Mad Style: The Doorway, Part 2

Posted on April 11, 2013

Onwards. Part one of this episode’s Mad Style is here and our initial episode review is here.

 

Once again, Sally stands out in a scene. In the living room, she was the only one in a brilliant blue, while the other women wore pink, red, or white. Here, she’s a focus-pulling red against the greens of the kitchen and the blues of her mother. Given her eye-rolling sarcasm in the few lines of dialogue she had, we think we’re seeing some visual representation of her oppositional attitude.

Is it awful that every time we look at that kitchen, all we want is for the Kitchen Cousins to show up and shove some stainless steel appliances and a tiled backsplash into it?

Betty is, of course, the height of ’60s housewife frumpery. Six years ago, this is what she looked like when she went grocery shopping:

Mad+Men+Mad+Style+Season+1+Episode+7+4

That sense of glamour and looking just-so (which was, to be fair, a middle and upper-middle class pretension of the period) has evaporated. This isn’t to say Betty looks like crap in 1967; just that she clearly didn’t spend the entire morning getting dressed to go shopping.  And to be fair, part of this change is due more to Betty and the change in her circumstances rather than the change in the times. She was much more glamorous when she was married to Don, in large part because he was making more money, she had one fewer children, she was half a decade younger, and he was pretty glamorous himself, in comparison to Henry. This is Janie Bryant using a character’s personal history as well as the changing times to make a point about her in her clothing.

 

We said something in the comments section the other day that we want to repeat here. Whenever we look at older characters in the show, we immediately try to figure out when they were born. It’s shocking, for instance, to find out that Miss Blankenship lived on a farm in the 1800s. So we look at these women and realize that they remember the First World War (well, in fact, since they would have been adults at the time) and were not allowed to vote until it was granted to them. They are, in effect, the American versions of the Crawley sisters on Downton Abbey.

So it’s perhaps not a surprise that they all look like (only slightly) updated versions of the Dowager Countess. The loudmouth in the wheelchair is wearing styles that mostly went out of style at least 50 years before.

The rest of the scene – aside from the Drunk Don parts – was all about highlighting those generational differences among the women.

First, there’s Jane, who breezes into the room spewing modernity and fabulousness in all directions. Gorgeous outfit.

There’s not much to say when everyone in the room is dressed in conservative black ensembles, but once again. Janie found ways to delineate the women from each other. There’s Jane vs. the old biddys…

And then there’s Mona, who is rather stylishly well-appointed in a mature way, giving off a sense of solidness and even tradition; a polite, mannered counterpoint to Roger’s histrionics as well as Jane’s mod mourning getup.

 

As for Margaret, she is, and always has been an exact clone of her mother, right down to the hairstyles.

 

Little, perfect, Betty Hofstadt, arguing with dirty squatters in a rat-infested building. As we said earlier, you can’t really come up with a better way to depict how much society felt like it was in decline to the older generation.

Just as all the intense, eye-popping colors of the Hawaiian interlude indicated heat, so do the greys and blues of this scene indicate cold to us.

This is an illustration of how the way a costume works in a scene can change from scene to scene. This exact outfit looked frumpy and mature when she was standing in the kitchen talking to Sally. And while it still comes across mature here, it looks utterly refined and expensive on her now; especially in juxtaposition with the squatters, the blues suddenly standing out in her scarf and skirt. She’s uncomfortable in that setting not just because it’s potentially dangerous, but because her upper-middle class life is laid out on the table for all of them to ridicule.

The creators of Mad Men will often very subtly refer to film and television styles of the period. For instance, the scenes with Megan’s parents last season were shot and staged like a typical French divorce drama of the period. Betty in Rome referenced Italian neo-realist films. The Christmas Party in the office looked very much like it could have been a scene in “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.” Don’s birthday party last season had the flat lighting and laughing background characters of a wacky ’60s sitcom. We said at the time that it looked like the kind of party The Monkees would wind up crashing. Anyway, we’re rambling, but this entire scene reminded us of a whole string of late ’60s/early ’70s TV movies about how the dirty awful counterculture encroached on suburbia. Endless stories of teenage prostitutes and drug addicts with patient, well-appointed upper-middle class white parents trying desperately to save them from a life of crime or worse, non-conformity. So basically, Betty’s standing in for Hope Lange or Eva Marie Saint or Shirley Jones (or some other blonde WASP mom-actress of the period)  in some ABC Movie of the Week about a wealthy mother searching for her runaway violinist daughter on the filthy streets of New York.

 

Another example of a costume doing yeoman’s work from scene to scene. When Peggy was on the phone with the pastor while wearing this outfit, it was all about her Catholic schoolgirl background. When you put her in a scene with her Zappa-faced boyfriend, who expresses some discomfort with her management style, you can see that these characters are going in different directions. When you have her berating a couple of nerdy, baby-faced copywriters, she comes across well-appointed and confident; even mature in comparison to them.

 

Adorable, slightly slimy Bob Benson is going to be a bit of a problem, isn’t he? In his earlier scene with Don, we noted how his youthful, college-grad career man clothes stood in sharp contrast to Don’s mid-Century mature blackness. Bob is a Don stand-in, even though he’s accounts. He resembles him to the point that he could pass for a younger brother and he’s got the same kind of 3-syllable alliterative name. Plus, Don got his first job at SC by essentially berating Roger on an elevator.

But here, he now stands in opposition to Ken, who’s probably not that much older than him but is far more settled in his career. Bob is once again wearing the blazer and khakis (as opposed to a suit) that indicates his youthfulness, but Ken is suddenly looking very settled and authoritarian, with his expensive-looking coat, scarf, and briefcase. Ken’s normally depicted coat-, hat-, and briefcase-free; a happy-go-lucky dreamer who refuses to make this world his whole life. But here he looks like he’s moved up the corporate ladder. SCDP is now handling Dow, which means serious bucks for the company and serious career advancement for Ken, whose father-in-law works for them. He refused a partnership and he can’t be made head of accounts while Pete’s still breathing, so we assume he must have gotten a serious raise. It’s not like Ken to do what he did in this scene; dress down an employee in front of other employees. He’s pure establishment now; fully entrenched in this world he used to be so ambivalent about, and willing to fight someone when he feels they’re not acting correctly.

Also: note how the hair product has mostly disappeared from the heads of the younger men. Ken used to have very lacquered Vitalis hair, as did Harry and Pete.

 

We don’t think the men in this scene have much to say, costume-wise. Except for Stan and Don, of course. The rest of the men are in grey, brown or black, but Don and Stan are pushing green and blue into the conversation (like the green and blue motif in Peggy’s conference room scenes). Stan looks insanely out of place in this setting, but no one in the room is batting an eye at him. Remember what Sal looked like 6 years ago in client meetings?

Don is in an unusual-for-him shade of blue, which of course matches the blue jacket in the ad.

Even in a setting as conservative and traditional as this, Janie Bryant made sure that the scene was loaded with pattern and color. Henry was initially presented as a romantic, sexual figure when he first came on the scene. Remember when he met with Betty for coffee to discuss some watertower or reservoir or something? Remember how charged that scene was with sex? We thought he was slowly being turned into a slightly less romantic figure over time, but this ridiculous sweater seals the deal. He’s solid and loving, but he’s boring, conservative and a little dorky (like a lot of people in politics). We’d argue he’s probably the best thing that’s happened to Betty, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’ll last or that she’ll be able to be happy with him in the long run. Then again, she’s chronically unhappy.

Anyway, here he is, looking like the squarest of the square dads. Nothing else much notable about the family, except there’s a through-line of red tones running through their outfits, in preparation for this:

It sucks that these posts take so long, because we wanted to be the first ones to shout “MAMA FRANCIS! MAMA FRANCIS!”  But alas, most of the rest of the internet got to it before we did. Yes, she’s serving up full Mother Francis drag here, and the sad part is, she has absolutely no idea. That deep wine red is not a very typical Betty color, but Mother Francis wore a dark red to the Nutcracker earlier, under her fur. We think it’s a color she favors, but we don’t have the time to do the research and we seem to remember her in a lot of blues. Either way, this is quite obviously not the Elizabeth Taylor of Henry’s polite compliments. This is what Elizabeth Taylor looked like at the time. We wonder if Henry sees it. How can he not? Then again, denial is a powerful thing.

 

Later, they all put their keys in a bowl and …

Don is grooving out in his middle-aged man’s respectable blazer. This looks wild to us now, but it’s not something the young were wearing at the time. We said this when he dressed similarly for his birthday party: he looks like a Seagram’s ad running in Esquire. The well-appointed male.

Megan is wearing the latest in late ’60s loungewear-as-hostess-wear, which was quite the trend well into the seventies and speaks to her youth in relation to the other women. She and Don are in matching tones of grey. Sylvia is once again wearing black with white accents and a big gold cross; once again reminding us of a sexy nun. Her husband is dressed to match her.

The drunker couple with the flirting wife were full of color, but not particular giving off a united front with their clothing. She’s wearing the eastern-inspired styles that came out of the Beatles’ flirtation with the maharishi and the way it trickled down to … pretty much everywhere, really. She and Megan both have metallic elements at the neckline, in competing golds and silvers. “Back off my man, bitch.”

Tom’s parents had that exact fondue pot, in ’70s burnt orange. He never remembers them using it.

 

We don’t have much to say on the costuming because he’s in a standard tuxedo and she’s in her coat. The differences speak to the power dynamic here, since he’s her boss. It’s notable that Peggy now seems to have several fairly nice-looking coats, which speaks to her income level now. Once again, she’s wearing a plaid scarf slung around the neck, Don-style.

We have to ask, though: Are we the only ones who thought this scene had a lot of romantic undertones to it? We don’t actually want to see Peggy have a relationship with her married boss because it would be such a stupid thing to do, especially since her Pete and Duck work-related relationships were both disastrous. But look at him in these pictures. He’s in love with her.

 

Their costumes are having a conversation with each other. They are both wearing exactly the same colors (dark grey, light grey, white, and red), dark-over-light vs. light-over dark (think about THAT), each with a bit of pattern peeking out. Unlike, say, Betty and Mother Francis, we don’t think these subtle similarities speak to a similarity in the two men. They couldn’t be more different from each other. Instead, it hints at the bond they have, even if only one of them knows they have it.

 

Like so.

We do think the symbolism of the heart, the crucifix, and the mother figure were way too much, though. Come on, Weiner. We get it.

 

[Stills: tomandlorenzo.com]

    • http://twitter.com/PhDKnitter marlie

      You guys are KILLING it. Great job.

    • Sobaika

      I need to learn the art of breezing through a funeral like I’m about to steal someone’s man a la Jane Sterling.

      • Eric Stott

        Does anyone dress for funerals these days?

        • Sobaika

          No, but I’d wear her getup pretty much anywhere.

        • NDC_IPCentral

          Yes. I certainly do and did when I had to attend one two weeks ago. It is a sign of respect one should show to the deceased, the deceased’s family and the venue, especially if it is a place of worship.

        • Jacqueline Wessel

          I do. But I dress for everything, even work. Mostly wear skirts and dresses and hardly ever wear the ladypants.

        • EveEve

          Absolutely!

        • formerlyAnon

          YES. In my experience ( multiple states, range of age of the deceased from 30s through old age), people are more likely to dress for funerals than for church. (Wakes, or “viewings” as the separate event usually held the day before the funeral is called, have more of a mix.) ETA: though people don’t seem to restrict themselves to black, or even to subdued colors the way they used to do. I think it’s partly because so many people over the years have expressed the feeling that they do not want their families to wear black for them.

          • http://profiles.google.com/dorothymichael Dorothy & Michael n/a

            My 90 year old mother’s sister died on Palm Sunday, and I took mom to the funeral home a few days later. My aunt was 83 when she died. Mom wore a salmon-colored/pinkish pant suit, and when we walked in the door, my cousin Ruth Anne (only daughter of the deceased) immediately said to my mom “Oh Aunt Mary, I’m so glad you wore pink, mom’s favorite color!”

            • formerlyAnon

              Love this story.

          • tallgirl1204

            We carefully chose our outfits for my mother’s funeral– the brightest biggest florals we could summon, per her wishes. I made a mistake though, wearing my favorite favorite outfit– I have never been able to wear it again. It will always be the dress I wore to my mother’s funeral. My style recommendation for others is to wear something appropriate (whatever that is) but recognize that you will never feel o.k. about it again. Perhaps a reason to reserve the sober black for a funeral

            • formerlyAnon

              That’s an interesting anecdote (I love to hear people’s stories). I can’t remember what I wore to either of my parents’ funerals – although I went shopping specifically for the funeral or for the wake in each case. I’m sure I could work it out if I thought about it long enough.

