Mad Men: Lady Lazarus

Posted on May 07, 2012

Mad Men has always been very clever about utilizing real products of the time to comment on the very people who are scrambling their asses off to make the public buy those products. In the early days of the show, the characters and the company of Sterling Cooper were dominated and defined by the brand Lucky Strike; a product name that evokes action and good consequences (even if it was a product defined by passivity and bad consequences). Since the heady days of “It’s toasted,” many walls have come tumbling down for these people and in light of that encroaching feeling of societal decay and deterioration, it’s perhaps not surprising that Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce is being defined, at the moment, by something that is not what it’s supposed to be; something that is a fake version of a real thing, meant to fool you into thinking you’re getting the same thing. From the name “Lucky Strike,” with its 19th Century air of can-do-ism, to “Cool Whip,” a name that signifies nothing, serving as a weak description of a product that exists to mimic something far superior to it. In the end, it’s a bowl of chemicals in a room that’s called a kitchen but that anyone can see is really a laboratory.

Things not being what they’re supposed to be was a theme all over this episode. Megan is not a copywriter at heart, even though she’s good at it. Pete is not a skier, but he’ll awkwardly snatch up a gift of free skis because they signify his importance, just as Pete will fetishistically hold on to anything that he feels signifies his importance; e.g., the rifle. That singing group is not the Beatles but they sound enough like them that middle-aged people like Don can’t tell the difference. Peggy is not Megan and when you shove her into Megan’s role and expect her to use Megan’s set of skills, you get a supremely embarrassing scene for everyone (because “Just try it” is NOT “Just taste it.”). Things not being what they’re supposed to has been a theme for Mad Men since the very beginning and played itself out in ways big and small, over and over again. From the Draper marriage to fake Ann-Margrets; when things are not what they’re “supposed” to be, people wind up disappointed by the results. That’s the grand irony of the world of advertising; you spend countless hours and dollars selling an image of something to the public, and it’s an image that no product could ever live up to, which means that advertising is the business of, first, lying to people and then ignoring their overwhelming disappointment.

“Overwhelming disappointment” could be a caption under a picture of Pete Campbell right now. Like everyone else who’s fanatic about the show, we spent the weeks before the season premiere watching previous seasons and trying to guess where certain characters were going to go this year. Of all the possibilities for story and character development for which we eagerly offered hypotheses, depressed, possibly suicidal Pete Campbell never even occurred to us. What’s interesting about his deep malaise this season is that it’s largely unexplained. When Betty was having psychological problems, no one needed to have it explained as to why; the unhappiness of her life in Ossining was apparent to anyone who viewed it. But with Pete, things aren’t so clear. He’s a junior partner in an agency that values his work highly; he’s married to a woman he seemed to be quite in love with for a good while there; and he’s got the baby and the house in the Connecticut suburbs, all of which are indicators of his success and the achievement of his dreams. But Pete always wanted to be a bigger man than he actually is; awkwardly “seducing” various women in inferior positions (Peggy, the German nanny, the model, the prostitute), fondling a rifle while  dreaming of hunting and killing some large animal, and trying over and over again to get Don Draper to bestow his blessing upon him. Pete, ever the child of privilege, wants it all and wants it now, and whenever he doesn’t get exactly what he wants (which is always), another piece inside him breaks off and floats away. He is defined by want. This is why he and Don will never be close with each other; because Don is defined by his ability to make people want.

Whatever the reasons, Pete this season seems determined to fuck up his life as much as he can. And in a move that would only be notable to someone outside his life, watching it (i.e., us), he put another notch in his “trying to be Don Draper” belt by inadvertently sleeping with … Betty Draper. Or at least, Betty Draper from 5 years ago; right down to the house, the shirtwaist dresses, and the housewife ennui. It says something about the desperation he’s feeling that he would essentially follow Harold home just so he could ambush his wife. Beth doesn’t seem like the most stable person in the world and this act of adultery bothered us more than most of the ones depicted on this show because it was the act of two people who don’t seem particularly sane at the moment. There’s been a lot of death and suicide imagery this season and quite a bit of has revolved around Pete, from the rifle, to the car crash films, to the Don crack about wanting to shoot yourself for spending Saturday night in the suburbs, to – and this was the most heavy-handed of all – Pete’s mentioning of the suicide clause in his life insurance; the writers have invested a lot of energy into promoting a black cloud of doom over Pete’s head. Personally, we have trouble buying it just because they’ve sold it so hard to us. Death does seem to be coming for someone this season, but it almost seems too pat to have it be Pete. Then again, we’ve never seen him as down as he is right now.

Someone else deeply unhappy in their current role is Megan Draper. Unlike every single other person on the show, however, Megan is capable of doing something about it. Mad Men is populated by people who seem to be resigned to their fates and who are letting this tumultuous decade get the better of them. Change occurs in the lives of these people but they all have a tendency to just let it happen or to let things deteriorate and escape at the last second. It almost never comes at the end of a sentiment like, “I don’t like this. I’m going to change it.” And sure, Megan had some difficulty getting to that point, not least of all because she was afraid to tell Don, but in the end, she did something that even Peggy had to admiringly admit “took a lot of guts.” We thought Peggy was at first a bit too hard on Megan but after a second viewing, her anger made a lot more sense. For one, Megan put her in the position of having to lie to Don; for another, it represented a mindset that Peggy couldn’t possibly comprehend: “You don’t WANT to do this?!?” To Peggy, who had to fight like crazy to get where she is, it’s unfathomable that someone who had it all handed to her is going to walk away from it. She eventually came around to respecting Megan’s decision, but her initial thoughts were a lot closer to Joan’s highly cynical take that Megan was now just another dilettante second-wife to a wealthy man.

Don, for his part, is trying to give Megan what she wants. It’s rare for the show to give Don any credit for growth, but having him come right out and say that he didn’t want Megan to become bitter and disappointed the way Betty was demonstrates a serious leap forward in empathy for him. It also demonstrates a surprisingly deep understanding of what went wrong in his first marriage. We would have assumed that he thought Betty ended it because of Henry or because of Dick Whitman, but he seems to have gained an understanding that Betty ended it because she was deeply unhappy in her life with him and never got to be the person she thought she was going to be. Even better, he seems to have gained an understanding of how much of that came down to how he treated her. So it speaks well of him that he is being supportive of Megan but he’s confused by it and fearful of what it means for him. He doesn’t understand the young; doesn’t understand their music, and when faced with the prospect of his young wife doing something his middle-aged self can’t even wrap his head around, he is literally staring into the abyss. Sure, it’s an empty elevator shaft, but the symbolism couldn’t have been any more apparent. Don’s scared about this turn of events and so tired of trying to figure the world out that he can’t spend more than a minute listening to The Beatles imploring him to turn off his mind, relax, and float downstream, before turning it off in befuddled, middle-aged disgust and shuffling off to bed.

Much more to come in our Mad Style post later this week.

 

[Photo Credit: Michael Yarish/AMC]

    • Sobaika Mirza

      My worlds collided last night. Mr. Belding was on Mad Men.

      • cteeny21

        I almost didn’t recognize him, but I was so excited when I did!

      • http://www.facebook.com/john.ridener John Ridener

        I’m thinking MJ from Desperate Housewives is also portraying Don’s son. Especially weird with one on at 9p.m. and the other at 10 p.m.

        • Allison Shannon

          OMG, THAT’S WHO THE KID WAS! I was like, ‘Who is that child? Why does he look so familiar?!’ THANK YOU! I haven’t watched this season of Desperate Housewives, yet.

        • amy_raks

          And he’s doing just as lousy of a job acting (sorry, kid!) on Mad Men as he has done on DH.

          • NoNeinNyet

            I’m beginning to think they lucked out spectacularly with Kiernan Shipka. Kids are certainly difficult to cast, especially in a long-running show, and nothing proves that more than the Bobby Draper revolving door.

            • Sweetbetty

               I think that every time I see her this season.  First of all, she is physically growing into a beautiful girl.  How old was she when the show started?  Seven?  Eight?  A girl who’s adorable at that age can go through an awkward change as she enters pre-teenhood.  Second, she is a talented actress.  I often think the same thing of the Olsen Twins.  They started their career as babies.  The producer of that show lucked out that they grew up cute and were acceptable actors who wanted to continue acting.

      • NurseEllen

         I especially liked seeing the old “General Foods” logo on the lab coats.  I was confused about the whole scene in the test kitchen, though.  Had the idea been that Don & Megan would just suddenly, seemingly naturally, start the whole “just taste it” conversation and then he or Ken would recognize the “spontaneous” advertising slogan miracle that had occurred?  Or, were they deliberately in a test kitchen to stage the potential ad for the execs?  At first I thought the former but then I wondered why they would be there…….by this point in the client relationship they’ve tasted Cool Whip. 

        • http://twitter.com/Fotstan Joe Johnson

          I think your latter thought is it: they were going to stage what the ad would look like. The employees got a kick out of the “Mr. and Mrs. Draper” working-together thing.

          That scene was the first time I can remember that a character has been told it’s not OK to smoke in a certain place. Kind of remarkable, if you think about it.

          • Spicytomato1

            Yes except I don’t think Don was being told not to smoke because of health concerns or even annoyance at the smoke…I assumed it was because they were in a room filled with potentially flammable chemical ingredients and additives.

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/DBSIHWVY4ECXGNXAXFXJMSCNIE Katrin

          It confused me too. And they never even tasted all the products. I didn’t get that scene at all. At this point, shouldn’t Cool Whip be out of the testing stages, or what that just a set up for the pitch? And if yes, what was in sample B and C?

      • http://twitter.com/BMoke28 Bernadette Moke

        It was good to see Rory again!! Alexis Bledel hasn’t been in much since then. I get my Lorelai fix with Lauren Graham on Parenthood, and my Sookie fix with Melissa McCarthy on Mike & Molly

        • JMansm

          I literally yelped when i saw her and told everyone who would listen “RORY GILMORE SIGHTING!” 

          • Robyn Morelli

             I was so excited too. It’s amazing how much like Betty she was. Down to the exact timing of the way she spoke. When she said “you can have me” it reminded me so much of the scene where she told Henry that she wouldn’t have sex with him in his office because “it’s tawdry.” The messages couldn’t have been further apart, but they sounded so alike. Two women desperately caught in a dull, beige place…

      • Rebecca Baker

        OMG, THAT’s who that was!!!  I knew I recognized him, just couldn’t put my finger on it.

      • juliamargaret

        Egads! Mr. Belding has…not aged well.

        • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

          I blame Zach Morris.

          • the_archandroid

            Why? Did he eat him? ’cause that’s what it looked like…

      • Eclectic Mayhem

        I’m very much enjoying the Gilmore Girls cross-polination with Mad Men; we had Lisa K. Wyatt as the Howard Johnson’s waitress a couple of weeks ago (she played Madonna Louise, one of Emily’s maids, in GG) and of course there was GG and Buffy alum Danny Strong in Season 4.

        I felt Alexis Bledel was a bit too young to play Beth but, having just checked her age on IMDB, blimey – she’s older than I thought and than she looks!

