind of part of that feeling. A silly dress. So I just didn’t like the whole thing.

            • formerlyAnon

              So agree with you about the chemistry, but then the place where I least “feel” Peggy is her romantic life. I got why she was attracted to Abe, but not really why it lasted so long, and I chalked Ted up to a conflation of personal and professional admiration. I was glad he let her down because I’m hoping it shocked her into being over him.

              The dress WAS silly, but I’ve long since concluded that I just can’t empathize with what revs the engines of the heterosexual male. I mean, certain things (tits!) almost always work, & individual guys have certain idiosyncratic things that get them, but it’s rote learning for me. So I was totally willing to accept that that was a dragon-slaying dress.

            • Glammie

              I think, in a way, you’re not supposed to feel Peggy’s choices because she consistently makes bad choices when it comes to men. She may be closing in on 30, but there’s something a bit immature even now about how she conducts her romantic life. She doesn’t see her romantic partners clearly. She doesn’t stand up for what she wants in a relationship.

              I’ve had girlfriends like Peggy–and she just wants to make me sit her down and give her a lecture over coffee.

      • Glammie

        I don’t know about desperate, but definitely over-the-top for Pegs. I tend to think sexy works best if you focus on one thing–so legs or cleavage, but not both at once–and if you do do that, you do it in in a solid and leave off the bow. Certainly broadcast Peggy being a present dying to be unwrapped.

        • Emily Dagger

          That’s 100% what I was thinking, but I didn’t want to come right out and say “boobs OR legs, Margaret Olsen!” because I have serious fears about turning into one of my grandmothers.

          • Glammie

            It’s all in the attitude. I like to think of it as keeping an element of surprise.

      • urbantravels

        I posted in the Monday thread that I thought it was really trying too hard. Peggy has finally reached a point where she has stylish, professional office wear (and hair) that she looks comfortable and confident wearing…but dressing up sexy just doesn’t seem to be an area where she’s caught up. Look at how stiffly she’s standing in that date outfit compared to the way she stands in her power pantsuit. Peggy *is* sexy – she’s always had plenty of men sniffing around her – but she isn’t good at *performing* sexy.

        (Yeah, but the outfit worked on Ted, so it served its only real purpose.)

        • Glammie

          She’s not a Jackie or a Marilyn. She’s Irene Dunne.

      • lilyvonschtupp

        The dress in itself was so Barbara Streisand-The Owl and the Pussycat which dosent come along until the 70s. But even by then it looked out of date.

        What I couldn’t help but to notice were the whorey stockings she wore with them.

    • Anne

      I would wear those last two dresses of Clara’s to work in 2013. Awesome.

      Also, I think Peggy’s Polyester Pantsuit of Power may be my favorite article of clothing anybody has ever worn on this show–and that’s saying something.

    • Scimommy

      ‘So yes, Bobby Draper. It’s true. You’re a negro.’ You sucker-punched *me* at the end there.

      Wait, I had another point, what was it? Oh, right. I agree that Don and Megan are visually tied together in that scene where she walks out on him, but does it really mean that they have a future? Because that would imply that Janie Bryant *knows* whether they do or not. You think it’s all mapped out in Weiner’s mind and he told her? Now that I type it, it doesn’t seem so unreasonable, actually.

      • isapaiva

        I actually took their matching outfiits as a signifier of their matching at that point, both excited about going to California. And then, the disconnect that came later, when Don, once again, pulled the rug from under her.

        • Violaine

          If I remember correctly, Megan and Don were both (finally) wearing bed clothes in bed together that night as well (the night that both were planning on going to CA).

          • ybbed

            Both in blue!

        • MilaXX

          I actually thought it was about them being on the same page for a change about the state of their marriage instead of one or the other pretending things were fine.

      • Little_Olive

        As I see it, they may be tied in the sense that they are both in the brink of a significant move forward, and a part of that move is related to the other person -their connection isn’t (yet) completely broken.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        Of course Matt Weiner — and Janie Bryant — know exactly what is going to happen next season. It’s disingenuous of him to repeatedly say that he doesn’t and I’m getting pretty annoyed by it.

        Janie bought some items from me for next season that directly relate to a new plot point. Unfortunately, I can’t share since I signed that Confidentiality Agreement.

        • Scimommy

          Wow, how great for you! You can tell us about it next year after the relevant episode airs. In the mean time, don’t burst from keeping all that lovely information in! :)

        • Glammie

          I assume that some of the minor character arcs aren’t totally plotted out, but yeah, he knows where Don and Peggy will end up and what the marriage is doing.

          • Chris

            And what he has in mind for Bob. I think he is being deliberately coy about him. He wouldn’t introduce a new character with such a big arc just to drop him or not have a plan in mind.

            • Glammie

              You don’t think Bob’s just another case of Don Draper–the man with the secret who charms his way to success? In other words, Matt Weiner’s way of saying the cycle begins again–there are changes–but the song remains the same.

              Whatever happens to Bob will be some sort of fun-house mirror as far as the other characters are concerned.

              Hell, maybe he’ll take down Cutler. Or maybe Cutler is the oldest version of Draper.

            • Chris

              I’m sure he knows at least roughly what Bob’s story is, if he is or isn’t gay etc. He’s even acting like he doesn’t know if Wolk will be available next season if he wants him etc. I find that hard to believe.

            • Glammie

              Hmmm, well that might be part of it. He’s playing coy until the contracts are signed in blood.

    • DeniseSchipani

      My skinny fourth-grade teacher wore dresses like Peg’s date dress (minus the cleavage; it WAS Catholic school!), in the 70s. But others definitely had that Peggy Power Suit. I love the close-up screen shots. The poly is hard to get over with my 2013 eyes, but she looks TERRIFIC in it. Really, you know, SUITS her.

    • Aly

      I’m so excited to read your callbacks about Peggy’s clairvoyant copywriting superpower in this episode especially after all the the repeating motifs from the first episode mentioned in your recap – the song in the seedy bar, Pete’s goodbye and I just thought of how Ted waited outside Peggy’s apartment and finally had his way just like Pete did. Now I need to re-read all Peggy’s campaigns while waiting for season 7. I am going to miss your Mad Men themed posts!

      Peggy’s sexy dress is a long-waited ‘Attagirl’ compared to the pink dress she wore to the date with Abe.

      • Chris

        I was thinking of Peggy’s campaigns too recently and how she really learned the Don Draper trick of tying your own experiences in to create the ad and sell to the client like she did with Popsicle and Avon. The difference is that Peggy really had those childhood experiences: her Mom breaking the Popsicle to share, Gladys Beauman, the elegant Avon lady her mother would vacuum the drapes for. Don has to make his up from whole cloth or twist his pathetic memories into good ones to make an ad. I really wish Peggy had been in the meeting to hear Don’s pitch. I think she would have been more affected (sympathetically) than anyone and it would have been as much of an “aha” moment to her as the old brothel house was to his kids.

        • TigerLaverada

          I think Don’s concepts aren’t made up, they’re dredged up out of such deep longing that they reach the archetypal. That’s why they’re so uniquely powerful so much of the time, and speak to so many people.

          • Chris

            Well he presents them as his experiences. That’s what I mean by made up. Peggy is repeating true stories from her own life (fine tuned I am sure to fit the client and situation). Don is creating fairy tales of the life he really wanted. He has to wish/dream them into being. The fact that it is a common experience so many people want and long for is what makes them so powerful and successful.

            • ailujailuj

              totally agree… Don’s creations are almost visceral. But they are also the fairytale he created in his head about other people’s lives, crafted simply from observing the world around him.

    • Danielle

      The women on this show have always dressed in the styles from when they were in their prime – Betty, Joan, Sylvia… all hit their prime in the 50s. Megan is dressing right on trend for the time, because this is her heyday.

    • imspinningaround

      I didn’t see Peggy’s navy-and-orange coatdress as a “negotiating the terms” dress, I saw it as a “I want you to want me” dress. I want you to want me to work for you; I want you to remember when you first you wanted me, period.

      And I realized this last night and I have to point it out and I’m a little surprised you guys didn’t mention it: The blue turtleneck Ted is wearing in Peggy’s smoking jacket fantasy is the same one he’s wearing when he shows up at her apartment.

      I’m really going to miss Mad Style until next spring!

      • MilaXX

        I think it’s both. It’s her negotiating dress, but the way she is wearing it with the neckline not as covered by the scarf is more sexy time Peggy.

      • filmcricket

        Oh, nice catch on the turtleneck. Will have to go back and look at that episode.

    • Tess Danesi

      After reading your Mad Style posts, I’m mentally exhausted for Janie Bryant.

      • bxbourgie

        Okay! Janie is working hard for her money! And I hope they’re treating her right.. ALL RIGHT! She makes everything come alive and TLo add the icing on the cake in explaining it all.

    • Little_Olive

      Well TLo, go get yourselves a well-deserved congratulatory drink (or shopping spree). Us bk’s reckon you have worked for this.

      I am still digesting everything this review, but can I just say in the meantime that I LOVE the character of Jim Cutler. That is one good pairing of writing and acting. He is so precise that I wonder how that office existed before without the person in that role. And dressed in utter perfection for it, of course.

      • makeityourself

        Me too. Jim is the calm voice of reason over and over again, keeping Ted’s emotions in check and negotiating through rough times with Roger, Bert and Don. He always looks at the big picture and makes good decisions quickly. I wish my boss were like Jim Cutler.

        • ailujailuj

          I gave you a vote because I agree with you. And then I started thinking that he either has an olfactory fettish or is also kinda a perv which get pretty annoying. heh

          • Aurumgirl

            I think men use the whole olfactory sensitivity thing as a come on. How many times have we heard Don tell a woman, “You smell so good!” as he’s coming on to her? Cutler’s “Is that _____?” (fill in the trendy perfume of the moment) question is the same kind of thing. It’s meant to get a woman to feel like you’ve been thinking about her down to the smallest detail, which should be flattering as hell. Except it gets trotted out so routinely by so many men that it’s a come-on line lots of women find cliche.

    • jennmarie19

      FANTASTIC recap. Your analysis adds so much to my enjoyment of the show. One question:
      “She’s been working in product advertising for 15 years, which means
      she’s probably worked every Thanksgiving day in that period (because the
      following day is one of the biggest advertising and shopping days of
      the year).”

      I always thought Black Friday was a more modern-day invention. Was it really such a big deal back in the 60s? And wouldn’t all of the ads had to have been produced well in advance? I would be surprised if Joan had to work T-days.

      But enough nitpicking from me. Thank you SO much for doing this. It’s a joy to read!

      • Corsetmaker

        I wondered that. I mean I’m in the UK so not qualified to comment on Thanksgiving but I have worked in advertising and for many years in newspapers and for major holidays (Christmas for instance with the big boxing day sales coming up) the ads are in sharpish and on the pages early. The papers would have printers working and in those days of manual page make-up, pre-press. But the ad sales and creatives should’ve finished up except maybe some devoted soul there to catch any errors.

        It has been a joy to read. I don’t even watch the show often but I read these posts!

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        Back in the olden days, the day after Thanksgiving signaled the beginning of the holiday selling season. There were never any sales until the day after Christmas. Retailers called it Black Friday as a reference to the bookkeeping method of writing profits in black and losses in red. Just about any retailer would make a profit on that day, even if they had been in the red before it. The general public wasn’t made aware of the designation until just a few years ago.

        I also doubt that Joan was used to working on Thanksgiving. At that point, most holiday advertising was put to bed. I found that we worked harder during late December preparing January client presentations for the next year’s campaigns.

        • mixedupfiles

          Apparently the “profits written in black” explanation was attached to the term after the fact. It originated in Philadelphia — “black” in reference to it being a miserable traffic and crowds day. Links will send this comment to moderation, but you can google for stories last year from ABC News and Businessweek.

      • quitasarah

        I don’t know anything about advertising and how it worked in the 1960s in real life, but I seem to remember an episode in an earlier season where they all had to work Thanksgiving. But not sure why… It’s super hazy. Anyone have a better memory than me?

    • Ashleigh

      Am I crazy for seeing a parallel between Ted and Bobby? The hair, the golden turtleneck, the dry drunk/drunk for a father… Could Don’s letting Ted go to Cali. be his attempt to help save Bobby. For that matter, is his adversarial relationship with Ted be about Don/Bobby, Ted/Ted’s father issues? Has this already been talked about by everyone else?

      • Chris

        I could see that. That’s a really interesting thought, especially after that little hint from Ted about his Dad. Plus Ted does dress in a more current “younger” style than Don and the other men do.

      • MilaXX

        I dunno, poor Bobby always feels like such a non entity. I mean, I gun to my head I could not tell the different Bobby’s apart, except for the one who is now on Once Upon a Time

    • Fan

      Sally didn’t use Betty’s name on her fake ID. She used “Beth Francis”. Beth is Sally’s middle name (see that gov’t letter addressed to Sally), and Francis is Don’s middle name. (It’s just odd that Don’t middle name is the same as Betty’s husband’s last name).

      • imspinningaround

        See, I thought she was calling herself Beth Francis because of Henry!

        Holy crap, this is the first time I’ve realized that Don’s middle name is Francis and Betty’s new married name is also Francis.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Betty’s full name is “Elizabeth Francis.”

        • Fan

          I know Betty’s last name is Francis. But there’ still the possibility that Sally was using her own middle name and Don’s middle name.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            Occam’s razor suggests she’s using her mother’s name, since it’s, you know, her mother’s name.

          • Cabernet7

            I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if Sally didn’t know it was Don’s middle name. I just checked back to the family tree she made, and her father is only there as “Donald Draper”. Not absolute proof she doesn’t know his middle name of course, but as she said she knows nothing about him. She chose “Beth Francis” as a fuck you to her father, but I think it’s just another example of no matter how hard she tries, she can’t escape him.

      • DeniseSchipani

        But Francis is also Betty’s married name (Henry Francis)

      • smh4748

        I think they meant it was reminiscent or evocative of Betty’s name, not that it was literally Betty’s name.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          It IS literally Betty’s name. Elizabeth Francis = Beth Francis.

