Mad Style: Time Zones

Posted on April 16, 2014

Welcome back. Let’s dig in.

But first, Freddie Rumsen would like to have a few words with you.

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Picture it. A close up of a computer screen. Lots of screencaps. Lots of words. People trying to find meaning out of things; to impose order on the unordered. Close up on faces. They’re excited. They like reading this stuff. Back to the computer screen. Colors. Patterns. Words. LOTS of words. Close up on more faces. They’re confused. Some of them even look disgusted. Keyboard. Fingers typing. Lots of important things being said. Questions. Rebuttals. Arguments. And then the tag:

“Mad Style. Calm Down. It’s Just a Conversation.”

Okay, that was more fun than it should have been. Thank you, Freddie. We’ll take it from here.

Welcome back to Mad Style, the TV show recap unlike pretty much any other TV show recap. We say some variation on this every year when we start, so let’s get to it: Don’t take this so seriously. Mad Men is a show that inspires an intense level of examination in its audience. We, of course, would be the last people to criticize anyone for that, but inevitably two different complaints about these essays arise every year. The first is that we’re thinking too hard and reading too much into it. We have no rebuttal to that except the standard one; the one that everyone hates to hear: There’s no reason for you to read something you don’t want to read. If you’re not into the kind of intense picking apart we do here, that’s perfectly fine. Run along. We’re pretty sure Buzzfeed has a listicle about the “Top Ten Trudy Campbell Lines” or “The Dogs of Mad Men” or something like that.

Okay, that was bitchy. Also: fun.

Second (and this is the really big one): It DOESN’T MATTER what showrunner Matthew Weiner or costume designer Janie Bryant or any of the other creators of this show intended. That’s not what these essays are about. A work of expression has to stand on its own apart from the intentions of its authors. There are times in these examinations that we’ll question whether something was intentional or not, but in the end, that’s not what we’re looking at here. We’re looking at what the piece does on its own; what motifs repeat, what bits of meaning arise from various style and color choices. Again, if you’re someone who doesn’t want to deal with any discussion of this show that doesn’t center around intent (which is how most reviews are written), then this is not going to be the discussion for you.

Alrighty, then! Onward.

The only thing you need to note about Freddie is how he’s shot and the fact that he looks more impeccably groomed here than he ever has. Rather than be cute about it, we’re just gonna jump ahead to show you what he’s contrasting:

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Starting with a closeup of the face, moving out to a medium shot and then taking it even further, out to a long shot. The opening and closing shots of the episode, mirroring each other. The reason Freddie looks so well groomed is because he’s a literal stand-in for Don Draper. The irony with that final shot is that Don Draper is no longer Don Draper. That’s Dick Whitman on that balcony, cold and shivering.

Also note that Freddie’s wearing an off-white shirt and a red, blue and gold striped tie. We’ll get back to that.

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How many people blurted out “POWER COLOR!” when they saw this? We did. Going back to her first day on the job, yellow/gold has always been the color that signals that Peggy is hard at work and usually kicking ass.

Here’s what’s notable: It’s a schoolgirl plaid, which tips its hat to all those riffs on Catholic school uniforms she’s worn over the years. But unlike those many dresses and jumpers, this is adult and business-like. In fact, except for the color and pattern (and fit, of course), this is very similar to the kinds of suits Joan has been favoring in recent years. Note the Ted Chaough-like turtleneck here. She’s referencing two of her three mentors in this look. Don is nowhere to be found.

Also notice SHIRLEY! The hottest new star of Mad Men! Who else cheered a little at the sight of a fabulous, ‘fro-rocking sister finally showing her face on this show? Don’t get us wrong, we love Dawn. She’s the Peggy in the secretarial pool; the one you identify with; the hard-working good girl. But ever since the show started admitting that black people exist and they’re not all maids and janitors and people who commit crimes, we’ve been jonesing for a Diana Ross stand-in. Her outfit isn’t shocking in any way and could be worn on practically any of the other secretary characters. The only concession in the costuming to her blackness are the hoop earrings, which Janie has consistently put on the African-American female characters throughout the show. Note that she’s wearing a Peter Pan collar, which was pretty much Peggy’s signature look for years. A way of signaling that she’s like Peggy and yet not like her at the same time.

 

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Dawn is as toned town and business-like as ever. Checks and gingham are her print the way plaids belong to Peggy and roses belong to Joan. We think it’s interesting that she’s wearing a business-like grey jacket over this dress. After Joan promoted her last season, it’s possible she’s taking a more focused approach to her job. Certainly, she came across very comfortable and competent in this and all her other scenes. She and Ginsberg had a flirtatious moment at the door. Is there a potential romance? Who knows? But they’re both dressed in shades of black, white and grey, and Janie tends to do that with characters who are interested in each other or connecting.

Also notable is the fact that Ginsberg and Lou are wearing cardigans here. Honestly, we keep trying to make some sort of connection between the two men, but if there is anything being said about that in the costuming, it’s an ironic statement. They may both be in cardigans, but they couldn’t be less alike.

Lou comes across kindly, avuncular and professorial in his cardigan. He’s the exact opposite: dismissive, condescending, and uninterested in anyone else. We’d hardly claim Don was a giving and sharing kind of boss, but he was able to generate excitement in his team. Lou seems to seek out mediocrity. There’s not a chance in hell he’ll have that office for much longer.

Peggy’s yellow pops in this scene the way Lou’s pale blue does. They are the main dynamic in the room.

 

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And how many people blurted out “HEARTBREAK COLOR” when you saw Joan in this purple? It’s been “her” color in scenes where she was heartbroken; her rape, the breakup with Roger, Marilyn’s death, firing Jane Siegel. But like Peggy’s “power color” being worn in a scene where she has no power, the use here is ironic. This scene – and all her subsequent scenes – have nothing to do with Joan’s heartbreak. Once or twice, she actually mistakes the intentions of men, thinking they’re looking at her as a sex object, which makes the purple color even more ironic.

 

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This somewhat mimics the opening scene with Peggy. A man and a woman facing off against each other in the office. She’s in her signature color (purple for Joan, yellow for Peggy), but it’s ironic. She’s not being heartbroken and Peggy’s not really in power. He’s in an off-white shirt with a blue, red, and gold tie, just like Freddie.

There was a repeating story motif of women facing off against men; needing something from them, whether it was approval or acquiescence or just to leave them alone. In fact, we’re going to skip ahead again, just to make that point:

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Purple.

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Yellow.

She’s mimicking Peggy and Joan here. They all need something from the men they’re facing off against. People have asked us about her rather prim hat and gloves and whether it signals that she’s out of touch. On the contrary. Nixon’s in office. There’s a renewed sense of conservatism being born at this moment and in this class. People like to think everyone was wearing their hippie beads back then, but a lot of young women dressed like the Nixon daughters.

Roger seems pretty clearly at the end of his rope. This is signaled in the costuming by having pretty much no costuming at all in his introductory scene. Margaret, we’re pretty sure, has discovered some form of EST or Dianetics or other type of feel-good movement popular during this period and all through the seventies.

 

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Heading into the blue. Foreshadowing…

 

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That spectacular entrance.

It’s hard not to see this dress as an ironic reference to this one. “Zou Bisou” was the height of their relationship. Now it’s in disrepair.

It’s also notable how subjective this scene is; how it goes from Don’s point of view to a more objective one. Megan comes out of the car in slow motion, looking like sex on legs to Don. The scene speeds up, she opens her mouth, and it’s all stress and fidgeting and awkwardness. Either he’s completely blind to what she’s feeling or he’s deliberately telling himself a more comforting story; a story where his beautiful wife can’t wait to see him and tear his clothes off.

 

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Love the sandals. It’s the Los Angeles version of the Zou Bisou dress. Notice how heavy her jewelry has gotten. There’s definitely a jewelry story being told this season. Costume jewelry exploded in shape and sizes by the late ’60s and Janie Bryant has typically used it either to denote prostitution or to denote wealth in women. You get to decide what’s being said about Megan here through her gigantic earrings and rings. Wealthy, accomplished woman or hooker with a sugar daddy? It seems to us that Megan herself is struggling with that one.

And yes, she’s serving up some serious Sharon Tate here, just like Joan used to serve up Marilyn and Betty used to serve up Grace Kelly. Joan didn’t die of a pill overdose and Betty hasn’t driven her car off a cliff. We’re pretty sure any references being made to movie stars doesn’t mean the characters will share their fates.

 

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We are NOT going to get into the whole “blue and green” signals adultery thing.

 

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Nope. We refuse. Too early in the season to make that assumption. We’ll see. It was ALL OVER the show last season, to the point where we went a little nuts pointing it out.

But Ted does stand out as the odd one in this scene. Moira and Jim are wearing business-like navy blue. Ted’s in his crazy California green.

 

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From a costuming perspective, every Megan and Don scene served to illustrate how far apart they are and how little they have in common. She’s all glitz and youth and Hollywood. He’s all age and establishment and New York.

Her agent is a typical one of the period. A lot of people read him as gay, but we didn’t necessarily get that impression. He’s flamboyant in that Hollywood in the sixties way, but that doesn’t necessarily make him gay.

 

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Do these two people even look like they belong in the same room together, let alone in a marriage? She wants to dress in a more bohemian style and live in a cheap place. She doesn’t want his penthouse and his fancy TV. He has no idea how to react to a wife who doesn’t expect material things from him. Note that she’s wearing a shirt that mimics a man’s shirt. The whole look reads “southern California” in the same way her cute little separates and dresses looked totally New York.

There’s very much a Rhoda Morgenstern feel to this look, which may be a cheeky reference, considering another costume choice:

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Peggy’s “You’re gonna make it after all” Mary Tyler Moore-style knit beret. Notice how her costume picks up both the reds in Stan’s and the beige/browns of Ted. Everyone seems to want Stan and Peggy together. This is one of the times where the costuming seems to imply a deeper connection between the two.

 

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In a later scene we get a better look at the costume and we can see that it SERIOUSLY mimics little girl wear, as so many clothes did for young women back in the day. The knee socks and gold (no-power color) turtleneck are deeply reminiscent of Velma from Scooby Doo. But we think the point here is to illustrate her lack of power in her life and how that makes her feel childish. Here she is, taking all her frustrations out at a child, yelling at him like they’re in a schoolyard together.

It’s Peggy and Julio down by the schoolyard.

 

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This, to us, is a very clear reference to this look from last season; the one she wore when she realized she had to stop thinking like a secretary and start thinking like a businesswoman.

Now check out that jewelry. She’s positively dripping with it. This works on both levels: she’s wealthy (relatively speaking) because she’s a partner in a successful agency, but she got her partnership through an act of prostitution and she can’t seem to forget that. She’s always going to be insecure about how she got ahead and what other people think of her for it, which is why she got defensive with the professor and why there were more than the usual number of shots of men looking at her as she walked past them. She’s feeling the whole male gaze thing and it’s suffocating her.

 

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This is a spectacular outfit. We noted as the scene unfolded how a point seemed to be made about her taking her coat off. The camera lingered on the moment. There was a sense of shedding something and a sense of standing revealed in front of someone. We can’t look at Joan in green without thinking it refers to the bathrobe she wore on the night she slept with the Jaguar guy and like we said, at least part of her story here dealt with her insecurities about how men see her. That she took off her green coat and sat down in an outfit that says “I know my shit” was important.

Seriously, what a great, declarative look for her. Exaggerated details like that collar and those sleeves only serve to make her look more formidable.

Remember how we said Lou’s cardigan made him look avuncular and professorial? There you go.

And speaking of men and their sweaters…

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Once again: California vs. New York. Freedom vs. repression. These two look like they have nothing at all in common with each other. Which is a shame, because scenes like this prove that Pete is actually a fairly decent friend to Don, who can’t recognize an ally even if they were to set themselves on fire.

 

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Hilarious. Don may have thought Pete looked like a hippy, but this is pure preppy squaredom all the way. And Pete hasn’t changed as much as you might think, because he wore a near identical sweater in the office almost 8 years prior to this. Like Margaret Sterling’s outfit, Pete’s working that new sense of conservatism that swept the middle and upper classes in response to the counterculture movement. TONS of men in his age group were dressing like this and would continue to do so pretty much for the rest of their lives. There are still men in country clubs and golf courses who dress exactly like this. By the eighties, looks like this will inspire “The Preppy Handbook” and have a rather enormous effect on fashion during the Reagan years. The new conservatism. It’s coming.

Bonnie Whiteside. Because of course. Pete finally got his Betty. He’s been trying for years.

 

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Aint no heartbreak in this moment. Joan’s wearing the purple, but she’s had it with men defining her and limiting her. We loved this scene because it showed her using the tools she has to get ahead. If there’s one skill Joan Holloway learned in her 16 years in the ad game, it’s how to take an obnoxious little shit of a man and scare the ever-loving daylights out of him in order to get him to do what she wants.

 

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And because her jewelry represents both the wealth she acquired and the way men see her as a prostitute, here’s Kenny, literally throwing it in her face. That she doesn’t catch it is ironic – and telling. She’s not the person she thought she was, nor is she the person everyone else thinks she is. She’s figuring it out and she’s moving forward. You can tell she’s scared and overwhelmed but also a little thrilled.

(EDITED TO ADD: It seems this passage wasn’t clear. We know that Ken has no depth perception and that’s why she missed his throw. The above isn’t meant to explain why she missed it; it’s to explain the deeper meaning we perceive in the scene. That’s the difference between intent and meaning and how the two don’t always overlap.)

We think we were too hard on Ken in our initial review. He’s rough with her here, but he pretty much says, “You’re an account man now. Suck it up.” Still, just once, we’d like to see Joan grab one of these men by the neck tie, pull them in close and say, “I’m a PARTNER, asshole. You don’t talk to me that way.”

 

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We feel like putting a pin on this scene because whatever significance it might have is probably going to play out further. We find it hard to believe they’d cast Neve Campbell for one brief, very odd scene. Like seemingly half the people watching, we spent most of the scene trying to figure out if that really is Neve Campbell. We have to say, she takes amazingly well to the styling for the period, but it seriously changes her looks and makes her look older.

As we said on Monday in our initial review, she’s something of a parody of the kind of woman Don goes for; mature, sexy, and vague, with a tendency to drop somewhat silly philosophical statements into general conversation. “He died of thirst.” Oh, please.

Costuming-wise, her jewelry indicates wealth and the buzzing, busy print represent a distraction to Don.

 

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Shirley helps frame the scene in her orange outfit…

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And then Dawn comes in to punctuate it in a green dress. Both looks refer back to Joan’s green trench coat and orange blouse in the scene with the professor. We don’t think there’s deeper meaning to be found there. It’s just a way to point out that Janie works in a specific color palette each season and each episode. Those colors repeat, and sometimes you can find meaning or connection between characters. Like we said, there was a repeating motif of women facing off against a man, trying to get something out of him. Dawn and Shirley weren’t part of that dynamic, but the color story helps to sell how pervasive it is. All these women are facing off against men, in one way or another.

 

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We would be remiss if we didn’t point out the dress hanging on the back of Peggy’s office door. This used to be Lane’s office, after all. That’s some sneaky use of costuming as props. Well done.

As for Peggy’s navy blue dress, with its row of military-like buttons?

 

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Trying to impress her boss, Lou, and avoid Ted in the office. Peggy is Mary Richards.

 

The Mary Tyler Moore Show Opening and Closing Theme 1970 – 1977 from TeeVees Greatest on Vimeo.
 

And what’s the exact opposite of throwing your hat into the air jubilantly on a city street?

 

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Sinking to the floor in despair, alone in your apartment.

Aw, Pegs. You’re gonna make it after all. You just don’t know it yet.

 

 

 

 

[Photo Credit: Jordin Althaus/AMC - Screencaps: tomandlorenzo.com - Video: YouTube]

    • decormaven

      Great observations, as usually. I lurve Megan’s earrings in the opening scene, and Joan’s necklace in the hotel bar- let’s just say she has big balls. And uses them!

    • http://www.what-the-frock.com Dana F.

      YAY!! I’m so excited that Mad Style is back.

    • LilyVanessi

      Love this! and love those last lines.

    • AndiMarie

      Yay!!! No lie, was refreshing the app every few minutes all morning. I’m seriously more excited for the Mad Style posts then even the new episode each week. Thank you TLo, for these amazing posts!!

    • Vanessa

      Not sure you ever followed the off white shirt with red and blue tie theme to its conclusion, except to note that Freddie and Ken both wear it?

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Nope. That’s it. Drawing a parallel between the two scenes; Peggy in her power color which isn’t a power color and Joan in her heartbreak color which isn’t a heartbreak color.

        • FayeMac

          Joan is wearing the same color when she was forced against her will, however this time she is standing up for herself – she is no longer the victim.

        • Rhonda Shore

          Really astute comment about Don Draper being Dick Whitman in those closing shots.

          • Kitten Mittons

            Yeah, that last scene left me wondering a little, and now it makes a lot more sense.

        • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

          I feel like there’s also a through line, both with the ties and the not-signifying colors, with people falling into unexpected roles. Ken to Pete and Freddy to Don, there’s been a lot of upheaval and reversals since last season. Things aren’t right without Don, which is ironic because they weren’t totally right with him either.

          Pete’s pants are reminding me of something from a prior season too- didn’t he wear a suit with a similar plaid to a party? Or maybe just a similar sport coat? Deja vu for me.

          • 3hares

            He wore a pink/red madras pad to Don’s birthday party in S5, I think. Maybe you mean that?

            • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

              That might be it. I’ll probably pore over old Mad Styles to figure it out tonight.

            • Laura Carney

              I think Megan wore similar plaid pants on the season six finale?

            • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

              THAT’S THE ONE. Thank you, it was really bugging me. Doesn’t match the pattern exactly but the colors (dark and light greys and red) are spot on. How funny.

          • L’Anne

            I recall in the season one episode in which Pete and Trudy want to get the apartment. Pete approaches his parents, and I’m pretty sure his father was wearing plaid pants in that scene when he says not to Pete and disparages Pete’s career.

      • Evan

        It looks like Don is wearing it on the plane, as well…

    • Shawn Taylor

      What do we think about Peggy realistically wearing knee socks at her age/time/place? I don’t believe for a second Janie would misstep with something like that, just remembering back to my early 70s childhood, and with Peggy pushing 30, I’m thinking…surely, as you said, just to make the point of how truly childlike she feels just then. Just remembered grown ass women back then and how matronly women of that age would have seemed and wondering.

      • decormaven

        Knee socks very appropriate for this look, usually worn with this type of jumper and a skinny ribbed sweater.

        • Shawn Taylor

          No I agree, just wondered if they would have given anyone around her pause for thought given her age and position. Bearing in mind, of course I came from a very Nixon-daughter dressing town and anyone I’d have seen of that age would have been well into marriage, motherhood and matronly

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        If she was married and had kids, it would probably have seemed a little odd, but for a career girl in the city, it’s not inappropriate.

        • lbee

          I remember my very conservative suburban mom wearing this sort of thing in the early 70s, including the beret with the pom pom too (which she knitted herself in garish colors.) Granted, she had been an elementary teacher and had young kids, so maybe it was partly an attempt to seem accessible to children, but I think it was also to look young just when she was starting to feel old.

          • lisbeth borden

            Interesting…So maybe her costumes are a nod to Peggy feeling like her youth is escaping her, so she dresses young. Hmm.

            • Alanna

              Yup. Do we ever learn her exact birthdate? I think she’s turning 30 this year, which would’ve been utterly ancient for a single woman in the city back then. (Thank goodness that has changed!)

            • BayTampaBay

              Peggy was born in May of 1939. She would be turning 75 this May of 2014

            • http://www.facebook.com/1033main Marci Smethurst Wolcott

              I’ve been thinking that this is the generation in nursing homes about now if they’re still with us. My family tend to die young (Mom 47 & Dad 66) but I think for longer lived families this would be their parents/grandparents depending on their own age.

            • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

              I am 28 and my paternal grandmother was born in 1937, but she got an early start on childbearing. She drives around the property she shares with my great grandmother on an ATV, great-grandma drives a souped-up PT Cruiser. God forbid anyone mention a nursing home! My husband’s grandmother has some wonderful snapshots of herself at that time wearing things like an egg-yolk-yellow long-sleeved maxi dress covered in red and green cartoonish flowers, and mother-daughter outfits for her and my mother-in-law that consisted of red jumpers with turtlenecks and knee socks. Her sister sewed the maxi dress and Margaret maintains that it was very stylish. She still does her hair like Peggy! I gave her Mad Men for Christmas a couple of years ago and she loved it. She was an elementary school teacher and later principal, and style and presentation has always been important to her.

            • http://www.facebook.com/1033main Marci Smethurst Wolcott

              I was born in ’63 and the clothes when I was growing up were a Lot of fun!

            • melisaurus

              My grandparents grew up in the 20s like Don, they wouldn’t have been in the 20s in the 60s. Those kids would be in high school now.

            • http://www.facebook.com/1033main Marci Smethurst Wolcott

              I’m not sure I understand what you mean. Someone who grew up in the 20’s would be in their 40’s in the ’60’s. Kids in high school now were born in the very late 90’s -early 00’s. As was said earlier, Peggy would be 75 now so it’s not out of ken that those of the adults who would still be with us would be quite senior in years now too.

            • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

              Don’tcha know that 90 is the new 70?

            • http://www.facebook.com/1033main Marci Smethurst Wolcott

              lol!

            • Trent

              Remember when Joan was humiliated back in season 2 when Paul posted her driver’s license on the office bulletin board and everyone saw that she was–gasp!–31? I wonder if we’ll get to see Peggy’s reaction as she reaches a similar milestone.