      • Katrina Mayr

        How about “Alex Mack” from Nickelodeon circa 1995 playing Ken Cosgrove’s wife?!

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1302929 Sarah Rogers

      The shot of the elevator shaft frightened me.  I was expecting someone to die by the end of the episode!

      • Sobaika Mirza

        Whoever dies this season – and it looks like someone will die – it’ll be interesting if they fall into an elevator shaft. A little callback to the credits with a man falling down a building.

        • SassieCassy

          I thought that too. It wouldnt come out of left field either because they have already shown an elevator shaft.

        • http://www.facebook.com/yanneng Yan Neng

          Hahaha I thought of Dr Drake Ramoray from Friends when I saw that elevator shaft.

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/toodleskitty79?feature=guide AWS

           I thought that too!  But then I thought of “L.A. Law” when they did that on there.  I’m not sure “Mad Men” would pull a cheesy move like that…

          • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

            Yes, yes! L.A. Law, that’s what I thought of too. But they wouldn’t kill someone off that way on Mad Men…would they?

            • http://www.youtube.com/user/toodleskitty79?feature=guide AWS

               No way.  Matt Weiner wouldn’t let them.

          • Jane_Lane

            Oh God, that is the only episode of LA Law I remember. That was messed up. To this day, I always pause to make sure there elevator is actually there before it get into it. 

            • http://www.youtube.com/user/toodleskitty79?feature=guide AWS

               ME TOO!  Seriously!  It’s like Pavlov’s dog… That image scared me straight about elevators!

            • FloridaLlamaLover

              This happened at the hospital where I worked many, many moons ago.  Hospital was being renovated; door opened, workman didn’t look…and  fell from the 6th floor to the bottom floor.  I thank God I wasn’t on duty that day; people who were still remembered his screams.

            • P M

              Oh Dear God Almighty. Poor them and lucky you – which sounds wrong. You’re lucky because you were spared the resulting nightmares. Seriously.

      • cmb92191

        There was an LA Law episode (god, I’m dating myself) where one character died from falling down an elevator shaft.

        • StillGary

          Ha ha, Roz fell down the shaft! And that was the biggest thing to happen on TV since JR got shot — I don’t think anyone from Sterling Cooper Draper Price is going to fall down this shaft since it’s already been done. It was used as an ominous reminder that any minute you can lose something — and maybe the exploring acting will lead Megan out of Don’s life. ANyway, I shouted at Don, “Jeez, aren’t you going to call maintenance?”

        • Sweetbetty

           Oh, I remember that.The elevator had been malfunctioning for a while and most of the people in the building knew about it but the character was making a rather dramatic exit, pushed the button, bid a nasty farewell, and when the elevator door opened turned and stepped into what Don saw last night as everyone looked on in horror.  I became much more cautious with elevators after that.

      • http://www.facebook.com/adamcatkinson Adam Atkinson

        The whole room gasped when we saw the empty elevator shaft! It’s like every other scene is saying, “No, seriously, people. Somebody is going to DIE.”

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=622570407 Alyssa Ball

           I was so nervous watching last night because I just kept waiting for someone (in my mind, Pete or Megan) to die.

          • http://twitter.com/pennyeager Penny Eager

             That’s what I thought too… definitely Pete or Megan.

      • Sweetbetty

         I had posted after the first episode this season that I heard Jon Hamm say in an interview that someone was going to die this season.  I was challenged to find a link, which I couldn’t do, so decided maybe my muddled mind was confused.  With each passing week it seems more and more likely that a major character will die (I think a minor character has died in each season so that would be nothing extraordinary).  In a way I feel vindicated but I really don’t want to see any of the majors go.                                   And I wonder if Don reported that malfunctioning elevator to building maintenance, or was that supposed to be a hallucination or something?

        • ballerinawithagun

          We hadn’t thought of that possibility of a hallucination. That seems to make more sense. We kept wondering when Don would call to report the malfunctioning elevator.
          Agree that a major character will die, so they are giving us many possibilities.

          • Sweetbetty

             And why was he summoning an elevator anyhow?  Did he want to run after Megan and beg her to reconsider?  Or just give her one more kiss goodbye as she went off to lunch with the girls?  It almost seemed to me that that empty shaft, real or imaginary, was telling him to not follow through with whatever he was planning to do.

            • makeityourself

              To me it seems that Don needs Megan in the most desperate way.  He impulsively decided to follow her down in the next elevator to give her one more kiss before she left the building.  When he stared down the elevator shaft, it was a wake up call saying “if you want to keep her, let her go.”  Then there was a thunderclap, lending an even more ominous tone to the proceedings.

              Or it could have been a hallucination.  Just sayin’.

          • suzq

            I remarked to my husband that he had his “anxiety attack” look on his face.

      • http://twitter.com/_faith Faith Chihil

        It was a bit creepy, especially since there was an accident where a woman got caught in the elevator shaft at one of the big ad agencies not too long ago.

    • schadenfreudelicious

      it was all i could do to not yell at my TV, “RORY!!..no, not PETE!……

      • http://twitter.com/ohmybears48 Michelle Argento

         I couldn’t stop referring to her as Rory Gilmore. This is what happens when you dont stay with Dean forever.

        • Eclectic Mayhem

          I really liked Logan, until he behaved like an utter turd at graduation of course…

    • http://profiles.google.com/denise.alden Denise Alden

      Watching Don listen to The Beatles’ singing, ‘this is not dying  . . ‘ was a little sad.  He clearly looks befuddled, as you put it, and it makes me nervous.  How long is he going to come home to an empty house while Megan is at acting class?  That shot of the empty apartment at the end said it all:  there’s nothing here, it’s a beautiful facade.  Like Cool Whip:  looks like something, feels like nothing.

      • http://www.facebook.com/adamcatkinson Adam Atkinson

        JUST TASTE IT, DON.

      • Jodie_S

        The Cool Whip metaphor could also be applied to Don and his life — a beautiful facade. Don Draper is an artificial concoction that he himself devised, which is why he’s such a dark, flawed and ultimately hollow man.  

        • http://www.facebook.com/adamcatkinson Adam Atkinson

          I seriously love Cool Whip, though. What is wrong with me???

          • Sweetbetty

             Have you ever had real whipped cream?  I’ll eat Cool Whip and enjoy it, but it doesn’t compare with the real thing.

            • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344922354 Eric Scheirer Stott

               Cool Whip is fine if you just consider it a substance, not a substitute

            • http://www.GiftedCollector.com Nancy Abrams

              The first time I ever saw Albert Brooks, he was on the Tonight Show. His entire act consisted of him reading the ingredients list off the Cool Whip label. There was not one drop of real food in it.

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              You’ve just given me my youtube assignment of the day. :)

            • http://www.GiftedCollector.com Nancy Abrams

              I hope you find it. It was both hysterically funny and scary at the same time.

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              I did not. But I did find him doing a ventriloquist bit on the Flip Wilson show, and I am nearly in tears, it is so funny!

            • formerlyAnon

               Exactly. Like most memorable junk food, it can be pretty tasty if you aren’t hung up on it looking or tasting like a “real” food, especially not the food that it imitates, or perhaps I should say, was inspired by. 

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              I feel that way about veggie burgers.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YYKK5LDOSRAPJXINSD253PYMIA Kathryn

               This is way off topic, but my sister likes bacon on her veggie burgers. No kidding. Not sure what that means in the context of “Mad Men” and Cool Whip, but….

            • http://profile.yahoo.com/DBSIHWVY4ECXGNXAXFXJMSCNIE Katrin

              I’m hoping that the ad campaign for CW will tank and the powers that be change history, making the brand disappear. Because YUCK!!

          • Sweetbetty

             Have you ever had real whipped cream?  I’ll eat Cool Whip and enjoy it, but it doesn’t compare with the real thing.

        • http://twitter.com/BMoke28 Bernadette Moke

          That is a really good way to put it!

        • http://profiles.google.com/denise.alden Denise Alden

          Yes, well said!

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/toodleskitty79?feature=guide AWS

           I know Don is flawed but I do really believe he and Megan are in love. 

      • UrsNY

        Oooo! great point about the empty apartment! It was sad seeing Don looking lost, but I couldn’t help feeling empathy, cheering at him stopping the Beatles song. What he said about being a child of the 30s was powerful. Feeling happy with such mean rewards, then being forced to confront such ambitious wants from others. Also, the song was the most disruptive piece of the loud late-20c stepping into this reflective mid-20c period piece. Then, at 40-something, I can empathize with how overwhelming it is looking out at the world and finding nothing familiar, and mostly hostile.

        • http://profiles.google.com/denise.alden Denise Alden

          Thanks for reminding me about his conversation with Roger about being a child of the 30s!  And I thought the same thing, that this particular number from the Beatles was jarring, and was meant to be so.

        • http://profiles.google.com/denise.alden Denise Alden

          Thanks for reminding me about his conversation with Roger about being a child of the 30s!  And I thought the same thing, that this particular number from the Beatles was jarring, and was meant to be so.

      • Sweetbetty

         I can understand his befuddlement at that Beatles song.  It was not the same Beatles that had swept them to fame in the UK and traveled across the ocean to the US.  It didn’t hold the mass appeal that their “I Want to Hold Your Hand” or “She Loves You” music did.  If they hadn’t already had a huge fan base, and released that song as their first I’m sure it wouldn’t have catapulted them to the fame they enjoyed.  I think I would have reacted just like Don and shut it off and gone to bed.  And believe me, I was a HUGE Beatles fan as a teen in the mid 60s.

        • suzq

          But you have to admit, that song launched the whole psychadelic genre that characterized the late 60’s and early 70’s. 

          • Jennifer Coleman

            I suspect this episode is the real entree to the changes of the 1960s. This is how the characters are positioned as the ‘storm’ hits. Don is clearly not prepared and disengaged and his wife has gently rejected the things that he defines himself by. Megan is going towards less structure & creativity and out of Don’s wheelhouse. Peggy is frustrated, still in the establishment, but curious & a natural rebel. Pete is disenfranchised, but not ready to abandon ship. Joan & Roger are fully entrenched in the establishment, but are survivors.

        • suzq

          But you have to admit, that song launched the whole psychadelic genre that characterized the late 60’s and early 70’s. 

        • http://twitter.com/closetcoach Heidi/Closet Coach

          It’s mind-boggling to realize that “Revolver” and the current “Mad Men” timeline is just 3 years removed from “I Want To Hold Your Hand” and 2 1/2 years (!) from the Ed Sullivan show. Time is spinning quickly and Don can’t keep up.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1394670289 Kira Gartner

             And this is the same time period that Andy Warhol’s Factory and the Velvet Underground were in the Village putting together the Exploding Plastic Inevitable tour. What would Don make of that? It really is all about to hit the fan!

        • http://twitter.com/closetcoach Heidi/Closet Coach

          It’s mind-boggling to realize that “Revolver” and the current “Mad Men” timeline is just 3 years removed from “I Want To Hold Your Hand” and 2 1/2 years (!) from the Ed Sullivan show. Time is spinning quickly and Don can’t keep up.