          • smh4748

            Yeah, I realized that about five minutes after I posted and thought about it a bit, but was already out the door for the day by that point. This being the internet, I knew I’d be swiftly corrected. I’m only surprised it was only done in one comment. :) Sorry.

          • Sean Gill

            And it’s also funny because Betty seemed to be slightly mortified that Sally used a version of her name for a nefarious purpose!

    • smh4748

      I liked the interpretation of angelic Megan, but my instant thought when I saw that white nightie was “wedding dress!” He references when they loved each other, and asks her if she’ll go with him–she even responds something like “I will.” So to me, it seemed very deliberately bridal, though that doesn’t necessarily exclude the angelic angle.

      • Paige

        I agree. Her crying and saying “yes!” excitedly reminded me of her response to Don when he proposed.

    • Puggermeg

      First time to comment here, although I am a loyal reader. When you noted the blue & yellows in the Chevy scene, I couldn’t help but note that those are the colors of the University of Michigan … perhaps signaling that all those people (Chevy execs and Bob) BELONG in Michigan. Bob also had the Michigan map in his office in the last episode.

      • Joy

        very good catch

      • urbantravels

        The one thing I can’t figure out about the GM office setting is why they used that particular setting for their headquarters lobby. (It’s one of the entrance hallways to the Biltmore Hotel in downtown LA. That hotel has been used many, many times in Mad Men, in various guises.) Wouldn’t they be in some kind of glossy High Modernist building with a big lobby and plate-glass windows?

        It was clever how they put up that GM sign so that Pete would have something to back into that wouldn’t involve knocking down a door or wall in a practical location.

      • testingwithfire

        nice one, I’m a Michigan alum and I didn’t make the connection

    • decormaven

      Aww, bless you for the Clara screen caps! Love those grey hose/tights she wears with one of those looks. Very on trend for the day. And the last line on Bobby – love it! It’s going to be a long time til S7; you two enjoy a well-deserved break from parsing the MM saga.

    • golden_valley

      Bravo Tom & Lorenzo! Another smashing year of Mad Style under your belts. Thank you for making this tv show even more interesting.

      But I have questions about not clothing styles, but furniture styles and what they might mean. The living room of Trudy’s house…that modern sofa and matching curtains in the same room as the antique looking secretary with Queen Anne style legs…was that sort of mixing fashionable or is that another example of the discordant nature of Trudy and Peter’s relationship? Is Peter the secretary and Trudy the sofa? Or the other way around?

      • decormaven

        I don’t think the furniture styles “mean” anything in the same way TLo have parsed the clothing styles. I’m sure Trudy (who wanted at one point in time to move up through the social circles) had what we used to call “family pieces”- usually hardwood furniture that was passed down through the generations. The furniture Pete was getting from his mother – like the china cabinet- would be very desirable family pieces. It looks as though the sofa, etc. are upholstered pieces from the current time. I think Trudy and Pete in many ways saw themselves as a modern couple, and bought their own pieces to reflect that. However, they weren’t going to ditch desirable family heirlooms.

      • Chris

        I’d say Trudy is 100% the sofa and we have seen in Pete’s office he goes for a traditional “New England” style nautical theme so the Queen Anne suits him. He is supposed to be descended from the old Dutch settlers of New York I assume based on his name (Dyckman). Especially after his mother passed, he would have some true antiques from her, going back to pre-Revolution Queen Anne times.

    • Laura Renee

      Omg. Clara’s first outfit, delivering the telegram, looks like a turbulent ocean!

      • Chris

        I cracked up when I noticed she had a turtleneck on under that dress. That was such a 1970′s thing to do. All my teachers did it and it looks crazy looking back on it but you could throw a turtleneck on under almost anything then. I had one teacher who did it with sundresses!

    • bxbourgie

      Peggy’s Polyester Pantsuit of Power and Stan’s Blue Plaid Jacket and Brown Pants and Super Fabulous Paisley Tie are THE best outfits ever on this show. EVER. I need these two to create a power work couple in 1969 at SC&P and rule the hallways of the agency with fabulous, stylish of the moment late 60s early 70s fierceness.

      • filmcricket

        I would watch the hell out of that show.

    • marlie

      This is a breathtakingly wonderful style write-up. Really amazing, TLo.

      Quick question that I’m hoping that the Bitter Kittens on TLo can answer… what do TLo mean when saying that Bob is “culturally gay”? I know they explained it a few posts back, but I can’t seem to find it.

      • oat327

        It means that he comes off as someone that, while not out at the office, clearly has a gay social network (of which Manolo is a part) as it could exist in 1968 New York. Compared to Sal who was 100% in the closet, got married, etc.

        • marlie

          Aha. I remember now. Thanks!

    • Joy

      Love me some Clara!! While reading this I was thinking, wait that is all the Clara I get?!! Thanks for the bonus at the end.

      Oh, and I know you don’t focus on interiors, but I LOVE the lamps on Don and Megan’s nightstands.

      • VictoriaDiNardo

        Too bad some interior-focused people with the insight and taste and savvy and energy of TLo ( is that even possible?! ) didn’t think to blog the interiors from day one…or did someone and I missed it? The detail in those sets is astonishing.

        Of course then I would get even less work done….

        • decormaven

          There’s been a little bit of blogging from the design community, mostly about the mid-century mod stuff that’s been sprinkled through the early seasons. The Jet Set episode got a lot of hearts pitter-pattering with the Palm Springs house. The old Mad Men thread on Television Without Pity may have some links.

          • VictoriaDiNardo

            Thanks! I didn’t watch early on so I figured I missed out on all the mid-century furniture love. I’m kind of over the mid-century stuff, but that Palm Springs house was pretty fab.

    • decormaven

      Anybody got a clue as to the graphic artist of that poster in Roger’s office? That is drool-worthy.

      • Chris

        I noticed Roger finally got rid of his white, decorated by Jane, office furniture. The look is more 70′s than 2001 Space Odyssey 60′s now.

        • 1carmelita

          I loved that white office with the Op art on the walls.

          • Sue Shea

            ME TOO!

        • leighanne

          I noticed that too. There are a bunch of colorful touches in his office now, from the checkers to the pillows and curtains and poster- as if someone wanted to make up for the lack of color in previous years.

        • MartyBellerMask

          I think Ted has his old office now? The first episode after the merger had Ted in the black-and-white office. Which he changed, pronto. Makes sense that Roger would be “upstairs” now, and just got new stuff. So yeah, he got rid of the office furniture (which is good), but most likely just because he switched offices.

      • Lilithcat

        It looks vaguely Peter Max-ish, but that style was widely copied.

      • 1carmelita

        Seymour Chwast. It’s Dante’s Inferno.

        • BarniClaw

          Holy smokes! That calls right back to the first ep of the season! Nice catch 1carmelita!

          • 1carmelita

            I recognized the style of the artist right away, but not that piece, so googled him just to make sure. I really gasped when I saw what it was called. The level of detail on this show is awe inspiring.

        • decormaven

          You are my shero! Many thanks!

        • Sue Shea

          you are amazing!

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        I’m surprised noone has mentioned that Rogers office is visually divided. Roger matches the darker wall and carpet while Bob’s outfit mirrors the lighter shades on the right.

    • something

      Sally Whitman. Absolutely brilliant! Can’t thank you enough for these amazing analyses. I think I look forward to Monday and Wednesday mornings even more than Sunday nights. I’m going to miss these terribly, but at least I should be getting a lot more work done now that Mad Men season is over!

      Did anyone notice the very distinct Dick Whitman walk down the hall after the Hershey meeting?

      • ybbed

        Loved that comment, and “Yes, Bobby Draper, you are a negro!” Hilarious

      • AmeliaEve

        I also noticed that Whitman is a brand of low-end chocolate, just like Hershey.

      • yllas

        I DID! I noticed that right away! Don didn’t ‘look’ like our suave Don, he looked…schlumpy. That’s it, good catch!

    • carnush

      There will be a hole in my Wednesdays now without these posts. The next season can’t come soon enough.

    • Bonjour

      Tom and Lorenzo, AFFECTING REALITY WITH THEIR SUPERNATURAL CREATIVITY.

      This discussion board has created an amazing school of wicked smart television criticism. It is such a pleasure to read & join in.

      Thanks for the work you do uncles and bks!

      • sarahjane1912

        Isn’t it the best? It’s scary-good to note that only a year or so ago, this blog was attracting 300/400 posts [max] and now it’s into the 1200/1300s. Bless the uncles and all the BKs. *Big kiss*

    • Paula Pertile

      I squeed a little at those Thanksgiving pilgrims on the counter in the Draper kitchen. We had very similar wee little pilgrim candles (and a turkey) that sat on the window sill. I salvaged them and still get them out every year.

      Thanks for another great season.

      • decormaven

        Good for you! I also loved seeing those vintage items. I have a clear glass turkey candy dish. His name is “Mr. Turkey”, and he’s been on a Thanksgiving table since my grandmother’s time.

      • yllas

        They sell those online at the Vermont Country Store, the Baby Boomers Nostalgia Bible.

    • LauraAgain

      85 comments already? Yikes!

      I loved it when men wore hats. Seeing Don/Dick at the end, looking at his childhood home/whorehouse, wearing his hat and looking sideways at Sally, brought me to tears … he looked exactly like my dad did in 1968, when I was 7.

      What a wonderful season. Thank you, Ted and Lorenzo, for making it even more special!

    • Julie

      Thank you for throwing in Clara’s pink Pucci dress! I would wear that today if I could.

    • Apple Tree

      TLo, thank you for making me appreciate my favourite show even more, all the discoveries and laughs.

      You, people, make hell of a job on this blog. I love your knowledge about 60′s fashion reality, film maker’s approach and smart and witty language. I think I have actually learned a bit from you! :) You are utterly remarkable. It was a pleasure!

    • Donna Tabor

      Oh, Clara’s color-coordinated tights! I had those. It sounds weird now, with all the hosiery choices, but that was the first time legwear was anything but sheer or ballet pink.

      Peggy’s va-va-voom sexy dress is almost exactly like one I made for one of my mother’s friends in 1968. Except that it was red velveteen and sleeveless. But it was just that short and plunging, with the same waistline and silhouette. Well done, Janie Bryant.

      One tiny quibble, T-Lo: in a vast sea of amazing commentary, I disagree with one small detail. Meghan is very trendy, but so was Jane, especially in the LSD scene with Roger. Her hairdo and peekaboo belly outfit were very go-go for that time period, but in a more expensive way.

      Thanks again for your hard work. You took on what ended up being a tail-wags-dog project, but you’ve done such an incredible job of it. Well done.

      • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ foodycatAlicia

        In the 50s there was a fashion for coloured stockings for a while – I don’t know how widespread it was though! But pastel shades to match your dresses.

        • Donna Tabor

          But they were sheer. The ones Clara is wearing are thicker, and have an intricate knit pattern. Mine were lavender to match a wool herringbone skirt, sweater and awesome velvet beret outfit I got for Christmas. I still mourn the beret, which I left on the bus one afternoon.

          • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ foodycatAlicia

            That outfit sounds like something I would wear today! Gorgeous!

            • Donna Tabor

              My mother had exquisite taste, and she really tried to keep us all looking good. Not unlike how Betty Draper Francis is with her daughter.

      • decormaven

        I get verklempt when I see the hosiery on Mad Men. Hosiery manufacturing was big business in North Carolina. It’s gone the way of the do-do bird.

        • housefulofboys

          While I don’t miss hose one little bit (don’t even own a pair anymore!), you’re right about North Carolina textiles. I grew up in the middle of that, too. Whole towns were built up around the local “mill.”

    • marlie

      Thank you!

    • sekushinonyanko

      Clara’s outfits are the cutest! I would be duly impressed if you made a mad style just for Clara? Or at least one comparing the secretaries. Please and thank you.

    • imakeart

      Peggy’s date dress was easily a 4-lawnmower moment for me! Couldn’t have been more out of character.

    • aesteve212

      ON THE FLOOR with the Peggy ads connections. Thank you TLo for an amazing season and series.

      • MartyBellerMask

        The “mark your man” image of Ted. WOW, this show. He looks flushed, sweaty, content… It actually makes me kind of sad for the outcome, seeing him truly happy. I really think he wanted it to work. Thank you for these recaps because I never catch that kind of detail when I watch the show.

    • LauraAgain

      When I saw the leaves embedded in the frosted glass at SC&P I immediately thought of the Mike and Carol Brady bedroom backsplash in The Brady Bunch!

      • jozie310

        Explain those leaves. They were everywhere, and were annoying. Is it to make sure people don’t run into glass?

        • decormaven

          No. They were seasonal decorations. The set decorators have a blast decorating the offices with period seasonal decorations. Trying to remember which episode, but I remember seeing Halloween decorations around the office walls. They also have done Christmas decorations as well.

          • ailujailuj

            what is interesting… is at the time, those graphics were very “current”. But they’re still being used today!

          • housefulofboys

            I was surprised to see that kind of paper decoration on the walls of a madison avenue agency, and thought it was a little kitsch-y. More likely to be found on the walls of an elementary school hallway.

        • LauraAgain

          I have no idea …… the glass is frosted, right?

    • leighanne

      Don looks so much older in the last 2 episodes of the season- maybe it was just me but in this final episode, his hair looks much more slicked back and the result is very aging to me. More haggard appearance overall. He and Betty look like they’re from a different generation when they’re talking on phone, compared to more modern Megan.

      Love that we’re seeing more of Clara and her stylish outfits. Very trendy and she seems to have a collection of long necklaces as they change with each outfit.

      I’ve so enjoyed this season, thank you!

      • Qitkat

        All season I’ve been noticing the progressive deterioration of Don indicated through makeup and lighting. An absolutely fantastic job from those responsible behind the scenes. As you said, he has looked more and more haggard, older, rougher, less handsome. All leading to this deteriorated house of his boyhood, seedy beyond all our imaginations. What an impact for his kids. Such a beautiful, sad, poignant ending for this season.