            • 3boysful

              I’ve had that advice from a friend.

            • aesteve212

              Agreed. The dress I wore to my father’s funeral will always hang in my closet, and never be worn by me again.

        • AmeliaEve

          I wear something quiet and formal, but not necessarily black.

        • http://cheekypinky.wordpress.com cheekypinky

          Yup.

          I agonized about what to wear for my grandfather’s funeral–it’s incredibly important.

        • Hollyg

          I must say I find this aspect of American (and Canadian? And English?) culture quite fascinating. Are funerals really that composed and organized? I know they’re done a week after the person’s death, but in movies you rarely see someone crying, and if they are it’s usually a big deal. It’s kinda weird how funerals are used in television, especially, sitcoms, really. Your grandfather just died, why are so dressed up and flirting with someone? Mind you, I’m not saying this is how people act in funerals, just that the off-hand way they use this moment in television is, well, weird.

          • J. Preposterice

            Re: American funerals: it…depends. a lot. There is a lot of cultural variation among Americans — not just “where you live” but also “your ancestry”. My Polish-American grandfather’s funeral was very different from my Irish-American grandmother’s funeral, and both were different from the Generic Various-White-People-In-A-Blender Presbyterian grandfather’s funeral.

            • formerlyAnon

              This made me laugh. You express so much that I recognize, but had never articulated.

              One side of my family is Polish-American, the other Irish-American (neither side very far from the boat), and my parents’ home church at their deaths was Catholic – but in a place where Catholics were such a small proportion of the population and the congregation such a blend of backgrounds that the public (church, funeral home) portions of their funerals were very “Generic Various-White-People-In-A-Blender” (a phrase I will steal).

          • MK03

            Just curious, what culture do you belong to? I’m interested to know how different cultures and ethnicities observe various events.

            • Hollyg

              I’m Brazilian, and over here people are usually Catholic or Evangelic*, but there’s really no difference in ritual is this case, and your ancestry really doesn’t matter. When someone dies, the funeral is immediately right after. The hospitals have mortuary chapels, where the body must remain for 24h and where families and friends can watch over it (most cemeteries also have chapels for that). I actually find it to be a very painful situation for the family, since they have to be there until the body is released for burial. But the family is never there alone, friends and acquaintances usually drop everything and run over to the chapel to stay with them and do whatever is necessary. As such, there are no rules for clothes or anything, and it’s of course very emotional. I remember when my best friend’s mother died, when we were in high school. It was very late at night, and I just put on a long coat over my pyjamas and ran to the hospital. My friends and I stayed with her for some time, went home and then got back to bury her in the afternoon. What is very common are masses – seven days, 30 days, 6 months and then every year – when the family is very religious, but I’ve never been to one.

              *there is, of course, the many religions and cults from Africa, but they are much more common in the north of the country. I’m from the South and therefore completely unqualified to talk about them.

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Sarah-Adams/1143985903 Sarah Adams

          I do. But apparently that’s frowned on. I showed up to my own grandfather’s funeral in a black pinstripe pencil skirt, modest black blouse, and understated makeup and my brother said “Since when are you a Goth?” Some of the men managed to wear ties. Some of them. (And no my grandfather was not a hip cool nonconformist who would have wanted everyone to party at his funeral. He would have had a heart attack.)

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1017585103 Kanani Fong

          Yes, we do. However, often the family asks that black not be worn, rather, a happy color not signifying death. In addition, I’ve been asked to attend funerals where military honors were going to be rendered, and one always dresses for those. I do have a black dress in my closet that has become the one I grab just funerals.

      • Little_Olive

        And didn’t the white stripe convey that “breezing trough- slightly out of place” sensation. Those were a couple of powerful white stripes IMO.

        • formerlyAnon

          To my eye, the strip on the skirt was the visual focus of the scene. If people hadn’t been talking, it was all I’d have noticed.

      • sarahjane1912

        What I noticed — apart from the drop-dead-gorgeous outfit — was that in the Jane vs old biddies jewellery stakes, Jane was definitely ‘fashion forward’. She was the only one who was wearing glamour/costume jewellery, when everyone else [even Roger's daughter] was sporting heirloom stuff. Not quite an old v new money thing, but Jane certainly showed she could look unbelievable without having a dividend around her neck/on her ears.

        • SuzyQuzey

          Jane and Mona were wearing earrings that were strikingly similar.

          • sarahjane1912

            Actually, I hadn’t even put Mona into the ‘old biddy’ class; I was thinking more of the *really* old set!

            But y’know, that IS true. But I thought that Mona’s were probably ‘Deco arty pieces from the 30s rather than straight-out fake flat pearls, and possibly worth a bit more as a result. I know, I know, I’m reading too much into this [but I do love jewellery spotting]. ;-)

    • schadenfreudelicious

      my parents had that fondue pot in a lovely avocado green, it sat unused in our pantry because my mother said it was a nightmare to clean out and too much trouble to use :)

      • http://twitter.com/susanpcollier Susan Collier

        My parents’ was silver. I have it now. My mom didn’t use it after my 9th birthday when the fire engine came to our house after the oil overheated.

      • Eric Stott

        We had quite a lot of stuff in that shade of avocado. After the newness wore off it always looked slightly dirty, as if there was a thin brown scum on it, and the Teflon started to scratch. We went through one season of Fondue dinners & then it went into the closet – the forks were used to get stuck toast out of the toaster. I still have some of them.

        • schadenfreudelicious

          ha, i kept some of those forks too, i was always fascinated with the little colored ends when i was a kid.

      • kerry noodles

        Did Megan say she was going to empty the fondue pot of cheese and put chocolate in it? Or am I misremembering? Because that would take forEVer and no one would do that in the middle of a dinner party.

        • schadenfreudelicious

          i believe she did, and you are correct, most people had a smaller pot for chocolate fondue, and no one would spend the time cleaning out the cheese pot in the middle of a party, that thing would need an overnight soak in the sink!

        • fursa_saida

          IIRC she just said she was going to “switch from cheese to chocolate.” I had the same concern and chose to assume they had a second pot.

      • filmcricket

        My parents had a slightly updated one in that Dansk chocolate brown. They used it occasionally for cheese, NEVER for chocolate, to my undying disappointment.

        • Chickadeep

          Those vintage Dansk enamel ones go for a pretty penny on eBay and Etsy these days!

      • greenwich matron

        I bought a stainless fondue pot before Christmas. We tried using an old copper sterno version, but it was a huge hassle and a fire hazard. It has a non-stick coating, but that won’t last because of the sharp metal forks…

        • sarahjane1912

          I have a stainless steel one as well as a couple of enamel ones [Creuset still makes a burnt orange number!] … but I use all of them for meat/fish fondue. I find people just get ‘sick’ of the cheese too quickly. It’s filling, certainly, but not as much fun as a bourguinonne where you can cook your meat or fish and then serve an array of delicious sauces/dips to ‘go with’. Have a great salad and baked potatoes on the side [the better to sop up some of those sauces!] and you’re all set.

          You’re right about the forks though; they CAN scratch a non-stick surface.

          Does anyone remember any ways in which fondue was enjoyed in ‘those days’? I think fondue is great for a group that possibly don’t know each other very well; it’s a great ‘joiner’-type activity. Lots of fun. We still, when we very occasionally ‘do’ fondue for a group, have penalties for dropping one’s food off the fork; a bottle of wine to the ‘house’ if it’s a man, a kiss for each of the men [on the cheek!] if it’s a woman. Cute.

          • greenwich matron

            Fondue is one of my favorite two step family meals (one step if I buy it packaged). I think it was part of an overall dinner party trend where people wanted to show that they were sophisticated gourmets even though they didn’t have a kitchen staff or servants. Can you imagine Betty’s parents serving dinner guests fondue? I see it as very Auntie Mame. Serving drunk, well dressed people rarebit on the couch with only one plate and fork per person – it’s must have seemed like a dream come true.

            I remember reading that chocolate fondue was actually invented in NYC in the late 1960′s as part of a promotion for a fondue restaurant and chocolate (toblerone, I think).

            • sarahjane1912

              ‘Packaged’? Fondue comes in packages?! Wow! Not in my little corner of the world!

              Am giggling at the concept of Betty’s folks having a fondue night. And oh yes, ‘Auntie Mame’; thanks for the frisson. One of my favourite books of all time. Mame would totally rock a fondue night. It would be a step up, perhaps, from cocktails and ‘fork food’, I suppose!

              I didn’t know that about chocolate fondue … Not a fan, personally, but I’ve been known to indulge in the occasional chocolate ‘fountain’ experience. Which is essentially the same thing, I suppose. *GRIN*

      • Janet B

        I have my parents old fondue pot and the forks with the colored ends.

      • tallgirl1204

        We had the green also. It came out when my dad was out of town on business, and mom and we kids would have “Welsh rarebit” which was toast dipped into a wonderful cheese sauce.

    • PowerfulBusiness

      As if your other recaps/style posts of “The Doorway” weren’t amazing, this is the most incredible of the three!!! Both of you picked up on SO many details it’s unbelievable. Loved it. And I didn’t even see that trifecta of the heart/mother/crucifix so even though it was heavy handed, I only know it’s heavy handed because you guys were smart enough to point it out. Already looking forward to next week’s posts.

    • http://twitter.com/EttyM E.M

      That’s Frasier’s kid, Frederick as a junior copywriter getting a walloped by Peggy

      • http://twitter.com/martaklilly Marta Lilly

        I thought I recognized him!

      • juliamargaret

        I knew he looked familiar!!!

      • Robyn Garrett

        Oh, wow! I love it when familiar faces show up on this show because they’re so recontextualized by the period. Except maybe Rory, who is always the same.

    • AViewer44

      Of course Peggy’s boss is in love with her–that’s exactly the impression Stan got too. Remember, “he likes you!”??

      Also, I agree, the crucifix seems a bit much. As does the intermarriage, which would have been a big deal when their son was born, circa 1946. And especially a son! What did they do about a bris? All the references to their separate religions yet on the surface they seem solidly settled. It doesn’t make sense.

      • Sobaika

        One of the running themes throughout the entire series has been Jewish identity and assimilation during the 60s. Rachel Menken, Jane Sterling, Ginsberg, etc. Perhaps this was part of a long-running reference, or a sign that Sylvia and her husband will never quite be on the same page – their marriage seems oddly settled on the outside but she’s stepping out on him.

        • AViewer44

          It just seems over the top (or maybe on the nose) to have such overt references to religion in the home. They had to have been married in the 40s to have a child at college now. Jane and even Rachel were both more assimilated. But the doctor’s conversational style and his wife’s decorating style suggest much less assimilation was going on in that household. I think you’re right about it being a way to demonstrate that they are not on the same page, but I think it’s also tweaking the realities of the era too far!

          • http://twitter.com/enuma enuma

            See, it seemed totally normal o me. My grandparents’ houses all had a crucifix like that in every room, and in my parents’ house there was a crucifix in every bedroom.

            • Sobaika

              It would be normal, but more so for a Catholic family. A Catholic woman and a Jewish man, maybe not so much? Maybe he doesn’t care how she decorates.

              Either way, MW loves a heavy-handed visual. Perhaps the repeated references to her Catholicism were to emphasize her ‘otherness’ – Don has always gone for that in his affairs. He was married to the perfect WASP bride and cheated on her with the opposite: Jewish women, working women, Catholic women, the beatnik from the first season, etc. What rang true about his last line (‘I want to stop doing this’) is that he married the type of woman he was usually drawn to in Megan and gave what he considers an honest shot and still ended up in another woman’s bed. He’s so broken he doesn’t know how to get out of this cycle.

            • formerlyAnon

              Yes. I thought this episode kept hammering home just how broken Don is.

            • AViewer44

              But was one of your grandparents or parents Jewish? My grandparents intermarried and it does not seem at ALL normal to me. It was a much bigger deal in those days. You’d either have been pretty assimilated (in which case you wouldn’t be flinging Yiddish sayings around or hanging your crucifix) or you would have stayed married in. IMO, it might work dramatically, but it doesn’t work as a realistic reflection of the times.

            • formerlyAnon

              I tend to your view, but religious observance also tends to reinforce the idea that once you’re married, you stay married – especially if you have kids. The working class neighborhood stereotype prevalent when these characters and my parents grew up, (caveat: as it was repeated to me): if you had to have a cheating husband, better a Jew than a Catholic. He’d treat his wife better in that situation. Meaning less likely to let his married family suffer financially and less likely to publicly embarrass his wife by being seen with his mistress in the circles he and his wife moved in. NOWHERE in their discussion was reference to the idea of getting a divorce.