        • dbaser

           Earlier in the season, I believe “Help!” was referenced as being young and hip, probably because it could be associated with the titular movie.  I can see Don being on board with the fab four up to this point.

          The thing that I thought was a little odd was that Megan would tell Don to start with what was easily the most alienating track on “Revolver”.  Don should have waded into that on his own.  No mention of “Rubber Soul” either, which was sandwiched between “Help! and “Revolver”.  

          • oxhanoverxo

            I think that song was really just picked for the way it flowed with the montage.  That was an awesome montage…  :)

            (MON-TAGE!)

        • Glammie

          Well, I’m younger than the Beatles generation and I always thought that was the worst song on Revolver.  Just sayin’.  

          Love the way Peggy and Stan have switched to pot.  

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YYKK5LDOSRAPJXINSD253PYMIA Kathryn

             The worst song on Revolver is “I Want to Tell You.” Beyond banal.

            • Glammie

              Ugh, forgotten about that one.  You have a point.

      • ballerinawithagun

        The beginning of the “marketing” world. Chemicals, facades, family, all created in a lab, then sold to us as better than the “real” thing.

        • MinasAunt

          That would actually be the 1920s.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_HU6TW5A67UOLM5IPLN6INMAVZ4 Martin C

        What does it mean that Megan told him to start with that specific song. If I were Don, I’d start listening and immediately dislike the song. But since I love Megan, I’d give it 30 seconds more because she specifically recommended it to me.

        But Megan, why that song?I also noticed how strange the image of Megan lying on the floor in the dark at acting class was from the world of SCDP. Of all the shots in the final montage, only hers fitted the new music.

    • MissAnnieRN

      The mention of the suicide clause was a bridge to far for me. It won’t even be a surprise when someone dies or kills themselves. The only surprise will be who it is. I almost think it’s too obvious for it to be Pete. But if it turns out to be Pete I will be surprised if he is successful.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1084733830 Kate Andrews

        I think it’s going to be Layne. He’s in money trouble, he acted really impulsively by kissing Joan, and he’s not happy with his wife. I really think Pete, when it comes down to it, wouldn’t commit suicide because he’d be afraid to. 

        • Emily Guillory

           Yea…Pete’s a pussy, I doubt he’d pull the trigger.  However…now that you mention Layne….hmmmm

          • Sweetbetty

             Maybe someone will save Pete the trouble.  Like his wife, the train guy, the train guy’s wife; and those are only the people he shat upon in last night’s episode.

            • Susan Crawford

              It would be SO typical of The Philanderer to find out about his wife’s encounter with Pete and then come over all self-righteous and go after Pete, wouldn’t it? And then initiate divorce proceedings against his wife just to fix HER wagon. Ah, the double standard – – –

          • Chaiaiai

            Actually, I am wondering if it’s going to be someone we DON’T suspect.  Maybe because of personal experience but the people I’ve known who have committed suicide were complete surprises.  It wasn’t until after the fact that it became clear that things weren’t well.  Maybe Ken?

            • Susan Crawford

              Oh, Gawd, I hope not Ken! At least not until he finishes his book about the world of the ad agency. I sincerely want him to write a bestselling novel that rips the lid off SCDP – under a pen name, of course. That would be absolutely delicious as a story arc that would involve all the SCDP crew, testing their loyalty, revealing their foibles for the world to see, and shaking the agency to the foundation.

            • P M

               I wonder if it’d be more interesting than ‘Sterling’s Gold’

            • CozyCat

              I doubt it would be Ken.  He’s one of the few characters who has managed to fulfill his need for deeper meaning in his life while doing what he has to do to survive in the world.  When Roger called him out on his outside writing, Ken dealt with it in a highly constructive way–he went home and wrote about it (under a new name, of course). 

          • http://www.facebook.com/amy.greiner Amy Greiner Miller

            I think it’s going to be Bert.

            • P M

               I can see Bert doing that. But then again, maybe not. I imagine Bert saying something to the effect that he goes down only when SCDP goes down.

            • Sweetbetty

               I don’t think crusty old Bert would off himself but he’s no spring chicken and statistically he’s the most likely to drop over any day.

            • P M

               Well…… yeah. True.

        • http://twitter.com/BMoke28 Bernadette Moke

          Layne hasn’t been in the season very much so far… if they kill him off it would seem very out of the blue. Maybe Pete will contemplate it, decide against it because (he’s afraid to) and then die in an accident like the elevator shaft. Betty seems pretty depressed too…

        • MissAnnieRN

          It just doesn’t seem very English. Not that Brits don’t off themselves, too, but it just seems rather out of character for layne.

          • ballerinawithagun

            Layne has proven he’s a man in the boxing scene. I don’t think it will be him.

            • Snarky_Amber

              What does “being a man” have to do with whether one commits suicide or not? This comment is confusing to me.

            • Glammie

              Yep, tough boy Ernest Hemingway killed himself.  Pete seems really unhappy, BUT he doesn’t seem hopeless.  Mostly dissatisfied.  Someone who’s suicidal is going to think there’s no way out.  

        • marywv

           Layne is a good guess. He’s also a less essential character than someone like Pete.

          • Sweetbetty

             And with Layne it might not be suicide if he reconnects wit that gangster’s girlfriend.

            • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1084733830 Kate Andrews

              Well, that’s what I was thinking: That gangster’s going to reappear at some point. And Layne may fall on his own sword to get the life insurance for his family, if he is really in severe debt. But I’m just conjecturing because I don’t want Pete the weasel to leave the show. 

        • makeityourself

          My money is on Roger or Bert.  They are logical choices, due to age and previous health issues.  Plus, it would further sever SCDP’s relationship with its past.

          • formerlyAnon

             I’m pulling for Roger. Previous health issues, enough screen time so he’ll be missed, but moving in and out of the center circle of importance at the agency.

            Plus, I gotta admit it, while I’d probably be charmed by him if I met him, I don’t root for him the way I do a lot of the other characters on the show.

        • HeatherD9

           I, too, think it might be Layne.
           My fellow bitter kittens have valid points… However, I keep thinking of the scene in which Pete tells Layne that Trudy’s “with child”.  That’s when Layne makes a snarky comment, then comes ’round the pillar & offers congrats.  It flashes by v. quickly, but the paperwork that Pete has on his desk is the fateful LIFE INSURANCE.  I remember seeing that & thinking… It would be too “Double Indemnity”/ “It’s a Wonderful Life” to kill off Pete just as he’s getting the life he’s been selling for the last few years.  Of course, he does look v much like the credits. 

          However, we all thought it was going to be Roger falling through the ad world last year.  Layne, on the other hand, is near this world but not of this world.  Also, they’ve taken that character about as far as he can go.  Think of all the fabulous bunnys & flings that would show up to the funeral!

          Hmmm then again…  When one considers;  Adam, Gene, & Anna….  I might be a little more concerned for someone directly related to Don. 

        • formerlyAnon

          Ohh, I hope  you’re wrong. I am a sentimental soul and I want things to come right for Layne, someday.

          • P M

            I’m with you! I’m a dedicated Lane-Joan shipper!

      • Sweetbetty

         ” But if it turns out to be Pete I will be surprised if he is successful.”       That made me snort coffee out my nostrils :-)

      • judybrowni

        I think it’s more likely to be Beth.

      • judybrowni

        I think it’s more likely to be Beth.

      • http://www.youtube.com/user/toodleskitty79?feature=guide AWS

         I keep thinking… MURDER… Murder for the insurance?  I could see Pete doing that…

      • 3rdsister

         I’m thinking Roger . . . what has he got now ???

    • liz howson

      Don peering into the abyss of the elevator shaft was another (albeit heavy handed) image of suicide/death.

    • http://www.facebook.com/stacy.clarke1 Stacy Clarke

      Peggy screaming at Don to shut up was stunning for me.  I don’t care how close of a work relationship the two of them have, that scene, in front of their coworkers and a Cool Whip employee, in that time period, would have gotten anyone in trouble, I think.  My eyes were wider than when I realized Joan was kicking Greg out.  And I didn’t end by screeching WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! this time. 

      • Sobaika Mirza

        I chortled myself silly at the reaction of the Cool Whip employee. Also at Roger’s reaction to Pete and the skis – “And I got to see that.”

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3KCDEX4FOTCFHZP6WLKSOOKUVM Danielle

          Since his LSD trip and splitting from Jane, Roger seems to back in old form – I hope it stays that way.  A nice turn from the start of the season when it seemed like he was the one heading for death. 

          • ballerinawithagun

            Roger is so sexy now.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3KCDEX4FOTCFHZP6WLKSOOKUVM Danielle

               Megan’s mom certainly thought so.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3KCDEX4FOTCFHZP6WLKSOOKUVM Danielle

               Megan’s mom certainly thought so.

        • ShivaDiva

          “Jane wanted a kid, but I wouldn’t do that to anyone.”  Best line of the evening!

        • ShivaDiva

          “Jane wanted a kid, but I wouldn’t do that to anyone.”  Best line of the evening!

        • Eclectic Mayhem

          What made me laugh about the woman in the lab was that they’d all forgotten she was there and so had I!

          • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

            That was a very “sitcom” moment.

          • roadtrip1000

             I loved how she told Don he couldn’t smoke.

      • http://www.facebook.com/adamcatkinson Adam Atkinson

        She was right, though–and I’m not sure he would have gotten off too easy if the issue came up with Bert Cooper, who might have agreed that Don was unnecessarily bringing a marriage problem to work and dumping it on Peggy.

      • Annie Leung

         I couldn’t agree more about this scene! Peggy’s come such a long way in her relationship with Don, I never would have imagined her yelling “SHUT UP” at him. Ken casually taking a sip of his water made me giggle though.

        • AZU403

          I ‘m sure he was wishing it was gin.

          • Susan Crawford

            I loved that, too. I also thought he was desperately trying to wash the cloying, chemical taste of the “non-dairy whipped topping” out of his mouth! His version of orange sherbet???

          • Susan Crawford

            I loved that, too. I also thought he was desperately trying to wash the cloying, chemical taste of the “non-dairy whipped topping” out of his mouth! His version of orange sherbet???

      • PaulaBerman

         I was so relieved that she was calling Don on his misdirected anger. Don NEEDS someone to tell him that kind of stuff. He will never be able to course-correct unless he realizes he is doing it. He sabotaged Peggy by refusing to rehearse, setting her up to be terrible in the skit so he could unload on her. Good for her for not just laying down and taking it.

        • ballerinawithagun

          Yes, even though they keep showing Peggy’s failures and not her successes, she is moving up at the firm and so she is allowed to point out Don’s problems, and she is also of the “new” generation, ready to take over.

        • dbaser

          Watching that scene was painful because Don wasn’t even TRYING to work up a little banter with Peggy; he was treating her like an underling instead of a romantic partner.  It was like improv where one of the players doesn’t know the rules and hangs the other performer out to dry.