        • fitzg

          I definitely noticed a decline in his looks until last week’s episode, with the worst being post-being-caught-by Sally, but then thought he started looking a better this week. Apparently, deciding not to live a lie every waking moment makes you more handsome. Who knew.

        • formerlyAnon

          Yes. The contrast between red-carpet-appearances Hamm and Don Draper has been amazing.

    • imakeart

      So was Peggy’s pantsuit orange or red??

      • http://angrynerdgirl.net/ Jessi03

        I thought it was red when I watched the show, but it looks orange in the pictures here. Either way, she’s a company woman.

      • HengRu

        It looks burnt-orange to me here, a perfect Thanksgiving color.

      • Joan Arkham

        On my TV it looked red, white, and blue which I strongly associate with the 70s Bicentennial look. But here it does look more autumnal.

    • appliquer

      I love when I open up TLo and realize it is Wednesday! Mad Style Day! And I will so miss it until next season (you guys are going to have to find another show to review like this, if that is possible). What an excellent review of the episode and I love all the things you point out that I don’t see (even though I feel like I’ve been trained as a BK)! I did immediately think of you guys when Peggy appeared in her power pant suit!

      • quitasarah

        While I would love TLo to adopt another show, I think they deserve a break. Plus they have a wedding to plan! :D

      • something

        “I love when I open up TLO and realize it is Wednesday!” That never happens to me. I start refreshing on Tuesday nights just in case they decide to post early (they never do), and hit it first thing Wednesday morning. I might be obsessed. LOL!

    • Chris

      I guess MW thought we should all intuit that they landed the Avon account because Peggy has an Avon powder can on her desk.

      • NMMagpie

        Good catch!

      • Eric827

        I think it’s much more likely that he forgot to put a clear indication in these past few episodes – and now he’s insisting that it was supposed to be apparent, instead of just admitting he screwed up.

        • Chris

          I agree, I was just being sarcastic because the set dressers (who are excellent) put the Avon stuff on Peggy’s desk.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        Matt Weiner has said in every post-finale interview I’ve read that he expected us to understand that they did land the Avon account. Now we’re supposed to be mind readers?

        • Chris

          Exactly! So frustrating. An entire episode of Peggy and Joan was built around it then the answer is never given. It’s not like it was some esoteric, subtle thing people had noticed. It was the crux of a good part of the episode and Joan’s juiciest storyline.

        • editrixie

          He’s just such a dick.

    • Lady Gray

      Has anyone else ever mentioned that the large pendant lamp shade in the Draper’s apartment has all four of the key colors of this season: red-yellow-green-blue?

      I remember seeing it in the first episode that the apartment appears in and thinking “that doesn’t really ‘go’ and it’s kinda ugly”, but now, after following this amazing blog all season, that lamp not only makes sense, but is the heart of the show’s color theme, right in the heart of the Drapers home.

      It was all right there in that lamp, from the start. It’s a detail I never would have noticed if not for this intelligent and thoughtful blog series. Thank you so much! I can’t wait until next season.

      • lisbeth borden

        I thought it looked too cheap—But you’re right! There is a reason there. Thanks.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        That lamp is the real deal. One of my friends had it in her family room. I recognized it the first time I saw it and also thought the colors did not go with the rest of Don’s living room.

        • Lady Gray

          Isn’t it amazing that it’s the color theme for the whole season? But yes, it was a weird, discordant note in the whole coloring of the room. Now that I think of it, that lamp was featured prominently in almost every episode!

    • luluransom

      Congratulations Tom and Lorenzo!! And many thanks for this, and a whole season of amazing, insightful Mad Style posts. Can’t believe you got this out on such an important day. Raising a toast to you both from California, in hopes that Pennsylvania soon joins the list.

      • urbantravels

        Yes, many many congratulations!! Make a post so that everyone can have a proper place to kvell, instead of the kvelling being scattered all over the other posts!

        (I’ll be moving from LA to Philly in about six months, so I will do my best to vote a lot and help make the state just a speck more blue. Nobody needs my contribution to blueness here!)

        Come to think of it we here in California don’t have that much to be proud of re: marriage rights. We’re free of Prop 8 finally… but we should NEVER have allowed it to pass in the first place.

    • lisbeth borden

      Don’s tie in the Hershey pitch was Hershey colors. We discussed on the re-cap there were plenty of chocolate brown AND direct shit references at the same time.
      I agree about tiny clues regarding Bob’s clothes hinting at his ‘otherness’. He’s a bit more colorful than the other men–like, his ties usually have 3 or more colors as opposed to most of the other ties on the show. Even the yellow shirt with the blue suit (as perfect as the scene was), was a little ‘off’…as in, straight guys aren’t that clever with their clothes. (sorry, stereotype that has held so true in my life). ESPECIALLY at SC&P.

      I will be frank, I hoped Megan would be gone. I think you guys just broke my heart a little by noticing their clothes match. Maybe Don will go with to California during his suspension, but come back during his surely heroic S7 return to SC&P.
      I thought her white nightie, with Don’s suit–looked like WEDDING….and they were discussing a new start.

      THANK YOU for noticing Cutler as ‘ghost’. I love that his character is there for plot development only (usually), and he is dressed as such. No agendas, no serious secrets, just time for the meeting everyone! I will always love Harry Hamlin, no matter what.

      As soon as I saw Bob’s blaring B & Y, and Ted’s blaring B & G, I knew exactly what they were thinking. That’s because of you guys, thanks for this blog.

      “She loved the sea…”

      • VCR1

        Good point about Megan’s angelic nightie. I think I read an interview with Matthew Weiner in which he states that that scene is akin to a proposal.

        • lisbeth borden

          I avoid interviews, worry about spoilers. I should get out more.

      • Benjamin Franz

        I wish Megan would be gone for good as well. I take that scene as Megan and Don matching, but since Don is possibly becoming Dick again, they soon won’t be so matchy.

    • rachel schiff

      Great analysis that helps me enjoy the episode even more. Love the idea that Peggy’s ads are coming true with the half popsicle and the lipstick marks!

      I thought the last scene had a Wizard of Oz vibe. There was a shot of debris blowing around on the ground that almost looked like it was in black and white (and reminded me of the windy Kansas scenes from WO), and then you see the shadows of the four of them approaching before the camera pans up to show them all looking up at the rickety old house. I had a “Ding dong, the witch is dead!” sense of calm, like the quiet after a storm. Don’t know if this reference was intentional or just speaks to my own experience of the scene, but either way the scene was incredibly evocative! Also, Both Sides Now was a perfect song choice. The whole thing was gorgeously done.

    • charlotte

      Peggy marked her man! Thanks for pointing that out. Although I am proud of myself now for making the popsicle connection on my own.
      “Beth Francis” is not only Betty-esque, but also Don Draper and Bob Benson-esque in its pattern.

    • chelseadee

      Re: Megan and Don’s outfits, i always thought for the longest time that the way Janie Bryant matched Megan directly to Don, and the fact that she’s so up-to-the-minute fabulous and youthful and Don’s still 1960, AND the fact that they both have black hair and are gorgeous, was all just a way of signaling that Megan’s more like a daughter-figure to Don, as Freudian as that sounds. I especially thought that Megan’s line of “now we’re all in the same boat” clinched it.

      Also, longtime lurker, first time poster, hello!

    • jozie310

      Joan is wearing an animal print because she is going on the prowl, once again, for Roger. Caroline tells her of emotional opportunity opening up in Roger’s life, and Joan hardly needs to sniff the air. Notice her look after Caroline leaves.

      I think Joan & Roger will marry by the end of MM. Kevin will make sure of that.

      • ybbed

        We can only hope. I’ve been rooting for those two to come around and I kept trying to tie their green and red together in the Thanksgiving scene and couldn’t make sense of it. Maybe they’ll marry at Christmas!

      • Girl_With_a_Pearl

        Count me in the I hope Joan and Roger get together.

        On a they’ll never meet, but you know who would be good for Joan note: Dr. Arnold Rosen. Why, because Joan would get the caring, successful doctor she always wanted and Arnie would get a wife that would appreciate him. Nope. It’s not going to happen, but they would make a good couple.

      • Chris

        I thought Joan’s animal print spoke of her being more aggressive/powerful as well. Maybe on the prowl at work and in her personal life. It was a nice strong statement look for her, much more flattering than some of the older looking floral blouses she has worn.

      • formerlyAnon

        Joan could do worse than Roger. Especially if she still has feelings beyond fondness and mild lust for him. But I think she’d be “settling” with him, because she’s got her own damn good income now and I wish she’d find a man who loves her and values her appropriately and who would be reliable. I know that’s reaaally unrealistic – she’s not likely to do any better than Roger and if she can believe he’s a different man from the one who treated her like his girl on the side, who am I to quibble? (And, bonus points: he’s likely to go quickly from a heart attack when his time comes, and not linger as a burden on her for years of slow, cranky deterioration.)

    • Chris

      The pictures above of the SC&P sign made me think of how much foreshadowing there is on Mad Men. The “D” for Draper is gone from the name and now so is Don from the agency (at least for now). Ted and Don were the ones who took the “hit” and they are the two (along with Pete who never got his initial) who are not there.

      Also: the Nicholas and Alexandra book that Nan was reading finally played out. Ted “abdicated” his position like the Tsar did and went into “exile” with his family in L.A.

      • mapmakerscolors

        ooooh, good catch on the Russian czar parallel. love it.

      • imspinningaround

        Oh snap, that adds weight to Peggy’s “It’s Siberia!”

      • http://www.lindamerrill.com/ Linda Merrill

        Yes, but weren’t they all killed, not exiled?

        • charlotte

          They were pretty much exiled in their own country and then killed.

        • Chris

          Yes, as Charlotte said they were exiled first and were executed later. Let’s hope there’s no Bolsheviks in L.A. (kidding) I don’t think it’s in any way portentous of danger for them.

      • Glammie

        I wonder, too, if SC&P means that the agency will regress to its white-shoe roots–the agency we saw at the beginning of the series. Once again, they’re big with big mainstream clients and now Don Draper’s admitted he’s a white-trash interloper, he’s out the door. At least for now.

        I think though that SC&P can’t maintain its momentum without a Draper or at least a Ted. Pete was always the AE who thought ahead–so he’s in California and that’s where the action will be.

        I have some vague memory of burgeoning LA ad agencies at this point, though advertising central continues to be New York.

        • Chris

          I like to think Don had the touch that made the agency something special. Remember when one of the big agencies was after him so intently they used Betty and her modeling to try to get him? (Which was awful because she really was stunning in the ads) Peggy brings some thing different to the mix and she is excellent but an agency of that size needs more than one reliable east coast creative. With Ted and Ginsberg if they all worked together they really could have been the dream team. With Ted uprooting his family I wonder how much time he will have to devote to the business from CA. I admit I’m excited to see Don come back from being the underdog. He works best when he is hungry for something.

          • Glammie

            Yeah, Peggy’s got the “it” factor as far as her copy goes, but she’s s still a bit green on the social thing. Or it’s more that she’s a little more passive–. Don really will take the out-of-the-blue idea and run with it, good or bad. He’s also singularly persuasive when he’s on his game.

            I think Cutler has angled to get him out of there, but I think he’ll regret it. I also think Don will end maneuvering right back. In some ways he already did by putting Ted on the spot in that meeting. In some ways, that forced the issue and Ted went running. If Don had cared enough not to self-implode, he would have been in the catbird seat as far as New York was concerned.

            Even when Don goes haywire, he’s still got a knack. Dick Whitman’s Hershey tale is a gritty little tearjerker.

            • Chris

              Oh yeah, we know Don knows how to do the sneaky maneuvers when he wants to. If he thinks Cutler is the one behind his ouster old Jim may live to regret it. He may get some revenge served up Don style.

      • Orange Girl

        Great catch on the book!

      • CMSmith1848

        The new logo makes me think of the Price is Right logo.

    • Madelyn Cuello

      Hello Everyone. T&Lo thank you so much for all your recaps, both the show and mad style. So interesting. I send them along to coworkers and friends/fam. I also wanted to point out that Joan wore a animal-print coat the night Roger and her met at the hotel room when he gave her the caged bird. Interesting she’d wear it again when she is doing the opposite, freeing herself from being caged not only by him but by all the men that have done her wrong (even Don whom she considered a friend before he fired the pig from jaguar). And Peggy’s power suit is phenomenal!

    • Damien W

      “So yes, Bobby Draper. It’s true. You’re a negro.”

      My mind has never been so blown by one of your Mad Styles as by this one. You see and connect things I couldn’t see/connect in years of rewatchings. Thank you both for your bitchery, your insight, and most of all, your heart.

      • BarniClaw

        Hear, hear!

      • jozie310

        A commenter here Monday made that remark. A Brit, I believe.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        It reminds me of Steve Martin in “The Jerk.” I was raised a poor black boy (or something to that effect).

      • Chuck Chuckerson

        I actually started laughing when I saw the black kid because Bobby Draper asking “are we negros?” was the first thing I thought of.

    • Sara Padilla

      Those pantsuits! They’re inextricably bound up with post-Vatican II nuns in my mind. After everyone else had binned them, those nuns kept rocking ‘em in my Catholic School days. edited to ask: is this deliberate? Joannine wearing her black and white nun outfit, Peggy in her folk-nun outfit. Probably not, but something to chew on ’til the next season.

      • mcpierogipazza

        Joan didn’t look like a nun to me, she looked like a pilgrim. Though the black was also mournful for a super serious moment. And I agree with TLo that the Peggy pantsuit was what kids of the 70s would remember their teachers wearing. I didn’t see a lot of nuns-without-habits til the 80s myself, but I can see nuns wearing them in the 70s as part of that general teacher type demographic. The clothes were very practical.

    • ‘Becca’lise Deveaux

      Maybe it’s been mentioned, but where was Adam when Don was getting deflowered by prostitutes?

      • charlotte

        I think he was still a baby and we just didn’t see him.

    • gsk241

      My husband swears that Cutler is a time lord. This would account for his ability to phase in and out of scenes.

      • NMMagpie

        Don’t blink. :)

        • Guest

          Also, didn’t the Plop Plop Fizz Fizz jingle come out in the 1970s? Was it in print before that?