            • AViewer44

              Formerlyanon–I agree. However, my point was, if you really were wedded enough to your cultural/religious identity to hang a crucifix or use Yiddish expressions, you would probably have stayed married IN. Rather than marrying OUT as these two have done quite unbelievably. It’s the only unbelievable thing I could see about them, but it sticks out like a sore thumb! (Okay, enough of my point–I think I have been hammering it home long enough!)

            • formerlyAnon

              Oh, I tend to agree with you. Especially about the crucifix – I don’t know how closely use of Yiddish expressions tracks with religious feeling. But I know plenty of people who come to be closer to their religious roots as they move through their 30s and 40s, so perhaps she identified with them less when they married.

            • urbanamish

              i found the crucifixes disconcerting/unbelievable. as a non-religous jew, i could live with a christmas tree on the holidays…but jesus on the cross? that’s not assimilated, that’s a catholic conversion -which is not how that dr. presents himself.

            • AViewer44

              Urbanamish–yes, totally! They are a very disjunctive couple, which might work in a writer’s room but does not seem an accurate reflection of real life.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I don’t know… I don’t think it’s all that unusual to see a wealthy interfaith Manhattan couple at the time. Especially if one of them is non-observant.

            • urbanamish

              interfaith couples? non observant jews? plenty then ,plenty now. there is nothing neutral or peaceful or joyous (like a x-mas tree) about jesus nailed to a cross. this man presents himself as a jew he won’t even accept a “merry christmas” from don. .to a (non practicing?) jew..this is a foreign , unsettling image. jews have in fact taken a lot of heat for the act this image represents. we do not sleep peacefully or fuck next to this symbol. unless this man has accepted jesus as his true savior…or this turns out to be some kind twisted revelation about the dr.’s psyche…i ain’t buying this.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I’m sorry, I know way too many Jews too subscribe to such a sweeping argument, mainly because it belies quite a few of their family situations.

              This reminds me way too much of the whole “There’s no such thing as a Norwegian Catholic” argument from Season 2. There are all kinds of people living all kinds of lives, especially in a place like New York City.

              And they seem to be in either their son’s or a spare bedroom; not Sylvia’s bedroom.

            • urbanamish

              ok, if it’s their son’s bedroom and he was brought up catholic i could see how there might be a cross. but that’s a one big cross and his dad presents himself as one big jew, so i’ll repeat. unless this is acknowledged as part of some dynamic in there marriage, that is way too much jesus going on for a non practicing jew. i’m sticking with it.

            • judybrowni

              If his parents were married in the ’40s — like my parents were — then in order for the wife to still practice Catholicism, the non-Catholic husband would have had to sign a pre-nup contract stipulating that the children would be raised Catholic.

              Really. It’s why I attended Mass and Sunday School was confirmed and made my First Holy Communion.

              So if Slyvia and Don are schtupping in the son’s bedroom, yes, there could likely be a cross, even if Dad’s Jewish.

              And it’s more likely Sylvia would be schtupping a neighbor in an otherwise unused bedroom, rather then her marriage bed.

            • greenwich matron

              Many people in my mom’s family were in the same religious situation, but I think they only had to sign something if they wanted to get married in the church (which they had to if the other person wasn’t baptized).

              I’m surprised at how people here are focusing only on how Dr. Rosen would feel about the cross, especially when there is no evidence at all that he was observant and she is obviously a reflexive catholic. Marrying someone Jewish won’t send you to hell, but denying Christ will…

            • 3hares

              I think the idea is that many Jewish people have a specific dislike of crucifixes as a cultural symbol even if they’re not religious. Which I’m sure MW knows. Obviously the doctor just isn’t one of those people or he’s gotten used to it. I’ve known more than one Jewish person who loved symbols like that and decorated their apartment with them.

              I suspect they’re there because there’s going to be a lot of religious themes in the show this season. We’ve already gotten the Inferno and Sylvia’s many crosses, Roger’s mother’s mostly secular funeral, Ted on a religious marriage retreat and Peggy not only explaining her religious background but ending a conversation with a pastor she accidentally called father with “and also with you.” Plus a near death experience complete with the light…

            • judybrowni

              Not in my parents’ case, and they were married in the late ’40s.

              Couldn’t be married in a church, by a priest, but still my father had to sign the contract stating he’d agreed to raise the children Catholic.

              My mother was, eventualy, president of the Rosary Altar Guild, and I and my brother and sister were raised Catholic — but my parents were forced to be married by a Justice of the Peace, still.

            • Eric Stott

              A bit off topic – a mixed couple I know were married in a civil ceremony though they wanted a church. A friend suggested a Unitarian church, but they decided “It wasn’t quite religious enough”

            • fursa_saida

              I think it’s because most of us reacting to it are Jewish to one degree or another. It feels natural, at least to me, to balk a little at that and then consider that reaction in terms of Dr. Rosen because I automatically identify with someone who says something like “that’s Italian for L’Chaim.” Plus, though it’s obvious we’ll get more of Sylvia, Dr. Rosen got way more screen time in the ep; more to chew over there.

              (Speaking of this whole subject: god, I need more Ginsburg, like immediately.)

            • Aurumgirl

              Also, that heart is not a religious ornament, it’s a study tool someone in med school would have used to either learn or teach the anatomy of the heart. This is not the bedroom used by a husband and wife who live in a Park Avenue apartment, it’s the bedroom that used to belong to a child before that child moved away. Used now as a second bedroom where things that need to be kept around but not seen are stored.

            • judybrowni

              Exactly! I thought that was obvious (although the heart could still stand, metaphorically, for the Sacred Heart of Jesus.)

            • urbanamish

              as a fourth generation jew of new york city. i feel confident i have had a great deal of exposure to the multiple permutations of ny jewish identity and ny jews married to non jews from a vast variety of cultures and religions and their offspring. and while living in nyc, i can literally lean out my window right now to hear 5 different languages spoken, and only in the last 24 hours have seen and spoken with an amish farmer at union square farmer’s market and an orthodox jew in williamsburg and a muslim woman in full burka,
              i never had any idea what the norwegian catholic line meant. not my world. so i don’t quite understand how you are dismissing my argument.
              is it similar to finding a gay republican? i know they exist, i’ve never met one, it’s counter intuitive. i’m certain there is a story there. it’s not typical. that is my argument. .
              i am not saying it is impossible to find a culturally identified jewish dr. married to a christian religious woman with a son who grew up worshipping jesus in 1967 …but it would have been a sensitive subject, probably dealt with with a lot of humor, seen as controversial, and even in 2013 they would be hesitant to waive so much jesus around as a family likes to feel bonded, not divided. it is unusual behavior: noteworthy.
              given this is madmen, and nothing if not thoughtful, i suspect matt wiener’s fascination with chirstian themes ( especially though in no way limited to peggy) and jewish themes ( especially though not limited to ginsburg) will be explored in depth this season.
              ginsburg and his past is obvious, now we have two jew/non jewish couples (don’t forget peggy and zappa), and more subtle in this episode to non jews, would have been one of the many glaring death symbols employed.
              betty rips her coat while going through the doorway of the st. marks squat, before abandoning the violin (as bobby called it,” a coffin”)…in a jewish funeral, all mourners literally rip their coats to symbolize the permanence of death and their anger.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I’m not dismissing your argument. I simply don’t agree with it based on my own experiences and people I know.

            • urbanamish

              i’d love a count.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              You’re being obsessive. I have no intention of taking the time to count the numbers of observant, religious Catholics married to non-observant Jews I’ve known in my life, but I suppose I’d start with the relatives of mine in such marriages. Then I’d tell you about the high-rise luxury condo next door to the Catholic church my family went to every Sunday; the condo with the Jewish supermarket on the first floor, which catered to the roughly 70% Jewish population of the building. I know all this because my father was the building manager and because I worked in that supermarket, delivering groceries to the largely elderly population of the building, all 4 years of high school. I got to know many of them quite well and 30 years later, can still remember their names, what their apartments looked like, and even what their favorite foods were, in some cases. I ate my first (and last) gefilte fish there; plus kugel, borscht, and those little jelly rings covered in dark chocolate, which I couldn’t get enough of. I had the honor of getting to light the community menorah in the building lobby (which was resplendent, in an ’80s way) one night. And the rare opportunity to meet and talk to many older people in their condos who didn’t mind showing me the numbers on their arms if it came up in conversation somehow (which it did).

              And every Sunday, in church, I would see quite a few of the pretty wives married to several much older Jewish men in the building next door. Everyone knew them. They were almost all blonde and tastefully well-appointed.

              Are we done establishing our credentials now?

            • urbanamish

              and yet , you are outsiders who do not know the private conversations of jews speaking to other jews. period.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              And yet, you moved the goalposts and barely acknowledged that I answered your questions. How terribly unsurprising.

              And for the record, I never claimed to be an “insider” who “knows the private conversations of Jews speaking to other Jews.” How ridiculous. I said I didn’t agree with your take and that I knew interfaith couples like the one depicted.

            • urbanamish

              obssessive? we’re on a website dedicated to deconstucing the buttons on the costumes of fictitous tv characters..i think we all past obsessive long ago.
              you resorted to calling me names and sarcastically
              educating me to the fact that there were other people who might think differently from me.
              while i was attempting to make some insider observations , specifically, how do jews, even non- religious jews respond to the image of jesus nailed to a cross in 1967.
              and this jew and others above, insist it cannot be neutral. the jewish generation that grew up in the wake of the holocaust had arguably one of the most complicated times of jewish identity.
              the holocaust made it very clear there was no real assimilation.
              i grew up surrounded by italian catholics and make a great gravy, but i wouldn’t presume to know what an italian catholic feels when they look at a cross.
              the question under discussion is what does it say about this self identified jew, who won’t accept a merry christmas from don yet lives with such heavy christian religious iconography in his home mean?
              and the answer from this jew and some others above say it’s significant.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              “obssessive? we’re on a website dedicated to deconstucing the buttons on the costumes of fictitous tv characters.”

              Yes. And you turned that obsession away from the characters and toward a person who had the nerve to say they disagreed with you, demanding that they give you the details of their personal knowledge.

              “you resorted to calling me names”

              I did absolutely no such thing. I stated that I didn’t agree with your premise.

              “i wouldn’t presume to know what an italian catholic feels when they look at a cross.”

              And there is nothing in any of my responses about how anyone “feels” when they look at a cross.

              We’re done here. You don’t debate in good faith.

            • urbanamish

              absolutely not the discussion. absurd.

            • Eric Stott

              let it go. and by the way, I happen to be Gay AND Republican.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              You shouldn’t exist because she’s never met anyone like you.

            • Eric Stott

              It isn’t easy – the Albany NY Gay community is very political – most will automatically assume that I’m a liberal Democrat and look at me with either pity or disgust when they hear I’m registered Republican. One man actually screamed “DON’T YOU KNOW YOU’RE KILLING US?”. For the record I’m disgusted with both parties & retain my registry out of habit. (end of confessional rant)

            • urbanamish

              i said i know they exist. but it’s uncommon.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              And I said I don’t think it’s all that unusual. That’s ALL I said. So why did you argue with me, claim I said things I never said, demand that I provide examples from my personal life, and then claim the conversation was about something else entirely?

            • http://www.facebook.com/jackie.womble.9 Jackie Womble

              >betty rips her coat while going through the doorway of the st. marks
              squat, before abandoning the violin (as bobby called it,” a
              coffin”)…in a jewish funeral, all mourners literally rip their coats
              to symbolize the permanence of death and their anger

            • lulubella

              Did you also notice Joan’s dress sleeve is ripped after her night at the Electric Circus with her Mary Kary friend? And FWIW, my Jewish father and Catholic mother spawned a Born Again daughter (my sister), and my parents were married a few years after this fictional couple. And … everyone lived/lives in peaceful harmony.

            • http://www.lippsisters.com/ Deborah Lipp

              I agree. I think the doctor wouldn’t have wanted that in his house.

            • urbanamish

              thanks for having my back, basket case- chip Ndip
              ,

            • H2olovngrl

              Incidentally, it was such a big deal when my husband’s father, from a very religious,upper middle class, Jewish family married his mother, a non religious agnostic, he was written out of their will, even after they had children, grandchildren, and had been together for thirty years. They, especially my husband’s grandmother, never forgave them.