          Incredibly petty on his part.  Just when you want to give him an attaboy for being understanding with Megan, he acts out, craps on his staff, and could even end up punting the account because he couldn’t play along.

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Liz-Norris/26609454 Liz Norris

            Yes! God, what a dick. Was Peggy a natural at the role-playing thing? No. But he gave up on the whole thing after a hot three seconds. He couldn’t even crack a smile for the client, like “Okay, not our best, but just you wait!” He was totally stone-faced the whole time.

            If I’d been the Head of Desserts, I would have been equally alarmed by both the pitch itself and the fact that Don appeared to hate his own pitch.

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        And I loved Ken in that scene. The whole cast– what they do with so little is amazing.

      • Sweetbetty

         I agree; I couldn’t believe what I was seeing/hearing.  When Don reached inside his jacket I though he was getting a pen and paper to write down that she was fired because he was too angry to even say it.

      • MK03

        Peggy was on fire last night. “I’m not the one you’re mad at so SHUT UP!!” God, I love her.

      • MsKitty

        I witnessed an eerily similar confrontation in my office yesterday, only to turn on the DVR last night and watch this scene unfold. I needed a drink after that, and I never drink on a school night. So much for TV as escapism (lol).

      • fursa_saida

        Man, I was kinda screaming woooo. Don started and escalated the argument. She shut it down. And I also think that Peggy of a few years ago wouldn’t have understood so clearly that Don’s anger truly wasn’t about her, let alone stood up for herself. If she can get vomit off his shirt in the middle of the night, she can tell him to shut up, is my philosophy.

      • fursa_saida

        Man, I was kinda screaming woooo. Don started and escalated the argument. She shut it down. And I also think that Peggy of a few years ago wouldn’t have understood so clearly that Don’s anger truly wasn’t about her, let alone stood up for herself. If she can get vomit off his shirt in the middle of the night, she can tell him to shut up, is my philosophy.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/W7A5N4G7FDTV5U2KOHBVSB55XI Basket

      I have been re-watching the old Men Men and I just cannot feel sorry for Pete.  He is just a brat that expects everything to land in his lap and when it doesn’t he throws a fit, attempts blackmail, rape, etc…

      I also don’t feel sorry for Megan. I am so over Megan and Don.  It is getting boring.  I take Joan’s view on Megan.  She has everything and can afford to indulge.  What’s the story in that, just another overly privilege woman.

      • http://www.facebook.com/adamcatkinson Adam Atkinson

        Maybe. But as Peggy noted, she’s “just one of those girls” who’s good at everything. A genuinely talented privileged person doesn’t bother me so much–I’d pursue what opportunities I could, too.

        • VanessaDK

          I was struck this episode at how much Peggy truly likes Megan, both befriending and defending her in the office. Being able to like someone who is beautiful and talented, whose life “rolls easy”, speaks well for Peg.

        • Sobaika Mirza

          I have a cynical reaction to Peggy’s feelings about Meghan. I think she saw another woman in the copywriting arena and wanted to support her and mentor her, regardless of who this woman was or what she wanted. Kind of like the ‘we gotta stick together’ musings she gave Dawn.

          • http://profile.yahoo.com/M476USE6GD6VEE4RO6JA22VRLI Kriesa

            You may be right, but what’s wrong with that? As a woman working in a still male dominated profession, I’ve been perpetually disappointed by the lack of mentoring I’ve found from my women bosses. I don’t need them to genuinely like me personally, but I’d love a little of the professional guidance that Peggy tried to provide Megan. I don’t think that’s at all cynical. It’s how a professional SHOULD behave toward those below her on the corporate totem pole.

            And with Peggy, it’s not just Megan and Dawn. We saw her coaching Ginsberg not to “act like that” when he met Don.

            • Sobaika Mirza

              Nothing wrong with it at all. There just seems to be the idea that Peggy genuinely likes Meghan and I think her support came from elsewhere.

            • http://profile.yahoo.com/M476USE6GD6VEE4RO6JA22VRLI Kriesa

              OK, I get where you’re coming from, now. You’re saying that in the normal course of life, Peggy and Megan wouldn’t bond. I can agree with that. Neither would Joan and Peggy.

              But I just don’t see it as being cynical or self-serving to be supportive of your professional team. It’s a different sort of relationship, in that it’s one that you don’t choose, but I don’t see it as being false. I still think that Peggy’s attitude is to her credit.

            • Laylalola

              I agree. Or, I disagree with the generally expressed sentiment that Peggy represents all-things Second Wave feminism. Because I’ve never thought there was anything genuine or “for the team” or sisterhoodish about her relationship with Meghan. It made my skin crawl when she told Meghan the other week that she should be jealous of Meghan’s success but isn’t — yeah, that’s not going to strike most women as incredibly passive-aggressive. I mean it’s like Peggy’s pointed look at the purse while Dawn was on her couch … Peggy’s not nearly as politically progressive as she thinks she is. Anyway, my initial reaction to Meghan’s less-than-enthusiastic response to Peggy’s self-absorbed little commentary on how Meghan’s success was all about Peggy was an expected fake response to a fake and irritating passive-aggressive overture. (On top of just a general dissatisfaction with the job itself.) They don’t have a friendship or sisterhood bond or even a mentor-type relationship: Meghan blatantly lied to Peggy this episode without blinking, to get out of working with her and instead audition, that’s how close their professional, personal, and policitical relationship is.

          • SassieCassy

            Yeah, I don’t think she ‘likes’ Meghan one bit. She respects her for being competent and and is just really into the idea of having another female in her department.

            • filmcricket

              I think she’d like Megan just fine if their work circumstances were normal. If Megan had worked her way up the way Peggy did, and Peggy wasn’t in the incredibly awkward position of having to supervise her boss’s wife, they’d probably be perfectly friendly co-workers (although probably not best buds, it’s true). Whatever she dislikes about Megan doesn’t seem to have much to do with Megan as a person, just with the fraught relationship they have due to their positions at work.

      • Sobaika Mirza

        Regarding privilege: I liked Don’s line about indoor plumbing. That’s the key generational difference between these baby boomers and Don, it’s why he doesn’t get them. They have economic stability and myriad freedoms, what more could they possibly want? But it is this set of privileges that have opened doors for them into things Don will never get, specifically something like the importance of the arts.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

          I agree. And we forget how close we are to that world, in generational time at least. My dad is about 10 years younger than Don would be, and he also grew up without indoor plumbing, at least till after World War II. And my current house was built in the 20s and didn’t originally have plumbing or a real kitchen, just a cookstove. (It’s been renovated since then, of course! The kitchen was added on in the 40s and I suspect that’s when the original plumbing was added too.)  And my house is in a neighborhood built for relatively middle-class families.

        • hth16w

           Megan is not a baby boomer, if she was 26 in 1966, which would mean she was born in 1940. The baby boom generation runs 1946-1964.

          • SassieCassy

            Thank you nitpicker of the year lol. I think we are speaking generationally why Don can’t connect with these new audiences and there tastes. Like the girls at the Stones concert.

            • fnarf

              The point is that Megan is also too old to really be a part of the “Beatles generation”. She’s a long ways off from those girls at the Stones concert. She’s younger than Don, but she’s not a boomer and she’s only “hip” in comparison to the old men at SDCP.

            • SassieCassy

              But nobody called Meghan part of the beatles generation so I don’t know what the point of that was. Even still on the show she is being used to demonstrate the tastes and beliefs of that gen. And are you really saying that six years is a ‘long ways off’ because thats all that separates Megan and the boomers.

              lol still nominating you for nitpicker of the year.

            • fnarf

              Six years is a long ways off when you’re twenty. And she is NOT being use to demonstrate the tastes and beliefs of the boomer generation; she’s older than that. She’s very stylish and fresh and modern but nothing remotely to do with boomers. 

              And you can’t “still” nominate me for anything because I’m not the same person who made the other comment.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_FBVC5LBEOWEHBYYCH3A2IZGZHI yahoo-FBVC5LBEOWEHBYYCH3A2IZGZHI

              I do not feel that hth16w was nitpicky to clarify that Megan was not a baby boomer.  I thought the same thing, she is not.  Six years does matter.  It was a very fast-changing time.  However, Megan is in touch with youth culture, unlike some others her age (born about 1940) so she seems part of that lead-up generation to baby-boomers, about the age of the Beatles and Stones and Bob Dylan who mightily pioneered the culture of their younger brothers and sisters.

            • SassieCassy

              But noone called Megan a baby boomer to begin with. Thats why I think this is all very funny

              I also should say that I mean all of this lightheartedly. Just putting it out there since you can never tell tone on the internet although Ive tried putting in a few ‘lols’ so people catch my drift.

            • Sweetbetty

               “And are you really saying that six years is a ‘long ways off’ because thats all that separates Megan and the boomers.”          The difference between a 20 year-old and a 26 year-old in 1966, or even today, is enormous.  I was a teen, a 1948 baby-boomer, when the Beatles became popular and people in their mid 20s were adults and mostly not impressed with them at all.  This isn’t to say that there was some magical dividing line between those born in 1945, non-boomers, and 1946, the first boomer year; but the difference between those born in 1940 and those born in 1946 would have been significant at that time of their lives.  I, too, was surprised at Megan’s knowledge of the Beatles music.

            • Glammie

              Actually, the original comment implies that Megan is a baby-boomer.  The response seemed like a reasonable one and not overly nit-picking to me because it helps inform our ideas of who Megan is.  

              The main baby boomers we see are Sally, her brothers and creepy Glen.  The baby boomers aren’t yet in the workforce at this point.  

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              The oldest of the baby boomers are 20 in 1966 and the youngest are all of two. Megan doesn’t really stand in for the baby boom generation at all in Mad Men. She represents youth generally (in the same ways that Pete and Peggy have filled tht role in the past) but if any character represents the baby boom on Mad Men, it’s Sally Draper.

              So yes, six years is a long way off and you’re being fairly rude when you call people nitpickers just because they’re correct on a point of which you seem somewhat confused.

            • SassieCassy

              I didnt mean to be rude! Really I didnt. Its just that noone is arguing about Megans birth year so I dont really get the back and forth. Even still in terms of the show, Megan is used to illustrate the tastes and desires of the generation we call the boomers, even if she does not technically fit the exact categorization.

              I took the comments section to be healthy fun discussion with a little bit of silly. Never meant to be rude. I guess I will shut up and be more of a spectator from now on

            • roadtrip1000

              I didn’t think you were being rude either. Please don’t shut up!

            • SassieCassy

              But nobody called Meghan part of the beatles generation so I don’t know what the point of that was. Even still on the show she is being used to demonstrate the tastes and beliefs of that gen. And are you really saying that six years is a ‘long ways off’ because thats all that separates Megan and the boomers.

              lol still nominating you for nitpicker of the year.

        • VanessaDK

           …and the way the 1960’s opened the idea of self-fulfillment — in work, in love, etc.
          BTW:  the Beatles are not boomers either….

          • SassieCassy

            The baby boomers didnt listen to the beatles??