            • Michael J. Galt

              Peggy’s date of birth is established as 25 May 1939 in the season IV episode “The Suitcase”; she turns 26 on the day of the second Ali-Liston heavyweight championship fight (25 May 1965).

            • Guest

              Aw remember when they posted Joans id to the bulletin board. >.<

            • lbee

              Maybe? But then again the schoolgirl stuff has different meaning for Pegs than my mom. But part of her power, creatively speaking, comes from being more in touch with youth – unlike Don.

        • Chickadeep

          Agree it’s appropriate for someone her age—I seem to recall my second-grade teacher (who must have been in her thirties at the time, roughly 1970-71, because I remember she was older than my Mom) wearing very similar outfits, with the knee socks. She even had a kicky plaid poncho and beret with a pom pom to go with.

          • Shawn Taylor

            For some reason in my mind, I kept thinking about how the other characters would react, maybe a too long WTF gaze from Joan or people like Margaret or Megan who are roughly in her age group. I certainly can better see it and remember it after reading your comments. I had no doubt that it was timely fashion wise but think often about the differences in 30 then and 30 now and about her rather lofty career at this point and somehow saw these socks as a gauge of the degree she’s fallen emotionally. Still Peggy has done ‘fashion forward’ to varying degrees of awkward and successful in the past. What a ridiculous luxury to overthink a fictional characters 45 year old hosiery choices ;) THanks!

            • 3hares

              It’s probably one of the advantages of the show that JB can put her in something with two meanings. That is, she can be wearing something fashionable for the time that still reads as a regression or a lack of power to us. Though I do like it when Peggy wears that outfit–I remember it from last year’s New Year’s Eve. Back then it read as more fun and young. Here as more powerless.

      • BayTampaBay

        Shawn, Where did you get that necklace worn by your avatar?

        • Shawn Taylor

          At a sort of import store for knock off bags and jewelry. It’s actually two necklaces (the rhinestone and a bulky 3 pearl strand twist) Fairly inexpensive and came in a set with earrings.

    • Anna Vasquez

      Minor, and not costuming-related, but I thought Ken’s mis-throwing the earring at Joan was maybe a result of his lack of depth perception because of the one eye?

      • Kathy

        Yes, at first I thought he was being mean, but then decided it was an accident.

        • Anna Vasquez

          Had the same thought process. He was kind of being a dick anyway, and I wish Joan had smacked him down just a little.

          • lisbeth borden

            I thought the toss was showing an equality with Joan, a friendliness or assumption that she could catch whatever he threw at her. But Ken’s depth perception reminded us that they’re not yet working together as well-oiled, and Joan’s still learning her new role, and how to be an real equal with the men.

            • Anna Vasquez

              I think that makes the most sense, after reading a lot of the comments.

            • lisbeth borden

              And it was a gold BALL. Ken tossed her her missing ball, similar to the others balls she is trying out throughout the episode. The gold kind & the metaphorical.

          • FayeMac

            I think Joan, realized that Ken is stretched to his limit so she just let him vent. She is on his team and she is trying to help him. She is mature enough not to take his harshness personal.

            • Anna Vasquez

              That’s interesting, too. The Joan of season 1 *would* have felt a need to “put him in his place,” whether she acted on the impulse or not. But maybe this was showing at least one way in which she didn’t feel she had to defend her status? That would be nice.

          • Cheryl

            I totally took it as a dick move. After all he could have handed her the earring instead of shotgunning it at her, then the depth perception issue becomes moot.

      • elbow

        I thought that as well

      • katiessh

        Yeah, I think his reaction to the throw suggested his aim was just out

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Yes. Did we give the impression we thought otherwise? We’re asking.

        • Vanessa

          You mentioned Joan not catching it, rather than his poor throw. It looked like she tried to catch it and couldn’t because his throw was so off.

        • Latin Buddy

          I kept wondering whether Ken was being dismissive or belittling Joan or was he saying “act like an accountman” It was ambiguous. She would smirk but don’t know if she was amused or actually happy

          • 3hares

            I feel like often with Joan, because of her history and her being a woman, it’s hard to tell. When men treat her the way they treat other men it sometimes gets interpreted as them being a dick or misogynistic in ways I sometimes don’t think they’re actually being–but of course sometimes they are being that. Maybe it’s just that at this time in history they don’t get have a comfortable (or more comfortable) known way of communicating because they’re in transition?

            It’s like that scene in the elevator between Pete and Tommy earlier on. To many people that shows Pete being racially insensitive vs. Don being cool with the bus boy. But to me the difference is that Don and the busboy are following the 50s rules of black/white interaction where Pete and Tommy are both trying new ground. I can see a little of that with Ken here. Accounts people snap at each other.

          • EveEve

            My take is that Ken is being written as overworked, irritable, frustrated (as in “frustated writer”) and was in a bad mood. Tossing the “Stay out of my office” earring at Joan was a punctuation mark as the scene’s denouement. And missing his target because of his lack of depth perception was merely another Ken sight-gag, intended as comic relief. Which had its intended effect with me. I chuckled. Joan probably did too.

            • FayeMac

              Yes, I think Joan looked down with a slight grin, and Ken sort of stopped and looked at her. He knows his behavior is off center as well as his toss and he knows that Joan understands the pressure his is feeling. Great scene – and I do agree there was an intent to give us some comic relief.

        • Anna Vasquez

          “here’s Kenny, literally throwing it in her face. That she doesn’t catch it is ironic – and telling.” To me, this read as an implication that Joan either missed it because she was too off her game to catch it or that Kenny intended to miss her so she would have to stoop to pick it up. Because his whole attitude seems to have changed, these were in fact my first thoughts. The eye thing came to me later, so reading the above phrase and knowing what my thought process was influenced my interpretation of your statement.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            No, you’re confusing our reading of the meaning behind the scene with the intent of the scene. It wasn’t an explanation of why she didn’t catch the earring. It was an explanation of what we think it means on a deeper level.

            • Anna Vasquez

              Right, right, I get that. I saw “literally throwing it in her face” and for the reasons I mentioned before, I thought you were implying intention on Kenny’s part, which made me question my interpretation of the scene, so I posted to see if I was just completely off. But as you point out, his intention does not necessarily influence the deeper meaning of the scene in a larger context and if you were obligated to clarify that every time you made an interpretive point, these posts would never end!

            • BayTampaBay

              I thought the scene was nothing but comic relief.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              Again: intent is not the same thing as meaning.

            • BayTampaBay

              TLO, thanks for all your hard work. However, this is getting a little over my head so I am going to stick to commenting on IZOD-Lacoste pants with Gucci Belts and Loafers worn Geezer style by teenage hipster-slacker want to bees. OL! LOL!

        • jen_vasm

          He is so stressed out that his obnoxiousness goes out to everyone in a 10 foot radius around him. He is in overworked crisis management mode: just keep all the balls in the air so he can get a little bit of peace. He was happy she handled the footwear account, but annoyed she did it in his office. Generally, I think he was being a decent mentor to her as an accounts person in the Don/Peggy fashion, but until he gets some help in the office, he’s going to express himself abrasively.

        • E M

          First watch through I thought he was just being an ass, but on second watch he’s actually smirking when he says not to use his office, and I think his “every account man” says that is trying to be complimentary (if we ignore she’s a partner in fact). I think the scene was to show them as a team, they are all that is left of Stirling Cooper on the account side…

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            Yes, we said as much:

            “We think we were too hard on Ken in our initial review. He’s rough with her here, but he pretty much says, “You’re an account man now. Suck it up.”

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        That’s what I thought too. He wasn’t trying to be mean or cruel.

        • Kate Andrews

          Me too. I laughed. Is that evil?

          • RainbowsLollipops

            I think that moment where he mis-aims was maybe not the “last straw” but certainly yet another indignity to illustrate the defeated man that is poor sad sack Kenny. It was easier to chuckle at than to cry over, but let’s hope we get to see a dramatic turn around in our favorite science fiction-writing moonlighter.

            • lisbeth borden

              Ken’s truly a good guy. Perhaps this over-work portends a future in which he quits this and pursues his writing full-time, by the series finale? The good guy deserves a happy ending, I think.

      • tallgirl1204

        Yes, and I thought her reaction had to do with her knowing that his anger is borne out of frustration at his situation, fear that he could lose his position (and his office) at any time to someone else, and her little smile was a bit “I’ll let you have this one Ken, because I know what you’re afraid of, and it doesn’t have to be me.” Ken is another one who doesn’t recognize an ally when he sees one.

        • lisbeth borden

          And Ken is by far the most straight-arrow stable and kind, when he’s not stressed. Joan would know this well by now, as do we. I hope this isn’t another tough year for poor Ken!

      • TheDivineMissAnn

        Spot on Anna! That was what I thought too. Ken even kind of shakes his head and gives a wry chuckle as he is leaving the room.

      • Jean Beaton Leavitt

        I thought he threw the earing at her then turned and walked into the door jam. It looked like instant karma to me.

      • ybbed

        It was because of his eye sight shortcomings, that’s why Joan had a little smile on her face after he did that.

    • BayTampaBay

      Per TLo: “Her agent is a typical one of the period. A lot of people read him as gay, but we didn’t necessarily get that impression. He’s flamboyant in that Hollywood in the sixties way, but that doesn’t necessarily make him gay.”

      I am now 100% convinced the agent character is based on Jay Bernstein as Jay Bernstein was not gay to my knowledge.

      • decormaven

        Yep, you have made a good call.

      • Guest

        The presidential inauguration was the central outside event, so the long weekend of Jan 16-20 was when the episode occurred.

      • AZU403

        I did see him as gay, and when he assured Don that he and Megan were close, but only professionally, Don seemed to replying that he had NO qualms about his wife being around him. Didn’t the agent seem very “Boys in the Band” to you?

        • BayTampaBay

          Not really. The agent reminded me of Elliot Gould, Peter Bogdanovich and/or Robert Evans from the times they were on Johnny Carson in the 1970s.

        • girlsaturday

          Eh, I think Don’s reply had more to do with the fact that he’s already aware that his marriage is falling apart. He’s not worried about Megan doing any damage to their relationship because he’s done a fine job of wrecking it on his own – if she were to leave him for another man, the only thing that it would do at this point is save him some airfare and cover up HIS past indiscretions.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Yeah, that might be how Don saw it, and the agent may have even played it up to an extent. But Don doesn’t know Hollywood. He doesn’t know the culture. I saw the same as you because I wasn’t familiar. But I trust everyone’s judgement here. :)

        • mwynn13

          I feel the same way. I didn’t read this far down and made the same point, Don says he feels completely at ease about her spending time with the agent. Sorry for the repetition.

      • Cordelia_Gray

        That’s a good call. My husband insisted he was based on Paul Lynde. He’s just really hoping Uncle Arthur shows up on Mad Men, I think. :-)

        • BayTampaBay

          I saw Paul Lynde once on Johnny Carson. He was great!

    • ScarlettHarlot

      I just noticed Peggy still has her little Christmas tree up, which makes me feel more sad for how alone she must be. The only other mention of the holiday was a passing reference in the conversation between Freddy and Don, so I imagine it wasn’t too recent, yet she still has her tree up. I remember when I lived alone and it was easy to let things sit around (dishes, laundry, holiday decorations) and slide for a while without anyone else to prompt doing them.

      • http://www.ellenciompi.com/ NurseEllen

        Good catch!

      • Kitten Mittons

        Yes, I think they mentioned it was February, or just past that, coming up on Easter. That makes me sad.

        • 3hares

          No, it’s January.

          • Kitten Mittons

            Oops, my bad.

          • TheDivineMissAnn

            Right. The speech Nixon is giving is at his Inauguration.

      • MilaXX

        I think it was the end of January. Peggy is Catholic, or was raised Catholic. Some people keep their trees up to January 30th so I didn’t find that all that surprising.

        • sugarkane105

          Growing up Catholic, I remember the standard was to keep your tree up until after the Epiphany, which happens during the first week in January. To me, January 30th is a little late and I think it was meant to signal that Peggy doesn’t really give a shit right now haha.

          • MilaXX

            I’m not Catholic but the ones I knew did til the 30th which is why it wasn’t a big deal to me.

        • ScarlettHarlot

          That makes sense, I just wasn’t aware of that tradition. We always took our tree down on the 7th, and my non-religious relatives usually took theirs down on New Years day, so having it up later seemed strange to me.

        • http://bidonica.wordpress.com/ Poggy

          Idk if it’s different in the US, but as a (lapsed) Catholic born and raised in a largely Catholic country, the traditional time to take the tree down would be right after the Epiphany. In my family we’ve sometimes kept the tree for longer but it wasn’t a traditional/religious thing, more like no one in the house finding the time or willpower to take up the task :)

      • KayeBlue

        Freddy said the Superbowl already happened and Nixon is shown being sworn in, so it’s January 20 or a few days later. Oh Pegs.

      • lbee

        I was thinking the same thing. I’m recently single, it’s April, and I *still* have some of my lights up. My ex would have freaked about this. Eh, they’re pretty. Screw him.

        • BayTampaBay

          It will save you time next year just to leav’em up.

      • jen_vasm

        The Nixon presidential inauguration was the central outside event, so the long weekend of Jan 16-20 was when the episode occurred.

        • Lilithcat

          Why do you say “the long weekend”?

          • jen_vasm

            It’s not really an official long weekend, just that the inauguration was on Monday and the show spooled out Fri-Mon.

      • formerlyAnon

        Her tree doesn’t read sad to me at all – it reads busy working woman who likes Christmas – notice she has a good-sized tree, something not all single people bother with.

        But then, I love Christmas decorations, especially the lights, beyond reason. Growing up we had the tree up till Epiphany (Jan. 6) and usually later because unless it actually showed signs of yellowing, no one was in a huge hurry to get it down. Nowadays, I’ve taken to leaving some of my indoor lights (yes, they escaped the confines of the tree long ago) year round, and I honestly don’t care if it reminds some of a decidedly downmarket bar or the yards in shabby neighborhoods around these parts where you can find people drinking beer and playing dominoes or cards in their carports on weekend nights nearly year round.

        • another_laura

          You’re just reinforcing my love for you, formerlyAnon. I’ve started calling them “fairy lights,” Anglo-style, but I’m leaving Xmas lights in the front window year-round. They impart a lovely little glow in the front room, so there. It’s pretty.

          • 3hares

            Me too. No shame!

          • Wendi126

            For some idk why reason I would drive past my own driveway time and again. Put up strands of 3 different color purple lights around my porch and trees. Some twinkle. All year. I never miss my driveway anymore

            • Qitkat

              Now I feel bad for my snark. Yours must look awesome!

            • Wendi126

              Don’t :) mine are purple- not only a fav color but have no holiday symbolism. People in my neighborhood have told me their kids love them. Helps I live in an extremely liberal hard to get into college town

            • another_laura

              Ha! Yes, I tell cab drivers to pull up to the place with lights in the front window. See, pretty AND functional!

        • marlie

          My family kept the tree up until the last week of January because my sister always begged to keep it up until her birthday. And even though I didn’t get a tree for my apartment, some of my decorations are still up just because they’re pretty. Sue me.

        • Qitkat

          One year at Christmas, I put up willowy white branches all around my front door to frame it, and they looked so pretty they have stayed up year round for more than 10 years. We always put lights around the door and also the window above it (it’s a two story entrance). Every year I am sad when we take those lights down, as we make fun of people who leave up their outdoor xmas lights year round. But I’m all for using those tiny lights indoors year round, or on the back deck. But maybe next year we’ll just defy convention and leave up the front door lights. We’ve always kept our tree up well into January.

        • Alloy Jane

          Many people in my neighborhood would leave up their xmas lights year round, but this year, it became a fineable offense :-p

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Pete also mentioned how he spent Christmas week with Tammy and his brother.

        • ScarlettHarlot

          You’re right, I forgot about that. I just got the feeling that the Christmas season was well over for most people.

      • KateWo

        Also, Peggy is supposed to be a bit of a slob, her apt is always a little messy

    • Vanessa

      I see what you mean about women facing off with men, and I think that there also was a child/parent dynamic here — not necessarily with one’s own children. It seems to both reinforce the growing “generation gap” between characters and point out the changing dynamic between mentors and mentees among the original cast. For example, Pete has always wanted to get Don to acknowledge his success (and to exceed him) in the way a son competes with a father. His offers of help to Don always feel to me like his need to shift the power dynamic between the two by showing Don that he can help him out . Don’s refusal to take anything from Pete seems like his need to maintain the status quo.

      • Kitten_Mittens

        I also thought the fact that Peggy was in her power mustard yellow during the first meeting with Lou in his pale blue was a nice way of showing their upcoming conflict via contrasting colors before any dialogue. Almost setting it up so you knew he was going to disagree with her before she even gave the pitch.

    • katiessh

      I think peggy’s school girl look represents (such a douchey word) how she’s slipped backwards from the finale of last season. I mean, all the plaid and hats make her look a lot younger in comparison to the bold pant-suit.
      Does anyone else think the real estate agent looks like a mix of january jones and anna camp?

      • marlie

        I thought she was Britney Snow from the show “America Dreams (she’s not).” I also commented that she resembled Reese Witherspoon.

        • Kate Andrews

          Wow. I thought she was Brittany Snow too. The actress is a dead ringer.

        • MilaXX

          She’s from Falling Skies

          • marlie

            Huh. I hadn’t even heard of Falling Skies, which is disappointing because I just IMDB’ed it, and saw that Noah Wylie was in it, and I love him.

            • Linlighthouse

              She’s that very creepy Karen from Falling Skies.

            • jen_vasm

              Omg. That’s why I had a seemingly irrational reaction to her! I was all, “Pete! Step away – that chick is bad news!” And I didn’t know why. Thanks for clearing that up!

            • Linlighthouse

              Watch your back, Pete! I mean, literally ;-)

            • MilaXX

              It’s pretty good. I think TLo covered it for a hot minute.

          • fitzg

            I have just been binging “Veronica Mars,” so I first recognized her as “that girl they hooked up with Logan in Season 2 because obstacles.” Also as Cinderella from “Once Upon a Time.”

        • charlotte

          I thought she looked like a mix of January Jones and Reese Witherspoon, so I’m with the two of you.

        • acarp

          My mind is blown. The actress’s name is Jessy Schram and for the last few years I have thought numerous times to myself, “My, My that Brittany Snow sure is working a lot!” Now I find out it is two different actresses! They look like twins.

      • Aurumgirl

        I thought she was the woman who played Bethany, the girl Don dated a couple of times and then never called back.

        • Alloy Jane

          Same here, I thought maybe they were recycling the actress, but they are two different people. Two very similar-looking people who look like JJ and Reese.

        • katiessh

          yeah, that’s anna camp. but i’m pretty sure it’s not actually her

      • Chris

        I thought she looked just like the prostitute Pete went to who called him “My King” and he loved it. I think Pete likes blondes now.

        • 3hares

          God, that scene was so pathetic and sad. I don’t think he even did love it. It was just better than the other two approaches. “Okay.”

        • katiessh

          I’m sad this probably means no more trudy

    • Scimommy

      Love your Mad Style recaps, love you. And no, I didn’t yell “Power color!” I yelled “Mustard!!!” Does that count? Aaand, my Dawn-Ginsberg ship is alive and well, and supported by color matching! WOOT!

      • MartyBellerMask

        That was you? I remember there being minor buzzing amongst a few kittens last year. Kind of cool if it plays out that way. :)

        • Scimommy

          At least one of those kittens was me. For some reason I find the Dawn-Ginsberg pairing really adorable. Of course when it looked like he might have schizophrenia, I was less excited about it, for Dawn’s sake, but still, it would be, in Ginsberg’s words, “very interesting”.

          • siriuslover

            you know, they just dropped that whole Ginsberg weirdness, didn’t they? I wonder if they’ll come back to it.

            • Scimommy

              Well, it sorta comes and goes, doesn’t it? I think it popped up kinda late in the last season, so it might pop up again.

            • siriuslover

              That’s a good point. It does. I guess the episodes of his madness (or whatever it might be) are pretty far apart.

            • UsedtobeEP

              Or, it just happens when they focus on him, which isn’t often. I wish he got more time onscreen.

            • fursa_saida

              I want more Ginsburg pretty much all the time. WHY, WRITERS.

    • Susan Collier

      Yay! Mad Style!
      It’s funny how when you remove the hat, Peggy’s last dress is considered military. When she wears it with her beret, she looked like Shirley Temple.

    • femme_esq

      Awesome observations, as always. I admit I missed the reference to Lane with Peggy’s dress hanging on the back of the door. However, I did notice a possible continuation of the “Don suicide motif” with the British Racing green convertible that Megan drives in the airport scene. I’m excited to see how the whole thing plays out.

    • Kitten_Mittens

      Oh how I’ve missed these reviews! This isn’t really a costume detail, but did the scene in the LA restaurant w/ Megan, Don, and her agent/handler stand out to anyone else? The way it’s shot and that particular booth was positively prison like, both when Don and Megan first approached it and after they sat down in the booth. The bars were also in full view and added to the sense of claustrophobia. I felt like it was mostly prison-like and claustrophobia from Don’s perspective, but maybe it also adds to the sense of foreboding surrounding Megan and her new life in LA. Thoughts?

      • decormaven

        That scene stands out for me in its dialogue, with the agent insisting on referring to Megan as “your girl” or “our girl.” “Your girl is lovely, Hubbell….”