            • fursa_saida

              I agree that neither I nor most Jews I know (it’s not like I’ve interviewed all of them on this subject) would be comfortable living permanently around blatantly Christian iconography (it’s one thing if I’m staying with my super-Catholic step-grandmother for a week or so, another in my own home). But per the below discussion, I’m not willing to say that it’s impossible. Plus, for me, it helps that this is clearly not a room that the good Doctor sleeps in (I had to sleep in a room with MAJOR Catholic religious decor for a couple of months once and it was very uncomfortable for me).

            • AViewer44

              Wow, this stirred up so much discussion! I don’t say it’s impossible. I say only that it didn’t ring true to me. It seems a writers’ room misstep, as if one of the characters had said, “I am just not that into you” or quoted Marshall McLuhan before his work was published (oh wait, that really happened). Intermarriage, yes, totally on board. Intermarriage with crucifixes on the wall? It just doesn’t ring true–and not in the son’s room, either. (First born, a boy, etc. Seems to me if the good doctor were willing to let his son be raised Catholic, rather than having a bar mitzvah, or just being raised as nothing, he probably would not be making it clear that he’s too Jewish to celebrate Xmas.)

              Although if it’s the wife’s own little reading room/boudoir or something, then it might be another matter.

            • Kitten Mittons

              I’m reading all these comments just now, since my husband and I are desperately trying to finish Season 6 before Season 7 comes out, and I just have to say that I think it’s really amazing that this show and this blog can inspire this level of discussion. Further, the fact that these discussions take place and are relatively civil and “troll” free is truly an accomplishment. Internet win.

              I could be completely wrong, but I’m pretty sure that Sylvia makes reference to the room being her maid’s room. At least once it was stated outright, but she also made a reference to the fact that the maid smokes in there, so it’s okay if they light up after sex.
              Having said that, I would be prone to saying the crucifix belongs to the maid. However, the medical heart-on-a-stick on display is more than likely not the maid’s, and either belongs to Dr. Rosen, or their child before he went off to school. Either way, the heart has made up my mind that the room was decorated not by the maid, but by Mrs. Rosen most likely. (If the room was her child’s before the maid’s, that brings in the whole mother theme, another interesting thought).

              I’m not Jewish, nor did I live during the 60′s, so my comments don’t have much weight. My take, though, is that Dr. Rosen seems to defer to Sylvia, or acquiesce to her preferences (the argument about money by the elevator is one example). Whatever the rest of the house looks like, he doesn’t seem like the type to make a fuss about a religious symbol that his darling wife holds dear and wants to display in some back bedroom of the house. And if they’ve been married 20+ years, then he’s used to it, or he knows when the fight ain’t worth it.

              I would also say that perhaps the way Don talks to Sylvia in the restaurant belies Dr. Rosen’s acquiescence. Sylvia seems ready to end the affair, and Don talks to her in the most appalling manner. She eats it up with a spoon and they end up in bed. Whatever other themes are there, or will unfold in future episodes, it seemed clear to me that Don was not what she was used to, and she liked it.

              I do so love these posts and the ensuing comments.

        • Alanna Wisteria

          Isn’t Mona Sterling also Jewish? Seems like I remember a scene last season in which he and Jane joked about how he had a thing for Jewish women, with the implication that his first wife was as well. Then again, they apparently raised Margaret as a Christian, so….

          • vandeventer

            No, I don’t think Mona is Jewish

      • filmcricket

        Someone mentioned that with regard to Peggy’s mom marrying a Lutheran, too. I can only assume Pa Olson converted.

        • Lisa

          My mother was almost exactly Peggy’s age. Her mother was Catholic and her father was non-practicing Presbyterian. The Church agreed to the marriage as long as he agreed to bring my mom up Catholic, and my grandparents did do that. He never converted to Catholicism (but the nuns told my mom that he was going to hell because he wasn’t Catholic, and so she prayed for him to convert).

          • filmcricket

            I wasn’t thinking so much about the Church’s reaction, although that’s very interesting. I was thinking more about Ma Olson’s family and how they would have reacted. My dad is a little bit younger than Peggy and was a lapsed Catholic when he married my mom, a non-observant United Church goer. His parents almost didn’t come to the wedding, because she wasn’t Catholic.

      • Adelaidey

        I got the feeling that Abe was not the father of her son- that she was a widow who remarried after her son’s father passed. Maybe it’s all the black.

      • lulubella

        Meh – my parents married a few years after that – he was a conservative Jew, she was a religious Catholic who had almost become a nun. Besides the inevitable lectures by friends and a bit of an icy Jewish MIL, my parents had no problems with their marriage and none with friends or acquaintances. They lived in urban Chicago. This fictional couple lives in Manhattan and presumably travel in well-heeled, educated circles. I’m not shocked at their experience.

    • http://www.what-the-frock.com Dana WhatTheFrock

      I also thought of the Dowager Countess during the funeral scene. Great recap as usual.

      • Girl_With_a_Pearl

        The elderly ladies in the funeral scene reminded me of the outfits worn by Cary Grant’s aunts when they were about to have a funeral for one of their gentlemen in Arsenic and Old Lace.

    • Paula Pertile

      Thank you again, so much!

      Look at how perfectly Bob Benson matches the couch in that one pic. I love that funny little gold and blue Christmas tree on the table.

      Do we think Betty will stay ‘dark’? What will be the thing that snaps her back into her blonde self?

      • Lisa

        Weren’t there a lot of women who were platinum blonde in the 50′s and then stopped bleaching in the 60′s? But that really dark hair is not close to Betty’s natural color either. She’s still playing a role of some sort, not moving any closer to being her natural self.

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1208138556 Sara Munoz Munoz

          I don’t think Betty has a clue who her natural self is. :-/

        • http://twitter.com/kerryev kerryev

          According to Roger earlier in the episode, she’s too old to be a natural blond anymore.

      • VictoriaDiNardo

        Re: little metal xmas tree – I bought one like it on Ebay last year – you hang whatever ornaments you want on it. It’s very funny.

    • http://twitter.com/steeenie Christine Hart

      Yes, the Ted/Peggy thing seems romantic, and is SO not a good idea for Peggy (which means it’ll probably happen).

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1208138556 Sara Munoz Munoz

        I think the flirtatious phone conversation with Stan set the tone for this scene. We’re already feeling the romance in the air, and then Ted walks in. In a tux no less.

        • http://www.facebook.com/darva.sutra Darva Sutra

          Peggy is truly coming into her own and she is owning her power and sex appeal at long last. Ted of course is attracted to this (guessing he’s a dog with his marriage anyhow).

          I don’t see her long-term with Abe; while his radical views would have been exciting and made her feel rebellious at first, now they are just kind of tedious and a bit disloyal to her and her career path. I hope she finds true love with someone who appreciates/deserves her. I do think she will have an affair, as it will show her mirroring Don’s path and also serve as character development.

          • Eric Stott

            Abe is going to go through a very strident and embarrassing political phase – but in 30 years he’ll be a member of a country club somewhere. Of course he’ll choose a restricted one to make a point, but after a while he’ll be like everyone else.

            • http://twitter.com/lbcubbison Laurie Cubbison

              Or he’ll go to grad school and end up a tenured radical.

            • Eric Stott

              which is in its own way joining the establishment.

          • http://twitter.com/creeple Alice

            I think she’s mirroring Don’s path, but not entirely. Peggy actually has a conscience, and she is not as irresponsible about affairs because she got burned badly by authority figures earlier on. She also had a fairly normal upbringing. Here’s what I find fascinating: Peggy mirrors Don’s career path but is fairly monogamous in her personal life (anonymous handjobs aside). Pete mirrors Don’s personal path and is an utter failure at it because he does not learn from his mistakes. Peggy does. She takes a few missteps along the way, but she takes advice from people (like Stan). It’s like Mad Men Does “Goofus and Gallant.” I agree with you, though – Abe might gone soon. He has always just kind of been around, but never an integral part of her life, not like her work buddies.

        • Meg0GayGuys6

          I still want her and Stan to get together- ever since she sat in that hotel room with him in her undies :)

      • MK03

        I want her and Stan to give it a go. I doubt it will happen, but they’re so funny together and they seem like a good match.

        • KayEmWhy

          Stan’s her wingman.

          • tallgirl1204

            I dunno. I think Stan’s a spy. but I hope not, because their flirting was delightful and very egalitarian.

            • http://twitter.com/creeple Alice

              Nah, Stan’s not a spy. Those two worked together every day and night for three years. They’re close friends. Bob Bensen, though…

        • http://twitter.com/steeenie Christine Hart

          I’m not sure Peggy respects Stan enough to be romantically attracted to him. Plus that’s not sufficiently controversial for this show. ;-)

        • http://twitter.com/pennyeager Penny Eager

          Yes, when they were on the phone just chatting I was wondering. He has Abe’s anti-establishment kind of vibe going on this season, however he is still in her world. Interesting.

          • Topaz

            Their relationship does make me feel warm and fuzzy, but on a show like Mad Men I tend not to trust anything associated with positive emotions.

      • Adelaidey

        I got the distinct impression that Ted and his wife were attending marriage counseling or perhaps a marriage strengthening retreat- the presence of a pastor and Ted’s too-affable “Apparently I work too much” stood out to me.

      • megohd

        Don will hate him even more for it.

      • fursa_saida

        Agree. She seemed very pleased after she had a second to think about Stan’s “he liiiiiikes you” comment.

    • http://twitter.com/YoBabaYaga Baba Yaga

      I also said the same thing about the “swingers” feel to the party and the romantic blocking and lighting in that scene with Peggy and Chaugh! God, I hope I don’t see an arc where Peggy cheats on her boyfriend with her boss. Yikes.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1208138556 Sara Munoz Munoz

        I think she and Abe will break up before that ever happens (and OMG don’t ever happen!) He’s a liberal journalist, she’s an apolitical establishment type. Things are about to get pretty hairy. I can totally see that leading to a breakup.

        • formerlyAnon

          I never thought they’d make it. But I did think he’d leave her and now I’m thinking it could go either way.

        • http://twitter.com/DallasDiner Infinine®™

          Yep, the writing is on the wall, the bathroom wall, specifically. In the only scene of domesticity between Peggy and Abe, he is separated from her in the bathroom in gastric distress while she’s on a business call. Hmmm.

      • Girl_With_a_Pearl

        I don’t think Peggy will end up with Abe at all. If you’ll remember what Peggy’s mother said about Abe not marrying her and then marrying someone else. It rang true to me at the time and even more so now that Abe seems to have embraced the anti-establishment feeling of the sixties. I like Abe, BTW. The more I think about it, the more I think it’s very possible that Ted and Peggy will end up together.

    • Puckndc

      RE: The kitchen….ever see Julia Childs at the Smithsonian?..no copycat stainless/granite, blah blah….I have an old 60′s kitchen and I LOVE it….

      • MsKitty

        I always laugh when I watch House Hunters and they insist on the stainless/granite, because 5-10 years down the road folks will probably consider that outdated like the avocado green/harvest gold/laminate kitchens.

        • 3boysful

          Not only that, but most of the time the buyers are young marrieds, and think they’re entitled to the stainless-granite, “dream” kitchen. Whatever happened to starter houses?

        • Puckndc

          it’s my favorite show to hate!!…when the self entitled brats say ” THAT KITCHEN WILL HAVE TO GO BEFORE I LIVE HERE”!!!! and the appliances are like 3 years old, but white etc..I had stainless/granite/ etc in my last house..trust me you don’t want it…..don’t get me started!!!..oh and ” I’m 25 and we just got married and we need a 5 bedroom home”…….ugh

          • H2olovngrl

            Or, after $38,000 in home renovation, this house will be perfect. Really? Ye Gods! Why are people always so willing to throw away perfectly good counters, cupboards and appliances? We are a very wasteful nation, and thank you, House Hunters for continuing to perpetuate this trend.

            • Puckndc

              I always wonder why they don’t donate to habitat or some other charity at the very least..

            • H2olovngrl

              I know, right?

          • greenwich matron

            I like to see it because it makes me think that my 13 year old granite counters may survive my tenure in this house (actually, they are 1,000,000,013 years old). Alas, I am sure they will be truly outré by the time I sell. Actually, my whole house will probably get torn down…

      • formerlyAnon

        I don’t hate the kitchen – but it is always lit to be SO DARK AND DEPRESSING that I think that I couldn’t bear to spend a minute there.

    • MsKitty

      Have to interrupt my reading of this post to give you two a shout out for referencing those ’70s “kids gone bad” movies. Loved those, especially the ones with Linda Blair. I practically did a happy dance when “Born Innocent” was released on DVD.

      Back to reading.

      • decormaven

        Yes! And don’t forget “Maybe I’ll Come Home in the Spring” with Sally Field.