          • sweetlilvoice

            Indeed they are not, they were all born during WW II. Of course, John Lennon was married when they became famous too.

            • SassieCassy

              Noone said they were.

      • Frank_821

        I actually had a mixed reaction to Pete’s behavior. His stalking of Rory Gilmore of course was a desperate piece of romanticizing on his part. However she clearly has issues since she did initiate they sex and he even made an attempt to stop it and be decent. I didn’t exactly feel sorry for him but neither did I hate him in this instance

        • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

          I don’t think he was trying to stop it at all. The “are you sure you want this?” “And “You’re just trying to get back at him”, was classic Pete, manipulating her into it. Of course, she was an easy target.
          Pete is such an asshole and I can’t help love him.

          • 3hares

            It seems too much to say he was manipulating her into anything. She kissed him. Why would she need to be a target?

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              Pete let himself into the house. He literally put words in her mouth. Not that she wasn’t interested, but she certainly wasn’t in the frame of mind to think rationally. 

            • 3hares

              But if she was interested enough that she took a non-sexual situation and threw herself into his arms and kissed him–I just don’t see how he’s manipulating her into doing anything by saying reasons why not to do it.

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              I watched it again. You’re right. But in Pete’s defense- or NOT, actually- I think HE thinks he’s seducing her, when it’s actually the other way around.

            • funkycamper

              She left the front door open just so he could come in.  Watch how she doesn’t touch the door at all to close it, not even a soft tap.  She heard him get out of the car and wanted him to come in.  I also suspect that Peter is not the first man she has lured home with the same routine.  It was too practiced.  Not at all like the fumbling Betty did with the car guy or how most any of us would act in a similar situation if it was our first time.  Also, just how many nights a week do the kids stay with her mom?

            • Sweetbetty

               “Also, just how many nights a week do the kids stay with her mom?”         I was wondering about that too.  Was it two nights in a row or were there a few days in between?  And did she send the kids to her mom’s when she knew her husband would be home so they could have a romantic evening alone?   But that wouldn’t explain why they weren’t home the night she first hooked up with Pete.  Can you imagine her shock when she saw Pete with her husband!

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              Ooh, and wouldn’t Pete be pissed if he continues to stalk her and sees her with another guy!

      • http://oneblueberry.com/ LaVonne Ellis

         When Pete said, “Why do they always get to decide,” I yelled, “…said the rapist!”

    • SassieCassy

      Anyone else getting tired of the heavy handedness? I like getting all thematic with the best of them but the only other show that broadcasts this loudly is – wait for – GLEE.

      • http://www.facebook.com/adamcatkinson Adam Atkinson

        Ouch! At least Mad Men’s heavy hand hits the mark, feels apt, etc. Can’t say the same for GLEE, which seems like it’s operating around an alternate universe (which is fine), while trying to make important statements about this one (less fine).

        • SassieCassy

          Okay, maybe not Glee but how about Revenge? MAd Men is two steps away from voiceovers connecting the dots for you.

          • Susan Crawford

            God, I love BOTH MM and Revenge, but for very different reasons.

            MM is so character-driven, and so dedicated to unpacking the huge, overstuffed suitcase of American culture in the 1960’s. The flawed, funny, sad, maddening, self-centered characters are struggling to keep up with an era that is literally all over the map: a dangerous, spirited, adventurous, death-dealing era of great music, crazy-wonderful fashion, changing mores, and the end of innocence.

            Revenge is campy, over-the-top, hilarious fun from start to finish. It is soap opera of the very finest grade, full of fabulous monsters wearing insane clothing, spouting non sequitors faster than speeding bullets fired on a Hampton’s dune. And it is delicious – kind of like a great, big Waterford bowl full of Cool Whip!

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_FBVC5LBEOWEHBYYCH3A2IZGZHI yahoo-FBVC5LBEOWEHBYYCH3A2IZGZHI

            I need my dots connected.

      • Verascity

         I’ll be honest, until now, I’ve kind of felt like people were overreacting about it, because it didn’t seem that bad to me. This week, I was like, “Oh, now I get it.” I thought it was incredibly overdone.

        Peggy, however, was a crystal goddess of perfection.

        • SassieCassy

          “Crystal goddess of perfection.”

          Yesss!

      • http://profiles.google.com/denise.alden Denise Alden

        I don’t watch Glee, but last night was the first time I wasn’t completely enthralled watching Mad Men.  It felt so odd:  ‘what is this supposed to mean?’ and ‘where is this going?’

      • http://profiles.google.com/denise.alden Denise Alden

        I don’t watch Glee, but last night was the first time I wasn’t completely enthralled watching Mad Men.  It felt so odd:  ‘what is this supposed to mean?’ and ‘where is this going?’

        • juliamargaret

          I’m happiest when MM makes me ask those questions! The analysis is half the fun! :-)

    • cteeny21

      It is starting to look like Pete doesn’t really like women. His comment of why “they”, being women, get to decide everything. He really seems to be resenting them.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/W7A5N4G7FDTV5U2KOHBVSB55XI Basket

         He is a rapist.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YAMNQMUGFM4NNSPAQLZRODSD5I Angela

           I thought Greg was the rapist/husbeast! When did this occur? I must have missed something! Tell tell tell!

          • http://profile.yahoo.com/W7A5N4G7FDTV5U2KOHBVSB55XI Basket

             Pete raped an au pair who worked in his building.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YAMNQMUGFM4NNSPAQLZRODSD5I Angela

              Oh yeah! okay, I’m starting to remember now, he fixed up her (employers) expensive dress for her and demanded some payback. Yeah, sorry, I have to blame the “mentalpause”…totally slipped my mind. Well, I still kind of like ole Pete in spite of everything, he still has a childlike quality, and he needs a chance to grow up. I hope he’s not a goner!
              Is no one gonna mention The Gay Dandy who gave Don a significant look, he was practically blushing!

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              The Dandy!
              Boy, things have certainly changed since Sal’s day. Sal….. Poor Sal. Will probably never get out of that closet. :(

            • Susan Crawford

              How things have changed, right? ONly a few years back, Sal’s encounter with a hunky bellboy was literally a “kiss of death” to his career, and now an openly gay man sits at the client table and directs the structure of the ad. Of course the requisite snarky remarks fly the minute he exits the agency, but still –  a major change has taken place. Poor Sal – one can only hope that the times will grant him some liberation, but he may have been so damaged that he will stay in his closet. I hope not, though. He deserves happiness.

            • sarahjane1912

              Yup, Sal DOES deserve happiness. And poor Kitty too. Sigh.

              I can’t help thinking that while, as you say, an ‘openly gay man sits at the client table and directs the structure of the ad’ he may have done the do and blown his own titular Lucky Strike guy to get there. Sal’s problem wasn’t just being gay but that he didn’t play the game when required. Nothing is certain in terms of what might have happened if Sal HAD stepped out with that nasty piece of work from Lucky Strike [could well have been fired anyway] but his ‘principles’ at the time meant he was shown the door. Still very sad about that. :-(

            • Glammie

              Stonewall was 1967, right?  I keep hoping Sal will reappear around them–at least so we see how he’s doing.

            • sarahjane1912

              1969. And if memory serves, the riots at the Stonewall involved the really downtrodden on-the-edge LGBT types [the homeless hustler ones, mostly] not the ones who were gainfully employed with a beard like Kitty. Of course, we don’t know what happened to Sal after he left Sterling Cooper but with his talent, I suspect he was able to get another job somewhere and not have to turn tricks for cash. 

              I also hope Sal reappears around them, but wouldn’t it be fab if he turned up as a client? Bit of a leap, I know, but he could bring a lot to the table, I think [just like the young chap from this episode]. Sorry, have to add … loved that lingering appraising look he gave Don as he left! ;-)

            • Glammie

              Yeah, I don’t actually expect to see Stonewall portrayed with Sal at the forefront, but I’m thinking we might see him reappear as gay liberation starts to occur.  My father’s ad-agency partner came out in either the late 60s/early 70s.  It was early enough that my father had a bit of a hard time with it, whereas 10 years later, he had multiple gay employees and it had become more of a norm.  

            • roadtrip1000

              A couple of years ago I saw a documentary on the Stonewall riots. I was really surprised at how extensive the rioting was. Gay men of all walks of life had had it with being harassed by the police. So it wasn’t just restricted to the down-and-out. Years later there were riots in Tompkins Square Park that involved homeless people and anarchists. Maybe that’s what you’re thinking of.

            • sarahjane1912

              I don’t think so … 

              That said, I’ve seen Stonewall doco’s myself and you’re absolutely right: the riots DID involve gay men from all walks of life back in ’69. However, the bar itself … wasn’t it originally a hang-out for — and I blush, seriously, for going to Wiki for this but — “an assortment of patrons … known to be popular with the poorest and most marginalized people in the gay community: drag queens, representatives of a newly self-aware transgender community, effeminate young men, hustlers, and homeless youth.” When the riot broke though, it spread to draw in the large population of GLBT in the Village and surrounds. 

              Happy to be corrected, cheers! Stonewall was the GLBT ‘shot heard ’round the world’ and kickstarted the burgeoning Gay Pride movement in the US and gradually into other countries [like my own, Australia, with its Sydney Mardi Gras] so it’s important, very, to get the history correct! ;-)

            • P M

               Actually, I respect that Sal had those principles. He wouldn’t sleep with just anybody, hopefully.

            • VanessaDK

              He also forced himself on Peggy in a similar way in S1, and I can never think of him as anything else.

            • Verascity

               What? I never had the impression he raped Peggy. She wanted him.

            • juliamargaret

              He didn’t force himself on Peggy, he showed up at her doorstep and begged her for sex. And she grabbed him by the hand, dismissed her roommate, and pulled him into her apartment. That says as much about Peggy as it does about Pete. 

              He definitely forced himself on the au pair. He may not have held her physically down, but he blocked her way from escaping and coerced and threatened her into complying.

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              Maybe not technically, but he was certainly in a position of power over Peggy. 
              Now their SECOND encounter. She was definitely all in for that one.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

            The situation w/the au pair could be described as rape.

          • Frank_821

            Pete forced himself on a nanny of a neighbor

          • fnarf

            He didn’t force himself on Beth last night, because she reciprocated — out of misery. But I don’t get the impression Pete would have stopped if she hadn’t. That was full-on creep-o stalker action, coming into the house like that — and then inviting himself over the next night? Shudder. Pete’s a problem.

            • 3hares

              He reciprocated. I completely agree that Pete’s a problem, especially when he shows up at her house, but I don’t understand how that sexual encounter can be interpreted as Pete even being pushy. She kisses him and says, “Don’t you want me?” when he’s slightly hesitant.

            • fnarf

              I dunno — he walked into her house uninvited and closed the door. He approached her. She knew what was going on. The woman is clearly disturbed as well — Pete is turned on by fear, I think.