        • Kitten_Mittens

          Does that make Megan the simple girl as opposed to the Katie girl? ;)

      • 3hares

        Looking at the pictures here it certainly looks completely different from the diner scene with Pete. That looks incredibly free and spacious. Yet another thing that makes Don’s two sandwich scenes look so much more healthy and friendly than his darker scenes with the two women.

        • Kitten_Mittens

          Great catch on the contrast! Every scene with Don and Megan in this episode had me squirming with discomfort.

      • Kitten Mittons

        Good observation. I took it as a reflection of their relationship, and I think they both feel trapped, Megan maybe even more than Don. Her nervousness and lack of affection toward him, and the way her entire life is completely different when he’s not around (i.e. her apartment and the tv thing) just screamed that she wants out. She wants an entirely different lifestyle.
        Don’s trapped in a different way. He wanted the California thing, can’t have it right now, and is at a total loss regarding his self. He’s caught in the lie that he’s still working, caught in the lie with Freddy, trapped in New York, trapped in his marriage, and that scene just contrasted the view of them from the outside (“You’re my favorite couple”), with the view from the inside.

        • lbee

          Also contrast Megan’s apartment scenes with Betty and Henry’s mansion – remember the crack Don made to Sally a few seasons ago, “say hi to Gomez and Morticia for me” or some such? And here he says he feels like he’s in Dracula’s castle because of the wolves. Megan is becoming Betty to him, he’s trapped in a horror show.

          • malarson2

            His kids.

        • tallgirl1204

          So, if Don’s company is still paying him, what is keeping him stuck in NYC? Why isn’t he in California with Megan? I think he is punishing himself. Other than that maybe Megan thinks he is working?

          • 3hares

            Megan does think he’s still working. And presumably he wants to be working again asap.

          • Kitten Mittons

            Yeah, I definitely got the impression that Megan did not know about his work situation. Which means that he could have chosen to take a little California break with her, but he lied and stayed in New York.

            I’m not sure if he’s punishing himself, if he’s giving Megan some space (or punishing her?), or if it’s all out of fear for his job. The whole Freddy situation is really curious. I think that is fueled partly by his need to work (to be useful, to stay anchored to something), his need to know what’s going on in the office, and maybe as insurance policy in case they want to get rid of him (he’s still giving them great ideas).

            It’s probably a little of all three. I think his job is the main thing tying him to New York, though, and what’s keeping him trapped. He was happy to move to California when he had a job, and a marriage he wanted to save, i.e. on his own terms. Maybe he refuses to move on Megan’s terms, or maybe he’s afraid of losing his job and then not being able to restart his career in CA. Or, yeah, maybe he’s punishing himself as he feels he deserves.

      • jen_vasm

        There was a lot of compare/contrast with NYC & LA. The relative modern LA backdrops vs the traditional establishment locals of NYC. We had the LA restaurant scene and the bar where Joan met the baby-faced snit right after one another. Megan’s pad is a flip-flop of her & Don’s Manhattan apartment: both have spectacular views, but Megan’s remoteness is in opposition to the city noise and centrality of the NYC flat. Since many of the key scenes happened at night, it occurred to me that all these unhappy characters are literally in the dark: confused, isolated and unknowing and ignorant.

        • BayTampaBay

          I have to continue to remind myself that NYC was in a state of decay going downhill at this juncture in time and LA was on the rise.

      • JulieTy

        The thing about that scene that jarred me the most was a big mistake in direction (IMHO): Megan in that micro-mini leaning over the table so that everyone seated behind her would have a clear view of her undies.* Those of us who grew up wearing those skirts knew how to bend our knees and “dip” rather than risk such a scandalous occurrence!

        *P.S. Oh, how I long to see a L’eggs egg on Megan’s or Peggy’s (or Sally’s!) dresser!

        • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

          That’s the Playboy Club’s Bunny Dip.

    • Chris

      I love that you included the photo of Ted hugging Moira and Peggy looking on. Poor Peggy got busted when Ted put his hand on her waist and they giggled too much but he can openly hug the secretary. Sometimes it seems that rules only apply to Peggy.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Mmm-hmm. I still don’t like Moira. Completely irrational, but I just don’t like/ trust her. Kind of surprised she didn’t go to Cali.

        • Chris

          I can’t stand her. It’s childish and petty but she irks me more than characters with far more screen time. I still think she sold Ted out to Don.

          • BayTampaBay

            How did she sell Ted out to Don? I have KRAFT diease! LOL! LOL!

            • Chris

              As decormaven explained below, when Moira made a sour face and let Don in on Ted and Peggy laughing in the boardroom. It was an open secret (especially to Moira Ted’s secretary who was always trailing behind him) that Don and Ted were at war. Or Don was at war with Ted (who made the remark about Fred Astaire punching Ginger Rogers in the face instead of catching her). It was just the opposite of what any other secretary there we have seen would have done. Don was having drunken fits in his office and Dawn was covering as best she could and cleaning up after him. IMHO Moira sold Ted out because she didn’t like him giving attention to Peggy. But it was alright for him to give her his chair and be nice to her even though she is “only” a secretary. She was jealous and effectively helped his “enemy” at the time hurt him. Plus she was rude to Peggy which will always make me not like a character.

            • Aurumgirl

              But it’s always been clear that Moira has an unrequited crush on Ted. It’s something Ted doesn’t even see, let alone acknowledge. Moira’s always had a problem with Peggy–so it’s Peggy she “sells out” to Don, not Ted.

              I’m probably not remembering this correctly, but doesn’t Don buy Midge, his first bohemian lover, a TV set too?

            • decormaven

              No, someone else had given Midge the set. When Don quizzed her about it, saying he didn’t think she cared about such things, she threw it out the window.

            • Chris

              Yes, it was his bonus money he gave to Midge.

            • Aurumgirl

              Okay, thank you for clarifying that. I knew there was something similar, but I’d forgotten the details.

            • Chris

              Yes, she probably has a crush on Ted, and no question she resents Peggy, but she threw Ted right under that bus anyway to the guy who was making his professional life miserable. The same boss who was so kind and deferential to her all the time. No matter what lousy stuff Don ever did to Peggy she always covered for him, even when he didn’t deserve it.

          • decormaven

            Chris may have a different scene, but the one that comes to mind for me is in S6 Quality of Mercy, where Don walks up to Moira’s desk, sees Peggy and Ted yucking it up in the boardroom, and asks, “What’s going on in there?” Moira gives him a look and says, “Someone’s having a good time.” The look was a telegraph- if anyone knows what a boss is doing, it’s his secretary.

      • insomniacattack

        I can’t be the only one who initially thought that the Ted-Moira embrace was more significant than it was. Peggy looked so hurt, so disgusted, and GREEN AND BLUE! THEY WERE WEARING GREEN AND BLUE! Thanks a lot for the mini heart attack, Mad Style.

        • Chris

          I’ve had my eye on Moira since last season. I have a feeling she is going to play a bigger role in some way. She is always very conspicuous in Ted scenes. I have also wondered if anything is going on with her and Cutler.

    • fitzg

      I took the matching grey, white and black of Dawn and Ginsberg as a nod to the link between them as minorities still learning to maneuver in the new, but still hostile, world order. And on a more shallow note, I die for Joan’s green leather trench.

      • Chris

        Joan’s green coat reminded me a lot of Megan’s green one when she was leaving SCDP. Joan’s was far more beautiful though. Maybe both are moving on to something they love more?

        • girlsaturday

          That makes a lot of sense, especially when you think about how invigorated she was when Harry Crane had her doing all the work for the TV department – I just hope Joan’s transition is better than Megan’s!

          • MartyBellerMask

            Hey, that reminds me. Where’s Harry?

      • marlie

        That’s an interesting way to look at it. Maybe that’s the connection that THEY’VE fostered. And though she’s not the only black woman there, she’s upwardly mobile, just as Ginsberg is.

      • jen_vasm

        Plus, when they walked into Lou’s office, he made that ‘Look who’s here, Gladys Knight & the Pips!’ not-so-microaggressive comment. They both paused for a second, taking in the way he called out her difference from everyone else before the door was even closed.

        • oldscrumby

          I wonder if he was calling out Dawn and Ginsburg with that line since he referenced a group act and not solo one, and one with a women as lead backed by men. It seemed to say “here’s the black woman and the guy who trails behind her.” It’ll be interesting to see if any Jew jokes are forthcoming, and I’m sure more emasculating ones are.

          • 3hares

            Or just that Dawn was Gladys Knight because she was the black woman and everyone else was the Pips.

            • oldscrumby

              Quite possible. I think I want to tie Ginsburg into it more because he was walking in the door with her when it was said and had a visible reaction to it. But Ginsburg having a physical reaction to something that is awkward or uncomfortable to someone else is something that he does is general.

            • fursa_saida

              Well, and being Jewish in that time and place, he might be more likely to recognize it for the microagression it was.

        • Chris

          Ginsberg was the most socially conscious person last season with his views on the war. He’s the only one who has expressed any political feelings or interest in anything apart from work and personal problems.

          • Lady Bug

            I would have to respectively disagree that Ginsberg is the only person to express political feelings or interest in anything about work/personal problems. Pete Campbell has always been quite progressive when it comes to race and civil rights-and has made his views clear from his “because Lassie can stay at the Waldorf and they can’t” retort to Burt to his “It’s a shameful day!” outburst after the MLK assassination, to of course trying to reach out to the African-American market with the Admiral television sets.

        • UsedtobeEP

          I wondered about that comment, too, and couldn’t figure out who he was talking about for a minute, besides Dawn. I was expecting to see Shirley behind Dawn, or something. I think I was probably cringing away from the television and didn’t notice. Now I want to watch again just so I can watch Dawn and Ginsburg and see if they interact. Can’t wait to see Dawn and Shirley’s conversation, now.

        • marlie

          I just got the impression that it was *everyone* following Dawn into the room, not just Dawn and Ginsberg. I (personally) didn’t think that comment was specifically relevant to their relationship, whatever it may be.

          • jen_vasm

            Gladys referred to Dawn and The Pips were the guys behind her. In typical form, Lou thought he was being witty, not understanding that having your race be randomly called out is tiresome at best. The other guys were likely clueless, but Ginsberg, with his own sensitivity to being different (Martian?) would understand Lou’s slight to Dawn and that’s why he paused to share her fleeting unease.

        • 28fairplay

          Dawn was “Nurse” to Lou’s “Doctor”. He makes the remark about Gladys Knight and the Pips while taking in Peggy and her guys, seemingly to trivialize them.

          • jen_vasm

            Oh, no,no, no. Trust me on this one. Lou was referring to Dawn. This is the 1960s, men like Lou would never refer to a white woman with a black woman analogy. I watched the scene again after I wrote this and Ginzberg not only glances a Dawn after Lou’s remark, but he goes on to snark on Lou for his ‘hipness’, which goes over Lou’s head. Lou does go on to call Dawn ‘Nurse’ (if I wanted to go overboard, I could say that he was referring to the ‘Julia’ tv show of that time with Dihann Carroll, but that is taking this little exchange too far) also, but his pile-on of hack jokes just illustrates his corny and out of touch style in contrast to Don’s lets stripped-down business mode.

      • Eva

        I thought the buttons on the trench were oversized, to resemble nipples and further highlight Joan’s wariness of her sexuality (or the male gaze in relation to it) – hence the lingering on the coat’s removal. A shedding of one skin or facade.

    • Capt. Renault

      Thanks, guys. You’re so very smart. We love you so much, and not just for your looks.

    • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

      “It’s Peggy and Julio down by the schoolyard.” You guys crack me up. LOL. :)

      • Kitten Mittons

        That was the one that made my entire day.

      • zeiserl

        Is Julio yet another Weiner son?

      • jen_vasm

        Because that was totally a schoolyard showdown Peggy had with that kid. I was surprised she didn’t give him a 2 handed push.

      • Chris

        Peggy should ask Betty, it’s a no win situation.

      • Lady Bug

        now I have that song stuck in my head

    • MartyBellerMask

      Pete. Kind of a jarring look after seeing the promo shots. But OF COURSE California would agree with Pete. I love it. I know it is unpopular opinion, but he deserves success and contentment after working his butt off (not literally because DAT ASS) for years with little acknowledgement. Let’s hope Ken gets his dues soon, because his situation is sad.

      • oldscrumby

        I don’t think Pete deserves success, but I still want to see him successful. There is a good side to Pete that comes out when he’s happy and fulfilled. I root for him not to end up as another Don or Roger trapped between whats expected of them and what they desire, and burning their lives down in the conflict.

        • MartyBellerMask

          That’ll be the test, for sure. Will he recognize that the man he’s emulated all these years is empty? If he can see that, he might be alright. He’s maintaining a relationship with his daughter, but it hasn’t been very long. So eager to see how this season unravels!

      • lunchcoma

        Yeah, it doesn’t surprise me that Pete thrived in California. A lot of his arc has been about getting out from under his family name, his East Coast heritage, and the expectations he placed on himself to have a certain sort of manly personality. He’s not that guy and won’t ever be able to be that guy. Being somewhere else seems to have given him permission to drop the pretense.

        I do think some of his personal demons will eventually come back to bite him, because no one changes completely on this show, but I hope he ends up with a little more peace by the series finale.

      • KayeBlue

        Every time I want to cheer for Pete, I remember there’s a former au pair in (West) Germany with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    • Chris

      Did anyone find anything significant in Lou, Megan and Pete all being in the same shade of light blue? All people with new starts?

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        That’s a good call, bringing that up. We didn’t make any connection, but that doesn’t mean you can’t find one.

      • 3hares

        Cool catch! New starts or maybe in control? Megan and Pete are both dealing with a Don who’s used to being the one in control with them, and while neither of them is controlling him, they’re also not dancing to his tune as in the past. Megan stays in the driver’s seat and fights back against the TV rather than give in to Don to make him happy. Pete laughs off Don’s little digs and just generally keeps his own “vibe” that he walked in with. And Lou is immune to Peggy’s charms–not letting her turn things the way she wants and the way she has in the past.

      • French_Swede

        Lou looks exactly like Duck to me. I seem to remember Duck in a blue cardigan back in the day. Maybe that partially fuels Peggy’s pursuit of the Armitron pitch line.

        • Chris

          Lou is the first older male superior that hasn’t recognized her gifts. Even before Duck was fooling around with her, he was trying to lure her and Pete away professionally. Freddy, Don, Ted, Duck, Ken, Harry, Pete and even Paul Kinsey have acknowledged how great she is at what she does. It must kill her that Lou continually dismisses her.

          • Aurumgirl

            I think it kills her to be working with such an imbecile. This is her career, after all, and now a half-wit is going to be in charge of it while she’s working there.

      • eenster

        This SCREAMED out at me during the episode. Thought for sure TLO would pick up on it. The powder blue just screams ‘I’m different!’. It pops in every scene. Those characters are in completely new positions from last season; Lou is the ‘new’ Don, Megan is the new hot actress with a new life in LA, and Pete is the new and improved Pete! It was so glaring. TLO did mention how Don is ‘heading in to the blue’ while he is scrolling past the tiled airport walls. This couldn’t be any more telling… New Don here we come.

      • radioactive badger

        Ersatz authority?

    • BayTampaBay

      In regards to Pete’s preppy look, this is now called the “Stymie Geezer” look in Florida when worn by high school & college kids and unemployed Florida hipster want to bees. Males who wear this look go to ‘Lila & Stymie” estate sales, buy the men’s clothes and alter the clothing not to fit but not to fall off their bodies. The look is to appear as if you are wearing your grandfather’s IZOD pants that are three inches to short and five inches too big in the waste but held up with his old Gucci belt that you poked extra holes in because everyone knows that one does not throw away Gucci or original IZOD.

      • decormaven

        What a hoot! Also the Lacoste sweater and polo shirt.

      • Tanya Wade

        Everything you say is true.

      • EveEve

        Seriously? That’s a thing?! That’s an hilarious fad. I must remember to be on the lookout for such creatures next time I’m in Florida.

        • BayTampaBay

          You will see the “Stymie Geezer” look in Tampa, St. Petersburg, Sarasota, Naples and Fort Myers. No so much in Miami due to the Latin culture being so dominate.

          I do not know about the East coast of Florida as I spend almost no time there.

      • jen_vasm

        I think I still have my IZOD from the late 70s somewhere – cant even wear it because it’s just about see through now. I loved how out of touch Don called Pete a hippee, which I recall, was a catchall word of the establishment to describe someone different from them, counterculture or not.

      • Chris

        It reminds me of all the golf clothes in “Caddyshack”.

      • Qitkat

        This made me laugh, my late father-in-law lived just south of Sarasota, and his favorite place to shop was Goodwill. But I think he went for the cheap stuff.

    • Kent Roby

      I haven’t watched Mad Men for ages (yeah, I know, right? I stopped after home-boy Bryan Batt was off the show ages ago, but have recently added the whole shebang to my Netflix list), but I always LOVE these Mad Style posts.

    • KM grah

      Brilliant analysis! Love it.

    • schadenfreudelicious

      I had no idea till very recently that the actor playing Freddie is Joel Murray aka Bill Murray’s younger brother…there is a resemblance..

      • AZU403

        How did we not know that! That explains the Chicago accent.

      • MartyBellerMask

        I mostly know him from Dharma and Greg, but I’m sure I’ve seen him in at least 20 roles. Rumsen is hands down my favorite. And I knew his name was Murray but didn’t think I knew h was Bill Murray’s brother. Huh.

        • MRC210

          Dharma and Greg! Thank you! I was trying to remember where I’d seen him before.

    • Danielle

      OK, now I want to read the list of Top 10 Trudy Campbell Lines. Or maybe Top 10 Pete & Trudy Campbell Lines. Can some fellow bitter kitten get on that, please?

      • Kitten_Mittens

        I submit her fierce as shit: “I refuse to be a failure!”

      • decormaven

        “My father loves blood sport.”

      • KayeBlue

        Pete’s definitely includes: “Hell’s bells, Trudy!”

        • lisbeth borden

          “She loved the sea.”

          • rage_on_the_page

            Borden you are KILLING it today.

        • decormaven

          “But I meant where are you from? Are you Amish or something?”

        • Denise Alden

          Pete’s also includes “Not great, Bob!” For completely inexplicable reasons, that may be my favorite line in all of Mad Men!

          • Betsy

            It was the beyond-brilliant delivery.

            • Denise Alden

              You’re right!

        • rage_on_the_page

          I think the sound of him falling down the stairs should count as a quote.

          • lisbeth borden

            L.O.L. Hilarious! I was sure Kartheiser would get an Emmy nod last season. He had so much great material last year!

          • acarp

            I agree…I kept on thinking, how could he have acted that out so perfect, it must have been a mistake that he played off!

          • Alloy Jane

            The sound of him getting punched in the face by Lane should too. That is my favorite Pete scene ever.

            • rage_on_the_page

              Grimy little pimp.

      • Capt. Renault

        “This is America — you just don’t shoot the President!”

      • http://brianfortedesigns.com/ BForte

        “I’m drawing a 50 mile radius around this house and if you so much as open your fly to urinate, I will destroy you.”

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          Yeah, that’s gotta be Number One.

        • Heather

          Yup. Awesomeness.

        • Chris

          That gets my vote too. Trudy at her best.

        • acarp

          Brilliant, my jaw dropped when she said that. Best line ever.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Can Pete’s include the monologue about killing the deer? It worked on Peggy.

      • gogobooty

        “Christ on a cracker!”

      • Logo Girl

        “I don’t have any laudanum, either”

    • marlie

      This is a tremendous writeup. I think I like the Mad Style posts better than the Mad Men reviews/recaps. The one thing that I wanted to add to the part with “preppy” Pete and Bonnie is that – as TLo mentioned – you can see a completely unchanged version of Pete at every single country club in the world, but most of the women are almost exactly the same as Bonnie. That’s some Lily Pulitzer realness right there. Also, she could stand in for Reese Witherspoon on her Parking Lot Tour *any* day.

      • lunchcoma

        That’s a great point. I think the women’s version of that look has been even more powerful. The men who dress like Pete are mostly men of Pete’s generation or part of a slightly younger set who picked up the look in the 80s. The women with Bonnie’s look are legion, and many of them are in their 30s.

    • LCTerrill

      So happy Mad Style is back!

      I also got a heavy parallelism vibe from Megan’s hippy cooking outfit: Midge from S1, anyone? Seems to reinforce Don’s struggle to change.

      • Aurumgirl

        Right down to the unwanted TV.

        • Bostwick

          Oh GOD, yeah. Thanks for the fun new parallel!

          Though it seems more like Megan is just trying to play some kind of stock “Midge” character, and Don is far less into it now that he, himself, is a total mess…

    • http://samanthatennant.tumblr.com/ Samantha Tennant

      I am SO happy Mad Style is back!! Love how you add a some depth and perspective to each episode (since I’m too much of a simpleton to see how a tie can be a parallel between 2 scenes) and I appreciate all of the time you put into it

    • Andrew Schroeder

      *costume designer, not costumer

    • Kit Jackson 1967

      In the 1970s, my father owned a pair of pant very similiar to what Pete wears. It was crazy to see it on screen. When I saw Megan with the scarf, I thought, so that’s where Rhoda got her look from. I want Peggy’s navy blue dress from the last scene.

      • Kate Andrews

        My dad had pants like that too. I gasped twice on Sunday — at Roger’s bedroom scene and at Pete’s outfit. So hilarious.

      • Kitten Mittons

        My grandpa wore that outfit for decades. He had a particular pair of plaid pants that are still around today, and get passed among my cousins for wacky golf tournaments and costumes, etc.
        My dad also had a pair of pants like that, but they became his painting/grubby pants somewhere in the 80’s, so we got to tease him about them for many years to come.