    • Nicola Anna Molly Page

      I’m going to miss these posts in the dark long months to come, re-reading them will sustain me I’m sure ;) This whole site, fellow BK’s, our beloved uncles; everything here is a pure joy. Congratulations TLo, I hope you’re relaxing and celebrating today!

      And although my mind refuses to contemplate a world without Mad Men, I can’t help but wonder… Will our favourite Uncles move their attention to Game of Thrones…..? I would love it if they could!

      • asympt

        They’ve said nope.

        GoT becomes very complicated on account of the spoiler situation with the books, if nothing else.

        • Nicola Anna Molly Page

          Ah, I thought it was a time constraint thing, but that makes sense. If either of them have read the books it would be difficult to remain spoiler free.

          • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

            a little bird told us that Lo was heavily into the books.

    • NMMagpie

      As annoyed as I have become with Megan, I did not consider the possibility of any further connection between her and Don/Dick until now. I read an interview with MW and he mentioned that Don/Dick truly loves Megan and the costuming signaled that perfectly.

      I gave myself props during the show when Megan showed up in that nightgown and my first thought was savior/angel.

      For a show that is about the use/abuse/creation of power, Peggy’s outfits made me want to shout. While it may not happen within the context of the show, Peggy will definitely a power player for many years to come. SC&P (and any future incarnations) have no idea what they have their hands on there.

      Excellent analysis again, TLO. :)

    • kittentoes

      And now, my Wednesday mornings are sad and empty until next year.

    • Fede

      An interesting detail —I wonder if it was intentional or not— is that Pete’s telegram is dated November 22, 1968 which is the same day The Beatles White Album was released.

      • Nicola Anna Molly Page

        It’s the end of the world as they knew it? That was made during a big spiritual change for all the Beatles IIRC, even though it cost them dearly at the time, it worked out being one of their best albums. A sign that the current and future turbulence will shape the members of SC&P for the better?

        • Fede

          Who knows? Mad Men is so sixties like The Beatles and I hope that next season will end in December 1969 with The Logn and Winding Road :)

          • ybbed

            and ominously, Helter Skelter, although I don’t buy into any of that.

        • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

          that was also the album that convinced charles manson that the beatles were communicating with him and directing his actions. interesting.

          • Nicola Anna Molly Page

            Very true! That’s probably it after all the Sharon Tate references.

    • http://www.facebook.com/dglassman1 Doug Glassman

      I’m so happy you’re still calling it the “Whershey Whorehouse!”

      Also, since Bobby got actual dialogue, including one of the most quotable lines of the season (“Are we negroes?”), I’m assuming he’s sticking around for the final season.

      • Glammie

        Yeah, this Bobby got his own scenes and his own little storyline. And they allowed him a line at the whorehouse. He may now have had more lines than the rest of the Bobbies put together.

    • ybbed

      One thing about Don and Megan’s scenes together they seem to wearing white, black and shades of grey. For once Megan is out of red! It may indicate that they are in some kind of “grey area” in their relationship, but I tend to agree with T and L that they will remain a couple in some form or another.

    • MartyBellerMask

      It’s been argued that young Dick doesn’t physically resemble Jon Hamm, but man, does he have the mannerisms and expressions down.

      Also- Gene REALLY looks like his uncle, Betty’s brother whose name I can’t recall. But I remember him being creepy. Or maybe I’m just confusing the character with the Compound Gynecologist he played on “Big Love”. *shudder*

      • Tippi123

        I think the brother’s called William.

    • Miss Disco

      Joan’s green dress is so luscious, i want it.

      • ailujailuj

        oh yes, she looked just gorgeous in that final scene – and I think there was some serious foreshadowing for next season’s reuniting w/ the Roger. Makes me roll my eyes but I’ve already ranted on his character. But I hated that she was overwhelmed in that scene with the whole hat on the baby and the box of cranberry sauce. WTF. probably to make her more (yes, relaxed) maternal, less siren.

        • Miss Disco

          I dunno though. Mad Men is always teasing a Joan/Roger reunion and it never seems to happen.

          Roger’s a total manchild, but he seems more sincere towards Kevin and Joan. His focus on Kevin in that scene, rather than fussing about Bob or making some snidey quip, may be encouraging. But he is a total manchild, so he may get bored of his new toy eventually. Meantime, all the toys for Kevin! :D

          Hell, if Joan wants to mingle with people, get Bob to introduce her to someone NOT planning to push her overboard*, a second parent isn’t so bad. Just don’t let him take the kid to Planet of the Apes.

          *I remain hopeful that Bob is more trying to escape his seedy past and ‘Manolo’ was a misstep, and his Joan friendship is genuine, rather than part of some plan to get into Joan’s bank account – he can surely see that she’s not that well off anyway.

          • 3hares

            Joan’s value is in the intel she provides. She’s the one that gave him the dirt on Pete, and now she’s given him dirt on Roger. She’s one of the best people for Bob to know in the office. Which doesn’t mean that Bob doesn’t actually like her, but he’s practically admitted that he’s incapable of having a friendship without looking out for what’s in it for him, even if he can’t see it yet. It’s not, so far, that he goes after people just to go after them, but that he wouldn’t hold back out of personal feelings for them if he had a reason to go after them.

            • Miss Disco

              What dirt has he got on Roger though? That he and Joan have a kid? Not much mileage with that. Both are now divorced (there was no mention of Joan/Greg’s situation), both are partners in the firm, both are already suspected of having had an affair, so what dirt has he really got?

            • 3hares

              When I say “dirt” I don’t necessarily mean blackmail material. With Pete it was that his mother needed a nurse. The key is just infiltrating things about the person’s life. Knowing that Roger is Kevin’s father is huge, because it’s a weakness for Roger just as Pete’s mother was a weakness for Pete. He struck gold there, if he ever needs it. Roger himself already gave himself away when he tipped his hand about not wanting Bob around Joan. Yet another reason for Bob to be around Joan.

            • Miss Disco

              But still, what is there to do with that? Much like the whole idea of Bob working at SCtheampersandofdoomP, if this is a scheme, it must be a complex scheme for little payoff. All the hours, all the aprons, all the toys… It’ll annoy Roger to have Bob around, but if he wants to unzip Joan’s dress again, he’s probably going to have to take the harder route anyway, and Bob’s not really in the way. Bob’s probably more at risk trying to pit Joan against Roger.

            • 3hares

              I’m not saying it’s a scheme, like with some specific objective other than doing well at SC&P. I’m saying that a relationship with Joan is very valuable for Bob beyond just Joan being somebody he likes to hang out with. That’s why he originally came to her apartment with the football, just as it’s why he strikes up conversations with people and offers them things. Like he didn’t specifically become friends with Joan thinking she’d give him something he could use to get in with Pete, but he worked that angle when he was with her and it paid off. The goal is just to get himself more secure at the company and to move up. Anybody who’s open to his overtures can have a relationship with him.

          • ailujailuj

            totally agree that kevin can benefit from the goods – but I think that’s the best he can hope for. Roger is zeroing in because he has no one left. But you’re right that Joan could be an awesome friend to Bob – especially in ways 3hares mentions below. And vice versa. I feel very strongly that every woman needs a gay in her life.

    • pottymouth_princess

      My little brother had Bobby’s jacket c. 1970. Sears, I think.

    • susu11

      I remember Joan wearing a subtle leopard print brooch and earring set in the season 4 finale (“Tomorrow Land”) In that episode she was pushing the mail cart, and was given a promotion with no actual pay increase or real clout. I feel like here she’s come full circle with the leopard print being so bold – she was part of the partners’ decision to oust Don, and apparently according to Matt Weiner she landed the Avon account. Taking that into account with the fact that as you guys mention she is also setting the terms for how and when Roger is involved in Kevin’s life, It’s kind of “I am Woman, Hear me Roar” isn’t it?

      Thank you Tom and Lorenzo for the great recaps and style posts this season. Season 6 hasn’t been my favorite overall, but your posts are always insightful.

    • scribbles14

      I wanted to cheer when I saw Peggy in her pantsuit. SO cutting edge.

      Hard to picture now how revolutionary those first pantsuits were. I remember my mother coming home from a card party/fashion show benefit for my Catholic school, totally amazed that a couple of the outfits modeled were PANTSUITS!!!!OMG!!!! What made it that touch more eyebrow-raising was that PTA moms did the modeling — there was much talk about the moms who had the nerve to wear those suits. This was probably about 1970 or 1971, which shows you how long it took for stuff to trickle into the suburbs.
      P.S. first time commenter here — hi :)

    • sekushinonyanko

      Joan’s office Thanksgiving outfit had a lot of pilgrim realness going on.

      • Chris

        And she had a nice Cornucopia pin on with her purple suit when Don announced he was going to L.A. I think that makes three Thanksgiving pins in one episode. It fits in with TLo’s theory she probably has 20 years worth of them.

      • makeityourself

        That acorn brooch was over-the-top fabulous.

    • Cabernet7

      I just noticed that the blue sweater with white stripes that Pete is wearing in the scene with Trudy mimics Don’s sweater in the scene in “For Immediate Release” in the kitchen with Arnold, Marie Calvet and Megan.

      Another example of how Sally just can’t escape her father…When Sally uses the fake name “Beth Francis” she’s taking on her mother’s name, but as was shown on the box with the purple heart back in the pilot episode, Don Draper’s middle name is Francis. (I knew that name connection had to pay off someday!)

    • Josefina Madariaga Suárez

      “D-less” made me laugh, sometimes I act like I’m 12.

      It was always kida dark that they basically only removed the D, and then see Don/Dick act his own way while the rest of the partners were trying to work together.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Jim is a cunning fellow. And he knew that implosion was coming.

    • dickylarue

      Thanks TLO for another amazing season of recaps & Mad Style! It’s imposserus now to watch this show without your weekly contributions.

      I loved the Sally Whitman piece. The fact that she’s already using fake id’s to change her name like her Father completely went over my head in the watching of that scene.

      Now I’m fascinated to see if Don/Megan are together next season based on the dress in their “breakup” scene.

      Cutler as a ghost is perfect too. He’s running the agency. No one else really seems to know that. They will.

      • decormaven

        Preach it on Cutler. He’s already assessed the playing field, and he’s lining up his positioning.

        • ailujailuj

          yup. perhaps as is the actor, as well – perfectly cast. I love that he always looks like he’s being filmed in b&w.

          • dickylarue

            Love that B&W observation.

          • makeityourself

            You are so right.

      • tamsta99

        Is anyone else just riveted by Hamlin as Cutler? I’ve never seen him act before (didn’t watch him in the 80s). In ever scene he’s in, I’m just drawn into him. So icy, steely and he says so much with just a few words.

        • dickylarue

          I was a little kid so I really only knew him from the original Clash of the Titans. He’s a force. It’s great casting. You could see him take Roger down with a pen stroke if he wants him gone.

          I also think the name choice of “Cutler” was intentional. He’s cutting the place up. In the span of a few episodes he has Don & Pete out of their previous position. Granted, they had something to do with it but he’s a shark.

          • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

            He really is. He’s even frequently dressed in shark-like colors. Hell,in that silver suit and tie number, he’s basically a great white.

          • tamsta99

            You’re so on point about “Cutler.” She slices and dices. He’s like a knife, even his styling with all the silver and gray is like a piece of cutler-y!. God, I love this show and all the aha moments it gives!

          • siriuslover

            LOVED Clash of the Titans, but have also loved Harry Hamlin since I was a kid. I think the casting for his role as Cutler was spot on.

        • asympt

          Compare to Hamlin’s run on the recent season of Shameless–aside from being privileged in class, a *totally* different character.

          • ailujailuj

            you just reminded me of something I read about hamlin – a kitten posted awhile back that he insisted his MM role be neither gay nor a molester. And I wondered if it was because of his character in Shameless.

            • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

              I remember that. But he forgot to specify “not a creep,” so… :D

            • editrixie

              I also still have trouble washing the taste of him in Veronica Mars out of my mouth.

        • MartyBellerMask

          I really only know him from L.A. Law. He is so good here!!

        • testingwithfire

          Agreed. I didn’t really remember him as an ACTOR from LA Law, just another good-looking TV lead. Sometimes people have to age/lose some of their looks (although he’s still an attractive man) to become the fine character actors they’re meant to be.

          Love the way he uses those glasses – he’s like a great grey owl on the hunt.

      • Chris

        Ted did say he was splitting the agency- and not in half. He is literally the Eminence Gris behind the throne at SC&P I think.

    • decormaven

      What got me was when Roger came in and put his hat on Kevin. I think about the night he came to Joan’s- the night he was supposed to have returned from NC to rescue the Lucky Strike account- and the way he sadly put on his hat before he left. Joan may be saying she’s not going to let him back into her life, but I wonder if she will stay committed to this position.

    • rage_on_the_page

      God, I laughed out loud when Clara gasped SHE FELL OFF A SHIP! And then: “She loved the sea…” Pete’s life is just hilariously painful and tragic.

      Also: “So yes, Bobby Draper. It’s true. You’re a negro.” You guys. I love you guys.

      • Chris

        Yes- it’s particularly tragic when you look around Pete’s office and see it’s all ships and nautical themed decorations.

        • 3hares

          LOL! God, it’s like Ted’s pilot stuff only with ships. Pete was a coxswain in college right? Though the kind of cruise Dot died on was nothing like the kind of sailing the family probably did.

          Wonder what his office in California will be like…all desert? Nothing Spanish?

          • Chris

            That’s what is so much fun when they change settings- you get to try to imagine what all the L.A. sets will be like! Very 70′s looking I suspect as it will be all new stuff and L.A. is probably more fashion forward than NY at the time. I really hope Ted doesn’t start looking like Mr. Brady but I fear he will. Just no love beads on him please!

            • Blimunda

              Absolutely! Can’t wait to see the LA sets. And, of course, the costumes. During the pool party scene I was so agog watching the fashions I could barely follow the dialogue.