        • Joan Dahlgren

          Yes! And what triggered my memory of it was the maid vacuuming while Don watched tv–along with the accompanying static that brought to the picture–remember that? The end of “Maybe I’ll Come Home in the Spring” had the reformed Sally Field character vacuuming in her suburban home while her kid sister was shown hitching a ride, repeating the whole cycle.

          • decormaven

            Amazing! Whenever I bring up that flick, most people go “huh”? Glad you remember it as well.

          • BayTampaBay

            I remember another of the weirdo counter culture movies from the 1970′s but cannot remember the name. Anyhoo…the whole family ends up traveling around on a bus and in the last scene the son ask the father if he wants to go home and the father says…..”Not on your life”.

        • LauraAgain

          I remember my mom watching that when I was a kid, and it was recently on television. I watched it again and it really brought back memories.

      • Girl_With_a_Pearl

        Go Ask Alice. I remember reading the diary the movie was based on too.

      • formerlyAnon

        Not drugs, teen pregnancy: “Mr. and Mrs. Bo Jo Jones.” Desi Arnaz, Jr. as the Mr., can’t remember the girl. Also a hugely popular teen novel.

      • Wendi126

        Two words. Robbie Benson

    • Spicytomato1

      More great insights. I was blown away by the scene of Betty in the Village in front of the building. The juxtaposition of suburban establishment with urban counterculture was something to behold.

      I was thinking that it was interesting that it didn’t occur to her to dress down a little, so she’d blend in more. Would a woman like her not own anything more casual that might pass for bohemian, like even a pair of jeans (dungarees)?

      • MsKitty

        Many in that generation consider jeans as something that should only be worn around the house or for manual work. My boss, who’s close to 70, wouldn’t let us wear jeans on Casual Fridays for years because of that. And I don’t recall seeing my Mom (born in 1939) or her contemporaries wear jeans in public either.

        • momogus

          Agreed! My mother (born 1933) wore printed capris or solid-colored pants for casual wear, but she never owned a pair of jeans in her life.

          • sarahjane1912

            My mother (born 1936) owned one pair of jeans which she bought in the 70s. And she wore them exactly once, on a weekend away trout fishing. Her casual wear, too, consisted of plain-coloured trousers/capris as well. :)

          • schadenfreudelicious

            yup, my mom (born 1929) never wore a pair of jeans, though she wears them now from time to time in her 80′s!

            • VictoriaDiNardo

              Wow, I’m starting to appreciate my mother’s unorthodoxy! She was born in 28 and I have a picture of us in 1968 where she’s wearing white bell-bottoms with snakes printed on them, her “fall” and keds. Hell, she was only 40, still having fun with clothes. She also had a brown jersey hostess jumpsuit with turkey feathers around the cuffs; I used to put it on and pretend to be Diana Ross singing into an extention cord. That woman knew how to shop Value City!

        • C. C. Winslow

          I remember getting my first pair of jeans when I was 12, in 1968. They were stiff as a board, almost unwearable. I don’t think my mother ever wore jeans, even when the whole world was wearing them years later.

          • raininmai

            I remember being sent home from school in 1968 because I wore pants. Pants on girls was still counterculture then.

            • schadenfreudelicious

              we were allowed to wear our pants under our dresses to walk to school during our Canadian winters, but had to take them off when we got to class, this would have been around 1969.

            • Wendi126

              The first year we could wear pants to public school was 1970-71. I was in 5th grade. And not dungarees.(Wranglers). I had a purple pantsuit the exact color Joan wears for her picture- elastic waist bell pants with a matching long sleeved tunic top. I also had a cream colored pantsuit short sleeved with red wet look stripes around the bottom of each leg and then in Mondrian stripes on the tunic. Could wear dungarees two years later.

            • BayTampaBay

              Same thing in the US. I was in first grade in 1969 and pants had to be removed before the bell rang. By third grade everyone…even the teachers….wore lady pants. Thinks changed pretty fast from 1969 to 1975.

          • formerlyAnon

            In the category of questions you wish you’d thought to ask: There are photos of my mom (in her single working girl days) at a dude ranch wearing obviously brand new blue jeans. I wish I’d asked if she ever wore them again! She never owned a pair in later years, and there are no other photos of her in them. [yes. she and her working girl pals went on vacation together several years in a row in their late 20s - the ranch was in Arizona, I think, and there was a trip to Florida as well - HUGE adventures for working class girls living in or around Jersey City, not all of whom had graduated high school.]

            • artsykelly

              My grandmother was also a working class girl from Jersey City! Those were big trips for them.

            • formerlyAnon

              Yes, I give them a lot of credit. My mom was definitely considered an “old maid” by her family by that time and made the conscious decision that she was going to do some of the things she wanted to do with the money she earned, instead of waiting around hoping she’d marry a man with whom to start her “real” life.

            • C. C. Winslow

              FormerlyAnon, you just brought back a memory for me, a photo of Mom, hugely pregnant with me, in the kitchen of her family’s farmhouse, wearing an oversized man’s white shirt and jeans (I think?) that were cuffed to below her knees. I’m going to try to find that picture. That would’ve been spring of 1956.

          • http://twitter.com/omg_dora Dora K.

            Thank you for sharing your memories, guys. I love it :)

          • YoungSally

            I wore a lot of pants in the 60s and 70s (I was born in 64)…but never wore jeans…..I think my mother had some belief that they were for the “less fortunate”…my grandmother (interestingly my mother’s mother) bought me my first pair when I was 11….finally got a pair of Lee’s in 77 or 78.

            • C. C. Winslow

              My Lee Riders (1980-ish) were my favorite jeans ever. I wish I still had them.

          • http://twitter.com/DallasDiner Infinine®™

            I remember those, I don’t think we even knew back then to try to wash them before wearing, they wouldn’t be considered “new” anymore, lol. The jeans that I remember best were the ones I bought myself from the first Gap store in Chicago around 75 or ’76.

        • formerlyAnon

          My dad called jeans “dungarees” all his life, and neither of my parents ever wore them, even though they bought them for us. As far as they were concerned, they were what you wore to work in a factory or a mine.

          • BayTampaBay

            My father would always constantly say “dungarees” were for people who could not afford anything else and that he was working his ass off so we would not have to wear “dungarees” and “flannel shirts”.

        • Cheryl

          Betty is close to my parents’ age (my dad would be 90 if he were still alive, my mom is 89) and neither of them every wore jeans. As children, my generation (born in the late 1940s) wore dungarees, then blue jeans. Blue jeans eventually became just plain jeans.

          My dad did wear leisure suits in the 1970s, but he and my mom had a more casual lifestyle in the suburbs than Don and Megan. I don’t know how far into the 1970s MM will get, but I can’t wait to see how Don will or will not evolve.

          • sarahjane1912

            According to Betty’s biog, she was born in ’32. Married at 21. :)

      • oldbobbydraper

        noooo, a woman her age might have a pair of jeans but they would only be worn at home. remember the episode of i love lucy where she gets the loving cup stuck on her head, and she wants ethel to escort her to ricky’s ceremony because she can’t see – ethel tells her to wait because she has to change, and lucy resists, ethel replies “you want me to get on the subway in my blue jeans?!?! i have never worn blue jeans on the subway in my life, and i’m not gonna start now! just wait here.” that’s the kind of attitude that generation had toward jeans in public.

        • Spicytomato1

          Crazy how much things have changed. My 13 year old son thinks jeans are “too dressy.” He, and the majority of his classmates, prefer athletic/track pants. So far I’ve let him get away with what I think is slobby attire for school. I figure there will be bigger battles, more worthy of a fight, one of these days!

          • formerlyAnon

            You are so right to pick your battles.

        • Eric Stott

          Jeans were also acceptable if you were in the country – but although they could look a bit worn they NEVER had ragged holes or fraying.

      • Jacqueline Wessel

        Even though Levis have been around for ages they really weren’t part of the general population’s wardrobes until the late 60′s explosion. My dad worked in construction and never wore jeans. He wore what we called workies which were heavy duty cotton twill pants with matching shirts. He got them at Sears and they came in gray, khaki, navy and possibly deep green. Jeans and denim became ubiquitous during/after this era and have remained so ever since.

        • formerlyAnon

          Jeans were associated with working in a mine or in exceptionally dirty, dangerous factory work for my parents.

      • fursa_saida

        I was thinking maybe she was sort of armoring herself by looking so very respectable. I also liked that the color of her dress under the coat was very, very close to the color of the walls in the squat.

    • MrsAtaxxia

      I lust after both Henry and Sally’s sweaters in that kitchen scene.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1208138556 Sara Munoz Munoz

        I like Gene’s!!

        • MrsAtaxxia

          Actually I think I lust after most of the knitwear on this show. Its all just so good. But that fair isle that Sally is rocking is just so awesome.

      • sarahjane1912

        I’ll take either of them [but I draw the line at the shawl collar on Henry's; not madly me!]. Good golly, I miss getting rugged up in winter woollies. The coolest it gets where I live is about 12C. Even in winter, it’s 25C most days. Sigh.

      • H2olovngrl

        Me too! I want Henry’s sweater so hard!

    • Pants_are_a_must

      I loved the conversation Jane and Mona’s outfits were having with each other. Trend distance, but corresponding accessories. They’re similar women of different generations and that’s why Roger ended up marrying (and divorcing) both.

      And goodness, I missed these posts. Thanks, overlords!

      • C. C. Winslow

        I’m sorry if I missed this in a previous post/episode, but why was Roger so furious at the man (husband?) who was with Mona at the funeral?

        • quitasarah

          Mona’s “new” husband. Roger’s angry about having to share her attention. And likely a little jealous too.

          • C. C. Winslow

            Ah, thank you!

        • LauraAgain

          I was wondering the same thing too. In the screen shot, he isn’t wearing a wedding ring, so I didn’t think he was married to Mona. I don’t have a good memory anyway, but I don’t remember Mona getting remarried.

          • Joan Dahlgren

            No, I don’t think Mona remarried either. As I recall, this guy showed up as one of Mona’s escorts in either Season 4 or 5 and Roger made belittling remarks about him then, as well. Can anyone with a better memory clarify?

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              He was Mona’s date for Margaret’s wedding. It was never mentioned if Mona married him, so far as I know.

        • http://twitter.com/omg_dora Dora K.

          Because Roger is a toddler and the fact that he cheated on Mona and then left her doesn’t mean she’s allowed to date other men.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=149100065 Virginia McMurdo

      I, too, couldn’t believe how charmed I was by Peggy and Ted – I kept wondering why my romance alert was blaring…? Surely not… Anyway, you two gentlemen absolutely RULE. I watch MM trying to anticipate your style breakdowns, to see if can keep up.

    • urbanamish

      i definitely think ted is in love w/ peggy and he was at some kind of retreat which makes me think his marriage is in trouble.
      both of roger’s ex wives seem to wear the same earrings to the funeral.
      and now that i see henry’s sweater in close up…all i can think about is season one, when betty took a shot gun to her neighbor’s birds.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1208138556 Sara Munoz Munoz

        I know lots of (Christian) couples who go on marriage retreats. It’s just the thing to do.
        However I don’t know know the implications in 1967.

        • urbanamish

          i wasn’t aware it was a fun activity. i have no first hand experience with it. i thought it meant some kind of marriage counseling.

        • formerlyAnon

          I also wondered how common it was in the ’60s. In the ’70s “Marriage Encounter” programs became the thing to do for married couples active in our Catholic parish. It wasn’t necessarily something that both partners actively *wanted* to do, nor was it required – it became something of a community expectation in some subsets of the parish population. Less active church members also went, sometimes to strengthen their marriage and sometimes I think because it was a community-supported way to get away for a weekend. (Our parish provided cheap or free babysitting for couples who needed it). And many, many couples who attended church regularly didn’t participate at all.

    • greenwich matron

      The suicide motif in the ad is a lot more obvious to me now, especially because of the tie/noose. After all, hanging yourself seems to be the Mad Men endorsed suicide method…

      I am beginning to think that Betty morphing into Mama Francis is exactly what Henry wants.

      • Joan Dahlgren

        Well, they always say men end up marrying their mothers :)

        • Eric Stott

          That’s a sober thought considering Don’s mother…

      • baxterbaby

        “All men marry their mothers”

        • LauraAgain

          Noooooo! (Not my husband, anyway! ; ) )

          • greenwich matron

            So you think – maybe you didn’t start out that way… (evil laugh)

          • sarahjane1912

            Chuckles !!! I hope not as well! My husband’s mother couldn’t cook to save herself [we’re talking sprouts/taties/carrots/beans — anything! — put in a pot of water and she’d ‘set and forget’. For hours. Shudder. I like to think I have a bit more nuance than that!