        • BayTampaBay

          You can buy “Pete Plaid Pants” or “Neon Cords” at any pro shop or or almost any Macy’s on the west coast of Florida.

    • Wendi126

      Stan is so groovy- he’s wearing his tie like a scarf! I was struck by the ‘Sterling’silver tray holding the debris of crumbs and empty vessels of dreams….. Uncles what have you done to me!!

      • Chris

        And are those love beads he’s wearing later on? Stan is the grooviest.

    • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

      <333 Thank you guys, so much. I've been refreshing with increasing aggression all morning. :D And you didn't disappoint!

      Oh man, I laughed when Don thought Pete dressed like all the LA free spirits. And I loved Joan's jewelry — great analysis and insight of it, especially Ken tossing Joan the earring that she didn't catch. I hope she does assert her authority as partner soon, too.

      • Shawn EH

        Of course, Joan also didn’t catch the earring because he threw it yards away from her due to his eyepatch. Which sort of chagrinned both of them, I think. He made his point by bringing it to her, he wasn’t trying to make her search for it.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Yeah, as is being discussed in detail in another comment thread with TLo: bringing comic relief because of his lack of depth perception was the obvious intent of the scene, but the meaning of the sequence is what TLo focused on in their analysis.

          • Shawn EH

            This thread propagated very quickly! I swear there were just 22 comments when I started typing! And here I thought I was totally on board with intent not being the main criteria for analyzing a text!

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Plus it’s hard because Disqus is mixing up all the comments — they’re appearing out of order, at top-level instead of under the thread they’re responding to, etc.

    • Tanya Wade

      Peggy’s hat is crochet, not knit (I know, I know, it’s a nitpick and I love this column so I am NOT throwing shade. I swear by my mustard colored sweater). I also noticed macrame hangings in Megan’s SoCal pad.There was a rise in “handicrafted” items during this time that went through the early ’70s. The macrame and granny square craze really took off then. And just like the clothes are snatched up at estate sales, so are the crochet and macrame items grabbed at SoFla thrift stores and resold for a mint at shows and online.

      Pete could walk the streets of SoFla in his ensemble any day of the week for the last 44 years and never be out of style.

      I hope “Mary/Peggy” pops “Lou” in the kisser.

      • decormaven

        Ha ha on the macrame wall hangings- I spotted them as well. I shucked Mr. DM’s God’s Eye hanging while he wasn’t looking. Guess I should have held on to it for a vintage sale. Please don’t let those become a trend again.

      • EveEve

        Now I wonder if naming him “Lou” was an intentional allusion to Lou Grant.

        • BayTampaBay

          Great call!

        • 3hares

          I think it’s safe to say he shares Lou’s hatred of spunk.

      • http://www.franticbutfabulous.com/ Heidi/FranticButFab

        My mom totally took macrame classes in the early ’70s, as well as “natural cooking.” We had macrame hanging on our walls well into the early ’80s.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        Yes, everyone was doing handicrafts. Crewel embroidery was also becoming very popular at that time. I had framed crewel pictures that I had done all over my house. A lot of my friends were doing needlepoint and making hanging macrame flowerpot holders. We were also doing flour dough bowls.

        • Qitkat

          Macrame, crewel, needlepoint, batik, silk dying, quilting, applique, stenciling, french knot embroidery, painting ceramics, yep, we’re all sisters of another mother! I missed the flour dough bowls though, but have made nice torn art paper papiermache bowls.

          • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

            “Busy hands are happy hands.”

          • malarson2

            Don’t forget the decoupage!!

      • marlie

        Not in the least bit intentionally, I am wearing a mustard-colored sweater, which I often wear when I want an otherwise boring look to stand out a bit.

    • http://theargiehome.blogspot.com/ Gus Casals

      I was watching Sunday anticipating this. You’ve made my week.

      I wanted to point, that with the MTM references, Lee’s look (Neve’s character never said name, another clue to her returning status) is pure, earlier MTM.

      • MilaXX

        Yep a very Phyllis Lindstrom type of print.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Yeah, I was thinking that about her name. She should be in credits as “woman on plane”. The fact that she’s not worries me. I will go on record again as saying NO MORE SYLVIAS, PLEASE.

    • camdiggidy

      Mad Style is back! It feels as luxurious as slipping into a nice hot bath. Yay!

      I LOVE SHIRLEY. Her looks were both to die for this episode. YES natural hair!!!

    • Kate Andrews

      You guys are the best! Shirley’s orange ensemble is lovely, and I liked Peg’s gold turtleneck. It’s strange to be back with the characters only a couple months later. Of course Peggy’s still having a hard time with Ted. I hope old Lou’s gone soon. He’s like an evil Mr. Rogers with that cardigan.

      • decormaven

        I hope Lou takes the elevator – the one with the empty shaft.

        • Kate Andrews

          Yeah!

        • siriuslover

          ouch.

      • http://www.ellenciompi.com/ NurseEllen

        Right? Although I was thinking more like Fred MacMurray in “My Three Sons”.

        • Kate Andrews

          Very true.

        • Chris

          And I cannot get over how much Pete reminds me of Tommy Kirk at that time.

      • Denise Alden

        SO MUCH “an evil Mr. Rogers”!

    • Rhonda Shore

      Peggy’s scarf that she wore w/the military style dress…I’ve seen that before in important scenes but can’t place it. I feel like it mattered somehow, but i don’t know why…after i read “Mad Style” i feel like i need to be a lot more observant!

      • Ruby_Red

        It is very similar to a scarf Joan wore last year. She wore it tied in the back.

    • Kelly

      Oh, man, I love your write-ups, I truly do. Any thoughts on Stan’s costuming? I hadn’t noticed that necklace before? I, for one, am certainly hoping for some more great Stan-Peggy moments this season. He’s never been more charming than when he told her she had a great ass, amirite?

      • bawoman

        Deep red seemed to connect them this episode…the color of love..le sigh

      • Kate Andrews

        Stego-saurus! Come on. You know you want to, Mr. Weiner.

    • Kelly

      Also, Peggy still has her Christmas tree up.

    • http://www.ellenciompi.com/ NurseEllen

      I am feeling very smug, since at the end of the episode I turned to my husband and said, “That’s some major channeling of Mary Tyler Moore going on, and you know, Megan and that head scarf makes her look like Rhoda!” Of course, that leaves out the 99 other things I didn’t pick up on, but I have learned something.

      I was also thinking that Peggy’s interaction with Julio was sort of eerily reminiscent of Betty’s with that kid who she babysat for, the one who grew up to be a potential boyfriend for Kiernan Shipka….what was his name? I can’t remember.

      Joan’s black & white outfit with all the jewelry blew me away. She looked wonderful and projected such authority and assurance.

      • schadenfreudelicious

        Glen Bishop

        • http://www.ellenciompi.com/ NurseEllen

          Thank You!! Some days the CRAFT disease is so frustrating. (CRAFT disease is a medical condition, stands for “can’t remember a fucking thing.)

          • BobStPaul

            I hope to remember this long enough to use it in conversation.

            • BayTampaBay

              I already have!

          • Aurumgirl

            Oh, so that’s what it’s called! Lately, when it happens, I just announce that “that’s the way it is, now”.

          • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

            We call it CRS disease — can’t remember shit.

        • Malia C.

          Or just “Creepy Glen” :)

    • EveEve

      aw…that poor forlorn Christmas tree in Peg’s apartment.
      Purple and orange were hugely popular that year – by themselves and as a combo (as were purple/green, and green/orange). And doesn’t Janie Bryant usually try to bring in pieces of the wardrobe from the end of the prior season into the first episode of the next season?

    • KayeBlue

      Just can’t get this out of my head- Was every woman in the late Sixties/early Seventies freezing cold?! It’s supposed to be January in New York City, and short sleeves, micro mini skirts everywhere…

      Love that Megan wore her hair extensions to dinner with her agent and took them out as soon as she was ‘home’ with Don.

      • Chris

        She was styled very like Sharon Tate on her wedding day with the big curls and the mini dress.

        • KayeBlue

          Wow, thanks for getting me to Google that! Despite my loathing for convicted rapist Polanski, that was one fabulous late-60s wedding.

          • Chris

            I love that Barbara Parkins from Valley Of The Dolls was a bridesmaid too! That was the grooviest 60’s wedding ever.

      • omg_dora

        My mom wore micro-minis in Bucharest in the winter in the early seventies, and she confirms that indeed they all were miserably cold. She says once one of her friends actually peed herself in the street on the way to a party, she was so cold. Fashion!

      • 28fairplay

        Mini skirts were cold, for sure, but we always wore panty hose of some sort which helped. Coming soon will be maxi-coats (still worn with the short skirts) and pant suits as an antidote.

        • Laruchka

          Did you wear cable-knit sweater tights? I did! (I was a small child though.)

    • rebeemoon

      As a fiction writer, I really appreciate your opening thoughts on a work standing on its own, apart from the intentions of its author. Sometimes, another writer in my critique group will tell me something like, “I really like how you pulled the chapter together. You inserted all these different images of (whatever) and linked them to the metaphor at the end.” And I’ll say, “Really? I didn’t even see that.” In other words, it was not my intention. But somehow, (the subconscious mind, chance, etc.) it happened. Then, of course, there’s those times when someone will say something not so flattering, and I’ll say, “Really? That was not my intention.” So yes, writers can talk about intention all they want. But the work is what’s out there in the world. It stands alone.

      Sorry I don’t have anything to add about the costuming. Other than, great post–what a great way to start my day!

      • rage_on_the_page

        Here, here! Fellow writer on board with all of this :)

      • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

        It’s funny – when I was at school all my teachers must’ve been heavily influenced by Barthes, because we were never taught to critique with the author’s intention (thus I know almost no biographical details of any author I studied at school!). It was solely based on making an argument justified by the text. I wonder when things changed, or if it is just different country’s education systems?

        • girlsaturday

          I think it’s because they had to pull biography and intent into the picture in order to justify keeping so many Dickens novels in the curriculum. He was always the author we would get the most background details for (in my middle and high schools at least).

          • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

            I made it through school and university with only one Dickens novel!

            • BayTampaBay

              You are lucky. I read 10 Dickens novel between MS, HS & University.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              *Shudder* – I’ve read a couple subsequently but I can’t say I get the hype.

            • BayTampaBay

              It was reading (literature) for the masses (popular culture) published in installments (chapters) monthly in magazines/periodicals. The exception was “A Christmas Carol” which was published as a short story in a magazine.

              Dickens was never written or designed to be read in traditional novel form.

              If Dickens was alive to day he would be working as a script writer, screenplay hack or show runner.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              Exactly. So why is he in the literary canon while Arthur Conan Doyle is still popular but doesn’t get the same sort of critical appreciation?

            • girlsaturday

              I think there’s some kind of switch that flips in peoples’ brains that says ‘well, if the book is that long and boring it MUST be worthwhile’.

            • 3hares

              It was actually read to be read as a full novel as well. All his books were published in volume form as soon as they were finished. The installment versions were more affordable and wealthier people got them as books.

            • BayTampaBay

              True, but this is the way my college English professor presented “it” when statements were made in class regarding tempo & pacing of Dickens writing style.

            • girlsaturday

              I think if I had done the full regular English course, I would have had to read four – as it is between grades 7 and 10 I was supposed to have read A Christmas Carol, Great Expectations, and A Tale of Two Cities (and read the whole thing, just the first chapter, and roughly the first third, respectively). There may have been more that I’m not remembering because I didn’t read any at all, but my school system’s curriculum was pretty Dickens-heavy.

      • Qitkat

        The same thing can be said about intention for art. I used to show my mom creative pieces, artists books, photographs, collages. Invariably she would have a take that was never my intention. We often had the most interesting “arguments’ about the meanings of all types of art. Interestingly she herself was a writer.

    • disqus_0TygtVLWR6

      Dawn’s particular shade
      of green is the same as Peggy’s money filled handbag was the night she have Dawn
      for a sleepover. And it is interesting because in a way, the dynamic between
      the two of them is almost reverse now – Dawn is confident, Peggy is rather
      powerless.

    • Paula Pertile

      You didn’t mention Stan’s necklace. :~)
      Great stuff, as always, thanks. Gold star, and extra credit for MTM!

    • MarieLD

      I haven’t caught up on the last few seasons because I find the show so utterly sad. But then I read a Mad Style post and I kind of want to know what’s going on. But nothing could make me catch up on three seasons EXCEPT a Mary Tyler Moore reference. Damn. I love her. Sometime this summer, I will be watching entire seasons at a time.

    • dalgirl

      Just a minor observation here that Joan and Peggy both wore striped scarves mimicking the men’s striped ties (Joan while meeting with the professor, Peggy in her hallway conversation with Lou.)

      • decormaven

        “Men love scarves.” – Joan Holloway Harris

    • Jessica Freeman

      I have always appreciated your work on the Mad Style uncles. It makes watching the show just that much more interesting when you catch the bits of color and can tie it back to these posts. Keep on keeping on =)

    • siriuslover

      Bravo gentlemen, bravo! I’ve been waiting for this analysis since Sunday night when I flooded the TLo site with too many comments! Loved your opening, and though I’m kind of a buzz feed quiz fanatic, I totally LOLed at your comment–because it’s true!

      Thank you for verifying that Peggy was indeed in Lane’s old office. I was trying to figure that out. I love your analysis of Joan, as well. At first, I was sad for Joan dealing with the ogling and the crazy Kenny, but you’re right, of course. She is taking this job “by the balls” as it were and making it hers. Poor Peggy. I’m even sadder for her today than I was on Sunday.

      Oh, and one more point. You say, “A work of expression has to stand on its own apart from the intentions of its authors.” YES! Thank you so much for addressing the issue of intentionality, because at some point, we have to move away from that. What someone intended and what actually transpires can be very different beasts.

      • decormaven

        It’s been hard for me to determine if it was Lane’s old office- the building scape seen out the window in “Fees and Commissions” looks different, but the angles, etc. of the office in this episode makes me think it is his office. Guess Peggy didn’t want to be in her old office with the column any more, but Lane’s office has bad juju.

        • siriuslover

          On the recap post, I mentioned that I thought it was Ted’s office. That’s how I remember the placement of the window and door. But then we see Ted back in his old office at one point during this episode. So I guess process of elimination is that she’s in Lane’s office. And if the guys say it’s so, then I agree ;)

        • Chris

          It does have bad juju. And everyone else has moved around offices and moved “up” but Joan is still in her crummy one.

      • tallgirl1204

        Joan standing with her paperwork hiding her body while talking to Kenny was really interesting– was it emotionally protective? Was she hiding that spectacular bosom, which is still spectacularly displayed in early ’60s corsetry? I remember well-endowed girls in high school (of whom I was not one) walking like that, hiding their bodies. I have never seen Joan avoid displaying her beauty before.

        • charlotte

          That was my take on the scene with the heavy jewellery. It looked as if she was keeping her bosom chained up. Perhaps she is tired of the “not very subtle” stares.

    • DinnerIsServed1972

      I OWN MEGAN’S APRON!

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

        And we owned the daisy lamp above her head. It matched the kitchen wallpaper in the house we bought in 1972.

    • Roz

      And Ted’s faint plaid whispers, “Peggy”.

    • http://www.tweevalleyhigh.com/ Kristina, TweeValleyHigh

      Great Mary Tyler Moore catches!

      • Kate Andrews

        Especially the Ted and Lou bit. Awesome.

        • http://www.tweevalleyhigh.com/ Kristina, TweeValleyHigh

          Totally, that was so obvious yet not at all.

          P.S. You have a cool name, it’s the same as a character from Bomb Girls!

          • Kate Andrews

            Really? I didn’t know that! Thanks.

    • Anglow

      Definitely, Peggy’s BIL saying he didn’t want his wife alone all night was the last straw for Peggy that day. No one cared if she was alone and had to bar her door herself against the cold world outside. One of my most vivid memories of Mad Men first season is Peggy grasping Don’s hand and his telling her “I’m married.” Then she goes after Pete, then there was a young priest I think, and Duck and other inappropriate and unavailable men, right up to Ted. Her conflicting desires and lack of respect for men and women in her private life make her miserable because she cannot win.

      • bawoman

        She never went after the priest, though (allthough It wouldnt have been out of character if she had)

        • Anglow

          So much for my memory! Thanks.

    • therealkuri

      “The only concession in the costuming to her blackness are the hoop earrings, which Janie has consistently put on the African-American female characters throughout the show. Note that she’s wearing a Peter Pan collar, which was pretty much Peggy’s signature look for years. A way of signaling that she’s like Peggy and yet not like her at the same time.” And yet…. Peggy is also wearing hoop earrings of a sort (albeit smaller and more conservative ones)! Another way of showing them as the same but different.

      • Chris

        In one of the “behind the scenes” pictures TV Guide released prior to the premiere Peggy is wearing larger hoops. Hopefully this means Peggy will be progressing from her little girls looks again to more modern, adult styles.

      • marlie

        I think I remember TLo mentioning the jewelry at some point last year (I could be wrong though), and saying something about Peggy wearing small hoops as being a sign of the times. Back in the days when Peggy was a secretary, she never would have worn them, no matter how small, but as time has moved on, larger jewelry has become more acceptable, as well as jewelry that may have been adopted from other cultures. SO I think Peggy’s earrings are maybe a sign of her progressiveness and/or youth more so than her connection to Shirley. one other thought: if Janie were trying to imply some sort of connection between Peggy and one of the secretaries, I would think that it would be Dawn, since she’s in a similar place that Peggy was way back when in terms of moving up the corporate ladder in a world that she doesn’t “belong” in.

    • formerlyAnon

      Re: Jewelry: Is Stan’s silver & turquoise ring new this season? I don’t remember it, but that means nothing.

      I covet that damn apartment of Peggy’s. I lived in one of similar style and vintage in Boston, in my college years, and it entirely and completely formed the things I admire in housing. (Hard to replicate in single family housing in the southwest, I’ll tell ya.)

      I hereby declare, though we all know I’ll give in, my sincere effort not to comment on what of the characters’ wardrobes I owned. We have reached the period in which I owned something similar to most of the working women’s clothing, or a cheaper version of it. These are the collars upon which I learned to sew collar points that would match each other. These, the fabrics. These the notions.

      • decormaven

        Yes, perhaps it was the dear uncles who said it first, we of this vintage are definitely going to spot items this season that we or other family members once owned – or still own. I have always watched Mad Men for the set decorations and the fashions; I can never give enough kudos to its team for their dedication to authenticity, or to our dear uncles and the BKs who appreciate it.

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          I’m not of this vintage, but we’re definitely getting into things I had as hand-me-downs from my aunts!

      • tallgirl1204

        Last night I was thinking longingly of the Peter Max-print mini dress my mom made for me in about 1971. It had the big sleeves and swingy very short skirt and I loved-loved-loved it. I learned to sew in 1972, and immediately headed for hot-pants-jump-suits covered with mini wrap skirts. It was a great era to learn to sew in because things were relatively simple. Also, if you screwed up, you hadn’t ruined that much fabric… And those long “cocker-spaniel ear” collars like the seretary with the Afro was wearing– I remember my mom working so hard on those.

        • BayTampaBay

          The Peter Max-print mini dress reminds me of Marcia Brady. This is 1968; did not the Brady Bunch air the first season in 1968 or was it 1969?

          • Ginger Thomas

            Premiered September 1969.

            • malarson2

              The month and year I was born. I’ve been thinking a lot about this year being 1969 AND the last year of the show. Their ending was the beginning of me and sometimes I’m overwhelmed by how what was said, worn, believed, and fought for and against in the show are the same things that became my childhood (and even beyond). Basically, it makes me think about my Mom. And, bless her, she’s so missed it’s always good to have a specific memory point to focus upon. Speaking of overwhelming.

            • Qitkat

              I got a little verklempt for you.

      • BayTampaBay

        Does anyone have any idea what Peggy’s brownstone would be worth today? I am talking the whole damn thing, not just the apartment she lives in but the whole brownstone that she owns.

        • lunchcoma

          Somewhere between five and ten million dollars, depending on exactly where on the Upper West Side it’s located. The first thing I thought when she bought it was that Peggy’s a very wealthy 75-year-old these days.

          • BayTampaBay

            I thought the same thing.

            A NYC friend of mind but the value as 10-17 million depending on location.

            • lunchcoma

              Hmm. I haven’t lived there in awhile and might defer to an expert. I adjusted the value downward a bit because she already has tenants in the building and I suspect some of them are rent controlled. That’s inheritable by children, so I think the 2014 version of that building is probably a combination of people paying market rent and people paying $500 a month. Either way, I think she’ll end up being very glad she put up with all the problems in the neighborhood!

            • oat327

              Well, a landlord can evict rent-controlled tenants if they plan to use the unit as their primary residence. Presumably, Peggy (and Abe) bought the place with plans to convert it to a single-family home at some point–I think it’s only two units.

            • AZU403

              Or else the income from the rent was meant to pay for the mortgage.

      • EveEve

        Oh the Home Ec memories – purple paisley pinwale corduroy collar points

    • http://brianfortedesigns.com/ BForte

      Hooray for the return of Mad Style! I am LIVING for the Peggy/Mary Tyler Moore comparisons.

    • iwittmann

      Amazing! I just love the work you guy do!