            • 3hares

              I just don’t see how the ep makes sense if this scene is interpreted as Pete assaulting a fearful woman. Not only do you have to ignore ambiguous things like her leaving the door open, you have to ignore her being the one to kiss him (and so make it sexual), and her asking him “Don’t you want me? You can have me” when he is hesitating, but ignore that a big part of the story is Pete not being in control. They have one sexual encounter that she initiates, then he wants more and gets nothing, but feels like she’s holding out a thread of hope.  We know Pete’s capable of forcing himself on someone, but I thought this ep did a lot to show that she was in control of this relationship and knew what she was doing. If their genders were reversed and it was Peggy, for instance, I think Beth might be seen as a bit of a cad.

            • P M

               I don’t believe she’s a cad: more like a woman who ‘needs tending’ in ways and amounts that her husband can’t seem to fulfill; who feels guilty about herself; and can’t fulfill herself in a healthy manner.

              She herself says she’s done this before: she also sounds like she knows what can happen when things go wrong. And puts the kibosh on Pete for that.

              I see it as a woman not being able to get what she wants in a healthy way, and societal mores and standards blocking her like a wall.

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              Bingo. I think he was fully prepared to force himself onto her, and will in the future if he ever gets the chance. I don’t think he’s done stalking.
              (But yes, I retract my initial opinion that he seduced her.)

            • MK03

              Pete has a habit of sticking his nose where it doesn’t belong, and it NEVER ends well for him. Sitting at Don’s desk (and receiving the Box O’Secrets), getting involved in the dress debacle, inviting himself into Beth’s house…Pete, quit sticking your nose into other people’s business. It never ends well.

            • P M

               He needs a dog. Dogs can stick their nose up strange places and people think they’re just being dogs :D

            • P M

               Pete has what we would call a problem with boundaries.

        • margaret meyers

          I cringe for “Tweety.”  She really loves him and there is almost nothing nice about Pete. 
          He’d make a great “bitter divorced man who drinks too much, says nasty things and hits on increasingly younger women while complaining about how women get everything the way they want it.”  We had a neighbor like him who always brought his daughters to our house on custody weekends so he could drink and bitch/brag inappropriately. He didn’t know what to do with his girls!

          • P M

             ick.

      • SassieCassy

        Pete has never liked women.

    • ldancer

      Thanks for putting up this post so fast! What a great episode. My random thoughts:

      – Did you guys notice that near the end, when Don comes home to Megan after her first day not working at SCDP, the scene is shot to make their kitchen eerily resemble Don & Betty’s Ossining kitchen? That gave me a chill.

      – Beth’s crazily helpless facial expressions pained and annoyed me, but were in character. Pete was very predatory with her. This is disturbing. Good job, writers! This has potential to explode well.

      – I loved watching Peggy let Don have it.

      – Cool Whip. Argh. That stuff tastes and feels like whipped Vaseline. Petroleum-based dessert topping!

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/W7A5N4G7FDTV5U2KOHBVSB55XI Basket

         Most of all, I like how naturally Peggy seemed to feel when she unleashed it on Don.  If he pulled rank and had her reprimanded, I think she would be shocked.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

        I’ve never understood the concept of Cool Whip. It takes all of 5 minutes to make whipped cream. 

        • halleygee

          Agree, but real whipped cream doesn’t stay “fresh” in the fridge for a week or two…

          • margaret meyers

            Cool whip also never softens back to liquid — never.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

              When I make whipped cream it never lasts long enough to either go bad or revert to liquid! :-)

            • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344922354 Eric Scheirer Stott

               To make whipped cream (as opposed to using the redi-whip) you’ve got to have cream- which means buying it on purpose which means planning ahead. You can’t just keep whipping cream in the fridge waiting to use it, even the pasteurized stuff goes bad fast. Unless you’re experienced with making it the process is a bit tricky. If you use a hand whisk it takes time. If you use an electric mixer you can go from whipped cream to sort-of-butter in a couple of seconds. I’m not fond of Cool Whip but it’s a useful thing to have on hand during the summer dessert season when you’ve got berries and want to throw something together fast.

            • Glammie

              Ultrapasteurized cream lasts a long time.  Certainly enough to buy it during a weekly shopping trip and then have it around.  Don’t find cream a challenge to whip either, but to each their own.

            • Sweetbetty

               Try letting it sit out of the fridge at room temperature for several hours or overnight.  Not very appetizing when you open the lid.

          • makeityourself

            Only a week or two?  More like a month of two.  It’s rather like a Twinkie that way.

            My mom used to make parfaits for us kids — a blob of jello, then a blog of Cool White, then a blob of jello, and so on, in tall glasses.  We thought it was the greatest!

            • Sweetbetty

              Left-over Cool Whip does get green and fuzzy after a while in the fridge.  Maybe not after a week, or even two, but definitely by a month.  This I know from experience.

            • formerlyAnon

              I haven’t ever actually bought Cool Whip as an adult. But if I did, it would be to mix with Jello. It’s a combination that I’d probably never think was delicious but that It was such a huge treat in my childhood.

            • malarkey

              LOL I remember this too! My mom made them, and then my sister. We had tall narrow glasses, much like champagne flutes, and would make ‘parfaits’ in them. Layers of Jello, Cool Whip, bananas, other fruit if we had it…

        • Sweetbetty

            To some people that’s too much time to spend on “cooking”.

        • Sweetbetty

            To some people that’s too much time to spend on “cooking”.

        • cleep1000

          It’s non-dairy, for those who can’t tolerate dairy or want to cut it out of their diet.

          • fnarf

            It’s not really non-dairy, though. It has casein in it — milk protein. 

            • cleep1000

              You are right. I checked at the grocery store last night, and it does indeed contain dairy. I could swear it used to be billed as “non-dairy” but that label is no longer there. I guess it just didn’t taste as good without it?

            • Sweetbetty

               I seemed to remember “non-dairy” too so I looked it up:  ” It was originally described as “non-dairy” as it contained no cream or milk and no lactose; however, it did contain the milk derivative casein. In 2010 both skimmed milk and light cream were added to Original Cool Whip.”  The hyperlinks are Wiki’s, not mine.

      • AZU403

        Yes, I noticed the kitchen!

      • Jennifer Coleman

        Absolutely that was Betty Draper territory! Especially after Joan’s comments about the women Don marries. He’s scared that things are going to backslide, as evidenced by all the pasted on smiles he’s giving. He only got close to his tears by the outburst on Peggy, even it was completely wrongheaded. I’m not so sure about his growth this year. He treats Megan like a security blanket and that’s why she had to work in the office with him. What happens next is anybody’s guess.

        Again, I’m so impressed with Peggy’s mothering of Megan. Everyone in an office should hope to have a mentor like her. Even at the end, she strong-armed the guys to treat her right, stood up for her in talking with Joan and second guessed her (correct) firm treatment. Peggy was right to tell Don she was a better trainer/mentor to Megan then he was. 

        I’m getting the feeling Roger is setting Pete up with that sports account, which might just put him over the edge.

        • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

          I was worried at first that Don would try to turn Peggy into Megan. But the scene at Cool Whip put an end to that.

    • AliciaChamisa

      I loved Don’s Allen Funt reference; anyone else remember “Candid Camera?”

      • http://www.facebook.com/adamcatkinson Adam Atkinson

        Yes! Loved it, too!

      • NurseEllen

         I caught that too, but I thought it was said by Roger (when he was giving the skis to Pete).  “Where’s your sense of humor?/There’s a rumor/Laughter’s on the way/Smile! You’re on Candid Camera!”

      • Sweetbetty

         It was actually Roger’s comment (he gets all the best lines, doesn’t he) and I snickered out loud, then wondered how many of today’s viewers would get the reference.  I guess you’d have to substitute Allen Funt’s name with Ashton Kutcher’s of “Punk’d” fame.

        • http://twitter.com/Selkiechick Selkiechick

           I think that living in the “age of the internet” is one of the things that really helps a show like this. They can throw out all the period references they want, knowing that the ones people don’t get, they can look up on Wikipedia during the commercial break (or pause the dvr…). They don’t have to be as concerned that people will feel lost, and they can throw out tidbits like the Romney dig that get people talking about the 60’s, and some of the things happening around the show.

        • http://twitter.com/Selkiechick Selkiechick

           I think that living in the “age of the internet” is one of the things that really helps a show like this. They can throw out all the period references they want, knowing that the ones people don’t get, they can look up on Wikipedia during the commercial break (or pause the dvr…). They don’t have to be as concerned that people will feel lost, and they can throw out tidbits like the Romney dig that get people talking about the 60’s, and some of the things happening around the show.

    • VanessaDK

      So far in MM the downs dont seem to head straight down (as in an elevator shaft). They have all been cyclical. SCs decline and buyout was offset by a very satisfying rebellion; Dons alcoholism and deterioration ended with recovery and marriage to the fresh young Megan. The ebbs and flows of life seem to always be at work here. Makes it hard to predict what comes next.

      Almost makes David Simon right when he says not to judge a TV series epidisodically. Wait to see where the arc leads. Of course half the fun is guessing and then looking back with hindsight.

    • cteeny21

      That scene where Megan went into the elevator, and kissed Don good bye, really felt like a good bye scene that you would see in a movie. Like the kind where they will never see each other again. Did anybody else get that impression? I was starting to think something was going to happen to her or that maybe that could be the beginning of the end to their relationship.

      • http://profiles.google.com/denise.alden Denise Alden

        Yes, I felt the same way.

      • http://profiles.google.com/denise.alden Denise Alden

        Yes, I felt the same way.

      • Sweetbetty

         It hadn’t occurred to me, but yes, I can see that now.  They will never see each other again as they had been up until then.  The next time they see each other she’s no longer a SCDP employee and he’s no longer her boss.  She’s an aspiring actress who will be running off to classes and auditions and a world Don knows nothing about.  I doubt she regularly cooked dinner for them but they probably ate together in restaurants and now chances are they won’t even be able to manage that.  They won’t be able to talk over the day and bounce ideas off each other because neither one will be invested in the others’ activities.  They were seldom closer than during that cab ride home after they sold the Heinz account as a team and now that will never happen again.  Unless some drastic adjustments are made I do agree that the elevator farewell was the beginning of the end of their marriage.

      • Sweetbetty

         It hadn’t occurred to me, but yes, I can see that now.  They will never see each other again as they had been up until then.  The next time they see each other she’s no longer a SCDP employee and he’s no longer her boss.  She’s an aspiring actress who will be running off to classes and auditions and a world Don knows nothing about.  I doubt she regularly cooked dinner for them but they probably ate together in restaurants and now chances are they won’t even be able to manage that.  They won’t be able to talk over the day and bounce ideas off each other because neither one will be invested in the others’ activities.  They were seldom closer than during that cab ride home after they sold the Heinz account as a team and now that will never happen again.  Unless some drastic adjustments are made I do agree that the elevator farewell was the beginning of the end of their marriage.

        • TheDivineMissAnn

          Ya know, if you think about it, the only thing they really seem to have in common IS the ad agency.  It will be interesting to see how they each adjust to this change in the future.