    • wallyeast

      The way Stan has drawn the tie on the beach, it looks similar to a noose.

    • http://twitter.com/martaklilly Marta Lilly

      That last scene looks like Don ended up with Elizabeth Taylor, not Henry.

      • vandeventer

        Yes, she’s got the Liz Taylor beauty mark on her cheek and everything.

      • http://twitter.com/SamH4Prez Samantha

        I can’t unsee her as Lindsay Weir from Freaks & Geeks and it’s freakin’ me out a little.

        • Topaz

          Yeah they seem to have a thing about getting the grimy men on the show to sleep with female cult TV icons at the expense of their wives. First Alexis Bledel, now Linda Cardellini. Maybe that’s Matthew Weiner trying to say something about the pernicious influence of television. Or maybe they like casting people we have such pure associations with and then destroying them by giving them miserably sad storylines. Or maybe he just really likes those shows.

      • Jennifer Coleman

        She kind of reminded me of Megan’s mom, who had a similar, but formal dress on last season.

    • CCAdams

      I agree with the T & Lo fashion comments.

      However, minutes after she died, Bert Cooper said: “Ida Blankenship was born in a barn in 1898 and died on the 37th floor of a skyscraper. She was an astronaut!

      Also, that is Peggy Olson who had the phone conversation with the priest and sometimes wears Catholic schoolgirl outfits. Betty is not Catholic and does not dress like a schoolgirl.

      • MilaXX

        Pretty sure it’s just a typo.

      • BayTampaBay

        Has anyone ever seen a date of birth for Bert Cooper?

        I spent over an hour surfing the next and could not find one. If he is 20 years older than Roger that would make him 71 born in 1897 as Roger was born in 1917….same year as my grandmother.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1208138556 Sara Munoz Munoz

      Does anyone remember the approximate season/episode of that meeting between Betty and Henry? I remember it but would love to see the recaps again.

      • decormaven

        Seven Twenty Three from Season Three

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1208138556 Sara Munoz Munoz

          Thanks! :)

    • http://twitter.com/TigerLaverada TigerLaverada

      Just want to add to the chorus of kudos for your Mad Style posts, guys. You are incredibly insightful viewers and simply terrific writers. I LOVE these posts.

    • http://twitter.com/marared Jaime

      I had assumed Ted had a thing for Peggy last season, when he upped the salary she asked for.

      • MilaXX

        I caught a whiff of it last season, but thought it was more about trying to lure her away from SCDP. This week it really did feel romantic tension. I don’t want Peggy to have an affair with her boss. Abe is not the long term boo, but I want Peggy to find romance with someone more her equal.

        • formerlyAnon

          If someone more her equal makes her happy, sure. But what I think she needs is someone who understands her work life and can accept both how important it is to her and how her very traditional background may affect her world view. I just really want her to be with someone who can make her happy and be happy with her. She is the character I most want to be happy, now that Lane is gone. Joan running a close second. ETA: take a fictional t.v. serial a tad too seriously, much? Guilty.

    • decormaven

      Love it! Great points all around. Couple of call-outs from this portion of the episode:
      * When the Wheelchair Dowager spoke at the funeral, she recalled Roger’s mother saying, “I don’t need anyone…my son is my sunshine.” That statement punched Don in the gut- he never knew his mother’s love.
      * When Megan comes into the bedroom and finds Don after the memorial service, and they joke about her character, she says, “You’ll love me even if I’m a lying, cheating whore?” Did that ping anyone’s foreshadowing radar?
      Totally agree that was more than a little moment between Ted C. and Peggy. Wonder if his Colorado trip with his wife was a Marriage Encounter weekend? If so, maybe nothing will come of his possible attraction to Peggy.

      • tallgirl1204

        I heard Megan say that too– I wondered if it was foreshadowing her, or Don.

        • vandeventer

          Well we already know Don’s a lying, cheating, whore. Poor Megan thinks that’s all safely in his past…

          • formerlyAnon

            In her heart, there’s a seed of doubt, waiting to be watered. Her father’s daughter is going to have a hard time truly accepting that a cheating man can reform.

    • Lisa

      Probably the reason that Ted didn’t get back to Peggy while he was at the marriage retreat was because his wife would have been pissed (or actively objected when she found out that Peggy had called). If it’s that obvious to us that he is in love with Peggy, then it’s probably obvious to his wife too.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1208138556 Sara Munoz Munoz

        Or possibly it was the pastor’s decision. I don’t think he’d put a woman on the phone! But excellent point.
        I wonder what would have happened it Bert called instead.

    • filmcricket

      New Year’s is a bit early for the Indian influence, for the Beatles anyway. They didn’t go until Feb 1968. But maybe the Krishna movement was already being seen in clothing?

    • Eva_baby

      To me, everything about Betty has to do with the weight. A slim Betty with dark hair would not have made me think of Mother Francis. I think she would have felt darker & sexier, but not Mother Francis. I’d be curious to see if we’d feel the same level of stodginess with just the clothes and not the fat suit.

      I’d wear that cute dress Peggy has on right now. The fit is awesome.

      Henry’s sweaters deserve their own post. Somebody has to have a tumblr I am sure.

      • sarahjane1912

        Mmm. Agree. A slim Betty with dark hair definitely would have been more Maggie the Cat than Mother Francis. Especially if she updated her make-up [and sauntered around in a lace slip]. ;-)

      • Beth513

        I’m not sure if anyone else has mentioned this, but right away I thought – she died her hair the same color as Megan’s! And then I thought, and she looks like Mother Francis. So sad. I hope Betty gets her groove back.

        • Mia Bard

          Agreed. I immediately thought she was imitating Megan – or copying all the other brunettes Don’s ever gone for – way before I made the Mother Francis connection.

        • http://twitter.com/amayskimom Anneliese

          I think it’s more likely she’s responding to Sandy’s challenge. Sandy implied that Betty trades on her looks, which was reinforced by the “bottled blonde” comment of the squatter. She wants to show she’s more than just her looks. Whether she herself believes it just yet, I don’t think so.

          • http://twitter.com/DarrenNesbitt Darren Nesbitt

            The “bottled blonde” comment jumped out to me as well. I think on the car ride home while thinking about that young girl dangerously following her dreams Betty decided to make a drastic change. I don’t even think she likes it that much and her face was totally in different to her son’s upset.

          • Beth513

            I agree that this was her motivation for dying her hair. I don’t think she was trying to imitate Megan, but having the two women have the same hair color makes for some interesting visual cueing going forward, at least I hope so.

        • Lauren Hall

          See, I thought it was Betty trying to show that she still has enough youth to spontaneously change her hair color, after the “bottle blonde” comment and Sandy reminding her of her modeling days. Of course, she ironically ends up looking like Mama Francis.

      • oldbobbydraper

        betty and her MIL have the same personalities regardless of how much either one weighs at any given moment.

      • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gabriella M

        I LOVE that sweater for my boyfriend. Delightfully dorky.

        • SuzyQuzey

          That sweater has a hunting theme. Dogs and birds.

          • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gabriella M

            So it’s basically tailored to Betty.

          • lulubella

            I thought of the birds Betty shot from the sky in the early EP. Message about Henry?

      • makeityourself

        Re “slim Betty”–her jowls are MUCH more believable this season. Good job makeup crew.

      • H2olovngrl

        Can we include sweaty, lawn mowing Henry just for fun?

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1017585103 Kanani Fong

        Right, my first thought was, “She’s changed herself into Henry’s mother.” Well, maybe he’ll be into that!

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=14301272 Kate Gorton

      Damn, they made Linda Cardellini look old! I barely recognized her and kept second-guessing myself whenever I thought it was her.

      • 3boysful

        I recognized her as Chutney immediately. But then I wasn’t sure, and had to IMDB it.

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=14301272 Kate Gorton

          Fuckin’ Chutney.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=681683965 Jessica Maxwell

      Oh I loved the anatomical heart. What a perfect detail for having an affair with a doctor’s wife! And I am lusting over Megan’s lounge-wear-as-hostess-wear ensemble and styling. I need an outfit like that.

      • NDC_IPCentral

        Well, Dr. Rosen IS a cardiologist, so having a heart model is not that surprising, though maybe a bit outre for the bedroom.

        • sarahjane1912

          I think Don/Sylvia are conducting their affairette in the spare room of the apartment, not the main bedroom. That’s a more likely place for not only the spare Catholic crosses/icons/stuff Sylvia has, but would be probably somewhere she’d stick the heart model as well.

          • formerlyAnon

            Plus, much easier to hide an affair not conducted in the marital bed.

            • AnotherJulie

              Returning to the marital bed was not a problem for Don

      • formerlyAnon

        I thought it was a fascinating piece of set dressing. A heart model for the cardiologist – but next to the crucifix it reminded me of nothing so much as the “Sacred Bleeding Heart of Jesus” prints that most of my Polish aunts had somewhere in their homes. (There was one who put a rosary on every pillow when she made the beds, but she was an extreme case.)

    • http://www.lippsisters.com/ Deborah Lipp

      I really disagree with your first paragraph on Betty. She is wearing a Hermes scarf on her head; still staking out Grace Kelly territory. It was terribly difficult in those days for a heavier woman to find attractive clothes; she’s doing her best with less available to her.

      The coat is hiddy though.

      • Moriginal

        I totally agree with you about the lack of stylish/attractive clothes available to heavier women at the time, but I bet the writers are probably using Frumpy Betty as part of a storyline. I am wondering if she will be VaVaVoom Betty by the end of the season….

        • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

          I hope so. I’m kind of sick of sad, frumpy Betty.

        • KateWo

          Right, because Joan is far from frumpy.

      • http://twitter.com/omg_dora Dora K.

        She got frumpy before she gained weight, though! She looked fairly matronly by early season 4.

        • http://www.lippsisters.com/ Deborah Lipp

          Frumpy and matronly are two different animals. You can be matronly and still stylin’. One of the differences between the 50s (and early 60s) and the late 60s is that young people were expected to look “mature” pretty much as soon as they graduated.

          In Season 1, Betty was still in her 20s, but she also was a suburban mom with 2 kids and dressed with a severe formality that we associate with people much older. TLo would rip that style if it appeared on a 20something on a red carpet.

          Betty in that first picture isn’t merely matronly, she’s down-style. She doesn’t look wealthy and she doesn’t look sexy or special. That ugly coat and that plain sweater–those are frumpy items available in “Women’s” sizes of the times. The scarf and purse are the old, stylish Betty (still matronly, but stylish), because a scarf and purse don’t have to be sized.

          • http://twitter.com/omg_dora Dora K.

            Okay, you’re right. Still, my impression is it’s part of the same process rather than caused by her size alone. In the early seasons she was a very put-together housewife with moments of glamor. She let go of the glamor first, then the put-togetherness.

            Actually, you could theorize that the weight-gain is an effect, rather than a cause, of her descent into frump. I’ve had a hard time taking Fat Betty seriously as a story development; mostly because of how silly the fat suit looks but also because Betty hadn’t gotten even a little bigger during some very tumultuous times in her life, including three pregnancies (her doctor remarked on her remarkably stable figure when she got pregnant with Gene). I know people with huge weight fluctuations but Betty has never been one of them. So to me, anything she’s gone through since being married to Henry doesn’t explain the weight gain — unless she’d actually been on a severe diet all her life (which is fairly in keeping with the character) and had suddenly “let herself go*” as she gave up on being, or looking like, the suburban Grace Kelly.

            * I hate that phrase! And I’m also sorry to talk like fat equals frumpy or something, I really don’t believe it does in real life, but it does for Betty.

            • Robyn Garrett

              Actually, I’m not so sure about that. In the early seasons there were multiple references to her struggles with weight as a child. Remember the swim camp? And Grandpa Gene mentioned it too when Sally said she wasn’t allowed to have ice cream before dinner. I think it’s just hard for us to cope with Betty’s descent into averageness after many of us were hopping she would be thin again this season. We fell in love with her as such a glamorous character that represented classic chic styles of the mid-century. But she fell out of the hip crowd. Is she really that much older than Jane? Or really more unhappy? Not really. It’s really more that she turned to food for comfort as so many women do. Glamor is no longer her priority.

            • http://twitter.com/omg_dora Dora K.

              Well, I’ll readily agree that she took my breath away in every scene in the early seasons and that it makes me biased. :-)

            • sarahjane1912

              Oh my word, yes. I am still in lust with that gorgeous floral print she wore to meet Henry Francis that time … can’t remember the ep, but she looked like a delicious ice-cream cone. With flowers. Sublime. She rocked every scene she was in, fashion-wise, I think, even when her hair was in curlers before the birthday party get-together in Season 1.