    • KinoEye

      Goody, we’re on the same page — the Zou Bisou redux, Pete’s very own Betty (seriously, she’s almost a dead ringer for J Jones), Mary Tyler Moore, marital discord, heartbreak and power colors. And yep, chock full of the new conservatism and the Nixon influence. Will be very interested to see what Margaret’s gotten herself into. When I saw Pete, I laughed and laughed, but he owns that yuppie drag.

      • sweetlilvoice

        I thought that girl was a ringer for Bethany Van Ives of season 5. She of the taxi bjs….

        • KinoEye

          I actually thought that, too! But Bethany was a misguided attempt by Don to find a new Betty, so to speak, so I think the resemblances to them both are intentional.

          • Frankie Carter

            Ha! Funny enough, I thought she looked like that girl he picked up in the Playtex audition for the Jackie/Marilyn campaign in…..was it season one or two? She smiled and tilted her head at Don and I could have sworn I saw her somewhere before. Then it hit me.

        • Aurora Leigh

          That’s it! I was trying to put my finger on why she looked so familiar.

          • http://www.franticbutfabulous.com/ Heidi/FranticButFab

            Me, too! Thank goodness for commenters with better memories :)

      • LittleMascara

        Don told Freddie that he is still being paid by SC&P. I don’t think Megan is working at this point. Just going on auditions.

      • MilaXX

        Megans’s not their only source of income . Don is still getting paid from SCDP.

        • KinoEye

          I missed it! But she still does seem to have a level of control and authority in this relationship that she didn’t have before.

        • Bostwick

          I love that even my fellow fanatics sometimes can’t keep the name straight!

          So sorry to be “that guy,” both splitting hairs and derailing, but: *SCP, in which the C may as well stand for “clusterfuck” :)

          • MilaXX

            Was that the new name after the merger? I thought Don’s name was still in there.

            • Bostwick

              I could totally be wrong (like I said, it’s comically hard to follow!), but I think that the last change was to “Sterling Cooper & Partners” after the merger with CGC.

            • MilaXX

              No that sounds about right. But yeah totally hard to follow.

      • oat327

        She’s not their main source of income, though. I don’t think she’s actually working at the moment, while he’s still getting a paycheck as a partner–though she’s the one getting a callback and he’s not getting called back. In some ways, they’re both putting on airs though.

        Agree with everything else, though. Once the women in his life start asserting themselves and going after what they want–Betty, Faye, Peggy, Megan, even Rachel Menken–he can’t deal with them. He only likes the beginnings of things.

        • KinoEye

          Yes, I realize I missed that now. But the power dynamic of their relationship is very, very different than it used to be, which might’ve led me to believe she was making money and he wasn’t. Also, excited as I was about the premiere, it’s hard to focus sometimes when a kitten is trying to crawl on your head :-)

      • Alloy Jane

        I miss Faye. She was my favorite Don girlfriend for the reasons you listed. She wasn’t haunted by life or anything, she was a solid, successful, independent woman who had nothing holding her back, not even Don’s rejection.

    • MsKitty

      That comparison between a triumphant Mary Richards tossing her beret in the air and Peggy becoming a crumpled heap on her living room floor is reason number 637 why I love you guys.

      I was so excited when I saw Megan’s Corningware blueflower casserole dish and syrup dispenser. My mom bought the entire set and used the hell out of it. I particularly remember that the coffeepot made an excellent press for grilled cheese sandwiches. I love how even the smallest props on this show evokes so many memories for me.

      I can honestly say that my Wednesday’s are complete now that Mad Style is back.

      • DeniseSchipani

        I still have a piece of two of that same blueflower Corningware. It never really dies.

      • tallgirl1204

        We’re still using my mom’s blueflower corningware. And not ironically, either. It’s good stuff.

        • http://www.franticbutfabulous.com/ Heidi/FranticButFab

          My mom is still using her blue flower Corningware, so I had to get my own when we bought our first house. Making the green bean casserole for Thanksgiving just isn’t the same in any other dish.

        • MsKitty

          Only the small casserole dish survived, which I ended up with. I inherited a lot of mom’s old pots and pans. They’ve all seen the wars, some have handles missing, but they still get used right alongside my prized Le Creuset pieces. Can’t bring myself to get rid of them.

      • DeniseSchipani

        I’m looking again at Megan’s kitchen. That’s a Farberware pot, and my parents still use their original set from when they got married in the early 60s. They bought ME the same set when I got my first apartment in the last 80s, then took it back when they set up a second home in Florida. Farberware, too (well cared for) never dies. And how I would love to have Megan’s white stove now! Unironically! (getting over the whole stainless-is-best thing with appliances).

        • MsKitty

          I thought it was just me with the classic stoves. I would watch Rachael Ray’s Food Network shows so I could ogle her stove. I always joke when I win Powerball and build my dream kitchen I’m gonna have a restored Chambers or O’Keefe stove as the centerpiece.

    • rage_on_the_page

      Wow. You guys. Nailed it. As always. The dress on the back of the door? The Mary Tyler Moore shit? Goddamn.

      • lisbeth borden

        Instead of love being all around, it’s death & depression all around Peggy.

        • rage_on_the_page

          yass!!

    • ConnieBV

      “It’s Peggy and Julio down by the schoolyard.” I fucking love you guys.

    • Alex Palombo

      …I totally didn’t notice the Lou/Ted thing. Well done.

    • lisbeth borden

      I saw Margaret Sterling’s outfit and I immediately thought it was more Hare Krishna – orange, more than yellow. And her attitude too, looks like she may join a cult, or get into TM or something. Maybe a ‘Moonie’? They were timely for the late 60’s, right?

      • MilaXX

        We already had a character involved with the Hare Krishna’s. Paul got involved with them last season or the season before last through some girlfriend who was recruiting him. Harry helped send him to California to get away from them. The whole giving up all possessions doesn’t sound like something Margret would do. I know it’s too early for EST, but that sounds more her speed.

        • BayTampaBay

          What is EST?

          • Kate Andrews

            Here’s a definition from the interwebs: Founded in 1971 by Werner Erhard, a former encyclopedia salesman who had experimented with Zen through reading Alan Watts, Silva Mind Control, Scientology, humanistic psychology, and many other self-actualizing techniques, est (Erhard Seminars Training, always written in lowercase) was one of many popular therapeutic or “human potential” movements that developed around this time in the United States. These movements, of which est was one of the most successful, shared several characteristics, including a focus on individual well-being and a sense of optimism about human possibilities. est was developed from the beginning as a well-organized business enterprise, structured to maximize profits and minimize tax liabilities. Its major corporate arm, Transformational Technologies, is an extreme example of the rationality that pervades some such movements that have as a major goal the maximizing of profit (Tipton 1988). By 1988, it had trained nearly 400,000 people, all of whom had taken the two-weekend, 60-hour training session, paying a sizable fee ($400 per person) for so doing. est grossed some $30 million dollars in 1981, and it was claimed that one of every nine San Francisco Bay Area college-educated young people had gone through the training.

            Erhard has become a controversial figure, with many lawsuits against him, mostly by the Internal Revenue Service but including some by his own family members. The controversies have contributed to Erhard reestablishing his enterprise under a new name—The Forum—which is the organizational form under which he operates currently.

            —James T. Richardson

            • Qitkat

              This rang a bell with me, and I realized that 10 or so years ago, I attended one of The Forum’s meetings, run by Landmark, evolved by former employees of Erhard. There were aspects about it that I liked, but it also made me feel rather uncomfortable (guessing this might be on purpose). Although they insisted it wasn’t so, I felt a bit of pressure to join them, but I didn’t. But I had no idea this sprang from est.

            • Glammie

              Erhard started as a travelings salesman, I think his stuff always involved closing the deal. Some business associates took my parents to hear Erhard during his heyday. My mother thought he was ridiculous and made fun of him. She also made fun of Ayn Rand. Sigh, I miss my mother–she had snark before there was snark.

          • MilaXX

            Erhard Seminars Training (est), an organization founded by Werner H. Erhard, offered a two-weekend (60-hour) course known officially as “Theest Standard Training”. The purpose of est was “to transform one’s ability to experience living so that the situations one had been trying to change or had been putting up with, clear up just in the process of life itself.”[ The est training was offered from late 1971 to late 1984.

            Stan’s wife on The American’s is getting involved with it

            • Qitkat

              :) shoutout to The Americans. Another stellar show.

            • Malia C.

              “The Americans” would be a great show for style recaps, although most of the focus might end up on the assorted hairpieces! :)

            • Glammie

              There’s actually a pretty good parody of EST in the Burt Reynolds’ movie “Semi-Tough”. EST seminars were infamous for not letting people go to the bathroom. (Phew!)

            • Qitkat

              Yes, same with the Landmark Forum I mentioned below in this thread.

            • Glammie

              Damn, what is it with Erhard and bladder control?

      • Kate Andrews

        It feels more like California, though, that would be into those sorts of things, at least in that era. I sort of wonder if she’s going to a therapist.

        • lisbeth borden

          You’re right. Maybe her enlightenment is showing how the modern free thinking extends even to the good NY Republican wives too.

        • Glammie

          Most of them, yes, but the Moonies were more East Coast–I suppose that is a possibility and it is a “church” whereas some of the other ones are not.

      • MRC210

        I wondered at the seeming dichotomy between Margaret’s prim outfit and her New-Agey language (and smug blissed-out “I’ve found the secret of life” expression) so I was happy to see TLo’s mention of this. I stil say she’ll be wearing something loose and flow-y the next time we see her.

    • Calinda_L

      Things I shouted during the first few minutes of the show: “Peggy’s thigh!” and “Joan’s knees!”

      They seemed to make a point of showing the rising hems, especially on our two main ladies (then there’s fab Clara, in her mini-mini).

      • Kitten Mittons

        Yes! I said, “Look at how much shorter Joan’s skirt is now!” Then I saw Clara right after and went, “Whoah!”

        Side note: At the first shot of Joan, my HUSBAND, who doesn’t even read these posts, said, “Oh no, she’s wearing purple!” I love that y’all are helping me train him properly.

        • marlie

          I thought that about Joan too! She always seemed like one of the last to embrace new fashion trends, so it was nice to see her catching up, in a way.

          • Kitten Mittons

            Right, and I remember a discussion about that from a previous season, where I think TLo pointed out that Joan would probably never embrace the short-short minis as the decade went on, but her hem would rise some with the times. On point. It wouldn’t befit her position or character to wear something as short as Clara did, but she’s aware of the trends.

      • Selkiechick

        My thought watching was, “well, I know what year it is now- because those skirts are Star Trek short…”

      • gogobooty

        Regarding miniskirts and dresses: Do they not look exponentially shorter when the dress or top has long sleeves and the person wearing the garment(s) arms are straight alongside the body? Even as a kid, looking at Marcia and Jan Brady’s dresses, in my mind I was screaming, “LOOKIT! THE SLEEVES ARE LONGER THAN THE WHOLE DRESS!” Megan’s blue minidress performed this illusion for me in the episode. In the still photo, it looks short but not AS short (to me) because her arms are lifted.

    • sugarkane105

      Did anyone notice that the dress Megan is wearing at the airport is the EXACT dress portrayed in the promo posters for last season? In the poster, Don is walking away from another version of himself, and all we can see is a sliver of a blue sleeve hanging off the hand he is holding. They must have had that dress pegged for a vital scene for a long, long time.

      • BluesD

        I saw it too. Amazing how far ahead they must be planning things.

    • Frank_821

      I love these extra analysis

      I got home late from a free venue screening of Game of Thrones-so I had to catch the repeat fo the episode. Come midnight I was a little zonked about the details. I was up late enough to catch your review

    • Margaret Barnes

      Wow. Do your heads hurt after you do one of these? How DO you come up with this brilliance? Amazing!

    • Jacquelyn

      Ahhhhhh. All is right with the world again; I have TLo’s Mad Style to read and re-read . <3

    • Erica

      I like the women vs men analysis of the framing and costume. Just this morning, my husband mentioned how gloomy the future seems for most of the characters (yes, he brings up MM while we’re feeding the kids and getting everyone out the door. Quite a show.). Then he said, oh, except for Joan. She’ll be fine. And I added Peggy because I think she’ll make it after all, too. Then that started us musing about the female characters evolving and surviving and thriving and most of the men not.

      • formerlyAnon

        Oh, Peggy is going to [continue to] be successful professionally. I have no doubt whatsoever.

        What I wonder is if she will be happy/content with her life, professional and personal. Will she feel she’s been as successful as she deserves? Will she make her peace with what she was brought up to want in a personal life, what she really wants and can integrate with her career, and what she has?

        Obviously, Madmen is going to end before she’s old enough for any final analysis, but I think starting off this season with her frustrated professionally and feeling unhappy or at least dissatisfied personally is a good sign. It makes me believe her happiness will be a subplot and if there’s movement it can be in a positive direction.

        • BayTampaBay

          Isn’t the Peggy character based on the woman who came up with ….Plop Plop ….Fizz Fizz…Oh what a relief it is?

          Peggy will be fine because she, like Rollo on Vikings, will end up with it all.

          • marlie

            I love that Vikings reference. ;)

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            Jan or Jane Maas is the ad woman you’re thinking of.

          • Glammie

            Vikings! Another Vikings watcher. I wish TLo wrote about Vikings. I know they’ve explained that they’re backing away from TV shows, but Vikings is a kind of fascinating show on the fashion/sartorial/haircut front. And hot guys not wearing much.

      • Qitkat

        Lucky woman you. I have never gotten my husband to watch the show, and I would be bereft without this forum to discuss it the way we do here. Even when I only get to read the post and have to postpone all the comments til this evening.

        YES, Peggy and Joan will Make It After All. This is now my workplace era, and I am beyond happy to see this year portrayed.

    • Victoria Ramirez

      Ken’s and Freddie’s outfits tied them together so closely because, I think, they’re both pretending (consciously or not) to be other men. Ken was clearly channeling Pete in his temperament (“Clara!”) and because of his stress from the job that was Pete’s. And Freddie was a stand-in for doing the job that was Don’s.

    • starfish

      And so we close with Don on the balcony.
      It’s not about a man who grew up in a whorehouse; it’s about
      a man who lives in a penthouse.
      Yes he is all about changing the conversation.
      Until the woman on the plane rejects that notion by saying ” blame the guys on Madison Avenue”
      That was one cold hard slap.

    • Qitkat

      Wow! I am thrilled to have these back. Such a mega-ton of work and thought you guys have put into this post. I am dying to jump in and have things to say, but I need the next two hours of my life for other, much more mundane things.

      This year Mad Style feels a bit different, I can’t quite put my finger on it, but I love the analysis of the costuming, along with additional insights into the show. Several, mental head slaps for myself, OH, that’s right! Why didn’t I see it that way?

      I truly cannot imagine watching this show without having your erudite take on it, along with all the Bitter Kittens, who comment so thoughtfully. Thank you so much.

    • yllas

      Vincent K. looked good here, IRL he is SUCH a cutie!
      The knee socks, the big Carnaby Street white collar on Shirley’s dress, yes, some of the fashions seemed kind of childish on grown women. All of them have shorter skirts (and thankfully Joan sticks with what suits her, not the latest fashion!)
      I’ve said this before, elsewhere, but I think there’s something off with Megan’s micro-miniskirts. When I wore them back in the 60’s, I was closer to Sally’s age and we were all young and thin and some of us wore daringly short skirts. But Megan’s clothes seem a bit too ‘old’ and ‘formal’ to warrant such a length. That light blue thing she wore to pick up Don looks exactly like a baby doll nightgown. She often looks like she forgot to put on pants.

      • siriuslover

        I just found a picture of myself when I was like 2 or 3 and my sister was 5. Granted, we were really little girls, but our (matching) dresses were so short you could see our underwear. I mean, was that a thing in 1972? ‘Cause I’m thinking it must have been a thing since my mom is not exactly fashionably daring.

        • Aurumgirl

          All my photos from that era are just like that, too. Skirts so shirt the undies had to match!

      • KayEmWhy

        Or if you wore a dress this short you wore matching hot pants underneath.

    • Sanguinic

      Happy to see “Mad Style” back in business. I also thought of Mary Richards (a Minneapolis kid here, who was obsessed with “MTM”), but the show premiered on CBS in September 1970, more than a year after the time when this episode is taking place.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        We’re not claiming that Peggy’s taking her cues from a show that hasn’t aired yet.

        • Sanguinic

          I’m not claiming you were, either. Just observing that if the show is making the connection, they’re a bit ahead of the curve.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            That’s Peggy. Trailblazing.

          • 3hares

            Not really, though. If Mary Richards and Rhoda Morgenstern were supposed to be working women in 1970 it would make sense there would be women in 1969 who already looked like them.

          • oat327

            The connection isn’t for the characters to get; to them, a hat and a dress is just things they threw on. The connections are for us to get in 2014.

            And single girls in 1970 Minneapolis probably did dress like single girls in 1969 New York or California. Fashion trickled in from the coasts.

    • Shawn EH

      I loved Neve’s look on the plane; she totally seemed like a confident, sexy woman of the era. And she is actually 40 now, so it’s sort of like her first high profile adult role to my eyes.

      • Candigirl1968

        Yup. She seems older because despite the freeze frame we have of her in our heads, she actually IS older (but looks absolutely fantastic!).

        Don sure does have a “lady I am into who’s not my wife” type.

    • Heather

      Does anyone recognize that mosaic from LAX? The exterior shots look like one of the smaller airports – Burbank maybe? Also, WANT Megan’s car.

      • siriuslover

        At first I was thinking Long Beach because of the curbside framework, but Long Beach doesn’t have one of those escalator things.

        • decormaven

          It’s LA/Ontario International Airport.

          • BayTampaBay

            What?

            • decormaven

              It’s in San Bernardino County, California.

            • BayTampaBay

              How can the LA and/or Onatario (Canada???) International airport be in San Bernardino?

            • schadenfreudelicious

              Ontario is the name of both a Province in Canada and a City in California….

      • CatherineRhodes

        The colored mosaic is LAX, the exterior is Burbank.

        • French_Swede

          Yes! I was just there (LAX) last Friday and immediately squealed when I saw the blue tile walls!

    • ashtangajunkie

      Mad Style has conditioned me to watch Mad Men like it’s the Rocky Horror Show. “POWER COLOUR!”

    • CatherineRhodes

      That opener (“Mad Style. Calm down. It’s just a conversation.”) was absolute genius. As was the contrast between Don’s stand-in at the beginning of the episode and Don at the end.

    • wisenhar

      I don’t watch the show, so everything I know about it comes from TLo. I found it interesting in the “art department” scene Lou’s color scheme matched the large painting on the wall while Peggy’s color scheme was that of the small painting on the wall. Is that symbolic? Or, is it just an example of utilizing a specific color palate? Thoughts?

    • DeniseSchipani

      Why that car for Megan? She complains about the giant TV because everyone around her in the ‘hood is “starving,” but she’s driving around in that and not worried?

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Surely Don bought it for her, as she couldn’t be making that good money yet. Maybe she didn’t always protest expensive presents.

      • lunchcoma

        I saw that as a sign that she still hasn’t figured out who she wants to be. She wants to hang with the starving artists crowd, but she also wants the perks that come with being a successful up-and-coming actress, and she can’t even completely let go of Don as the last remnant of the Manhattan trophy wife identity she’s mostly rejected.

      • Sofia

        no kidding-great point. i’ve never had an easy time following megan’s thought processes. i am reminded of the way her dad scolded her for “selling out” by marrying money while still trying pursue her art. the two aren’t necessarily mutually exclusive, but it appears that she was raised with that point of view. in the end, megan’s dad didn’t appear to have much money and still experienced artistic failure. megan married a man who had money and talent, and she never seemed shy about spending don’s money. now suddenly she’s half-hearttedly reverting to her father’s mindset – but only as a way to scold don, and not as introspection regarding her own choices.

        • 3hares

          I assumed in this ep that Megan’s worry about money was completely superficial. When her father criticized her it was at a time when she wasn’t acting at all, she was in advertising with a rich husband. So that probably really made her think she’d betrayed herself because she really did want to act. But here it seems like a fashion issue. She’s living amongst poor starving artist types and wants to fit in with them because she finds that look cool the way she thought expensive decor was cool back in New York. But as the car shows, she basically just wants what she wants. I don’t even think she’s thinking it through as much as her dad did with regards to the whole issue. She just wants her house to look the way she wants.

      • MartyBellerMask

        No kidding, right? To me, the TV was Don marking a territory that was very much not his. And Megan saw it that way, too. The line about money, well, that’s BS. She’s playing a part, as always. As is Don.

    • BroadwayGirl2000

      As impressive as the blue dress was to announce Meagan’s entrance, the use of it was very contrived to me. The blue dress was obviously too small for someone of Meagan’s height and build as the fit was not accurate for the style. The sleeves were meant to be wrist length or even longer and the length of the dress was meant to be a bit longer. The bodice didn’t look right either. It looks like they found a cute vintage dress sized for a petite girl and tried to make it fit Meagan but it really wasn’t a good fit and didn’t represent the actual style of the period. Dresses were short but there weren’t that many women that wore their dresses THAT short, even among young women. It just wasn’t practical. In fact, more and more women were embracing pants, especially young women and dress was becoming more casual everywhere you went in those days. That dress would have been worn at night or for a dress up event. It would have made more sense to have her in something more mod and casual during the day.