      • MK03

        Most definitely. I don’t think Don’s really grown all that much. Maybe he doesn’t want her to end up like Betty, but he also doesn’t want her to have a life as someone other than his wife. As we have seen time and again this season, Don wants an attachment to take to client dinners. He is not really interested in having a wife who has her own life.

        • formerlyAnon

          Beyond “not really interested” in having a wife with her own life – I don’t think he can conceptualize a wife in any way that incorporates that. (And I think the vast majority of the men on the show are the same.)

    • http://twitter.com/elousive elouise

      I was struck by how Beth resembled the Betty of a few years ago – in clothing, situation, and name. Seems like yet another way in which Pete is, intentionally or not, attempting to imitate Don… 

      • sherrietee

         Not to mention in name.  Both Betty and Beth are nicknames for Elizabeth.

      • http://twitter.com/RozSeven Roz

         Another layer for the Beth character is her strong resemblance (petite, brunette w/bubble flip, high forehead) to Peggy!

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

          Interesting – I actually thought she looked a lot like Kitty Romano – same heart-shaped face, hair color and style.

          • malarkey

            Yes, yes yes. I was about to post this. 

        • judybrowni

          And Trudy.

          A future melancholic and neurotic Trudy, when she becomes aware of Pete’s infidelity.

          • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

            She’s been aware in the past. I wonder if she thinks it’s totally behind him?

            • Susan Crawford

              Woe is Pete if (when?) Trudy finds out about Beth!

      • sarahjane1912

        .. And Beth’s behaviour in ‘picking up’ Pete was a throwback, I thought, to Betty’s pick-up in the bar during the Cuban missile crisis episode. 

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1084733830 Kate Andrews

      As a Beatles fan, I loved how that theme wound through the episode with the clients wanting that pale retread of the Beatles’ early pop selves (which so disgusted Ginsberg), or the Beatles’ own “running from crowds of girls” era . It also recalled Don whistling “I Wanna Hold Your Hand,” which comes off as sooo old compared to where the series is now. Or Sally screaming bloody murder when Don got Beatles concert tickets. Now the Beatles are singing about death, and out of all the grownups, *maybe* Roger would be the only one who gets that.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3KCDEX4FOTCFHZP6WLKSOOKUVM Danielle

        What was up with Ginsberg anyway?  He had a bug up his ass the whole episode.

        • sarahjane1912

          I noticed that too!

          And did you notice that lovely bit of method acting when Don offers the guys a drink and Ginsberg surreptitiously checks his watch [but nevertheless, really makes no secret of it] as if to ‘say': Damn, it’s MORNING, way too early to be indulging! Who ARE you people?! 

          • Susan Crawford

            Yep! It shows that despite Ginsberg’s seeming “street smart” bravado, he is really a pretty naive young fellow about some of those “uptown executive” traditions. What Ginzo needs is a couple months under Roger’s tutelage.

            Think of it: Roger takes Ginzo to his tailor and barber; Roger teaches Ginzo about single-malt scotch; Roger takes Ginzo to The Four Seasons and La Fonda del Sol and teaches him about fine dining and seeing and being seen; Roger takes Ginzo to industry parties and shows him how to work a room and pick up classy broads. And then they drop acid together and see the light!

            Are you listening, Mr. Weiner??

            • TheDivineMissAnn

               “And then they drop acid together and see the light!”

              THAT is hysterical!  Like x 1000.

            • fursa_saida

              Oh my god, I would pay good crisp money to see that. SPECIAL THANKSGIVING EPISODE, SOMETHING, WEINER, PLEASE. 

              It could be like that time Don and Layne went on their man-date, but even better.

      • sarahjane1912

        I liked — with all the suicide/death/potential-for-death references — how the Beatles album was ‘Revolver’. Yes, I know it was released in ’66, so it was timely for the episode, but I thought at the time: Bang, bang. Another death reference.

    • TheDivineMissAnn

      I was cringing during the Cool Whip laboratory scene.  It was painful to watch them flail about, tripping up at every line.

      • AliciaChamisa

        I loved the “bad acting” by great actors in that scene, cringeworthy indeed!

        • TheDivineMissAnn

          Agreed!  It’s like a outstanding singer trying to sing off key.

        • TheDivineMissAnn

          Agreed!  It’s like a outstanding singer trying to sing off key.

    • Frank_821

      I have to say I cheered when Peggy lashed out at both Megan and Don. She’s been having to walk on eggshells for over a year now where Megan was concerned and she’s had to bottled up her frustration all this time. Don put her in a very difficult situation-especially if Megan had turned out to be mediocre at the job. Don was really oblivious to how awkward an environment he created

      Megan at least had some awareness what the other employees,especially the women, thought of her and she knew she had a lot to prove to them. In hindsight Peggy had to be harder on Megan than anyone else to make her earn her place.

      • PaulaBerman

         What neither Don nor Megan realized until last night’s episode is the horrible position they both put Peggy in. Don, by making her train his wife to do a job that we all know a person must be much better qualified for barring nepotism (recall the search process for Ginsberg and his extensive portfolio, when Megan had zero), placed Megan’s success on Peggy’s shoulders. All he did all season is sabotage Megan’s success and ability to fit in by asking her to leave and drop everything all the time. Megan, by asking Peggy to lie for her, also very presumptuous. I’m glad Peggy finally got to tell them both off. They richly deserved it and of course, with the insight they got from Peggy, they were able to be happier. I hope it was as satisfying for Peggy.

        • Lisa_Cop

          Megan didn’t ask Peggy to lie. Megan lied to Peggy about where she was going.

          • PaulaBerman

            She didn’t go up to Peggy and say, “Will you lie for me?” But she did put her in a weird position vis a vis Don. Megan had to know Don was going to call looking for her. I guess she couldn’t expect Peggy to lie for her, so instead she and Don shared a laugh at Peggy’s expense, both gigglingly admitting that they lie to Peggy to get out of doing work. It made me want to slap both of them.

      • AliciaChamisa

        He didn’t care

      • Susan Crawford

        I also felt proud of Peggy for yelling at Don in the lab – er, I mean kitchen – scene. She of all people at SCDP had to bear the brunt of having Megan on board. Don essentially took Peggy’s cooperation for granted when he turned the responsibility for showing Megan the ropes over to her. There was no place even for Megan to sit, for God’s sake, and Peggy ended up dispossessed every so often when Megan was typing at her desk. She was the one who had to “train” Megan while still juggling her own work. She was the one who had to run interference when the others on the creative team made jokes about Megan. She was the one who had to smile and make nice.

        The final straw for Peggy was Don’s calling her in at the last minute to sub for Megan, not giving her enough time to rehearse her “lines”, and then blaming the debacle on HER for flubbing the lines. I would have done the same thing at that point – accompanied, perhaps, by planting a dish of Cool Whip on Don’s handsome head!

      • rowsella

        Meghan always seems to act about 12 in her interactions with Peggy.

        • sarahjane1912

          Come to think of it … Megan behaves like a 12-year-old in a lot of her dealings with EVERYONE on the show, except when she’s having a stand-up knock-down fight with Don. She has this coy half-embarrassed way about her most vividly expressed last ep when she was batting off all the compliments for the Heinz pitch. Her clothes may be uber-confident and up-to-the-minute [except when, as TLo point out, she's rocking the schoolgirl look to labour a point] but she still SEEMS like a schoolgirl in her mannerisms as well.

          • roadtrip1000

            Megan does tend to seem hesitant in her dealings with people. However, I think that probably is related to her role as the youngest in her family, and quite possibly the peacemaker with her parents. But deep down she seems pretty confident.

    • http://twitter.com/genabarrons Genevieve Barrons

      Haven’t seen the episode yet, but after reading your synopsis I’m struck by the use of the Emily Dickinson poem as a title. I think that undoubtedly adds layers and foreshadowing to what was going on on screen. 

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1084733830 Kate Andrews

         It’s a Sylvia Plath poem, and what do you think of when you hear her name? Ding-ding-ding, suicide.

        • http://annequichante.wordpress.com/ Anne

          I actually didn’t realize that it was a Plath poem (recognized it but couldn’t place it), and my first thought when Harold took Pete back to his house to talk about insurance was, “They’re going to find Beth with her head in the oven.”  Then I felt really cool when I looked up “Lady Lazarus.” ;)

    • miagain

      Cool Whip….
      the basis of just about every dessert coming out of my mother’s kitchen in the 60’s and 70’s.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com Nancy Abrams

        Especially yogurt pie: Prepared graham cracker crust, two containers of any flavor yogurt and a carton of Cool Whip. Refrigerate for a while and you’ve got a delicious dessert. My mother loved to serve it to company.

        • sarahjane1912

          *Gags* Sorry. 

          In my defense, I’d heard of Cool Whip before having seen it on American TV shows in the past, but I did have to look it up to find out exactly what it was when it came up in MM this week. The closest we had in my home country growing up, was real cream in a can [sweetened, stored under pressure] and that was only used in store-bought cakes from memory. 100 percent my mother wouldn’t have used it. ;-)

        • miagain

          My mother (an admittedly lousy cook) would add lemonade concentrate for her lemon pie… Part of me shudders at the thought… but I seem to remember loving the stuff!!

    • JulieTy

      BEATLES: I found it amusing/disturbing that the SCDP client and staffers were so excited about ripping off “A Hard Day’s Night.” It’s already late 1966, and that film came out in 1964. SO much has changed since then — as personified by the Beatles. They had already moved WAY beyond the cuddly “mop top” phase. Revolver was groundbreaking in form as well as content –just compare the cover art to the cover of AHDN — and Sgt. Pepper is up next. Not only is SCDP not cutting-edge, it seems to be falling behind the curve. 

      I found it gratifying that when Don turned off the stereo, the needle was indeed positioned over the last track (“Tomorrow Never Knows”). But why would he start there? If he’d started at the beginning, he might have found something more to his liking; “Here, There and Everywhere,” or “Got to Get You INto My LIfe,” perhaps? Or he might have been able to relate to “Taxman” (track 1).

      But the MM masterminds interestingly chose “Tomorrow Never Knows.” Roger samples LSD and Megan tries to teach Don about current music with “Revolver” — he plays one of the first recorded psychedelic songs, which was inspired by both Timothy Leary and the Tibetan Book of the Dead — and SCDP is trying to keep in step with “A Hard Day’s Night”?? 

      PETE: I think Pete is unhappy because (like Megan, Joan, etc.) he has what he always thought he wanted, but it doesn’t fulfill him. And he never really wanted to house in Connecticut (or the child, for that matter). That was all Trudy. Remember the Cuban missile crisis? She escaped to the country and he chose to die in Manhattan. He is in love with the city and never wanted to leave it. 

      Furthermore, Pete, like Peggy, has been seeking Don’s approval and affection since the pilot — and he has had even less success there than she.

      And has anyone else noticed that his hairline (the character’s, not the actor’s) seems to be receding?

      • barbarasingleterry

        RE the Beatles, Megan suggested Don listen to that track first.  She is dragging him into her world, or at least attempting to do so.  I liked the way the song was playing across all the character arcs last night and the only one who truly related to it was Megan in her acting class.