            • http://twitter.com/DallasDiner Infinine®™

              Since you gals are talking about a subject dear to my heart, I have to reiterate it here too. I miss Betty Draper. I coveted her riding gear with the obligatory Hermes equestrian scarf, the whole Italian affair and
              the turquoise dress from the episode called The Violin.

            • KateWo

              I’ve brought this up before, but there are many subtle signs that Betty has an eating disorder. Betty wasn’t struggling with weight as a child, her mom made her go to swim camp. Weight became the one thing she could control. I think she became happier with Henry and gained the weight because she didn’t know her limits. Even after you’re a healthy weight, body issues and eating disorders are similar to being a recovering addict: you’re always conscious of it. Most tv shows depict it as something you quickly develop and get over ( I’m looking at you Glee) so if Weiner is aware of this, it’s brilliantly done.

            • sarahjane1912

              A lot of borderline-OCD type mothers from that era saw faults in their daughters that they felt needed ‘correcting’.

              I had a friend whose mother was a size 0 [well, the equivalent in those days] clothes-by-Chanel/heart-by-Frigidaire type and she thought that her daughter was carrying a bit too much ‘baby fat’. She was dragged to dieticians, WW, put on extreme diets throughout her childhood/teen years [and this was the 70s/80s] and seriously, there was really nothing wrong with her. She also never developed any eating disorders because she ignored her mother and just did her own thing. Looking back at photographs of the two of us together now, wow, she was thinner than me. Some mothers are just … like that. It doesn’t necessarily mean that their daughter is going to have problems with food. And PS. the daughter became a chef. LOL!

              Betty, of course, is another matter entirely. There is MUCH more going on there than just her mid-life weight issues. ;-)

            • fursa_saida

              The following might be triggering to anyone with issues around eating disorders, so if that describes you (not necessarily you you, KateWo, just…anyone reading), be careful.

              It was always obvious to me that Betty was ED-NOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified, meaning that she didn’t fit the stringent criteria for being full-on anorexic, orthorexic, or bulimic but was still engaging in disordered behaviors like extreme calorie restriction or, in other cases [though not in hers] less-frequent binge-purging or over-exercising). Her recent stubborn weight gain (as in, she’s having a lot of trouble getting it back off) fits with my own experience–after I mostly abandoned my extreme behaviors I was afraid to think about the subject of food or body image at all and so completely stopped considering factors such as health and portion sizes. As a result, I gained a lot of weight, and I still haven’t really addressed it (because there has to be a happy medium, dammit); so, I haven’t gone back to my natural size in between. Betty was in a similar state for a while. Whether her dieting and weight loss represents a healthier path or a simple relapse is hard to tell so far, but it certainly doesn’t seem like her thinking is much healthier.

            • http://www.lippsisters.com/ Deborah Lipp

              You’re right about the “frumpy” (or “homey” or “relaxed”) preceding the weight gain; it’s an excellent point. Betty WAS starving all her life, there are several times this is mentioned (Sally says “Mommy doesn’t eat” and Don says “That kid’s going to weigh like a pound.”).

              Obviously, the meta-story is that Weiner wrote a weight gain storyline to accommodate January Jones’s pregnancy, and did his best to have it be consistent with her character, but he didn’t plan it in advance so it’s not seamless.

            • BayTampaBay

              I think Betty will get very skin very quickly…I just anxious to find out the reason why with regards to story line.

            • formerlyAnon

              I keep thinking this and it keeps not happening and the prime time-window for this cliche is closing soon so I might be wrong: I think somebody will suggest diet pills, casually, she’ll try them and like them (speed feels great if you’re a bit depressed and that mausoleum of a house is enough to depress anybody) and get hooked.

            • http://bidonica.wordpress.com/ Poggy

              Well, she *did* have a thyroid disorder – I used to have one too (though my thyroid was overworking so it actually got me thinner) and that kind of stuff really does mess up your weight even in a short timespan. It also influences your emotional/psychological state, and can lead to episodes of either anxiety or depression depending on whether your thyroid hormones go up or down. Of course there’s more than this to Betty’s issues (we *do* see her having midnight snacks and such since last season; something I can’t imagine early!Betty doing), but in my opinion it’s a pretty believable shortcut to justify her seemingly sudden change in appearance.

      • gogobooty

        I kept thinking of Richard talking about Pat Nixon’s serviceable cloth coat. There’s a speech where Nixon mentions it several times, trying to make the point that they are not fancy and Pat doesn’t wear furs.

        He just sounds like a cheapskate, tho.

    • Maryanne525

      Can I just say that not only do I freaking love these posts, but I had a moment when I clicked on the Liz Taylor photo. I wish I could pull off a scarf like that.

      • Amelia

        I feel like any one of us mere mortals would look wrinkled, stained and more than a little ridiculous within 10 minutes of putting that outfit on, yet she manages to look perfect.

    • Jessy Yancey

      Wow, Abby from “Scandal” was Helen the divorcee (and Glen’s mom)?! Never made that connection before.

      The screencap of Margaret also reminded me to look up the actress – we thought she looked like a Lohan.

      • http://twitter.com/hifigoddess Ann-Marie Kirshon

        Thank you! That was driving me CRAZY. I couldn’t remember where I knew her from.

      • http://twitter.com/DallasDiner Infinine®™

        Wow, I didn’t catch that either, thanks!

    • formerlyAnon

      I just keep being struck, over and over, how much older – and maybe not entirely well – Don looks in most of this episode. I don’t think anyone else has aged so dramatically.

      I thought Peggy & boss *were* happier in their collegiality than bodes well. I didn’t see it as romantic/sexual tension as much as the potential. This scene was laying down ground work so a later development wouldn’t seem to have come out of the blue.

      Women and men who spend most of their time at work do fall for each other, and god knows he’d “get” her better than Abe, at least in many ways. I hope she gets the “tempted but avoids it and it spurs her to seek a better job elsewhere” (her old firm as a partner?), rather than the “has office affair with married man, ends badly and she’s forced to seek a better job elsewhere” story arc.

      • Spicytomato1

        I’m with you about Don’s looks and agree it was leaning into more than just age. His face seemed to have that flush/bloat that someone who drinks too much tends to acquire. His outward appearance is not quite as smooth as it once was.

        • sarahjane1912

          Still … he has just come back from a holiday, where he obviously caught the sun [hence the flush]. He’s in his early 40s now so any sun damage is going to be more noticeable. Plus, comparing his tanned/lined skin with the fair New York winter faces is a teensy bit unfair. Just kidding: you’re no doubt correct re the flush/bloat. :)

        • AnotherJulie

          Agree. He has aged 10 years since last season. The booze bloat is not a good look for him.

      • AutumnInNY

        I agree with you about Peggy and Ted, I see that coming as well and the ground work being laid here. Peggy and Abe seem to be on different tracks, I don’t see that last much longer regardless of Ted’s involvement or not.

    • Qitkat

      No one could make a scarf look elegant like Elizabeth Taylor, not even Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

    • baxterbaby

      Jane….sigh. Pluperfect 1960′s rich bitch.

      Ted Chaugh’s face was practically shining at Peggy; either he adores his little money-maker or it was a New Year’s Eve glow. That look is strikingly similar to the one Abe is giving her in his screencap.

      The Francis family is relentlessly preppy; even Sally, with the possible exception of her modish blue velvet dress. Velvet dresses with white satin or lace collars and button down the front; nearly every girl in my 10th grade class had one.

      I’m wondering if that is an actual Koss ad. Koss pretty much had the headphone market sewed up at the time and that b&w print ad looks torn out of the pages of Life or Look.

      I still adore little Kenny Cosgrove.

      The scenes at the flop really hit home. In 1968, ’69 and ’70 (my last years of high school) my friends and I would cut school and take the train into “the Village”, after changing at someone’s house into a suburban notion of hippy which usually involved something vaguely Indian, (American or East), tattered belled jeans, ethnic jewelry etc. The Village, East and West was incredibly seedy; so much of what is now ridiculously expensive real estate was horribly run down and instead of looking like a mini Madison Avenue, Bleecker, 8th Street, St. Mark’s etc were full of head shops,record stores, Army-Navy and sandal shops, tiny clothing and jewelry stores full of the stuff we so desperately wanted. But it was dangerous and we were mostly oblivious to that. Surely we, and all the other suburban kids stuck out by a mile. I know that my friends and I might go into a squat like that if invited, to smoke pot, but we were secretly a little terrified (and thrilled by that). I listened to many rants of the same nature as the one given by Betty’s antagonist.

      • gracedarling

        Ted’s spent the last week at a marriage retreat because he ‘thinks about work too much’, but ducked out of his New Years Eve party to visit Peggy in the office. He’s in love.

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=720946720 Carolyn Smrcka

          I”m not sure about that; he knew that she’d called him several times but didn’t call her back, leaving her hanging and anxious. Her ability to come to a resolution in a pinch was partially a test, I think, and I think he was beaming more with pride than anything else.

          • http://twitter.com/creeple Alice

            I agree. Ted has always talked about his family in past scenes. I think he’s the anti-Don: fairly nice, easygoing, religious family man. I don’t think he’s an affair kind of guy, I think he’s more interested in Peggy making their firm successful.

    • http://twitter.com/NMMagpie NMMagpie

      I am new to the Mad Style posts and I have to say: utterly incredible analysis. I am sure costume designers everywhere love you. Kudos to your insight and knowledge of history of style. Well done.

    • tallgirl1204

      A few random thoughts:

      – I think the new guy, Bob Benson, is the new Pete Campbell. As TLo put it so well, “adorable and slimy.” He’s an obvious climber, not seductive in the way Don Draper must have been, and he keeps putting his foot ever so slightly wrong, a la Pete. I think Ken sees this, and he’s thinking “fooled me once, Pete– not letting the new guy fool me twice.”
      – Peggy’s boyfriend is way hot as a hippie! I am partial to scruffy types, and he is gorgeous.

      – Stan is not so gorgeous, but I find it interesting that he is clearly flirting wtih Peggy (and maybe spying too?) — men are attracted to powerful women, and Peggy is enjoying that role, whether she really knows what to do with it or not– time will tell.
      – In that almost-last scene, in the storage space, the piles and piles of suitcases called back to “The Suitcase” and that last scene where Don dreamed he saw Anna. Gave me chills.
      – Fur is a symbol in this show– Joan with the fur Roger had given her when she sold herself for the company, the furs TLo noted in their review, and Roger cuddling with the furs on the bed at the funeral– I thought he was like a little boy, playing with his mother’s furs, and maybe wishing Joanie was there to comfort him. I still have my grandmother’s furs, and they are quite sweet and comforting– even though I could never wear them.

      • Guest

        In

      • http://twitter.com/dndmadre Just Plain Jane

        In “Waldorf Stories,” Season 4, Episode 6, when Roger meets Don for the first time in the fur shop, he makes a comment about having an affair with his mother’s furs.

        • breathlss79

          Great catch. What a brilliant readership TLo has.

      • fursa_saida

        I seem to be the only one who read Stan and Peggy’s conversation as 100% adorably platonic (epic bros, I tell you, EPIC BROS), but I suppose we’ll see. Mostly I’m commenting to agree that Abe looks wayyyyyyyy more delicious like this than he did before.

    • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

      I want the Kitchen Cousins to show up for another reason….anyhoo.
      Have I told you two lately how much I love you for these posts. I know they are tons of work but so enjoyable. Thank you!

      • http://twitter.com/omg_dora Dora K.

        That was LINDSAY?!!!!!

        Oh gods I am so old.

    • ballerinawithagun

      We had the orange fondue pot also. The long forks each had different colored ends so that you would mix yours up with someone else’s, much like the wine charms everyone used for awhile.

      I haven’t even seen the episode yet (waiting to watch with my husband) but just from the photos I’d say Peggy and her boss are in love.

      • NoGovernmentName

        I bought one at a yard sale that looks exactly like it. We use the forks but not the pot because ours requires sterno and we just use a pot on the stovetop, but we keep it for sentimental reasons.

    • http://twitter.com/MelanieM_Texas Melanie Morgan

      Jane’s funeral dress was great (I have one very similar that I bought at Banana Republic last year), but the hat is wacky! Looks like she stole the Flying Nun’s cap, pulled the wings off and wore it.

    • breathlss79

      Just want to point out something I noticed about the nail polish on Sylvia (red) and Megan (white) in the last couple of scenes. They are both naked, and I think Janie Bryant was using the polish to show generational differences, cultural differences, and to represent hell and heaven. Just one floor apart and using only nail polish! She’s a genius.