      • tallgirl1204

        I agree with a lot of what you say, but Megan was going directly from the airport to a dinner with her agent– she said something about not having time to go home before dinner. So it was for at night/dress-up, right? I did find her outfit the next day a little more late-60s real. And I LOVED the flat bejeweled sandals. Even as a then-11-year-old I think I had some of those.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Re: the line about being early, despite being too late to go home — that made sense to me, given the remote location of Megan’s house. It was preferable to be a little early than to be horrendously late.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        I agree with tallgirl1204, and would also point out what someone else said (another review, or a comment to TLo’s review, I forget), about how despite their marital issues, Megan still very much wants Don to desire her. I can definitely see her picking this out to be her first impression on Don after an absence.

        • Kate Andrews

          Yep. She may even have had it hemmed especially.

      • decormaven

        This dress was absolutely of the period- Megan might have had Playboy on her coffee table, but that is a straight out Vogue look. Both Time and Life magazines ran cover shots in 1969 hailing the mini-skirt trend. Janie Bryant talks about the dress in her review of the episode; this is an actual 1969 piece.

        • BayTampaBay

          Where did you see the review of the episode?

          • decormaven

            It’s over on AMC.

      • ACKtually

        Hmmm, I think it was meant to wear at night- she went right to dinner with her Agent in the dress (and hair extensions) but was shown later with jeans on, and her hair tied in a scarf.

      • Laylalola

        Have to disagree. I have photos of my Mom with me and my baby sister at an airport. There are photos of me shot at my eye level (my father was returning from Vietnam and bent down to hug me) and we’re right in front of my mother, whose dress absolutely is as short as Megan’s. (We were all dressed to the nines for the occasion. But her dress was in that hideous burnt orange of that era with all sorts of tiny stripes.)

        Edited to add: Actually, come to think of it, I don’t know if the shortness was accurate to 1969 — the scenario I described above was in the early 1970s. But it wasn’t an accident or misfit — dresses really were deliberately as short as Megan’s, just maybe a few years later.

        • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

          Thanks for the testimony! And I’m pleased to note that again, it was a dress for greeting a husband after an absence. :)

        • BroadwayGirl2000

          –stevelee–

          “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but not half so bad as a lot of ignorance” Granny Weatherwax (Equal Rites)

      • BayTampaBay

        That dress reminded me of old episodes of Love American Style.

        • yllas

          Looks like a nightgown. And she forgot the matching panty/bloomers.

      • Glammie

        Megan’s an actress, so she wears the shortest skirts in the cast. And 1969 was the year where skirts just got insanely short. The word s”micro minis” floats through my mind. Check out the pictures of Edie Sedgwick for Vogue for an example.

      • Lilithcat

        Dresses were short but there weren’t that many women that wore their dresses THAT short, even among young women.

        Oh, yes, we did!

      • Qitkat

        The outfit I changed into after my wedding, getting ready to travel was exactly that short, in early 1970. I still remember it, a cute lavender skirt and matching vest, with a pretty blouse with touches of pink and white. I had to be really careful bending over! The best my legs ever looked.

      • Aurumgirl

        Well, it was night–she dressed to go to her meeting with her agent, which was happening at night.

    • MichelleRafter

      In the 60s and 70s, my grandfather ran a wholesale costume jewelry business that sold to retailers up and down the West Coast. I remember walking through the showroom here in Portland as a little kid, past rows and rows of necklaces, earrings and braclets like Megan’s and Joan’s. I still have a gold and pearl braclet and earrings from that era that were my mom’s — just like what Joan wears in the bar meeting scene. Janie Bryant does it again.

    • Jacquie

      My mom had the same blue dress that Megan was wearing. I was always fascinated with the sleeves.

    • G. M. Palmer

      Love it, guys!

      I didn’t yet see this in the comments, but isn’t Peggy dressed more like Marlo Thomas in That Girl instead of Mary Tyler Moore? If you look at the seasons 2-5 openings, MT is wearing that blue military style outfit with a white hat. I wrote about it on my website Monday and felt a bit silly because I knew the two of you would note it.

      • tallgirl1204

        Mary was the heir of Marlo in That Girl– Marlo was terminally dating the same guy (Donald), and was kind of a goofball, at least in my memory (I do recall complaints about Marlo not wearing a bra, however– very Ms. of her). Mary had a more professional and mature demeanor and was a little more conservative dressing.

        • G. M. Palmer

          Yes but MTM post-dates the world of Mad Men. That Girl was actually a show on the air that Peggy would have drawn comparisons to in her life, even if she didn’t watch it. She *has* to know that she’s dressing like Marlo; Janie Bryant certainly knows she dressed her that way.

          • tallgirl1204

            that’s something I wonder about Peggy. She’s in advertising, but does her apartment have a television? Seems like she would want to keep up. Makes total sense that she would imitate That Girl– I remember that I wanted to be like her (although I drew the line at the episode where she made soup out of free ketchup from the automat machine–).

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          Yeah. We’re not saying she’s mimicking Mary Tyler Moore exactly, but she’s far more like Mary Richards (especially with the Lou and Ted stuff) than she is Marlo Thomas, in our eyes.

          But that’s the beauty of interpretation. We can see the argument for Marlo over Mary.

          • golden_valley

            Lou and Ted! Your sentence just hit me right between the eyes. Lou and Ted were on the Mary Tyler Moore show! Two of Peggy’s bosses are named for them! OK my silly reaction to the revelation is over.

            Thanks Uncles for the most enjoyable analyses of a TV show I’ve ever read. So glad you’re back doing this again.

          • Glammie

            Agreed. Marlo played a would-be actress, while Mary played a career girl. Megan’s character actually seems to be a bit more *That Girl* (she even has her own Don) than Peggy, who really does have all sorts of costuming shout-outs to Mary Richards this episode.

            Except knee socks. Mary would *never* have worn knee socks.

            • Lilithcat

              Apparently, she did. I can’t find an image, but according to one site, she wore them during her initial interview with Lou Grant: http://www.moviemistakes.com/tv3584

            • tallgirl1204

              You can find that original episode for free online– at least, I watched it within the last year.

            • Glammie

              Nooooo! Mary, what were you thinking? That said, I remember owning tons and tons of white knee socks and begging my mother as a kid to stop buying me ankle socks. Nylon knee socks were completely de rigueur.

            • camdiggidy

              I was going to type the same thing! Then I went back and found the premiere episode on Hulu — she is actually wearing go-go boots to that initial interview with Mr. Grant.

      • gogobooty

        Marlo Thomas had amazing nonstop clothes on That Girl. Hats, gloves, shoes and a sheath dress and matching coat. Suits, dresses, separates, sporty stuff, she was always cute and her clothes repeated, BUT were always up to date and modern looking. She was Carrie Bradshaw before Carrie Bradshaw, though without the label flaunting and shopping fixation. I guess Lou Marie in Brewster bought all Ann’s clothes since she was always scrambling for acting jobs.

    • shoneez

      I think I will miss Mad Style more than Mad Men. Awesome work uncles.

    • Tricia

      I missed these posts so much. As someone who doesn’t generally catch costume/style details in whatever I’m watching (I know, I know), this is so fascinating.

      • marlie

        I pay particular attention to the costuming on some of my other favorite shows precisely because of the Mad Style posts. I’m not nearly as observant as TLo, but I love noticing when something in a character’s styling changes!

    • Frankie Carter

      I can’t say how much I’ve missed Mad Men and Mad Style!

      I got such a shot of deja vu when I saw Pete, and then it hit me. Mr. Hanson. My gym teacher in 1989. He had those SAME EXACT PANTS. And wore some variation of Pete’s outfit there pretty much every day. I didn’t realize the seventies had such staying power, fashionwise. A lot of pop culture references make it look like they were around for five or six very ugly years and then everyone started wearing stirrup pants and acid-washed jeans.

      I really, really feel the urge to wear a miniskirt to work today. I wonder if hemlines will ever rise that high again.

    • http://www.sfairchilddesigns.com Susan Wheeler

      Great insights, fellas! Love the Mad Style posts =)

    • andi56

      I just had to laugh at Pete; Vincent Kartheiser is so fun to watch in this scene, and I loved when he hugged Don. And sure enough, men here in the Washington area are *still* dressing like that — it’s the J. Press/Brooks Brothers classic boredom look that makes some of us cross the street and head in the other direction.
      Do you supposed anything is living in Stan’s voluminous beard?

      • Denise Alden

        I laughed out loud, too! Especially because we’d just heard from two different characters about a lack of being tan, and then the next shot is Pete Campbell with that smile and California glow!

        • andi56

          Yes, and wherever Don Draper goes, he looks out of place, compared to just about everyone!

      • tallgirl1204

        I love that beard. Jeremiah Johnson realness in the urban jungle.

    • andi56

      Oh, forgot the pinky ring! You gentlemen might think the press agent wasn’t gay, but amazingly, I used to work with a hilarious gay LA press agent, now long passed, that had that horseshoe pinky ring, with diamonds. Coincidence?! Maybe!

      • Frankie Carter

        I got a Jimmy Barrett vibe off of him, funny enough. And pinky rings are always awesome.

        • andi56

          Oh, right! I had almost forgot about him!

    • Chris

      I love that Shirley has those fantastic boots on at the office. I also love seeing the TWA stewardesses outfits from the time as well.

    • NMMagpie

      Beautifully written. And man… if I were Peggy, I’d be all over Stan. Cheeohguh (as Roger says) was never worth her time.

      • Danielle

        Ted Chow-gah-gah… “leave some vowels for the rest of us!”

    • French_Swede

      In her first encounter with Ken, Joan is holding the account file in front of her like a shield. I think she is used to Ken’s raging temper and uses the folder as metaphorical armor.

      I haven’t read through the 300+ other comments yet, so apologies if someone else has already mentioned this.

      • tallgirl1204

        That’s a great observation. I thought it was because she was hiding her body, but that didn’t make any sense– Joan has always been pleased to display her formidable assets, and certainly wouldn’t fear Kenny on that front at all. But his temper (which i read more as him “needing a tissue” as she states) might require a “I’m going to keep a boundary here” type gesture.

    • BluesD

      Did anyone else notice that when Megan meets Don at the airport, her sleeves look just like the ones in the Season 6 promo poster? One of the Dons is holding a mystery lady’s hand and the mystery lady has long, filmy blue sleeves.

      • French_Swede

        Wow….great catch!!

    • RichStrathmann

      God damn, Stan is a good looking man. I’d hit that. Two times…

      • DeniseSchipani

        I sighed with happiness at his first appearance onscreen. Yum.

    • JMEL

      Dawn, Ted and Ken all wear the same color green. All three are business focused at the moment.

    • aquamarine17

      so happy TLo to have this column back!!! Love your observations so much and all the comments, too. Loved seeing Don with that song in the beginning, loved Megan’s blue dress and loved Freddy’s presence in the story. Love seeing Stan the man again. xox

    • leighanne

      I love going back and noticing all the accessories in these shots- esp Stan’s cowboy boots and belt buckle, Shirley’s boots, and Joan’s jewelry. Joan is back to wearing her charm bracelets in meetings where she has the upper hand or has something to prove. Peggy is wearing more makeup now it seems.
      Happy to have my favorite Wednesday class back, great post!

    • French_Swede

      SO happy to have Freddie grace the opening scene!

      Also, Shirley’s dress (minus the collar) reminds me so much of the Laura Ashley dresses I wore in the ’80’s. Never thought about the LA prints harkening back to the late ’60’s.

      • Musicologie

        My husband and I cheered when we saw Joel Murray’s name in the credits. Then we cheered AGAIN when he took up the whole screen in the very first shot.

        …I didn’t realize until that moment that we’re both apparently Joel Murray fans.

      • Laylalola

        Freddie did, of course, grace the opening scene. Yet really it was Don speaking.

      • Qitkat

        :-) Laura Ashley, Villager, Jonathan (somebody)-damn CRAFT disease!

        • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

          Jonathan Logan. But MaryLu, what question are you answering? This has nothing to do with Fred.

          • Qitkat

            I was just recalling favorites along with Laura Ashley designs of the day.

    • tallgirl1204

      All the apartments are a mess of one kind or another– everyone’s home is in disarray, whether infested with hippies, having plumbing problems or a non-working balcony door– except (at first) Megan’s, whose apartment is exactly how she wants it until Don comes crashing in with a giant t.v. set and messes hers up too.

      • ACKtually

        This is a stellar observation.

      • Glammie

        Megan struck me as a pile of mixed messages–glam girl with expensive sports car at the airport and then Bohemian rustic in her house-with-a-view. She says she doesn’t want to be ostentatious, but a lot of her actions contradict that. And, like Joan, she did use sex to get her career going. Joan was more of a cut-and-dried sleep for partnership deal, but Megan was getting nowhere without Don pulling strings to get her that commercial.

        Megan wants to look poor when it suits her, but it’s clear she loves Don’s money and power in a lot of ways. Don’s TV is clearly meant as a reminder to her as to who’s paying for all of this.

        • Susan Velazquez

          She hasn’t really changed from her dilettante ways, has she?

          • Lilithcat

            Dilettantes don’t move an entire continent away from their spouses to further their careers.

            • Glammie

              They do if it’s way to get out of a bad marriage without actually making waves. That said, I’m not sure Megan’s precisely a dilettante–she does seem to be pursuing her acting career and she did go back to it even after succeeding in advertising. But her interest in acting has a bit of a callow quality to it to me. I feel like she’s doing it to be noticed, to be famous, to have the house with the pool–the house that Don isn’t a part of until she catches herself and corrects. It’s pretty clear that if Megan can afford a Don-lifestyle on her own, Don’s out the door. Til then, she’s not rocking the boat. She’s keeping her meal ticket and Don’s connections ’til then.

            • Susan Velazquez

              Continent? Did you mean coast? I’m confused by your word choice.

              Anyway, what I meant to say is that Megan likes to play Poor Little Rich Girl in her clothes, which admittedly, is typical of the time since TLo note that counterculture styles trickled up. But this thing with her clothes happened in season 5 with her clothing choices: she would wear counter culture clothes but they had expensive detailing which caused some resentment between her and her actress friends who had to hit the pavement for every audition while Megan generally lounged around in the apartment.

            • Lilithcat

              I meant continent. By moving from NYC to LA, she put an entire continent between them.

            • Susan Velazquez

              Oh okay, that word choice confused me because you when said “away” it sounded like something completely different.

            • BayTampaBay

              Megan’s moving to LA was Don’s doing. Megan quit the soap opera to move to LA with Don. This bi-coastal marriage is all Don’s fault.

        • NeenaJ

          I think Megan has a public image very different from the one she cultivates when it’s just her. Public Megan is attention-demanding/seeking and revealing (she’s an aspiring actress after all) whereas Private Megan is much more affable and home-y. Also, I’m sure she’s very aware that casting agents, directors and current stars are all over the place – especially at LAX – so one must exude their star power at all times.

          • Glammie

            Megan clearly has two sides, but I don’t think they’re Public and Private, per se. She wasn’t trying to be an actress when she did her French party number or did her sexytimes black lingerie anger-sex thing with Don. I think of her as always-acting. She wears personae that she thinks fit a particular situation. I’m not convinced that there’s a lot to the “real” Megan. I don’t think the hippie boho is any more “real” than Zhou Zhou Bisou.

            • Wendi126

              I think the real Megan is a sensible kind woman with real aspirations. She has always seemed like a good stepmother to the kids and is put off by her mother’s dramatics. She’s usually honest and likes making people happy. She also certainly enjoys the trappings of wealth and seems to enjoy the public persona she’s created. I’ve always liked Megan. I wish my own stepmother had been more like Megan than the step-cunt she was!

            • NeenaJ

              LOL at “sexytimes black lingerie anger-sex thing.” The Zou Bisou stunt was totally an act in my mind. Megan turns on actress mode whenever she perceives that she has an audience – whether a party of 1 (Don), guests for a surprise party or random strangers at the airport. I think we’ve glimpsed the real Megan, albeit just a handful of times, and she’s a lot less glamorous than she would like everyone to believe (not that that is a bad thing). Lots of food for thought but then, Mad Men always is!

          • Aurumgirl

            Yes. I think that explains the car nicely. You don’t become a successful actress without looking like a successful actress. People in that business have all kinds of expenses (like lawyers on retainer in case they’re in a position to sign or get out of a contract, or stylists, or agents). She’s still going to classes every day and she must be paying a lot of money just to aspire to an acting career while she’s in California. I know a lot of people really hate Megan but she’s not really a dislikeable character. I get why she’d want to keep trying with her marriage even while she’s out there in California on her own (remember her mother’s big litanies about her tendency to fail at everything she does). I think it’s clear that Megan is going after her own goals first, and Don will have to fit himself in if he wants to be a part of the life she wants. Can’t say that I blame her, as Don’s been a less than fabulous husband.

        • oat327

          Also, a reminder that he got her on TV in the first place.

          • Aurumgirl

            She’d have eventually got there, but just like her friend and all other people who want to be successful in any line of work, she decided to use her resources to get a chance to audition, rather than allow those opportunities to go to someone else. It’s not like Don got her a job. It’s just that Don knew of a casting opportunity and Megan decided to submit her audition reel for a chance to try for the part. It’s kind of a testament to how much she was compromising her ambition for her dreams that it took her actress friend’s request to get Don to do the same thing for her to realize she had opportunities she could use to her advantage herself.

            • 3hares

              I think with that particular ad it was a little more than that. It was for Butler shoes and everyone knew she was Don’s wife, so as he himself pointed out to her, she would be trading on the relationship. The same doesn’t apply to the soap, presumably, though.

            • Aurumgirl

              Yes but she made a point of eliminating her connection to Don and submitted her reel under her maiden name. She was just as set on seeing if she could do it on her own merit, but she just needed a chance to demonstrate her own merit. So she did what any other actress would do–use a connection who knew about an opportunity. Don didn’t push her into the job, she was selected for it legitimately.

            • 3hares

              But she couldn’t be submitted for that specific job on her own merit. It didn’t matter what name she used. Everyone knew she was Don’s wife. That isn’t true of any other job she’s gone for that we know of, but if we’re talking about her first TV job, the Butler shoe ad, her connection to Don went beyond her getting to submit herself.

            • Glammie

              I don’t think that that’s at all clear. She’d tried before working at SCDP and gotten nowhere and she’d gotten nowhere before Don helped her get a commercial for an SCDP client. There’s no indication that Megan’s the sort of go-getter who will make it on her own steam. She’s not like Peggy whose talent was recognized by Freddy and Don, but who really has made it without anyone opening doors for her. Peggy’s had to persist and persist–and her various boyfriends sure haven’t been much help.

            • Aurumgirl

              To be fair and as we’re shown, none of Megan’s other actress friends could also make it on their own steam–they were just like her, they were trying out for auditions and offered nothing. When one decides to ask Megan to get Don to submit her audition reel for a chance on the Butler shoe commercial, Megan finally realizes that if she really were ambitious, she’d have thought to do the same thing.

              As for Megan not being able to make it on her own steam, I don’t think that’s fair. She emigrated from a foreign country to work in New York at…anything she could get. She excelled in advertising and won awards for her work even after she stopped working at it. She’s written as the girl who is good at everything, not as the girl who can’t make it on her own. The one place she does “fail” is marriage, and we know that’s not all her fault.

            • AnneElliot

              I disagree. There are thousands of attractive, talented young women who are trying to get their feet in the door as an actress. It takes opportunity as well as talent and persistence. Being in the right place at the right time can be a big factor. She may never have gotten a shot if it weren’t for Don’s connections. I’m not saying she’s not talented or deserving, I just think it may not have happened if it weren’t for Don.

            • Aurumgirl

              Well, then, I just have to say that we do agree on something: there are thousands of attractive talented young women trying to be successful actresses. You need talent and persistence. But Matt Wiener shows us that Megan’s equally talented and pretty actress friends are getting ahead because they are doing what she has convinced herself she must not do. All season long we watch as they try again and again to use her as a “connection” to help themselves into an acting career.

              Her fabulous red-headed actress friend never fails to put on a show for the “creative” team. Her striking blonde actress friend has no problem asking Megan to get Don to put her in to the Butler ad. It happens so often around her that it’s a kind of suicide for her not to do as all those in her profession (and indeed, all other professions) have to do in order to get an opportunity. It takes her almost an entire season watching her friends get ahead and get auditions while she gets none before she figures out that it’s not what you know, but who, that will create the opportunity. Megan keeps herself back from pursuing her goal by failing to use her own connections in a business she knows well to further her career. Yes, everyone knows Megan because of Don, but they also all know she can act. They watch Peggy bend over backwards to come up with something the Heinz beans man likes, and she fails, several times–then we all see Megan win him over with a simply described idea executed over dinner, with absolute ease. They watch Megan and Don work together effortlessly to sell Cool Whip–and then they watch just how hard it is for Peggy to do the same simple acting assignment and fail spectacularly. Everyone knows she’s Don’s wife. The real point is that they know–and say repeatedly–that she may benefit from her connection to Don, but her talent is undeniable.

            • 3hares

              I don’t know if she’s supposed to be that great an actress. But I agree there’s no problem with her using connections. In fact, I always took her friend’s more mercenary attitudes as yet another way they were more professional about the whole thing than she was.

            • Aurumgirl

              Maybe not that great, but certainly capable in a way that not many others can be. Otherwise why take the time to write that in to the episode so clearly?

              And yes, her pals were more professional, more ambitious. It’s one of the ways the writers showed that Megan was torn–go after her prize or keep her marriage happy.

            • 3hares

              Write her acting talent into it? I didn’t think they did. She was a far better actress than Peggy but I didn’t get the impression it was supposed to be showing her as exceptional. I never doubted that she was basically competent but I don’t know how good her ability at commercial pitches (which Don also nailed) was supposed to make her as an actress. When she was on the soap it seemed like she was popular but not necessarily too good for the show, for instance.