            • yllas

              I can’t wait for next season either. (already!) But everyone’s enthusiasm is making me sad, because next season is THE LAST. I will anticipate it, and I will dread it because it will be the last season, and each episode will be one step further away from the. end.

            • HengRu

              And no curly perm, either!

          • Bonjour

            Pete was a coxswain? Wow! Sooooooo preppy…and believable, w VK’s height/build

    • quitasarah

      Thank you guys so much for a fabulous season of recaps. I think I’m going to miss Mad Style as much as (more than?) I’m going miss the show. Such amazing information and so perceptive, just fantastic. I read a lot of recaps, and yours are my favorites by far.

      And mazel tov on your engagement! I hope there was one IRL as well as on Twitter. You guys made me tear up this morning. So happy for everyone who can now marry whoever they want.

    • AutumnInNY

      Stan- please take a razor to that handsome face of yours. He looks like one of the Smith Bros. cough syrup men.

      Peggy is certainly overdressed for her date unless they were going to some high end event. Obviously the dress was worn to be seen at the door of the conference room to show Ted what he’s missing. Mission accomplished a few hours later Pegs.

      • misscellaneous

        Hate the beard, too, but can think of several teachers/bosses, etc who wore that full beard back then. Blech.

    • Orange Girl

      So young Dick Whitman is starting to look less dorky, no?

      I would wear Clara’s pink dress today, hands down.

      • MartyBellerMask

        I swear, that actor hit a growth spurt since last time we saw him!

        • Orange Girl

          That must be it!

          • Cheryl

            They trimmed the bowl cut that he has had since he was little — it definitely made a difference in the way his face looked.

    • KC

      I loved the two references to silhouettes at the end of the episode: Peggy sitting in Don’s chair, and Don and the kids as they approach the whorehouse, where we see their shadows. Both refer back to the opening credits, and also the idea of “shadow” identities….Don/Dick, Peggy/”Boss”, Kids as Drapers/Kids as Whitmans

    • gubblebumm

      The whole wearing pants thing was indeed a huge deal. Even little girls had to wear dresses to school. I protested and wore a burnt orange suit. And I had a dress in the same pattern as Peggy’s dress. Ah the memories!!

      • Lady Gray

        My teachers in high school (in the late 80′s-early 90′s) were not allowed to wear pants and had to wear skirts.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        I remember the first time my mother wore pants to a funeral. She was so uncomfortable about the propriety but very comfortable in her outfit.

        • Glammie

          Funny, I’ve never worn pants to a funeral and I don’t think I could (or to a wedding.) Some habits die hard.

      • misscellaneous

        Burnt Orange! I had burnt orange crushed velvet Hot Pants. I know. Jealous much?

        • Qitkat

          /crushed velvet Hot Pants/ oh the memories! Mine were burgundy. Best my skinny butt ever looked!

    • KC

      And the little bit where Roger puts his hat on Kevin, claiming him as his own. Perfect.

    • melanie0866

      Dear T & Lo,

      Wonderful, thank you. I now have a Mad Men routine: watch the episode on Sunday night, read your recap Monday morning, anxiously await “Mad Style” on Wednesdays, and then watch the episode again on Wednesday night.

      Two things:

      1) Joan’s leopard-print blouse looked very 70′s to my eyes – and it made her look much more trendy and modern than pathetic Caroline in her old coat and hat.

      2) Megan on the couch in those plaid pants and sweater reminded me of Betty and Don in the first season, in the episode where they sit around and get drunk at home. She was wearing a very similar ensemble.

      Hugs and kisses,
      Melanie

    • jinco

      I thought Megan and Don matched so well in that scene because they were back on the mend as a couple, until he broke the news. I think the stylistic drifting we saw all season between them was the real story and this one scene of matching was just their temporary wishful thinking.

      Her leather mini dress was cool but so creaky!

    • ailujailuj

      OK will probably get kicked off of TLo for this rant – I was going to post this rant after the episode aired but thought I would wait to make sure I wasn’t just being persnickety…

      …but I was mostly underwhelmed by the episode. It felt rushed and crammed and had a messy focus. TLo’s analyses are becoming more entertaining, engaging, and thoughtful (aside from the story-telling costuming).

      I think I am just done with Don – don’t care how he resolves his life shit or shit life. Disinterested in Megan and don’t really care what she does – she’s an idiot for getting into the situation she got herself into and hope she frees herself from him and moves on to another show, literally. Of COURSE she’s in the same mess Don’s kids are. But I think TLo’s suspicions are also quite viable that they will reunite next season. sigh.

      The thought of Roger & Joan reuniting makes my eye twitch. I love love LOVE both actors but Roger has worn me out. He needs to shove that little snit of a daughter in front of a bus and get back w/ mona. Their exchange at his mum’s funeral was the only time (besides the LSD tripping) I’ve enjoyed him on screen for a very long while. His snarky quips are no longer joltingly funny… he’s just sad and boring.

      I love the actors playing them but the scenes between Petey and Trudy feel like nails on a chalkboard. I never believed their coupling – probably just me. But she gave a prescient monologue about him being free and I’d be willing to bet that it foreshadows not only a huge life change (LA) but perhaps a huge lifestyle change (sexually). Other than that, I’m no longer interested in him in the firm’s environment – or Trudy in any environment.

      The scene where Ted leaves Peggy and crawls into bed with his wife made me writhe. It really disgusted me. Removing himself from the environment is either going to be the only thing keeping him from wrecking his marriage or will make him lust even more for Pegs. Either way, I think she has already moved on and he just became another Don to her.

      Don can disappear for all I care; his redeeming qualities are now alive in Bobby and Sally, who could carry a couple episodes on their own. And I want more Joanie. Stan. Ginsberg. Bob. And for god’s sake bring in a Bobbie Barrett.

      • quitasarah

        Um, I’ve got an easy solution for you. Stop watching.

        • ailujailuj

          oh – I’m still having fun… finding other things to stay interested in but that is always an option.

      • misscellaneous

        I seem to be the ONLY one who finds Rogers character reduced to a cartoon.

        • ailujailuj

          No – I completely agree. Although he was the bank-rolling window-dressing face of the the firm, I really used to love his character for entertainment’s sake.

    • http://www.wordydoodles.com WordyDoodles

      Brilliant recap, as always. The observation about Peggy’s ads is the coup de grace. I’d be sharing this post even if that itself were the only revelation.

      Really appreciated the musing on yellow, especially as it related to the “woman trapped” episode– plus Bob. Seems to still signify being trapped–maybe most notably with Pete in the yellow car he can’t drive. But Dawn in yellow, and Tammy covered by a yellow blanket, made me really think about their futures.

      And check out Clara in those last pictures, with not a shade of yellow or orange in sight! She had it on earlier, but it’s striking when she’s next to Pete without it looking fabulous as ever. I wonder if she’ll follow Pete away from SC&P.

      Can’t wait to find out what happens when all these folks go West.

      • Lady Gray

        In the scene were Pete is saying goodbye to a sleeping Tammy, Pete is wearing yellow pants. Trapped latent sexuality? I hope so. I hope that Pete has some sort of huge awakening. He’s always kind of been my favorite character to watch.

        • http://www.wordydoodles.com WordyDoodles

          I wondered that too! And I have to think it’s a great visual metaphor to literally have him wear no ties.

    • missinmass

      Congratulations Tom and Lorenzo!
      I know it is such a relief to be able to enjoy the rest of your lives with legal security.
      Couples deciding to live together saying marriage is “just a piece of paper”… how glib is that phrase?

      • urbantravels

        Straight couples being so lofty about how marriage is “just a piece of paper” should have Peggy yell at them how they’re “lucky to have decisions.” Loudly and repeatedly.

    • Alison McAfee

      “So yes, Bobby Draper. It’s true. You’re a negro.”

      fin.

    • TigerLaverada

      Just want to chime in and thank you guys for the most fun and insightful critiques I’ve ever read. You’ve taught me to watch in a whole new, deeper and more complex way than I ever have before. Kudos to you.

      And you two were the first ones I thought of when I heard DOMA went down. I’m so so so happy for you, and for the country too.

    • Glammie

      A few thoughts:

      Joan:
      Joan’s not just in orange–she’s in coral–another lipstick color like last week’s hot pink. She’s embodying Avon’s product line at the office. Which is a wonderfully Joan route to dressing as an ad executive and different than her partner suits. She’ll just embody the product line.

      Firing scene:

      Frank Cutler’s all in gray until the Don firing scene, where he dominates in his version of yellow. Frank’s in charge. (He, Bert and Roger sort of looked like something from the Godfather.) Interesting that the two idealists–Don and Ted–are effectively out of the picture, even though the merger would never have happened without them. Joan’s predominant color is blue–a tip to the fact that she and Cutler won’t see eye-to-eye about this long-term? While she may be pissed at Don over the IPO, she also knows Don stood up for her and while he may have self-immolated in a meeting, she knows a lot of the dirt on everyone else.

      “Going Down?” “You’re early.” First is obvious; the second is Don’s way of saying “I’ll be back.” After all, Don’s like Bob Benson and Pete’s told us that these guys always get ahead. Don didn’t get out of the whorehouse by being easily defeated.

      In some weird way, he’s been successful enough (and he’s the most self-made of any of them) that he no longer needs to be Donald Draper the man out of the advertisement.

      Peggy:

      I love the way Janie Bryant clothes Peggy. The clothes get better and more professional, but Peggy never-ever shows the flair for clothes that Joan, Megan and Betty do. I love how it’s slightly wrong–though some of her business outfits have been good. Her mini makes her sexy, but then there’s that over-the-top pink bow (a call back to her non-engagement scene). You just know Peggy works at it, but she just doesn’t have the knack the others do. It says so much about Peggy’s discomfiture about her identity as a woman. She’s still not totally at ease in her skin.

      Bob:

      By the same token, Bob pops because he also overdoes it a bit all the time–he’s Mr. Eager-to-Please until you cross him.

      • housefulofboys

        You made a lot of great points, thanks! Especially Don saying “you’re early,” at the elevator. The “going down” comment was easy to identify, but you just know that MW didn’t throw Don’s response in there casually. And, neither Bob nor Don are the type to be easily defeated.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Now that I think of it, Coral lipstick totally embodies Avon to me. I predict next season we will see those fancy perfume bottles that look like dolls, on Sally’s dresser. Did they have them in 1969?

        • Glammie

          I had some black kitty with a pink bow that held some girly cologne a bit after–kind of think it was by Max Factor. Now I wish I still had it.

          Come to think of it, my father’s gay production manager gave it a new bow when my father was selling the house in 90s–he knew it was fabulous before I did.

        • misscellaneous

          Coral was HUGE early 70s/late 60s in SoCal. I can see the gunny sack dresses now…and, in so cal, coral necklaces. But that was mid 70s… My mother always wore Coral lipstick (teacher) with her plaid skirts and blouses…

        • Chris

          They used them in the background of the Miss Porters dorm room. On the yellow top shelf on the wall there are three or four of them. I used to love them! I got a kick out of seeing them there.

      • quitasarah

        From an interview with Elisabeth Moss on Vulture. She was asked how they picked that little black dress:

        “My boobs looked the best in that one. I haven’t seen the finale yet, but I was there so I saw them then [laughs]. Yeah, it was all about the cleavage, and that was the one that the girls looked the best in. And it was also the one that was sexy and short. Everything was perfect about it. And it STILL had that pink bow, which made it very Peggy.”

    • Samantha R

      I’ve been loving these articles all season–they honestly remind me of my days as an English major tearing apart the meaning of colors and symbols in Shakespeare courses! Thanks for feuling my Mad Men obsession week after week!

      One thing I picked up on: Sylvia and Betty both call Don on green phones, both in instances where their children are in trouble and need Don to save the day. I could write an essay…

    • Sara Padilla

      Every time I see the SC&P logo, the theme to “The Price Is Right” starts playing in my head.

      • lisbeth borden

        Every time anything, the theme to “The Price Is Right” starts playing in my head.

      • CMSmith1848

        ME TOO! I just commented on that somewhere else. They look so much a like!

    • missinmass

      Back in those days if you lived in New York City of course you would be fashion forward by at least a year …..right?

    • editrixie

      Uncles and kittens, something I’m curious about but don’t have the memory to figure out: is this the “longest” season of Mad Men we’ve had so far? By that I mean, it starts out around Christmas this year, and goes till Thanksgiving. It seemed like previous seasons, the focus was a much shorter time period, but I could be misremembering. We went from heavy coats and hats to hot summer skin showing (I’m not lettin’ that image of Bob in the shorts go for a loooong time) and back to heavy coats. It kind of interests me, especially since there was so much change going on at the time.

      • Cheryl

        I’m not sure they were ever so focused on the “dates.” 1968 had so many specific dates that they seem to have structured this particular year around those events. I don’t remember any other year being so definite. (And because I lived through this year in my young adulthood, it’s very clear to me. Earlier seasons, when I was just a child, seemed to me to be less pegged to specific dates.)

    • Brad Watson

      Just arriving – in case it hasn’t already been brought up (and in spite of the fact, if it has): I was kinda blown away by the arrangement of bodies when Don was called into the tribunal/partners’ meeting. Wonderful callback to the end-of-season tableau last year, each in their own office window. Don’s been squeezed out. Also LOVED that Roger went to the goodie closet for a case of Ocean Spray cranberry sauce before leaving for Joan’s.

    • AutumnInNY

      Brilliant as always Tlo and congratulations!

      I so love the girls in the office. Clara, Caroline, Moira and Dawn. The personal style evolution of all of them is so much fun to watch. I’m sure it’s been suggested but it would be fun to see a Mad style version of the 9 to 5′ers. Janie B does a great job of giving each a little bit of their own individual fashion vibe.

      Joan in emerald. Stunning! Bob in his Thanksgiving apron. Fabulous. Roger’s hat on baby’s head. Sweet.

      Loved seeing the telegram. I wish they were still around. A text just doesn’t have the same flair or sense of sentimental value.

      • MartyBellerMask

        As Peggy once said, “You can’t frame a phone call.” :)

        • 3hares

          I did find myself wondering if Pete would frame that telegram.