    • LauraAgain

      Oh my. I love, love, love Tom & Lorenzo! Now it’s not only Sundays I look forward to, but also Mondays for the show recap and Wednesdays for Mad Style. Seems like my life is all about waiting lately.

      I love all the references in the posts, like Thelma, Scoobie Doo, The Partridge Family, Thurston Howell III, That Girl, Welcome Back Kotter, etc. Makes me fondly remember my childhood and feel a great connection to all people posting here, like we all went through something significant together many years ago.

      One final thought … I wonder if Janie Bryant really puts a lot of thought into every single scene/character or if she’s just brilliantly intuitive and it comes to her naturally. Either way, she is a GENIUS!!!

      • H2olovngrl

        I feel the same way. I love these Mad Men discussions! Especially since many of the same people have been posting here for years, and so many of them are incredibly well spoken and articulate. I hate being the dumbest one at the table, but I also wouldn’t want it any other way.

        • pop_top

          All of this.

    • AnotherJulie

      I found this site by accident looking for a completely different MM review while home sick on Monday, and now I can’t stay away. I can’t tell you how many times I have literally laughed out loud reading this stuff! Thank you boys SO MUCH!

      The initial review was outstanding and these style recaps are hilarious. Zappa-faced? I died

    • YoungSally

      No one used their fondue pot — probably from Dansk —

      Unless you lived in northern California in 1968

      • H2olovngrl

        Did you see my comment? My folks STILL use theirs!

        • YoungSally

          No — missed your comment…Too funny.

          I blame my Northern CA formative years (1968-1974) for my fondness of avocado and my large set of Le Creuset — flame-colored, of course.

          • sarahjane1912

            *High five* Go the flame Le Creuset. Love it. *GRIN*

          • H2olovngrl

            You would probably love the bitchen set of 1960s era dishes my mother in law just gave me. It is called Fresca, and it is an awesome yellow, gold, orange and green. I am savig them for my oldest gir

          • http://twitter.com/DallasDiner Infinine®™

            Here’s few that I remember: metal neon colored drinking cups, the clear plastic and straw mugs, Corelle dinnerware, Tupperware popsicle molds.

    • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

      Such an awesome post!!! Great job!

    • rkdgal

      A random note…the face of Peggy’s underling on the right looked SOOO familiar to me that I couldn’t rest until I placed it, and it turns out that the actor played Frederick Crane (Frasier and Lilith’s son) on Frasier. So, nerdy, indeed!! (And fun to think of Frederick all grown up and working for Peggy, who has a little Lilith in her!)

    • http://www.facebook.com/mary.nease Mary Nease

      I wonder about Megan. Like in the beginning of the episode, she was talking to Don about having sex while high. She didn’t strike me as much of a pot smoker pre-Don, so that makes me wonder if she’s seeing someone behind his back too… But then again, who knows what our clean-cut Megan was up to before her SCDP days.

      • Cheryl

        Yes, Megan didn’t seem that shocked to find Don returning home to their marital bed on New Year’s Day morning after he had been gone for awhile. Maybe she hadn’t spent the night in their marital bed either?

      • oldbobbydraper

        megan has always (even before we meet her at scdp) run with a progressive, bohemian crowd by virtue of being an artist/actor. she might be clean-cut in dress, but to mainstream american adults of the time, her personality and social life were (and continue to be in 67-68) very libertarian and unorthodox.

    • trixietru

      I think Henry’s sweater is corny, exactly the thing an older man would wear around his young stepchildren. He may have political clout outside his home but the sweater implies Betty runs the roost. Betty’s new hair color is so deep and opaque it seems designed to clash with her skin tone. The hairstyle looked unflattering as well. I’m hoping Betty emerges as a slimmed down style vixen again. *In my opinion the heavy use of religious symbolism surrounding Sylvia is to highlight ‘hypocrisy.’ I also believe Dr. Rosen is played so smart, smooth and subtle…..he may already know about the affair— or at least he will know long before Don realizes.
      No matter how cute Sally is attired I always feel something sinister about her. Maybe it’s the eyebrows.

      • Cheryl

        It looks like Betty’s face was much fuller after she colored her hair. I didn’t recognize her, and even looking at the photos here on the site, she doesn’t look like January Jones at all.

      • H2olovngrl

        I can’t help myself. I love Henry’s sweater in a tacky, ski/Christmas sweater kind of way. It just brings a smile to my face.

        • decormaven

          It harkens to Mark’s ugly Christmas sweater in Bridget Jones’ Diary.

      • pattie capet

        i think stressing sylvia’s catholicism harkens back to her connection to Dante’s Inferno, which she gave him. it means something to her and to don, too. they are both struggling with these moral issues. they both know they are in some sort of hell and are trying to work through something. it’s their sadness and their moral ambivalence that brings them together. and her name means “dark wood,” which is in the first line of the Inferno that don reads in the opening.

    • gracedarling

      One thing that struck me was how visually tied Sally was to Henry in this episode, first in blues, then in tones of red. It speaks to the ease of their relationship, particularly in opposition to Sally’s behaviour with Betty. I wonder how Sally is going to treat Don this season, now that she actually has a sturdy, stable, besweatered father-figure around? She’s still wearing his necklace, but I get the sense that the hero-worship might be starting to dissipate…

    • http://profiles.google.com/basedow.maureen Maureen Basedow

      Maybe Ted’s marriage is in trouble because he’s gay?

      • trixietru

        Thank you. I did not want to bring it up. I’ve seen this actor play a gay tv character before and that may be clouding my take on Chaough.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        What makes you think that?

    • lauraq99

      Did anyone notice how poorly Megan’s New Years Eve party pantsuit fit? In such a styled show, I was wondering why she had on saggy pants.

      • http://www.facebook.com/marilu.bree Marilu Bree

        Yes! The seat of those pants were down around her knees!

        • sarahjane1912

          Maybe she was trying for a mock harem pant look?

      • aesteve212

        I loved that detail (whether intentional or not) because those sweater-pants would do that! I am assuming there was some kind of lycra stuff in the 60s, but anytime I’ve bought anything stretchy vintage, that is what the butt looks like after an hour of wearing! (but maybe that is just because the elastic has died.)

    • gogobooty

      I remember reading one time about how there was a dynamo husband and wife team in advertising that pretty much ruled the 60s and 70s, and some speculation that characters on MM might at some point emulate that storyline. The Ted and Peggy scene had me thinking maybe Ted was already on his way down the divorce highway and that when he was free, he and Peggy might be the new team to beat. He seems to understand her, and they could overwork together and lord it over all of Madison Avenue, pausing to stomp the booze-soaked husk of Don Draper on their way to the top. (Don himself thought he was on the way to being some kind of super couple of advertising when Megan was working with him at SCDP, but that didn’t last long.) It’d be fun if Peggy turned out to be vastly more successful and has a longer career than Don.

      The guy in this real life couple had a name quite similar to Don Draper, but I can’t think of it. Rats, I’m going to have to look it up.

    • Mia Bard

      Thanks for the excellent fashion round-up, as usual. You blew my mind with the “Ted loves Peggy” reference, though. I’m not so sure about that one. I’d like to believe that he just admires her work and is being a supportive boss. Then again, pairing them up would have some interesting repercussions, esp. since Don hates Ted, Peggy’s been down the work-romance road before, etc. I just keep thinking that Peggy’s going to end up with Stan somehow.

    • H2olovngrl

      My parents also have that fondue pot, also in burnt orange. Theirs is electric, they received it as a wedding present in 1968, AND they still use it all the time to make cheese dip.

      • YoungSally

        I think my parents’ burnt orange pot was sterno powered…..

    • H2olovngrl

      They are really shoving Mrs. Rosen’s Catholicism down our throats. Curious how this is going to play out.

    • ZnSD

      Not to mention the red nails. Jeez! Fab as always but the Weiner needs to reel it in just a hair. Not that I don’t LOVE it. Also, ABE! Love him, will be so sorry to see him go. :(

      • SonOfSaradoc

        Jane’s red nails or Sylvia’s?

        • ZnSD

          Sorry, Sylvia’s in party and the Don/Sylvia post-coital chat.

          • SonOfSaradoc

            Saw in Entertainment Weekly that, in order to play Sylvia, Linda Cardellini had to grow her fingernails in secret, while caring for her infant daughter and not telling any of her friends that she was filming Mad Men. Oh, the secrecy of MWeiner!

    • Topaz

      I have never found Abe attractive before, but my God he is working the new style.

      • fursa_saida

        SRSLY THO. At first I thought he was Abe’s replacement; didn’t recognize him at all.

    • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

      Huge question now I had the chance to really read in detail your analysis which is awesome per usual. Why do you think that Don makes money more than Henry? I was under the impression it was the other way around or at least that Henry has family money. Because this house looks like an upgrade on Betty’s old house at least to me.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Henry admitted as much back when he and Betty first met and she point-blank asked him if he was wealthy. Obviously they’re not poor or working class.

        • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

          Interesting…not sure how I missed this. I need to go back and re-watch. I just remember him saying that he didn’t want her taking money from Don. So many details. Thanks for the amazing recap!

          • H2olovngrl

            Modern perspective: she should have gotten all she could out of Don.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              agreed she should have

    • http://twitter.com/Merneith Merneith

      Linda Cardallini looks more Dark Betty than Alexis Biedal did, even.

    • Natasha F.

      Awesome analysis as usual, TLo.

    • http://twitter.com/DarrenNesbitt Darren Nesbitt

      Betty’s calm face when her son disturbingly bashes her new look and runs out of the room in angst is so funny.

      • http://twitter.com/DallasDiner Infinine®™

        He’s lucky to have gotten away with that comment. The old Betty would have locked him in the closet and threatened to cut off his fingers…or some other part.

      • fursa_saida

        It seemed like very normal little-kid behavior to me, honestly. When I was that age I was terrified by any change to our house, let alone my parents. My mom came to pick me up from school after cutting her hair into a pixie and I first didn’t recognize her and then, when I realized this person was my mom and she was (shock! horror!) DIFFERENT, burst into tears. I suppose it’s a little surprising that Betty, being Betty, took it so much in stride, but she was clearly very focused on Henry’s reaction.

    • Beth513

      I am late to the party, but I have to say, explaining the women at the funeral as the American version of the Crawley sisters was BRILLIANT. Makes so much sense to your audience. Brav-O T-Lo.

    • Jana hughes

      There are so many Mad Men recaps but yours are among the most thoughtful. The clothes are so brilliantly selected and so true, nothing seems like costuming. I was Sally’s age and I had so many of her dresses. I was doing a lot of babysitting and I had one family who were just like the Drapers, the Betty and Don version. She was gorgeous and I looked forward to their house so I could look at her clothes and dream. She later went the Megan direction and had the coolest clothes of any Highland Park matron. This week it was the quilted bathrobe that really killed me–my thinnish mother had a turquoise satin one and looked like a packing crate in it.

    • http://twitter.com/DallasDiner Infinine®™

      Every time I see Betty’s kitchen, I just want to barf projectile pea soup vomit on the walls. It would be a huge improvement.

      Also, every single time I see it I think about the movie Sybil and can picture Sally Field crouched under the sink saying over and over again, “the people, the people…”. I bet Mother Francis had a hand in the choice of decor.

    • pattie capet

      re: betty’s hair, it seemed to me that betty wants to become veronica. she must be so bored to have gotten what she wanted, a dull husband. from his end, i’m thinking of the way he first made his move on her when she was very pregnant, and the way he takes to her shoe polish black hair that looks just like his mum’s. just makes me wonder if he has a mommy complex.

    • AutumnInNY

      Anyone else think the blonde flirting with Don in the party scene is a dead ringer for Arlene Golonka?

    • Maryann

      Did anyone mention Henry’s sweater is a happier resolution to the bird/dog/gun plot of season 1?

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1017585103 Kanani Fong

      When I was a kid, I remember wearing those “jumper” dresses (I think that’s what we called them) that Peggy was wearing. They were always made out of wool and made me itch. I think Joan’s dress might be a foreshadowing of her pre-dowdy years.

    • wayout46

      Jane is always the most fabulous and stylish in any room. I guess she’s written that way. I don’t agree that she is just younger and mod. Any woman Mona’s age could have gotten away with Jane’s ensemble with the proper elegance. Jane’s dress as well as her accessories (earrings/hats/gloves) were tasteful and restrained enough – with just an edge of modern – to be worn by the likes of, say, Mrs. Robinson.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        “Any woman Mona’s age could have gotten away with Jane’s ensemble with the proper elegance.”

        That’s not the point. The costume designer chose this dress for this character in this scene.