            • Aurumgirl

              “She’s one of those girls who is good at everything”.
              The whole issue about her acting talent is that she’s going to be the character in this story who has dreams of her own to pursue, just like any man in the story. She’s an equal to her husband in a way that none of the other wives shown to us in the story have ever been. Don falls in love with her because in her he sees his twin–she’s great with kids; she’s great in organizing his life like a great secretary would; she’s just as talented as he is in advertising. She’s just as talented as he is with his clients. She’s just as talented in her delivery, as an actress or as a salesman…just like Don…as he is. And as long as she’s willing to go along with his vision for her, their marriage is great.

              So, does she suppress her own dreams to put her acting talent out there, and pursue her lifelong desire? And upset the happy marriage she’s always wanted, too? It’s hard for her because she knows Don’s really interested in her as his “teammate/partner” that he could marry and also have as a perfect wife. He married what he thought was someone who wanted the same things he did, because her talents and skills match his own. Her character’s big conflict, however, was that her own ambitions are for being more than just Don’s Female Equivalent, his “accessory”. Her own ambitions piss Don off, and she knows it. Does she pursue them as she’s wanted to, or does she suppress them to keep Don happy, even though she’ll be just as successful doing what he wants her to do as she will be following her own life goals–but she’ll have given up her own needs.

              THAT is the whole question of feminism, when you get right down to its core. This is the first married female character we see struggling with this dilemma. So in order for her to entertain the decision and demonstrate it to be as painful as it is, she would have to be written as a woman with many talents who could easily succeed pursuing her own dreams. If she weren’t talented at all and had no hope, there’d be no dilemma, and no story to tell. She’d have been married “happily ever after” as long as “ever after” meant Don’s female twin.

            • 3hares

              I agree that the point of Megan is that she’s good at advertising and yet she’d rather do other things–and I see her being shown as being talented at advertising. I also agree the point of the marriage is that she’s put in a position where she felt she had to choose between the “career” of Don’s wife and doing what she wants to do–even when she was being a copywriter (which she chose for herself at first) Don was controlling her rather than letting her make her own way. So yes, this is a struggle for Megan to keep from just being forced into the role Don wants her to have.

              I just don’t think she has to be super talented at acting for that story. She has to want to act and be viable enough that she can make her way. That’s what I think we’ve been shown with her. I agree that she’s been presented as having the looks and charm to succeed in acting. I don’t think that means she also has to be exceptionally talented at it or even have exceptional star quality. The point is that this is what Megan wants to do, even if she’s not as talented at it as she was at advertising.

              She did not get hired to act in the play only for Don to get furious. She is up for a part in the play, maybe gets a callback, and drops on him that that means she’ll be leaving for 3 months and she never brought that up before–that was one of the few moments that I didn’t think was all about Don being entitled in his reaction, actually. But as far as we know she didn’t get in the play or have to make that choice. Even if Megan never progressed any further than the soap where we saw her act and heard her talk about her character and she didn’t seem that great (but was still popular so the career aspect still works) the struggle would still be there because she’s not dependent on Don and wants what she wants rather than what he wants. Even if she’s not as good at acting as Don is at advertising.

            • Aurumgirl

              Ah, but the thing is, she IS that good. Good enough to get a callback. Remember, too, she’s in her 20’s. She is just starting out–no agent, no contacts, nothing. It IS realistic for her to have talent and promise that others notice. It is not realistic for her to be Elizabeth Taylor level in skill and expertise. She is half of Don’s age, don’t forget. If Don had had that much talent at that age he’d be much further ahead than he is when we see him.

              As for the play, Don pretty much decided that for her. No callback, no more audition for you. We don’t hear how that turned out because she cut off any opportunity there, as Don wished her to. That’s the whole point of her depiction.

              Again, in order for it to be a viable story line, she has to be considered talented above the average–or she’d never get a callback or a chance to audition. If it’s not believable that she could have that career then there’d be no story to tell. Unfortunately, when people in our culture today look at a character like Megan, they see someone to hate and complain that they’re bored of her and they despise her character and her looks (and you know miles of commentary have been written about this). So people miss the point of her character and her character’s traits and the role they play in the overall story in order to indulge some nasty misogyny. She is supposed to be a challenge for herself, and a challenge for Don: instead, she’s seen as the Skylar White of Mad Men.

            • 3hares

              So you say, but I disagree. I don’t think she has to be wildly talented for the storyline to work at all. She has just as much right to a career as a mediocre actress as a wildly talented one. She’s had success in her career, but nothing that screams great thespian talent–when she was on the dopey soap she didn’t seem all that exceptional or creative at playing twins. She’s now up for Bracken’s World which didn’t produce any big stars. She’s about 28.

              I don’t think I need to be indulging in misogyny to root for Megan to be independent and have a career while not seeing her as wildly talented (just talented enough). I think her independence is more important than her talent and personally I prefer characters who aren’t the superstars because I think it’s something more people struggle with. The type of person who is “good at everything” isn’t necessarily great at one thing. That, to me, is far more interesting and that’s how I see Megan.

            • Aurumgirl

              Ah, but I never said she had to be wildly talented. I said she didn’t have to be an experienced lauded thespian like Elizabeth Taylor. She’s very young. She got a call back to a play in New York. If someone can be mediocre and get that, or a recurring role on a soap opera, which actually paid really well even back then and was very promising for Megan as we could all see, then hell, everyone is a mediocre talent in show business. And they all win awards at other things they’re Not All That Good At, such as advertising, when others who’ve been lauded for their own talent just can’t quite be as successful in comparison.

              Just sayin’. We disagree, and that’s fine.

            • 3hares

              At this point I can’t tell if we disagree or not. I’m talking about her talent and skill as an actress, period. Not advertising. I said I didn’t think she had to be a great thespian and didn’t have to be for this story. If you agree with that, then we agree with each other. Nobody’s denying that she got a recurring role on a soap opera that paid well, or that she’s gotten callbacks for things. As long as Megan is good enough to have a career (as opposed to failing and needing to rely on Don) I don’t see any real disagreement or anything else needed for the story. If you think the whole point is that Megan is is exceptionally talented (iow, she actually is an A-list actress who’s just too young to have established herself yet at 28) then we do disagree, for reasons I said, but that’s too nebulous to matter much to the story, imo. Megan being a soap actress is enough to create the conflict. Whether or not she’s going to have international audiences in tears by 1978 is moot.

        • KateWo

          I also thought the tv served as an object to represent their failing relationship – he can’t go one weekend without watching a nice tv and they fall asleep in front of it instead of having sex

    • MartyBellerMask

      Well, it’s not Buzzfeed, but Vulture has a slideshow of “All the women Don didn’t sleep with”. Really now. Waste of bandwidth.

      • Malia C.

        Uproxx went with, “15 Megan Draper/Sharon Tate Connections That Prove ‘Mad Men’ Is Just Straight-Up Trolling Us Now.” But the commenters all telling the writer to shut up already make it worth it.

        • Chris

          Well to be fair most of the comments on Uproxx say things like that. I wish more sites would institute a basic civility rule like TLO does. Some sites are really not welcoming.

    • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

      Maybe I read it differently, but I didn’t see Ginsberg and Dawn really flirting so much as both expressing inner annoyance that neither of them has a good read on Lou. Ginz has no idea how long the meeting will be and Dawn is doing her best to be an Excellent Secretary (“That depends on you” struck me more like an evasion with a touch of “how the hell should I know” in a nicer way) as usual even though her boss makes stupid racial jokes straight to her face (Gladys Knight and the Pips? I groaned.)
      I wonder if the connection was made because those two are the most prominent “ethnic” characters in the office, keeping their heads down in the face of the uber-white patriarchal figure of Lou (and thereby serving to contrast with unsuccessfully confrontational Peggy). Mostly because I’m still boggled that Ginsberg’s ego didn’t rear in the meeting with Lou, especially with his instability last season. I can’t imagine that Ginsberg is getting much good feedback with Ted and Don gone and Lou as replacement. I imagine Stan’s mother henning must be in overdrive now.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Awww, I love Stan as mother hen, especially with taking care of Ginsberg.

      • http://inanimateblog.com/ NoNeinNyet

        Considering how Stan was with Peggy about creating the secret board, he’s probably running himself ragged trying to talk down everyone who doesn’t like Lou’s search for mediocrity. Stan just doesn’t want anyone to rock the boat.

      • MilaXX

        I can. low seems pretty mediocre so he’s probably easier to please than Don or Ted, especially when Don & Ted are struggling to out do each other. I think Ginsberg’s manic phases would likely be more prominent when stressed out and Mr. Status quo Lous doesn’t appear to be that stressful of a boss.

    • sienna elm

      I just want to thank you two for doing these Mad Style features. They’re fascinating and I (and all of us, I’m sure) appreciate the time you take to do them.

    • NDC_IPCentral

      You just made my lunch break, gentlemen. I’m sure I’m not alone in that. Thanks so much for ramping up my understanding of the premiere and my anticipation for the next episode. Your analyses are superb.

    • Linlighthouse

      So there’s this controversy about what Don actually said to Pete, and that’s because Hamm mumbles (yes, he does). Did he say, “You dress like a hippie,” or “You don’t dress like a hippie, but you talk like one” ? Oh, who cares? I like smiling Pete. I am glad the sweater-around-the-neck affectation is a thing of the past. That, along with sunglasses on top of the head, just tells me people can’t decide what to do with their clothes.

      I keep wanting to reach behind Joan’s head and remove the hairpins. I think she wants to be taken seriously and not like a sex object, so maybe long locks hanging over her shoulders would camouflage those bazongas a little bit.

      Abe, jerk that he is, did a great job renovating that space. The floor looks great. In a few years, when Julio and his feminine-hygiene flushing mother move out, if Peggy could redo that unit and charge some serious rent.

      Someone on another blog (I read a lot of them) postulated that that final shot of Peggy was reminiscent of the famous photo of the woman bending over the body of the Kent State student.

      Is Stan wearing love beads? Ha ha.

      • fursa_saida

        I definitely saw people doing the sweater on the shoulders thing sometimes when I was in high school, which was only eight years ago. But at this point I think it’s a full-on prep thing, probably due to the Reagan business T Lo mentioned above.

        The things rich white kids in Boston will wear to class are truly amazing.

    • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

      Slightly off topic, but I wanted to mention a documentary that I watched last night on PBS called “The Real Mad Men and Women of Madison Avenue.”

      There has been so much discussion here about what life was really like for women in advertising during this period and this show lays it all out in great detail as told by the women who lived it. It’s also a great history of advertising in 20th century America and how it reflects changing times. Lots of pictures so you can see the real mad styles.

    • CeeLayton

      “Trying to impress her boss, Lou, and avoid Ted in the office. Peggy is Mary Richards.”
      Thank you. That blew my mind.

    • teddy partridge

      Tam, not a beret.

    • Selkiechick

      When Megan comes to bed in the white shirt (instead of the more provocative sleepwear we have seen her in) did anyone else think of the Van Heusen ad, which I now cannot find, of a woman wearing her lover (husband’s?) white dress shirt?

    • Glammie

      Don’t know if you’ll see this deep in the 400-plus comments, but thank you TLo for your wonderful MadStyles. I love the way you dig into the details, it really makes watching the show rewarding on a whole other level. Just thought I’d say that before getting into some debate somewhere in the thread.

      • Lilithcat

        I was surprised to learn at their Skokie book signing that TLo read all the comments. I wouldn’t blame them if they just skimmed at times

        • tallgirl1204

          the way they rigorously monitor for trolls and keep this a pleasant venue would kind of force them to do that– thanks to TLo for truly being our Uncles with our best interests at heart!

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            I’m hoping they use mods too to trim out the trolls, just so they can leave the house for an afternoon without stressing.

        • Glammie

          I knew they read a lot of them, just because they’ll pop up deep in threads and comment, but all of them . . wow and whew. Does make for better discussions. It was nice when they cut off the Betty troll. It’s damn hard to have a Mad Men discussion if you have someone who hates any criticism of Betty.

          • Lilithcat

            True. And how boring would it be if we all agreed on everything? If the comments were all, “I agree!” and “Me, too!”, I’d probably stop reading them!

    • Therese Bohn

      Tam tossing and “Trying to impress her boss, Lou, and avoid Ted in the office. Peggy is Mary Richards.”
      An MTM connection! I Love you guys!
      This is going to be a hell of a season!

    • Selkiechick

      When Megan came to bed in the white shirt, I couldn’t help but think of the Van Heusen ad campaign “for a man to wear and a woman to borrow” but sadly, my research says, those ads are from the late eighties…

      • 3hares

        It’s probably very significant that Megan was wearing her own white shirt and not borrowing one of Don’s!

    • Mod_girl

      Great point about Margaret Sterling/”Nixon-daughter” style–my mom, who was 22 and a newlywed in 1969, dressed very much like this. When my sister and I were younger, we used to rib my mom about never doing anything “60’s cool” like going to Woodstock, etc. Her response was always along the lines of “Ahem, not EVERYONE went to Woodstock and dressed like long-haired hippies all of the time!” This episode/post are a good reminder of that.

      • Tiffany Birch

        Yes, good point. I felt the same way about my mom who was 27 in 1969. Back in the 1980s I asked why she didn’t dress like the other “fun” people did in the 1960s, and she said she wasn’t into the same type of “beatnik” music other people were into. She was into jazz and used to go listen to jazz whilst in high school, musicians like Stan Kenton and Dave Brubeck. Kind of cool.

        • AnneElliot

          Yes, my mom was a young bride in the 1960s (and had three children by the end of the decade). She pointed out that saying everyone was a hippie in the 1960s was like saying everyone in the 1980s was punk.

    • Lattis

      TLo – that was so damn much fun to read. You have the gift of being brilliant, accessible and funny.

      Also, that the screen cap of Pete hugging Don? Outright, prolonged laughter from this end. Reminded me of a trip to France ages and ages ago when I got so tired of being double kissed (wasn’t too touchy feel at that stage – young and stupid) that when an older guy I met graciously kissed me on both cheeks, I involuntarily grimaced. Looked up to see his wife and daughter glaring at me. I felt like the original ugly american.

    • Glammie

      Hmmm, I seem to be a Pete kick this week, but it seems to me that Pete and Don aren’t actually that far apart sartorially. Pete may be casual and Don may be dressed like a banker, but Pete’s in plaid pants and Don in a plaid jacket. Together, they complete an outfit if they can get the colors to match. Didn’t Bert say something about Pete being an eventual friend/ally if Don chose not to fire him? He is actually passing along some good info. to Don re: Ted Chaough not functioning well in California.

      Knee socks? Oh Peggy. Stop that. Stop that right now.

    • DeniseSchipani

      By the way, where is Harry?

    • Susan Velazquez

      I love Julio! In another universe, there is a sitcom about Peggy Olson, the formerly shy Brooklyn girl trying to make it in the big city while simultaneously handling the hijinks of her wacky tenants. Julio is the precocious child who lives upstairs, if Abe was still around then he’d be her free wheeling hippie boyfriend, and if Peggy had better relationships with her mother and sister, they’d be her meddling relatives who offer well meaning advice.

      • oat327

        I think that was the plot of “Rhoda.”

        • Susan Velazquez

          Ha, don’t even have to go to another universe for that show then! Although, “Rhoda” didn’t have Julio. I just loved that kid for some reason. The way he said, “YOU GOTTA FIX IT!” cracked me up

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        This is so much sitcom! I love it.

      • AnneElliot

        Loved TLo’s reference to Peggy and Julio down in the schoolyard. Nice Simon and Garfunkle shout-out!!

    • Alice Dennard

      Oh my god. Okay so I’m not crazy- I was screaming “Mary Tyler Moore!!” when Peggy showed up in that last scene. I had however missed the total Megan in Rhoda drag though. So spot on. And OF COURSE the new boss in named Lou! OF COURSE!!! Can we maybe assume Lou’s line “I guess I’m immune to your charms Peggy.” could have been another way of saying “You’ve got spunk. I hate spunk.” UGH I LOVE THIS SHOW.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I’m the reverse. I saw Megan and thought, Rhoda! I didn’t pick up on the Mary look until someone pointed it out.

    • Lilithcat

      Honestly, if it weren’t for the fact that she didn’t introduce them until the mid-’70s, I’d have sworn that was a Diane von Furstenberg wrap dress on Neve Campbell.

      And I find it interesting that Joan keeps looking younger. A change in make-up and softer hair, I think.

    • andrea36608

      I’m so glad y’all mentioned The Preppie Handbook. As soon as I saw Pete, I scrambled for my copy of the text so that I could find the picture of that look.

      “You’re involved in a rear-end collision on I-95. You (a) get out of the car and yell at each other, (b) exchange insurance information and wait for the police so that you can make an accident report, or (c) you find out that your fathers crewed together in the ’55 Regatta and go out for drinks.” Crack my shit up.

    • Danielle

      Re-reading, I spotted that Lou’s blue cardigan co-ordinates with the abstract blue painting on his office wall. Maybe an attempt to tie himself into the surroundings and claim them for his own? After all, it was Don’s mancave until recently. Can’t recall if the blue painting was also on the wall in previous seasons though.

      • sweetlilvoice

        I also like how Lou’s office is decorated similarly to Don’s photo shoot that took place last season. I can’t remember the specific episode. The desk is in front of the windows in the corner at least. I don’t remember if the sofa was against the opposite wall but it would make sense space-wise.

    • tallgirl1204

      O.k., I know it’s late in the commenting game, but I just thought of this: How is Peggy going to feel when she finds out Freddie is being fed lines by Don? I can’t see her being grateful. I think it will feel like a betrayal– either that Don doesn’t trust her to be o.k. on her own, or that he is undermining her from following her own path. What happens if she wins an award or account using ideas he fed through Freddie? Is it her turn to claim the idea as her own and deny him credit for the germ of the idea?
      Also: why is Don doing it? Out of the goodness of his heart, to help Peggy or SCDP? To keep himself in the game, just for the heck of it? To redeem himself in some way? To redeem Freddie?
      This is very puzzling.

      • 3hares

        I don’t see why that would matter. Peggy’s already hiring the freelancer to give her ideas so it’s not like she thinks the ideas are her own. It switches their positions from what they previously were, with Don giving her ideas and her picking what she likes.

        • tallgirl1204

          I see your point that Peggy’s hiring a freelancer– but there’s a difference between hiring good ole Freddie who she likes but doesn’t really admire, and hiring your old boss who is both your hero and your bane.

        • KateWo

          I agree, I don’t see why she’d feel betrayed, I think Don just wants to keep working and hear what’s going on. And Freddie/Don are going to other companies too. I think it was done in part to show Don is recommitting to his work and for the audience to see how bad Lou is in comparison.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        I think she’ll mainly be pissed that he was intruding into her work life without being gracious enough to let her know (like a creepy stalker). Especially considering that for both of them, Work is All, and they’ve had such a turbulent emotional-professional history. Of course she has an emotional reaction to Don/Fred’s pitches, and the process of deciding to take it to Lou after all — I can easily imagine her being furious to learn it was Don’s work she was promoting after all.

        Don’s motivation — I agree with some other reviewer that Don doesn’t know what else to do/can’t break away from writing ads, especially for this company. I also think he must get at least a little kick out of getting SC&P to use his material, even after they drop his letter from their name.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          They dropped his letter from their name before they dropped him. It went SCDP to SC&P after the merger. It was SC&P before he left.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Ah! Thank you for that fact check.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              No problem. The name changes do get a bit confusing. It’s hard to remember exactly when each name change happened.

      • DeniseSchipani

        I think it’s interesting that she is hiring a freelancer at all (as a freelancer myself, though not in the ad game, I gave a little cheer for some of my tribe getting work!). I’m thinking she must have been casting about trying to get as many ideas on board as possible to push them through Lou, because otherwise she’d be doing all the writing herself. But yeah, I can’t imagine her being thrilled that she’s paying for Freddie and getting Don, even though Don’s work is superior and she would know that. But it would make her feel undermined and duped and patronized.

        • 3hares

          But I would think that Peggy knowing Don’s situation would keep her from feeling that way. She’d know Don wasn’t messing with her. He’s the one in the humiliating position.

    • Megan Kennedy

      I’m not sure there’s NO connection between Pete and Don in the diner scene — Don’s shirt and the lines on his jacket echo the yellow of Pete’s sweater.

      Delighted to have Mad Style back!

      • oat327

        Yeah, I thought that too. The plaid jacket also echoes Pete’s plaid pants. I thought, if anything, there WAS a connection between the two of them.

        • 3hares

          I think it’s maybe both? I mean, there is some plaid there, which is similar, but Don’s whole look is different from Pete’s. He’s dressed in a sports jacket (which have often been plaid) and a tie. Pete’s wearing plaid pants (which are more casual than a plaid sports jacket) and no jacket at all, just an Izod. So they’re not completely clashing, maybe, but the style of dress overwhelms the things they have in common. Somebody looking at them would see two people dressed for different things, almost as different as Don and Megan when she’s in jeans and a head scarf. Their characters are getting along just fine in the scene, so it’s not a fight, but they’re in very different states of mind.

    • Fordzo a.k.a. Fancy Mukluks

      And here I was all excited because I thought that Peggy’s scarf on her final outfit of the show was mimicking Freddie’s tie from the opening scene.

    • Meghan

      What is the difference between Peggy’s mustard “POWER COLOR” in the beginning of the episode, and her “gold (no power) turtleneck” later that makes her look like Velma? It looks like she’s wearing the same turtleneck in both scenes, the only difference is the suit she’s wearing in her first appearance. What am I missing?