        • AutumnInNY

          Exactly! Good memory ; )

      • Qitkat

        Agreed on the telegram. I have the one dated January 21,1945 that my Navy Lieutenant (future) dad sent from NYC to my (future) mom: “ARRIVE TUSCALOOSA MORNING OF 23RD. MAKE WEDDING 27TH AT 5 PM.” Just like that, all caps, words pasted on the now yellowed, newsprint type paper.
        Time to frame it! I get a lump in my throat every time I look at it. He was returning from 3-4 years overseas in WWII.

        • AutumnInNY

          Ah, that’s great. A life-changing moment, a time and place in one treasured telegram for over sixty years.
          Beautiful!

    • jozie310

      I think we need some remark on the dreadful SC&P logo from TLo. I realize it’s design outside their metier, but it’s such an affront to design fundamentals in general, that it begs commentary.
      Looks like a fun TV game show of that era, NOT a corporation interfacing with other corporations.

      • ailujailuj

        yeah – thought that would have come up by now. it’s one of those graphic styles that you either love or hate. and the bright orange! reminds me of a dating game show on tv back then? can’t remember the name. but SC&P are trend setters, so by the time a meme goes mainstream, they’ve often moved on. I’ve always found that an interesting concept in the field of design – it is either responding to – or cuing a cultural movement.

      • housefulofboys

        I know! I was thinking the same thing, I feel like the set designers were intentionally making the logo as awful as possible to highlight the awkwardness of the merger. Also, even if you like the look of the design, why would a designer make the S and the P large (for Sterling and Partners) and the C smaller (for Cooper). It makes it hard to “read” the design correctly.

        • Cheryl

          Because you’re supposed to notice that there’s no “D” there.

      • DeniseSchipani

        I have a feeling it was thrown together pretty quickly. When they decide on the name, I remember Jim Cutler saying, “I’ll get creative started on a logo.” When you consider that the partners proved awful at working together and communicating (witness Sunkist/Ocean Spray), you can imagine someone signing off on the logo without really consulting anyone or, maybe, NO ONE signing off and the creative department getting the message that they had, and no one noticed till it was up on the door looking bulbous.

        • Glammie

          Hmmm, early hint that Cutler is a first-class office politician, but that doesn’t make a great leader of creative.

      • Glammie

        It’s completely period though–the burnt oranges and yellows, the rounded chunky typeface–had a Proustian moment there looking at it. Ouch.

    • jen

      Sigh! So, so good. Thanks T-Lo for an amazing season of brilliant recaps! You guys never cease to amaze!

    • housefulofboys

      TLo, thanks for a wonderful body of work on Mad Men, it has so much enhanced my understanding of and satisfaction with the show. The only good thing about the upcoming hiatus is that my boss is going to be amazed at how much I’m able to get done at work on Monday and Wednesday!

      I’ve been thinking about Don’s situation. He is an alcoholic, no way around it, he’s going to have a hard time stopping drinking and re-focusing his life. The obstacles he faces in mending fences with family and work, integrating his past and present, dealing with the fallout from taking over Don Draper’s identify – AND recovering from alcoholism – seem almost insurmountable. However, and I’m hoping some other commenters can help give me some insight into this, it doesn’t seem to me like he has what we now recognize as the “addiction gene” when it comes to drinking, or he would have been a non-functioning drunk long before now. It strikes me that he has always used alcohol to beat down his Dick Whitman secrets and to manage the chaos in his life, in a way that was completely socially acceptable for the times. The drinking has increased as he has had to run faster and faster to keep up, but it seems to me that his bottom has a lot more to do with his background than it does with him having a biological tendency toward addiction. I’ve been fortunate that my family has never had to deal with alcoholism or addiction (lots of other problems, but at least not that!). Does it make sense that – if he can battle his demons from his childhood and from Korea and reconnect the parts of his fractured psyche – that he will be able to control the alcoholism as well? I guess I see Don/Dick as an inherently strong character (like Ted said, “there’s a good person in there”) and I hope that he is able to find some peace.

      • Glammie

        See, now I think he has a major drinking problem, but I’m not convinced he’s a classic alcoholic. Don’s drinking occurs in cycles. It’s a symptom of inner turmoil that then becomes a problem in its own right.

        He became a terrible drunk after his divorce, but then he cleaned up and was able to drink in a way that was manageable until his life fell apart again. Alcoholics, in my experience, can’t cut back like that. (Which is why you have that no-alcohol-at-all stance of AA). Don’s womanizing actually strikes me as the more compulsive addictive behavior–i.e. he cheats even when he doesn’t want to. (“I want to stop doing this.”)

        But Matt Weiner may disagree with me, so we’ll see.

        • Cheryl

          I guess it depends on what you think “causes” alcoholism. My brother, who basically left home after high school and only came back for school vacations, developed a drinking problem without any of us being aware of it for 10 years. He was able to stop drinking by believing that he had an “allergy” to alcohol that had made him dependent. (As long as he thought of it that way, it was easy to resist, just like you’d avoid peanut butter if you knew you had an allergy to it.) Did he have a physical/chemical addiction?

          I think Don’s descent into alcoholism is not realistic; at the very beginning of the season we knew that he had been embarrassing himself in public (Mona’s remark to Roger after Don threw up at the funeral) and he hadn’t stopped drinking then; Megan has been very gently trying him to slow down, to no avail. At the rate he had been drinking, I don’t know if he would – in real life – be able to just control by himself.

          • Glammie

            Yep, my father was a “functional” alcoholic and was never like that. He was, however, drunk every night. Don’s downward spiral was pretty quick this season and not sure what set it off other than it being the penultimate season and the need to have things come to a head.

          • formerlyAnon

            The pattern of drinking Glammie describes was rife in my family and in several instances life events (either traumatic or just changes like retirement) did trigger someone to cross the line into something that was acknowledged to be “problem drinking.” Most of them course-corrected without giving up booze, others didn’t. I think it’s very individual.

        • 3hares

          What’s the difference between a major drinking problem and a classic alcoholic? It doesn’t seem odd to me that somebody could be an alcoholic who has, in the past, been able to control their drinking at times. It seems like Don’s problem has been cumulative anyway. JH has, I think, described him as a functional alcoholic in the past, but he’s getting less functional and needing more liquor.

          • Glammie

            Freddy Rumsen strikes me as a classic case. He simply can’t drink now or ever. And, from what we can see, he couldn’t stop without going all the way. The booze in and of itself and his need to always be sloshed made him ripe for A.A. Duck was another one. The moment he fell off the wagon, everything went out the window. He cannot drink.

            So I guess that’s what I’m thinking of. If Don faces his inner Dick and begins to live an honest life, will he go into a tailspin if he drinks at Sally’s wedding?

            • MartyBellerMask

              A family member, who has been sober (alcohol and drugs) for 20+ years- we recently went to dinner and she had a glass of wine. She said, “Yes, I drink wine sometimes” Is she capable of having just one? I really have no idea. Time will tell.

            • 3hares

              Good question. I don’t know–Don doesn’t seem like the AA type, but maybe that would change. With Don I can’t picture them making it so much about the alcohol. I mean, with Freddy and Duck it’s the actual substance that has a bad effect on them. Where as with Don it seems like they’ve never played it as being about alcohol as the priority, but more the symptom.

      • http://twitter.com/janedonuts Jane Donuts

        I think that makes perfect sense. Lots of people shed self-destructive habits once they address the root of their issues. If Don has made the choice to really start living as Dick Whitman (metaphorically if not literally) — and judging from his Hershey breakdown and taking the kids to see the whorehouse, he may have — we may be set up for an interesting final season. Is it possible there will be redemption for Don Draper? It’s an American story, after all.

    • yllas

      I must be the only one who loves Betty’s pink negligee – I don’t like Megan’s purple and white thing at all. But then I’m a hopeless romantic….Poor Peggy! That micro-mini did NOTHING for her, she just looked chunky. She looked great from the waist up. And that big. pink. bow! It said to Ted “look at me, Ted, I’m a present just waiting to be unwrapped. A man merely has to tug on the end of this ribbon, and it’s not you, Ted. Nyah, nyah!”

      • Eric827

        And by “chunky,” you mean “spectacular?”

        • quitasarah

          My thoughts exactly. I thought she looked good enough to eat. And apparently so did Ted! I loved his face after she left the room.

      • Pennymac

        Really? Cause I “gay gasped” when she appeared in the doorway. She knocked it out of the park!

    • Yolanda13

      A note of gratitude from this bitter kitten.

      I’m so sad the season has come to the end because it means the end of Mad Style until 2014. Gentlemen, you do a fabulous job of recapping and analyzing Mad Men and it has made watching the show so much more entertaining. This season you took it to a whole new level with focusing on Janie Bryant’s use of color to tie characters together. What could have been simple posts on the groovy ’60s outfits became a weekly lesson in how costumes are used in storytelling.

      Mondays and Wednesdays are going to be as grey as Jim Cuttler’s suits without our weekly Mad Men recaps.

      • Cheryl

        Don’t forget Project Runway is coming in a few weeks, there are also Downton Abbey recaps in season, and more. Check the “Television” tab to see what else comes up.

      • sweetlilvoice

        I agree with you 100%! To stave off the MM blues, I’m going to start with episode one, season one and work my way through the old seasons. I hope it helps, last year I was depressed for weeks every Sunday night.

        • Yolanda13

          I may have to go back and read past Mad Style posts.

        • nptexas

          I did that recently. It was great. You’ll be shocked how much much you’ve forgotten. At least I was. I’m sure ill watch all again before the last season. Man, I’m going to miss this show & TLo recaps. They’ve added immeasurably to my enjoyment!

    • kattyatlaw

      During the show, I noticed Megan’s angel dress and Peggy’s date dress as light/dark opposites. Seeing the stills, it’s even more so – same neckline, sheer sleeves, sleeve length, and bow.

    • Therese Bohn

      Man, I never wanted this recap to end! Another MM season tied up in a beautiful TLo Ribbon! Thanks so much for your insights and research — I have learned so much about costume from these posts,and I’m so familiar with TLo costume recaps that I now apply your theories to EVERY old movie (and some new TV shows) I ever watch as a clue to what will happen with characters! Thanks for another great year, guys, and I look forward to the Final season next year! (But dang I’ll really miss all this when MM is over!!!)

      Also, does anyone else think that the new SC&P logo looks like it could have been taken from the set of “The Mike Douglas Show”? :-) Highly reminiscent of that bulbous style, and of course it’s ORANGE! Here come the ’70′s a year early, bring on the Burnt Orange, Harvest Gold, and Avocado Greens!!! (I sadly remember them too well!!!)

    • PowerfulBusiness

      The only bad thing to come out of this recap is the reiteration that Don and Megan are destined to be together forever. It’s alright, I’m learning to accept it, but it’s a process. It’s a process.

      • misscellaneous

        Agreed. The horror.

      • urbantravels

        Sure – because marriages do *so well* in Hollywood.

    • retrogal9

      I worked at a “Big 8″ accounting firm and it was a VERY big deal when one of the newly promoted managers wore a pantsuit to work…in 1989! Once she did, we all did. No more crossing bridges in below-zero weather while wearing skirts. Brrrr.

    • i_heart_tom_and_lorenzo

      Thank you so much. You are both AMAZING.

    • KayEmWhy

      Thank you TLo I’ll never look at movie costuming the same again. See you in Mad Style next year.
      P.S. Had that pantsuit in 1969.

    • k op

      Jim Cutler – eminence grise who can identify vapours.

      Bob sends inappropriate food to Roger’s occasion. Roger brings inappropriate food to a thanksgiving that is Bob’s occasion.

      I think you’ve got it wrong in the car scene. Pete is consciously mimicking the style of the Chevy execs to fit in. Again, he misses the plot. What they like about Bob is he is young, his colors are fresh, his attitude is both hopeful and respectful (servile?) which is exactly how these execs wish their own kids would behave. Bob is the perfect son. He is dressed in a new, young, shade of blue that no Chevy exec would wear. But compared to the wild fashions their kids are wearing, they prefer Bob and like him in this color…which boldly calls out “Liberte!”…which has implications the execs cannot even imagine.

      The drawing by Roger’s grandson shows that money and granddad are discussed a lot around the house. Margaret is screwing the child up so badly.

      Clara is becoming my favorite fashion representative on Mad Men. No idea what it means, thematically. She is simply the only one on the show who doesn’t seem weighed down by what she wears. Her dresses are smashing!

      • Bonjour

        Not inappropriate! Re Roger. Box of cranberry sauce!

        • k op

          Because they can’t send it back!

          • Bonjour

            Ah yes. Classic Sterling insouciance!

      • Laylalola

        The funny thing is, I was thinking how Bob’s fresher blue suit he wore with the Chevy execs really reminded me a lot of Pete’s sort-of go-to uniform in the first season or two — Pete would wear a fresher shade of blue suit, often, when he was starting out.

        • k op

          I forgot that! Yeah, Pete used to wear a lot of blue in those early years. It could be the color of youthful striving, hope, or something more nefarious like scheming. This only seals Bob’s place, thematically, as Pete’s protege – far closer to Pete than is comfortable.

    • misscellaneous

      MTM never went that short on hemline BUTshe did rock some great Evan Picone pant suits that we all loved. That pant suit just leapt out and got all tangled in the windmills of my mind. I think every woman I know had one similar. Probably uglier. The last shot is so Twilight Zone. Like last stop at Willoughby creepy. I don’t think Megan and Don have a future, actually. Or maybe that’s wishful thinking. Once again: SALLY RULES. One look, bam.

      • Qitkat

        I liked this especially for use of *the windmills of my mind*. Love that song! And pantsuits. Wish I knew where to find some I could wear today ;-)

        • misscellaneous

          The kind that buckle in the front! 70s fashions were so comfy.

    • Karen

      The moment I saw Peggy in that date outfit, I was reminded of her dress when she thought Abe was going to propose! Both have that pink empire waist bow but instead of a dark pink (and sweet) dress, this dress is black and sexy!

    • Sally3000

      I’m a middle aged woman and even I want Bobby Draper’s jacket.