      • Megan Kennedy

        I believe the uncles mean that the yellow in the original scene was used ironically — hence the power color becomes a (no power) color.

      • 3hares

        I think they’re referring to how both Peggy and Joan are wearing colors that have meant something in the past, but now it’s ironic. Joan’s wearing purple, which used to be associated with heartbreak, but she’s not heartbroken at all. And Peggy’s in a power color, but she has no power and we know that by the end of the ep.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          Yep.

    • Laura Rodgers

      I see some kind of theme going on with characters seeking approval while wearing a striped tricolor thing around their necks.

      Freddy (with Don acting through him) craving validation through pitching freelance work, in a red-blue-green striped tie and cream white shirt. Ken trying to wheedle Joan into meeting with the Butler rep as a favour, in a red-blue-cream striped tie. Pete eagerly trying to impress Don with his freewheeling California life, in a red-blue-cream striped sweater tied around his neck like a scarf. Roger in a red-blue-cream tie with a loud paisley print that still recalls stripes, wishing for his daughter’s approval and not getting it. And finally Peggy, in a red-purple-cream striped scarf and blue dress, trying to impress Lou with high standards for her team’s work and failing.

      • Qitkat

        This is why reading the post/comments here is such fun, I never analyze things this closely, but I appreciate those who do.

    • malarson2

      Dear TLo – As I sat down, breathlessly, to read this article today, I tried to explain to my 16-year-old son (home with a cold) about why I was so darned breathless. I talked about how long I’ve waited for this article – all the way since last year!! – and how when I read Mad Style I get possibly overly gleeful and warned him that he was about to hear me seriously start speaking and laughing and mmm-hmmmmming to my computer screen. And then. You Amazing Suckers smack me in the face with your article-beginning lecture. Just like I needed you to. And, just like how I felt when I finally went to Nordstrom to officially and properly get fitted for an official and proper bra, I loved you even more for the smack-down. Hurt me, fellas!! I love everything about you.

    • decormaven

      Is Roger living in his old apartment or at his deceased mom’s place? Take a look at that beige phone near the silver tray. It’s a hotel phone- it has no numbers on the dial. It’s the kind that used to be in hotels with switchboards- all calls were placed through the switchboard. It makes sense if he’s at a hotel, though- somebody’s got to hose that room down every day after the debauchery that goes on every night. “Really getting somewhere,” indeed!

    • KT

      I actually just got chills by the end of this (yes, I’m a nerd). I live for these write-ups; you guys are fucking brilliant.

    • peachykeen5014

      Does anyone know the name of the song that’s playing during the scene where Don is picked up from the airport by Megan? I loved it and I can’t find a listing of it anywhere :(

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        “I’m a Man” by The Spencer Davis Group. You can find it on YouTube.

        • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

          and on spotify if you have it.

    • AutumnInNY

      Stan and his “love beads” priceless!

    • insomniacattack

      Don’t know why but my last comment seems to have been deleted, so I’ll try again. I don’t think this has been mentioned before, but the green suit Ted is wearing in the first scene of this episode is the same suit he was wearing in his last scene of season six where he breaks things off with Peggy. Kind of underscores all of the other intimations—”it’s winter in California too”, “you’re in an office here, you’re in an office there, what’s the difference?”—that moving to California hasn’t changed things.

      • Chris

        That’s a nice observation. I didn’t notice until TLO posted the pictures and commented how Moira and Cutler matched so perfectly and Ted was the odd man out colorwise. Moira and Cutler look like they coordinated their outfits they are so in sync.

        • lisbeth borden

          I was surprised to see a color on Cutler—the navy tie. He is usually all-gray, like a shark (or perhaps b/c he seems to mostly function as exposition).

    • Mia Moreno

      Mad Style rocks!!!!

    • Pennymac

      Is it wrong that after reading the Uncles opinions, and those of the Bitter Kittens, what is sticking with me the most is that Mary Tyler Moore theme? Watching that almost made me weep with nostalgia!

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        It’s one of the all time great theme songs.

        • tallgirl1204

          And there are two versions! the first season was “how will you make it on your own? /this world is awfully big and this time, girl, you’re all alone/ But it’s time you did some living/ time you let someone else do some giving/ (and it ends with “you just might make it after all”)
          I can’t remember which season, but it changed to:
          “who can turn the world on with her smile? / who can take a nothing day and suddenly make it all seem worthwhile?/ well it’s you, girl, and you should know it/ with each glance and every little movement you show it/ (and it ends with “you’re gonna make it after all”)
          I think that it is pathetic that I still know both of these songs. This is why I can’t remember stuff like where my car keys are…

          • sweetlilvoice

            Don’t feel bad…I still remember both Jem theme songs. Great 80s cartoon.

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            It changed lyrics in season 2.

    • judybrowni

      Janie’s styling is also on the nose perfect for the period: I owned dresses like Shirley’s and Peggy’s in the sixties, wore Peggy’s plaid to high school (boys in my high school also wore Madras like Pete’s.)

      Love her color stories, but she gets that decade down pat: what people actually wore.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Peggy and Ted should end up as friends. I want Peggy to end up with Stan in a romantic context.

    • TigerLaverada

      Mad Style! Halleloo! I live for these posts. Thanks, Uncles, for making a show I already love so much more fascinating. You guys are brilliant.

    • lillyvonschtupp

      This is Hollywood working because NO.WAY. IN.HELL. would Shirley have been hired in a Madison Avenue firm. Afros were perceived as counterculture and revolutionary ,evoking thoughts of Black Nationalism and unrest. Very scary for mainstream businesses. Even now its still an issue, where some places frown upon natural hairstyles, and have even told potential and employed blacks to lose it or lose their chance for employment.

    • ybbed

      The first time we see Joan is a close up of her legs coming up the stairs in the office, and noticed right away that dress was definitely a few inches shorter that it usually was. You can see it again in a side view shot, not as short as Megans (!!) but definitely shorter

    • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

      I miss this so much! : D

    • lillyvonschtupp

      Megan’s hair in the opening shot. References back to the marriage ceremony of Jackie and Aristole Onassis.

    • Columbinia

      I can’t analyze this stuff at that level. The colors mostly come from the palette of the times. The biggest issue was how women projected authority sartorially when styles were either girlish or sexy. A skirt at mid-thigh never looks serious. But at the time, anything with more authority looked stodgy and dated. It was the time of the double bind for women, and nothing said it more than the clothes.

      I will say that there’s no reason that Don and Megan should succeed. They didn’t know each other when he proposed. It was a chance throwing together of two people who had little in common except wanting to be in love and pair off. He needed someone to take care of his children on a trip when arrangements fell through and hired her. She was good with the kids, fresh and full of potential. Don loves potential. He was the hot Alpha male of the office and a prime catch. Megan had talked about how much she wanted to get married in a focus group conducted with the secretaries. So when the movie star proposed, she decided she’d hit the jackpot and said yes! They had a few months of honeymoon relationship when they projected their dreams on each other in a compatible way and had an unexpected time in The Zone when Megan proved to have a complementary talent in advertising. But Don is about the moment, the new thing, the potential, not intimacy or the long run. Megan doesn’t know what she wants. Does she want the trophy marriage (Don being the trophy), a real marriage, to be young and fun in the warm California sun or a career as an actress? Who knows, who cares? What is she doing married to a much older man in the middle of the Sexual Revolution? Aside from looking hot and being a rebound from Betty, who is this character? She’s a stranger to Don and the story and I’m surprised she lasted this long. She’s an interim girlfriend cooking coq au vin in her rental bungalow kitchen, not a marriage.

      And it’s 1969, the defining events of that year were Woodstock and the Moratorium to End the War, not Sharon Tate.

      • Glammie

        Well, I think the style analysis is akin to film analysis or art history–the palette reflects the times to a degree, but Jane Bryant’s use of them to emphasize character, conflict and themes goes well beyond a simple reflection of the time. It’s all about judging the book by its color in that sense.

        I agree that Don and Megan look doomed and I don’t really care. She’s already halfway out the door with her comment about the house with the pool that doesn’t, at first, include Don. She’s one of Weiner’s weaker creations. To me, there’s a big father/daughter element to the relationship. Don’s kind of been a legit. sugar daddy, but now she’s feeling independent. She’s outgrowing her role, but she’s still not old enough to really deal with Don–though I think he’d run from someone who could deal with him.

        I think the Tate murders mattered symbolically–epitomizing the chaos and destruction of the 60s at its worst. Helter Skelter was a huge bestseller for a reason. Manson was a crazy cult leader and we’re getting increasingly into an age of cults–the flip side of the human potential movement. I think there’s a reason Charles Manson is still a household name among people over a certain age.

        • Marceline

          Your mention of cults makes me wonder if Margaret’s obvious changes means that she might be getting involved with one. There’s been so much talk about Megan as Sharon Tate but maybe we should be looking to see who might be channeling Linda Kasabian.

          • Glammie

            Oh yeah, she’s into something. Funny, there’s actually a preview of Bracken’s World on Youtube and the main character is trying to lure a former director out of Synanon, which so far, is portrayed pretty positively. This is years before it became known as a creeepy cult.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Actually, the colors come from the choices the costume designer makes. This isn’t a documentary.

        And I’m not sure what you mean by your last sentence, because we can’t see where anyone said Sharon Tate was the defining event of the year.

      • yllas

        Wasn’t it Faye who said with perfect perception and truth to Don: “You only like the BEGINNING of things.”

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I would add the Moon Landing to the list of major/defining events.

    • Logo Girl

      I felt Megan’s dismay with the TV. Having grown up with a mom with her same sense of style, I KNOW she would only want a portable black and white that she would only turn on if one of her friends were on a TV movie, and otherwise keep it in a back room.

    • http://weirdinedgewise.blogspot.com ONEWEIRDWORD

      I’m liking Mad Style more than the actual show!

    • Orange Girl

      This isn’t directly related to costuming, but did anyone catch Megan’s agent refer to “holding off on fixing her teeth” and the “strong opinions” people have of her? I thought it was a tongue-in-cheek response to all the real-life criticism of Jessica Pare.

      And I just giggled with glee when Pete appeared on screen and hugged Don.

    • melisaurus

      Does Ted’s suit look like the faintest plaid to anyone else!!!?

    • andreawey

      there were a lot of men that i would have liked to punch in the face in that episode….. just sayin…..

      • Lattis

        For me, Lou’s is the face that is most slappable. In fact, his face is pretty much the definition of “backpfeifengesicht” (German word for a face that begs to be punched).

        • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

          I love that there’s a word for that! Too bad it’s so long and unpronounceable. I’ll never be able to remember or use it.

    • Lesa Quale Ferguson

      Such a great observation about Freddie mirroring Don, but doesn’t Don mirror Freddie (rather than being Dick again) – pre AA

      • Robin

        Don is turning into Freddie pre-AA!?!!
        Maybe. Interesting take.

    • DagnyReardon

      I need a nap after reading this.

    • megohd

      Such great analysis. Thank you. And I truly appreciate this:

      And yes, she’s serving up some serious Sharon Tate here, just like Joan used to serve up Marilyn and Betty used to serve up Grace Kelly. Joan didn’t die of a pill overdose and Betty hasn’t driven her car off a cliff. We’re pretty sure any references being made to movie stars doesn’t mean the characters will share their fates.

      So tired of the endless death predictions by fans of this show!

      • Susan Velazquez

        I know! Any time I try to read other analysis of Mad Men, I get people predicting Megan’s death and how she’ll probably be involved in the Manson murders. Come on now! Weiner has the the characters influenced by key events, not directly affected by them.

    • MeganPatterson

      I’m still convinced that Neve Campbell wasn’t actually there.

    • suzq

      Glorious recap. Missed this. We got sucked into Turn as a lead-in and I have to say both the time travel and the pickled bodies are just a bit too jarring to the point where the lamentations of the advertising world of the 1960’s are a welcome relief.

      Who hasn’t been there, on the floor, crying, early in their career?

    • Glammie

      So Bitter Kittens, the pilot of Bracken’s World is on YouTube. It was about some Hollywood starlets, has a couple of Megan lookalikes in the cast, and stars Eleanor Parker as a super-capable Joan-like character to a mysterious unseen mogul named Bracken. First episode has her seeking out a talented has-been director played by Ricardo Montalban, who’s happily retreated into Synanon, sort of your original good cult gone bad. Though at this time it’s not known as a bad cult and seems to be portrayed positively.

    • SoulMo

      Anyone talk about how nice Pete Campbell’s butt looked yet?

      • 3hares

        Manolo?

    • Blue

      Is the scarf Peggy’s wearing not the same one she wore during her interview with Ted, as well as when he told her he was moving to LA? That seems significant–as we move through each of those scenes, she progressively loses power. Last time we saw her wearing it, she says to Ted, “Isn’t that nice…to have decisions.”

    • SportifLateBoomer

      Observations in no particular order as I finally catch up on this ep and recap:

      -Stan’s looking mighty hot these days. Love the groovy little necklace.

      -I would kill, kill I say, for Joan’s charm bracelet. I love all her bling.

      -I nearly wept watching the MTM opening sequence.How I loved that show as a young girl, she was such a role model for me, for years. And the height of breezy chic. And yes, I love how JB is tying Peggy to her visually.

      -I continue to identify a lot with Joan; TLo’s description of her — “She’s not the person she thought she was, nor is she the person everyone else thinks she is. She’s figuring it out and she’s moving forward. You can tell she’s scared and overwhelmed but also a little thrilled” — captures where I am in my life right about now.

      -John Slattery should be naked all the time.

      Bowing in gratitude, and sending up snaps for this great analysis!

    • mwynn13

      Regarding Megan’s agent, I’m certain he’s supposed to be gay. When first introduced to Don, the agent reassures him that his only interest in her is greed, and Don says drily, “I feel completely at ease.”

    • gailfl87

      I like how Dawn is the new Peggy, which is echoed in her military style buttons in the same frame as Peggy’s, on on a dress with a pleated skirt, evocative of Peggy’s tendency towards schoolgirl looks. You could probably extrapolate even more meaning from the fact that they are lower on her body than Peggy’s, signaling how far she has to go, but that may be taking it too far.

    • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

      The stand out costume for me was Megan in the powder blue dress and sandals in the driver’s seat. She clearly has the power. And poor Don is out of his element, being the one for once that has to sacrifice for the relationship for once. He has to be her tagalong to her meeting when usually its the other way around. Ironically that powder blue color is everywhere this season in 2014.

    • Vermona

      Wonderful analysis, as always. I just have one nit-picky correction: Peggy’s beret is crocheted, not knitted. Crocheting was really big in the late ’60s and ’70s, possibly more so than knitting.

    • vickilu

      “a story where his beautiful wife can’t wait to see him and tear his clothes off.”

      Ahhhh the slow motion makes SO much sense now! It’s what he’s imagining, his life as glamorous as a movie (or one of his commercials). He needs to go into that world to escape the sad reality.

      Right? Right?!

    • kathrynon

      I was particularly struck by your comment that Joan was removing a shield, laying herself bare upon entering the professor’s office, and that it mirrored her bathrobe in the scene with the Jaguar executive. It also mirrored that scene in color – the emerald necklace he gave her as a gift.

    • http://batman-news.com Nick Valenziano

      This blog has made watching (and re-watching) even more fun and now I keep an eye open for all of the things I think will be discussed here. One thing I was struck by that you boys weren’t–I thought that both the eye patch on Ken and Megan’s whole gypsy thing implied pirates. This made me stop and ask why?–what could that be saying? What is, by definition a ‘pirate?’ Then it dawned on me: one could say that both Ken and Megan are in a position where they have ‘invaded’ where they once were subordinate, have infiltrated it and now have taken control of the ship. And Don was the captain both at the office and in his personal life. Megan and Ken have performed mutinies on both fronts. (Mutiny: an open rebellion against officers of a superior rank) And Captain Donald Draper is deposed, left–literally–out in the cold.
      Thoughts?

      • 3hares

        Ken seems like anything but somebody who got his position through mutiny. He wanted to cut down on the crazy stress at work, now he’s buried under it. All this got dumped on him when others abandoned ship or were ordered to walk the plank. Even Megan was basically cut loose by Don, told to abandon her soap job and then left stranded when suddenly he didn’t want to go, so she set sail on her own. (I’m ashamed of how many bad sea metaphors I put in this post.)

    • Stacy

      I’M SO GLAD MAD STYLE IS BACK! Long-time lurker, first-time commenting to say (although maybe in the billion comments I missed someone else catching it) that the AJ Soprano-looking guy from Butler’s shoes who meets with Joan, and Lou Avery in that last scene with Peggy, are both wearing blue/red/gold striped ties similar to the ones worn by Freddy and Ken that you pointed out! Similar things going on in all 4 scenes.

      Also I hate Lou Avery. Saying ‘I guess I’m immune to your charms’ to Peggy may as well be short-hand for ‘you should not like me, audience at home.’

    • AndrewKeesee

      I love mad men, & this is somehow the 1st time I’ve come across T&L – AMAZING READ!

      • https://twitter.com/KlooKloo Todd Simmons

        Time to rewatch the series and follow along!

    • http://www.lalaliberal.com Kate Sam

      I have to wonder if the “power colors” are meant to be ironic or rather a signal of the characters’ head states – how they are feeling or what they are trying to project. Was Joan prepared for heartbreak, self-concious because of how she arrived at her job? I definitely think Peggy was trying to project confidence and perseverance. And both are getting the opposite results – which seems to be a trend with the women and minorities who try to make it on this show. They’re all just grasping at straws, trying any strategy they can with mixed results, but never complete acceptance. I’m also wondering what you thought of the color white throughout the show. I noticed it most during Megan and Don’s sex scene, how they were both wearing all white like this was their first time. But Pete was wearing the white sweater, Peggy a white hat… Some kind of innocence or rebirth?

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        That was our read; that Joan was bracing herself for heartbreak and actually managed a small triumph and that Peggy was trying to exert power only to find out she doesn’t have it anymore. Their signature colors thus become ironic, in this instance.

    • Elizabeth Moore

      I hate to be picky here, but I’ve got a few complaints. First, I have complaints about certain outfits. Peggy and turtlenecks do not go well, Turtlenecks makes Elisabeth Moss’ face look wide and heavy. Two, was Megan wearing a cocktail dress when she arrived at the airport to pick up Don? And three, the dark blue dress with the flower print that Shirley wears looks straight from 1972 or 1973. I could be wrong, but . . .

      Now, to one major complaint in regard to the black females on the show . . .

      Why are they regarded as either a “sister” or a “girl”, instead of women?

    • frannyprof

      OMG–the actreaa who plays the lovely Clara is the stepmom of one of the kids at my daughter’s school. She is adorable in real life–and pregnant.

    • SunDevilWitch

      My mother received the apron Megan is wearing (while cooking Don coq au vin) at her wedding shower in 1968! It was part of a stick figure “lady” made of a mop, oven mitts, dish towels, and rubber gloves. Omg I can see the picture clear as day in my head…she had that apron until it caught fire in the mid-70’s!

    • Alice Teeple

      Another excellent Mad Style! You were right. I thought Lane’s office had become the staircase, but Peggy is definitely in the same room. That does make the black dress on the hook pretty chilling. I love the Mary Richards reference too…I picked up on the Lou/Ted names, but the military dress and tam are perfect. I love Peggy’s wardrobe. I know a lot of people are bracing for the awfulness of late-60s-early-70s looks, but I am actually pretty fond of those styles. They remind me of my childhood.

    • dryadgirl

      Didn’t Megan have the same green leather trench as Joan two seasons ago?

    • Blair Stenvick

      Love the analysis. One thing I noticed: in the Don/Neve Campbell scene, Don is wearing a red, gold and black striped tie — another scene where women are trying to get something from men and failing.

    • Haiku Karaoke

      I came to Mad Style for the clothes and stayed for the discussions centered on meaning rather than just intent.
      I hope it’s not too late to thank TLo for the amazing analysis!
      And cheers to the Bitter Kittens for keeping the community you helped create both insightful and courteous.
      Rather than continue an observer, I am joining you. Be gentle.

      The scene with Megan, Don, and the huge TV reminded me of the final scene in All That Heaven Allows.
      The children of the Jane Wyman character buy her a huge TV to keep her company after they made her break up with the Rock Hudson character.
      Also, Lou is sitting on a huge TV in his office.
      Better to see Apollo 11 landing on the moon in July?

    • jackie

      “Trying to impress her boss, Lou, and avoid Ted in the office. Peggy is Mary Richards.”

      Genius!!!

    • Serenity

      I want Megan’s shoes…..

    • Nikki

      My mom used to pull off her big earring to use the phone all up through the early nineties- then those HUGE earrings went out of style I guess… I just remember that from growing up in the office, such a hilarious and accurate memory- and she’d forget them all the time!

    • Apple Tree

      Missed these!

    • Megan Steigerwalt

      I love the Mary Tyler Moore references!

    • Ajay

      The scene when Don and Megan on bed. Both were wearing white and can’t help to notice the nail polish on Megan which was also white. It was a calm and beautiful scene that may symbolized a deep meaning what could hold their future together. Love white and its purity.

    • Cheryl

      Megan’s blue dress reminded me of the poster for last season, with the two Dons headed in opposite directions. One of the Dons was holding hands with a partially seen woman (only her sleeve IIRC) but that sleeve looked a lot like it belonged to this season’s first Megan dress. Anyone else remember that poster?

    • http://kittysdrawings.com Esz

      I need Joans orange blouse. I love the way the buttons are arranged. Must make one.