    • housefulofboys

      I don’t know if anyone has mentioned this yet or not, but early polyesters and man-made fabrics could be really uncomfortable to wear! It was a bonus when they were stretchy and would “give” a little, but doubleknits were heavy and stiff and scratchy. Some fuzzy wool blends would be combined with a manmade woven backing which was itchy and would pill up after a few wears. Even the slinkier polyester fabrics didn’t “breathe” and would make you sweaty, especially in the south before air-conditioning was widespread. Of course, the real bonus was that you could wash and wear them, no ironing, no drycleaning required, a huge support for families as women were starting to work outside the home.

      Laundry was always a huge chore back in the day. We had very little money but my mother always worked part-time and (in the 1960′s) had a lady come in to help with the ironing one day a week. She would wash my dad’s and brothers’ shirts and my dresses and keep them damp in the fridge for ironing day. Then she had an old coke bottle with a little aluminum topper stuck into the top, kind of like a salt shaker, which she would fill with water and then sprinkle the clothes with a little extra water so that they would iron better. Thinking back on it, I can understand why she was a big supporter of the new textiles!

      • Jemiah Jefferson

        I shop, love, and occasionally wear this era of vintage now. And oh, yeah, we know. :)

      • ailujailuj

        awesome story about the laundry. they say that 3 modern inventions fueled the women’s movement – the washing machine, the pill, and the polyester. ;)

      • Qitkat

        I’m catching up on some posts that I missed, and totally agree with your laundry comments. The best part is that my husband kept that old coke bottle with the aluminum topper from his late mom! It never gets used anymore, I think I’ll go give it more of a place of honor and create a vintage memory shelf, something I’ve been meaning to do. And ditto on the polyester. She also made me a 2 piece vest and pants out of said polyester, around 1971. Brilliant orange yellow, and scratch as hell.
        Thanks for the memories!

    • ShaoLinKitten

      Not sure if anyone noted this yet, but Joan was wearing an acorn brooch for Don’s quasi-firing… and there are two acorns at the bottom of the bannister outside the Whershey Whorehouse? That is some subtle signalling there.

    • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

      It consistently bugs me how poorly cast kid Dick Whitman is – I suppose I’ve been spoiled by Kiernan Shipka’s perfect mixture of Jon Hamm and January Jones, but I feel like they should have gone for a less dweebish looking kid who had better acting skills than just looking vacant all the time. I know it’s harsh and he’s 15 (and IMDB perusal shows that he’s a perfectly cute little child actor outside of Mad Men) but it ALWAYS throws me out of the scene, and not in a way that I find interesting that “OH Don Draper has reinvented himself down to his looks” but more “Jeez, if all they needed this kid to do is scowl and look bored, they could have found someone who looked like Don.”

      I feel like Betty’s nightgown also calls back to her nightgown in episode one, and the wayward girl she cavalierly joked about and who became lost to her – she probably fears Sally going down the same route (though obviously she’d never joke about Sally in that way).

      On the “change” in Peggy’s bust – she’s probably wearing a pushup bra, and possibly acquired it recently – the way she’s adjusting her rack in the date-dress reminds me of exactly what I have to do to get my breasts to sit properly in a pushup bra (ok, sorry, TMI TLo).

      “So yes, Bobby Draper. It’s true. You’re a negro.” I loled, and now all I can think of is the opening to The Jerk, from just ten years later: “Huh? I am *not* a bum. I’m a jerk. I once had wealth, power, and the love of a beautiful woman. Now I only have two things: my friends, and… uh… my thermos. Huh? My story? Okay. It was never easy for me. I was born a poor black child. I remember the days, sittin’ on the porch with my family, singin’ and dancin’ [and whorin'] down in [Pennsylvania]…”

      Yes, Don Draper is a jerk.

      • Bonjour

        Also Jon Hamm’s coloring (hair eyes skin tone) looks really different to me than the young “actor” playing Dick Whitman. Young Dick Whitman looks like he could have freckles and blue eyes. Jon Hamm looks like he and Linda Cardellini (sp?) — Sylvia actress — could both be from Mediterranean parents — tall dark & handsome for him, pert dark-eyed brunette for her. i know on this board not many liked Sylvia, but for me that was part of the visual appeal of seeing them together. Like those “Super Italy” Dolce & Gabbana print ads, with all the black lace and coiled & oiled shirtless men…

        • urbantravels

          Wait, what was I going to say? I got distracted by the oiled shirtless men.

          Oh yeah. It bugs the hell out of me, too, that kid Dick Whitman looks like he could never in a million years grow up to be Don Draper, and that kid Dick Whitman is never given anything to do besides gape at the things that are warping his childhood. By this age, you’d think he’d have started to develop the craftiness that characterizes his adult self…you should be seeing the Don Draper quick evasive thinking starting to form. But this kid just looks stupefied and helpless all the time. I think the episode “The Hobo Code” is supposed to show one early influence on his skills, but that takes place *before* the Whorehouse Years.

          • jozie310

            I agree with the casting problem with this kid. But it is compounded by the fact that these are flashbacks and act like dreams do. You don’t talk a lot in your dreams. You think you do, but it’s mostly observing the images you’re projecting, and telepathy. This could have been pulled off better with a young actor who has the correct face shape. And the potty hard cut is a calamity to the eye.

            • Bonjour

              Yes on all. Where’s the Draper jawline?

          • Bonjour

            Totally, urban travels. If Sally Whitman can show the signs of being Don’s crafty daughter at 14, why can’t Dick Whitman show signs of being Don Draper even older?

          • verve

            Maybe it has to do with Don’s opinion of himself at the time? He remembers himself as being an unlovable yokel, and he’s progressively been bogged down in the moments that warped/shaped his worldview. He’s not going to be thinking back on the first times he outwitted or manipulated someone– that’s not the point of his remembrance. Perhaps, if the final season is about him putting himself back together, we’ll start to see teenage Dick maneuvering about his life. Or maybe it’s commentary that some of the most impactful, important moments in Don’s life have turned out to be the ones in which he was at his most passive or helpless.

    • MeganPatterson

      Clara deserves like 5 bonuses, as far as I’m concerned.

      • sekushinonyanko

        Judging by how she dresses, I think it’s safe to say that Pete’s smart enough to make sure she gets them.

    • Mary Nease

      And well what do ya know- Peggy and Ted’s scene together last season features them in blue and green. Janie Bryant, queen of forethought.

    • little_miss_strange

      My grandma was an office manager in the 60s and 70s. And she had one of those pantsuits in every color.

    • Kristin Crase

      The way that Pete is with Clara, when he’s charming and sweet, makes me not hate him as much.

      • Chris

        I hope Clara still has a job with Pete in L.A. now.

        • Orange Girl

          Pete did ask her if she’d ever leave NY. I wonder if they will become a couple.

    • chowwander

      Sally should go by Sally Sparrow. That would be cooler than bow ties, fezzes, or Stetsons.

    • Angelfood

      Bravo. I enjoyed this as much if not more than the final episode. You never fail to delight me. I saw most of what you mention in this post because you have trained me well, but I didn’t pick up on Peggy’s ad campaigns bleeding into real life! Since Peggy and the advertising are the two primary reasons I watch the show, this observation is brilliant and so satisfying. Thank you!!

    • chowwander

      I like how Bob was wearing Pete Campbell Blue in that one scene, like he was taking over. He was.

    • quitasarah

      So over on Vulture MZS is talking about folks revisiting the season 6 poster and trying to reinterpret it now that the season is over. He says ” I much prefer the idea that the poster anticipates Don’s decision to crawl out of his misery pit, get clean (of both alcoholism and assholism), and, in a sense, turn away from himself, or from the swaggering alpha male image he’d fabricated over the years. I also like the idea that the poster symbolizes Don finally coming to terms with his past as Dick Whitman, the traumatized boy pictured in the show’s heavy-handed but still disturbing flashbacks.”

      This seems to play out with the costuming. In the image of Don walking towards us, he’s dressed almost EXACTLY as he is when he gets fired from SC&P and when he takes his kids to look at the Whershey Whorehouse. He’s swapped his hat for the pocket square, but the tie is almost perfect.

      What I can’t find is Don wearing a suit as light as in the image of Don walking away from us. I checked the Mad Style from the season 6 premiere and finale, and I didn’t see one (but it doesn’t mean it isn’t there). Anyone have any insight on that? Uncles TLo?

    • urbantravels

      “She’s actually a little ahead of her time here, and anyone who went through grade school in the 1970s has countless class pictures with smiling teachers wearing this exact outfit.”

      Yes, oh my yes. I am actually not *quite* alive yet in Mad Men time (born December 1968) but Peggy’s pantsuit was instantly recognizable to me as something akin to what teachers* and many other women (including my mom) were wearing in the mid-70s. So I was startled to see it in 1968. The explanation that Peggy’s version is extremely cutting edge, made of nicer fabric/better cut/etc., helps a lot, because certainly the versions my teachers were wearing in 1975 Michigan were not this nice. My mom certainly would have worn a houndstooth like that – I think she had a black and white version – but definitely not this expensive or high end.

      * I also remember my teachers pairing their pantsuits with gigantic arty-crafty statement jewelry. I had one teacher who had a collection of the hugest necklaces I’ve ever seen…including a metal tree the size of a breastplate, with separate metal leaves dangling from it so the whole thing was in constant motion. Try looking at your teacher for a whole school day and NOT being completely hypnotized.

      • mcpierogipazza

        Same thing for me with my Ohio teachers in the mid 70s. This show has reinforced for me how slowly fashion and decor change[d] in Ohio.

    • chowwander

      That scene with the Whitman family looking up at the whorehouse…smokestacks behind…it’s like the alternate universe Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, and what becomes of Charlie. Also we have Hershey in the episode. Deliberate.

    • Bonjour

      If you squint your eyes and let Dawn go a bit blurry, her hair shape in the screen grabs could also look like a mammy figure’s head wrap. Maybe I’m over thinking it. But Dawn, caught between worlds? ‘Aunt Jemima’ like ‘Uncle Ben’ were images decided upon by advertisers to sell ‘nurturing’ food products — France had its own version of racial caricature advertising food products, like the Senegalese rifleman on Banania packages. Not that anyyyyyyy of this is really inside the text of MM since MW (and Andre Jacquemetton) chose not to go there. Which is too bad because they could have. They borrowed from Serge Gainsbourg’s Couleur Cafe (1960s, mostly first half) for example, in an early episode when they are trying out coffee jingles (Peggy in the writer’s room says “That’s catchy”). Tooooo bad — I really wish MW had hired a writer who cared and knew about advertising and race, in the 1960s — it would have made the story that much richer and connected to the momentous events of its period.

      • Qitkat

        Even if MW didn’t go there, I find it really fascinating the contributions that bitter kittens as yourself can add to the conversation, from personal knowledge. I’m intrigued by your examples. Seems crazy sometimes that Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben are still with us, although updated, while there are still angry dialogues on whether the Washington Redskins need to change their name, and Paula Deen becomes the new face of racial animosity.
        Advertising and race, still supremely relevant.

    • http://vhanna26.typepad.com Vera

      After a year of reading the Mad Style posts, I finally watched an episode, and caught the fair isle tie between Sally and Dick Whitman. Thanks for the insight, TLo, and Go Me!

    • josie4444

      Just a small point of clarification as someone who works in advertising – it is not common for people in advertising to be working on Thanksgiving day. Buys are completed before that point and station logs are closed. It would be far too late to do anything for Black Friday. Just thought you would like to know, perhaps.

      Another great post – I enjoy these as much as the show! Will be missing it next week!

    • Logo Girl

      I am the same age as Gene, even half a year younger, and he is WAY too little. I was already putting on my own dance routines to The Wizard of Oa, and was not some tiny thing who needed my brother’s help out of the car.

      • Cheryl

        And WAY too silent. I’ve never seen a 5-year-old who was so passive.

      • jozie310

        And Bobby keeps getting smaller and smaller. Too many changes in actors for that role.

    • ailujailuj

      did anyone notice that the ending scene w/ the silhouette of the back of peggy’s head is nearly the same as the last image of the show’s intro? maybe we can get some momentum going on some other story lines in S7.

      • judybrowni

        Yup, a lot of us on the internets noticed.

    • Silencio Porfavor

      I just have to say.

      I only discovered the Mad Style posts before the previous season and I sped through nearly everything you’d written before then. I cannot begin to tell you both how much you’ve added to my enjoyment of this show.

      Also, I need to give a shout out to how you all choose to review this show. I used to frequent a message board that would discuss this show in length but it grew tiresome last season when nearly every other post I came across were in relation to Jessica Pare’s teeth or how Peggy is “so not attractive” or Weiner’s supposed love of Jessica Pare (i’m not a megan hater).

      So I have to say I really appreciate the reviews and those who commented for focusing on the -show- and not on the physical aspects of the actors or anything that had nothing to do about the episode. Tom & Lorenzo are majorly intelligent and those who discuss the show in the comment are so on their level too..

      Can’t wait for next year!

      • verve

        “I used to frequent a message board” — it wasn’t the one on IMDb, was it? If not, then I’m sad to say that means there’s (at least) TWO forums bogged down by hateful pettiness.

    • Blimunda

      Going back through these great stills again. I’m so not ready to wean myself from Mad Men yet! Do we think Joan’s hair in the Thanksgiving dinner scene is too modern? I kind of do. But I’m no expert and at time I was…Kevin.

      • Cheryl

        No, her hair at work is always very structured. But here she’s in her own home, just with family (and Roger) so I think it’s perfectly appropriate that her hair was more casual. Although you couldn’t tell from my 1966 helmet hairstyle. <<<<<

    • lilyvonschtupp

      I can never get into those hideous pants suits. In fact, they sadden me. I have a picture of my late Aunt in on of those suits, including a matching jacket.

    • eb1966

      Does young Dick’s face have wooden-spoon beating marks on it in the top shot? I didn’t notice that while watching the episode, but it’s obvious when you look at the still.

    • tintashoopa

      We don’t know the secrets to be revealed in Season 7 but it is possible that Bob Benson is the successful Don Draper? You would think that a gay man in 1968 would have more challenges than the son of a prostitute (albeit with some serious childhood traumas) but, so far, Bob seems to be happy in his professional and personal life. I love that absolutely adorable turkey carving smile you highlighted!

      Also, I’m sorry to say but they did not say “RFP” in 1968. I worked in advertising in the ’80′s and I didn’t hear anyone say “RFP” until the mid ’90′s.

      • 3hares

        Bob seems to be unencumbered by the guilt that makes Don feel bad. Don’s self-loathing; Bob thinks Bob’s great and deserving and everything’s fine. It’s quite possible that as Bob gets older he’ll wind up with similar problems to Don where he feels empty and without an actual identity, but right now he’s fresh and only cares about succeeding.

        • Glammie

          Realistically, the hard truth is that Bob is the right age to run full-force into the AIDS epidemic. There was that grim period where you had 50 percent infection rates in the gay male community and no effective treatment. Even if Bob stays healthy, he’s going to lose a lot of friends. (makes a sad face–hard to think about it on what’s been such a good landmark day)

          Joan would stick by him though. (I’m going to miss this show when it ends.)

          • Bonjour

            Aw fuck

            • Bonjour

              But I am going to imagine instead that he and Pete, or some other preppy boy of his choice, live to ripe old age with a giant family estate in Provincetown where they ring in the 2013 Supreme Court decision with a lot of friends, family and bathtubs full of veuve cliquot

            • Bonjour

              They will even track down Joanie’s old roommate and drag her out to the Cape (so to speak) from Northhampton

            • Glammie

              I don’t think that Pete’s gay (sorry) his taste in women is too quirky and individual. But I think we can wish Bob well with some guy who loves and appreciates him. People talk about the actors in Boys in the Band dying of AIDS, but Matt Crowley, the playwright, is alive and, I think, doing pretty well.

          • cpetersky

            I think of my generation – that of Bobby and Sally – that got hardest hit by AIDS. My peers were in their late teens and early twenties in the early 1980s, when it’s easiest to make bad decisions about who and how many people you have sex with. Yes, some gay friends survived – but a lot of them didn’t.

            • Glammie

              I’m of that generation myself (well a little older than Baby Gene) and certainly AIDS cut right through. But there was also a huge infection rate among gay men older than that. I know Randy Shilts in *The Band Played On* postulated that the huge Bicentennial celebrations with sailors from all over might have helped kick-start it–so gay men sexually active in 1976 were among the prime targets.

              The whole thing was such a terrible perfect storm a deadly, but slow-developing disease spreading among a group of people who were breaking free from centuries of repression by embracing “sexual freedom” that was still tied into the culture of anonymous sex. Then you got infection rates that were so high–once the test to detect HIV was developed–that you could have a pretty limited number of partners and still end up positive.

              The first man I knew who died of AIDS was my father’s art director–early 80s–he was 49 as I recall. At his wake, my somewhat-homophobic father was kind of a hero simply because he hadn’t fired him and the art director had been able to keep his health insurance. A lot of gay men would get this horrible diagnosis, but then keep it secret out of fear that they’d lose their jobs, be socially shunned.

              Looking back, it’s such a sad, sad period.

            • 3hares

              I was watching a documentary about The Boys in the Band which would have premiered by this time of the show and most of the original cast–the ones who were gay–had since died of AIDS. That was a real reminder of that period and how devastating it was.

            • formerlyAnon

              Yes.

    • wordlaw

      I think the writers just aren’t entirely sure where they’re going with Bob Benson. I think the clearly intentional gay-coding of the character is a placeholder for whatever it is they finally want to do with him. Right now, he’s gay, but they’re not committed to the idea yet and the ambiguity and subtle hints are to give them wiggle room should they change their minds.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        I find that impossible to believe with a show as meticulously planned and written as this.

    • DesertDweller79

      I am positive both my mother and my grandmother had a pantsuit which looked like that. Oh, how I remember going through their closets and thinking it was the ugliest thing I had ever seen. Thanks, Peggy!

    • SylviaFowler

      The interior of Betty’s bedroom looks just like the interior of the brothel.

    • Melissa

      Yeah, the Bicentennial lasted roughly from 1967-1981.

      • Laylalola

        It was so much a part of all of my grade-school years — every school week for literally years was devoted to learning some little component about that history or its relation to current events, even at my youngest I remember the class each week coloring in images of people presented as favorite characters in historical stories — that it wasn’t until several years later that I realized this wasn’t the norm. By the time Amy Carter was making national news as a 4th grader or 5th grader for having political views that her father shared, as a child her same age all of this made perfect sense — government, history, the White House, all of it seemed so much just really a part of our whole growing up at that time.

        • sweetlilvoice

          My husband was a kid in the 70s too and he holds red, white, and blue very dear to his heart. Even though he’s not patriotic, the bicentennial was a big event for him. He even has an old 70s tie with the liberty bell on it and another that says vote. He wore that last election day at work.

        • Chris

          I still love red, white and blue, colonial history and anything related to the Bicentennial too! It was such a great time for me as a kid. Even our school pictures were taken with a mini-liberty bell. I agree about Amy Carter it’s a shame she didn’t become more like Chelsea Clinton. For kids of that day she seemed like a peer.

    • Helen C

      More Trudy, less Megan, please!!

    • lilyvonschtupp

      I thought that green dress the Joanie wore was definitely La Liz at Thanksgiving. But you’ll never catch her in an apron these days. She’s got her little gay for that!

      • Miss Disco

        I bet Bob makes a really great dinner.

    • judybrowni

      I love Clara!

      That actress made her bit part come alive, and Joanie Bryant costumed the heck out of it.

    • H2olovngrl

      Pete and Trudy’s turn for the nice lighting, I see.

    • precious kittenhood

      Now that I can see the details of Sally’s coat in the final scene did I think of the dress she wore at Miss Porter’s:
      Both are dark, sober plaids and both have front panels ON THE BIAS (i.e., the lines look diagonal) while the rest of the garment is on the straight of the fabric. What can this mean? Confusion and disorder!

    • Timmay!

      I’m surprised no one mentioned all the BROWN in this episode. It was all over the place. Ties in to Hershey’s, presumably. And perhaps all the shit that so many characters were going through.

    • Simone Cumberbatch

      Thank you so much for your mad styles and recaps – I look forward to them almost as much as I look forward to the show. Bravo!

    • Therese Bohn

      When I first saw Peggy’s date/hooker micro-mini – all I could think was “Why is Peggy wearing a night gown in the office?” It was just awful, but I can see how Peggy would think it was super-sexy. The most astonishing thing for Peggy is that she’d intentionally change into it at the office so everyone (especially Ted) would see her in it. But gosh, it was awful.

      • Miss Disco

        i thought she was at home until she walked out of the office.

      • jozie310

        TLo above spends a few sentences explaining to us that it is “grown-up” clothes. Why? To us it looks like what kids would wear. The shortness of the skirt does that. Back then sexy woman meant “baby doll.” So it’s amusing that TLo had to interpret that for their readers.

        • ailujailuj

          As an adult, I can appreciate the juvenile trend in women’s clothes and how it evolved on the runway and then was adapted to pedestrian styles. But women back then also used terms like “Daddy” in affectionate, sexual ways. As a kid watching movies from that era – I was always confused by this.

          • judybrowni

            “Daddy” for one’s lover, but most especially for a man subsidizing a younger woman, was used more in the Depression era.

            Chorus girl and millionaire: even ended up in a popular song “My Heart Belongs to Daddy.”

            Heard a recording of that when I was a kid, say around 1960 or so, and it seemed definitely out of date.

    • jozie310

      I am way late in posting this. I should have done it last week when the headmistress at Miss Porter’s brought back to me a huge memory of the huge “fashion statement” that lasted for at least the entirety of the ’60s: the circle pin.

      We needed to see more of those in MM. I hope the headmistress isn’t the one and only to reflect that cultural Freudian slip. Nothing symbolizes the available female hooha like the circle pin.

      • judybrowni

        Joan has worn them consistently for the past couple seasons.

    • jd

      RE: Megan and Dick’s future
      As Vulture alluded to yesterday, I think it’s really interesting to go back and look at the promo image for this season in retrospect.
      • Dick is dressed in an almost identical ensemble that he wears in that final scene (less topcoat and hat)
      • He is without briefcase and passing a brief-case wearing doppelganger while giving him the side-eye, but clearly not joining him back towards Madison Ave.
      • The plane in the background is heading the same direction that Dick and Megan are walking, which is the opposite direction of the city-scape.
      • Megan is almost completely out of the frame to symbolize the distance that has come between them, BUT he has a very good grasp on her hand. She appears to be slightly behind him and it looks like he is almost pulling her to this new life away from Madison Avenue, doppelDon, the cityscape, and the waiting police.

      Thanks for putting the show in a new light this season fellas. I looked forward to this post every week. See you in California next season!

    • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

      I know I am so late with this because I have been away, but I just want to say that I burst into tears during the last scene when they showed the kids and Don looking up at the house and I agree that Ms. Schipka deserves huge kudos.

    • SoulMo

      So no mention of how great Stan Rizzo’s ass looked in those cream cords (?). Just sayin…..

    • siriuslover

      I don’t know if this has been said, but Bob’s outfit really complements Roger’s office. He blends right in.

    • A Shiny O’Connor

      My 35-year-old brother-in-law has Bobby’s exact jacket. I must recommend green skinny pants, a cable knit and a pair of Chuck-Ts. He’s an actor in Toronto – he can get away with looking like a kid in the late ’60s.

    • Laura Kaufmann

      “The child is father of the man” is from the Wordsworth poem “My Heart Leaps up when I Behold.”

    • RuthyHope

      I am not at all sure if this was mentioned in the comments, but it seems like you missed that Sally is wearing (in the last scene at the whorehouse) a comparable outfit to that of Peggy’s pantsuit–red plaid over a red shirt. This can only stand to signify a mirror image of the female trailblazer (Peggy) and the woman (future Sally) who will follow in her footsteps. The girls of Sally’s generation will wind up resembling Peggy much more than Betty or Don. (If Sally gets the right therapist.)

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        We didn’t “miss” that. It’s your interpretation. It’s a perfectly valid one too.

      • Logo Girl

        Sally will be fine. I picture her becoming a critically successful novelist. Maybe there will be some St. Elsewhere twist that Mad Med is a novel she wrote.

        Well, maybe not that last part.

        • Glammie

          I do think Sally’s pivotal–the end season pretty much times with the end of her childhood/first true move into adulthood. Don and Betty are the generation of Matt Weiner’s parents, while he’s Baby Gene’s peer–or a couple of years younger. ((Hmm, and Weiner’s family moved from the East Coast to L.A. when he was a kid.)

    • adam

      I have a question and was hoping somebody could help me out. What color is the suit Don wears at the beginning of this episode when he is talking with Stan and then Ken? I am color blind and cannot tell what color the suit is. Also is it the same color as the suit Don wears when he gave the Jaguar pitch last year?

    • mhleta

      I was hoping you’d say more about Clara’s outfits. To my eye, they stand out to the point of being distracting. That grey wool turtleneck under the chiffon dress with the grey wool tights? I kept thinking, “What does this mean? What’s happening here??” I don’t remember colored tights being available back then. You could get them in ballet colors and red and that was it. I don’t think the textured hose showed up until the 70s but I could be wrong.

    • mhleta

      Thank you for pointing out the whole “Mark Your Man” echoe! I missed it, even after watching it twice, though I did have other thoughts about the Ted and Peggy moments. When Ted and Peggy were in bed together after “the deed” they were both very obviously stained in her red lipstick. As you say, he was “marked” and he very much wanted to be marked. It wasn’t like they bumped into each other in the supply closet and things “just happened.” He went to her apartment, in her very sketchy neighborhood and claimed her for his own. Then when Peggy all but kicks him out of bed, (“You should go. No really you have to go. You should go!”) we hear him in the shower cleaning off the stain of adultery. Then, when he gets home and climbs into bed with his wife he is clad in white, pure WHITEST white t-shirt and boxers. Pretty clear evidence that Ted will be moving on from this dalliance unsullied. He is Sir Lancelot.

    • yllas

      one last thing….in the office scene near the end, Ted telling Peggy he’s the one going to California, he’s wearing a green suit and Peggy is in her blue dress. Blue and green: adultery? They could have worn vastly clashing colors – (or blue and yellow for bad communication) – Peggy could have had on something volatile, red/orange/yellow angry buzzing print and Ted in meek pale gray with a little red stripe in his tie..

    • Sally Stockwell Oshima

      Joan’s lace collar as Elizabethan ruffle. Off with his head!

    • Joanna Smith

      Well done analyses this season, Tom and Lorenzo! As someone interested in making a career out of costume history, your posts have become an integral part of my Mad Men viewing experience. I’m eager to go back and watch these past thirteen episodes and invest in the shows you study as well.

    • Garry Todd

      Well, I’m late to the party in several ways(only got addicted to Mad Man last year, and just found this ridiculously SUPERB/FABULOUS bit of style analysis via Googling MM recaps) but here are my thoughts, first, re: this episode–my big “a-HA” moment was that last shot of Bob with the apron and the turkey…is it just me, or is that “tucked tie” a euphemism for another part of Bob? I.E, his penis, as if he were in drag? Intended or not it’s brilliant. The only other thing I had to add was this: why was Don reading Dante’s The Inferno on the beach in Hawaii to open the season? Was that subtle foreshadowing of the Hell awaiting him this season? And the “Bobby, you ARE a Negro” is the funniest thing I’ve read since Mad Magazine. You two guys are absolute GENIUSES at this “forensics of style” and I’m sure your well-deserved nuptials will be THE fashion event of the season wherever you are. Kudos, and thanks for the ridiculously entertaining and eye-opening analysis. You nailed all the major plot points(Ted loves Peggy, Bob maybe gay-be, Don is more-or-less toast) and I can’t wit until next season. Til then, I’ll be catching up on this season and last season’s analyses. Please keep up the GREAT work, TLO!