      • MsInterpret

        Megan told Don to ‘start with this one’, hence why he placed the needle over the right place for Tomorrow Never Knows…

        • JulieTy

          I thought she was referring to the album. I’ll have to rewatch! :-)

          • Sweetbetty

             Don’t feel bad, that’s what I thought too.  Guess I need to get a new big screen High Def TV and new glasses :-)

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3KCDEX4FOTCFHZP6WLKSOOKUVM Danielle

          I think she was trying to broaden his view on modern music.  Tomorrow Never Knows is the most forward song on the album, and since it’s the last track, she probably thought that he would end up turning off the record before he got to that one.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3KCDEX4FOTCFHZP6WLKSOOKUVM Danielle

          I think she was trying to broaden his view on modern music.  Tomorrow Never Knows is the most forward song on the album, and since it’s the last track, she probably thought that he would end up turning off the record before he got to that one.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

        Re Pete’s hairline: there’s been some discussion of this. I think the actor, Vincent Kartheiser, had his hairline shaved/waxed to give this effect.

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344922354 Eric Scheirer Stott

           That’s what happened.

        • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

          I hope not waxed! That could make it permanent. D:

      • Spicytomato1

        “BEATLES: I found it amusing/disturbing that the SCDP client and staffers were so excited about ripping off “A Hard Day’s Night.” It’s already late 1966, and that film came out in 1964.”

        Agreed although for some reason I assumed that direction was client-driven. I got the sense that the SCDP people weren’t exactly thrilled with the idea, especially Ginsberg, but were going with it anyway to please the typical, stodgy, behind the times clients.

        • JulieTy

          I agree, but it’s almost been a mantra — at least for Don — that client-driven ideas don’t work (e.g. Patio). And Kenny seemed to be on board, didn’t he?

          • suzq

            Ken is an accounts guy, not a creative guy.  Why ask for his opinions?  They’re usually wrong.

      • ballerinawithagun

        Generational change needs to come to SCDP or the “new” generation will be breaking off. I now have a new “suicide” theory. It will be the “suicide” of SCDP not a person. SCDP will not be willing to change. But now that Roger has dropped acid maybe he will provide the funding for the breakaway team.

      • Sweetbetty

        ” And has anyone else noticed that his hairline (the character’s, not the actor’s) seems to be receding?”       That’s been much discussed since episode one of this season but what I noticed last night was Don’s hair, especially in the last several scenes of the show.  It seems to be more slicked down, or thinner, and maybe a few grey strands visible.  His hair just generally made him look older to me.

      • Sweetbetty

        ” And has anyone else noticed that his hairline (the character’s, not the actor’s) seems to be receding?”       That’s been much discussed since episode one of this season but what I noticed last night was Don’s hair, especially in the last several scenes of the show.  It seems to be more slicked down, or thinner, and maybe a few grey strands visible.  His hair just generally made him look older to me.

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344922354 Eric Scheirer Stott

           I agree that they’ve aged him a bit, but he IS at least five years older.

          • Sweetbetty

             Yes he is, but if his hair isn’t thinning it looked to me like he was reverting to the Brylcreemed Don of the early years.  And none of the male characters at SCDP, except maybe Ginsberg and that may just be his own style, has let their hair grow out the slightest in response to the longer hair craze brought by the Beatles and other popular musicians of the time.  I’m not talking about shoulder length, but a lot of fairly traditional adult men let the hair grow at the nape of their neck and over their ears a bit at that time.

            • sarahjane1912

              I think, at heart, Pete will always be the boy with the ‘short back and sides’ haircut he no doubt was required to have at his private school. He was employed, remember, because of old school tie [and his family connections to the Old Families of NY] and kept his job back in S1 because of those connections. Maybe I’m reading too much into his look on MM, but I suspect that even though he occasionally breaks out with a plaid coat at a party, he maintains his traditional look for work because he is at heart a traditionalist sartorially, even if he behaves like a dirty dog at times. ;-)

      • MK03

        I was hoping he’d land on Eleanor Rigby. Really, that could be the Mad Men theme. “Ahh, look at all the lonely people…”

        • Susan Crawford

          Is it EVER! Great call, MK03.

    • juliamargaret

      The suicide theme also is present in the title of the episode, “Lady Lazarus”. It’s a Sylvia Plath poem about her repeated near death experiences/attempts at suicide. She compares the doctors who resuscitate her to Nazis, because in her mind, they are cruelly preventing her from experiencing relief through death. At the end, there is some phoenix/firebird imagery, in which she says that this time around she’ll succeed in her attempt because she’s going to eat the men around her. 

      At first I thought Lady Lazarus was represented by Megan, because she’s been desperately wanting to get out of advertising, but her circumstances are making that difficult. Didn’t seem to fit for Peggy, who is a total survivor. But now the Beth character seems to be a good fit. She tried ending things with Pete multiple times, right after the first incident of adultery, then when he called, then when he came over to her house. But he won’t let it die. I wonder if there’ll be a little arc with her and then she’ll be the one to kill herself.

      • VanessaDK

        I tried to reply but it disappeared.

        The use of Plath was oddly out of sync since she committed suicide in 63 and the poem wasn’t published till the late 70s I believe.

        Interesting comment on attempted suicide, stopped by those who want you to suffer again and again.

        • juliamargaret

          Hmm, I haven’t thought about the titles too much before, and whether they are period appropriate or sometimes make references that look forward. I guess since the poem was _written_ before the time of the episode, maybe it’s not too out of sync.

        • judybrowni

          From Wikipedia
          …’Lady Lazarus,’ fear, hate, love, death and the poet’s own identity become fused at black heat…They are poems, as Robert Lowell says in his preface to Ariel, that ‘play Russian roulette with six cartridges in the cylinder.’
          Some in the feminist movement saw Plath as speaking for their experience… “When Sylvia Plath’s Ariel was published in the United States in 1966, American women noticed. Not only women who ordinarily read poems, but housewives and mothers whose ambitions had awakened [...] Here was a woman, superbly trained in her craft, whose final poems uncompromisingly charted female rage, ambivalence, and grief, in a voice with which many women identified.”[51]

        • judybrowni

          From Wikipedia
          …’Lady Lazarus,’ fear, hate, love, death and the poet’s own identity become fused at black heat…They are poems, as Robert Lowell says in his preface to Ariel, that ‘play Russian roulette with six cartridges in the cylinder.’
          Some in the feminist movement saw Plath as speaking for their experience… “When Sylvia Plath’s Ariel was published in the United States in 1966, American women noticed. Not only women who ordinarily read poems, but housewives and mothers whose ambitions had awakened [...] Here was a woman, superbly trained in her craft, whose final poems uncompromisingly charted female rage, ambivalence, and grief, in a voice with which many women identified.”[51]

          • VanessaDK

             So “Ariel” was published in 1966, eh?  Puts it all right back on track, and makes it much more a part of the 1960s development of the women’s movement than I thought.  That gives it more of a double edged connotation as a title–both the eerie cloud of suicide, but also the beginning of women reinventing themselves, overcoming male domination and “eating men.”

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_OSYAJATXUH3QX7ZDDF52GXG4PU Janie R

        That makes more sense to me than Pete commiting suicide. Her character is definitely neurotic enough.

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        I think so too. Clearly Beth is struggling, we knew that about her before we met her. She is much more young/beautiful/fragile than what I would have pictured. How did she wind up married to that creep??

        • TheDivineMissAnn

          He’s probably the source of her struggle.  I know I’d be depressed if I was married to him.

      • CatherineRhodes

        Good catch on the Plath reference. When I saw the title of the episode, it rang familiar but I couldn’t place it. You sent me scurrying to the bookshelf to find my copy of “The Collected Poems” and look it up.

      • CatherineRhodes

        Good catch on the Plath reference. When I saw the title of the episode, it rang familiar but I couldn’t place it. You sent me scurrying to the bookshelf to find my copy of “The Collected Poems” and look it up.

      • CassandraMortmain

        Gosh, I hope we don’t have an arc with Beth.  There are so many characters that are much more integral to the SCDP universe that we rarely spend time with.  So I wouldn’t want to waste time with a peripheral character like her.  I’d rather see a Bert Cooper arc.  Or spend more time with Ginsberg.  Or even Harry.  Or Lane.  And the whole numb suburban housewife thing has already been done by Betty.  I get that Matthew Wiener is committed to portraying the suburbs as a soul-deadening place, somewhere that destroys anyone who lives there, but we don’t need to see that play out with Beth.  I hope this episode is a one-off.

      • Laylalola

        Wow, sounds like Betty to a tee to me.

      • egl48

        Plus, Plath liked to paint hearts in her home, on furniture and things like that, and Beth drew that little heart on the car window.  Plath’s husband was having an affair too when she killed herself.

        • juliamargaret

          Oooooh, did not know about Plath’s thing for hearts!! So interesting!!!

        • sarahjane1912

          Superbly spotted. :-)

    • crash1212

      So much in this episode. Nicely wrapped T & Lo. I must say, I literally HOOTED when Peggy yelled at Don that he wasn’t mad at her and to SHUT UP! One of the most satisfying facets of this show is watching the evolution of the relationship between Don and Peggy. Another great episode.

      • sagecreek

        Crash — YES! My SO has never seen MM so I’m rewatching S1 while he watches it for the first time — it’s lovely to see the difference in meek, cowering Peggy to this season’s Peggy. I cheered when she said that.

      • sagecreek

        Crash — YES! My SO has never seen MM so I’m rewatching S1 while he watches it for the first time — it’s lovely to see the difference in meek, cowering Peggy to this season’s Peggy. I cheered when she said that.

      • http://twitter.com/sarahohmygod Sarah Oleksyk

         Or when Don just smiles a hello at Peggy in the elevator when he and Megan get on. It’s such a great moment. They’ve reached a level of friendship I don’t think Don shares with anyone else in his life.

    • juliamargaret

      Also thought the discussion of the pictures of the earth by various characters was interesting. First of all, amazing to realize that this was the first time people had seen photos of the earth from space, that before that it was unknown. We take it for granted now. Another reference to the fantasy vs. reality or things not being what they seem. 

      Also thought it was interesting that Don and Megan say to each other, “You’re everything I hoped you’d be,” since that also brings up the difference between dreams and reality. That and the final images of people experiencing reality in different ways: Megan fully embracing being in the moment in her class, lying on the floor and mediating or focusing or whatever, while Peggy is working but at the same escaping from reality with a joint. Don meanwhile is trying to grapple with reality by listening to Tomorrow Never Knows, unsuccessfully, apparently. 

      • Sweetbetty

         “First of all, amazing to realize that this was the first time people had
        seen photos of the earth from space, that before that it was unknown.
        We take it for granted now.”          For someone my age it’s fascinating to read the MM comments and find out how surprised some people are about things that took place during that era.  Just like last week when so many were surprised that unmarried people living together was a Very Big Deal at that time and this week finding out that Cool Whip isn’t what was always used in/on desserts.                       Speaking of last week, why no mention of Abe (well, there was that sarcastic comment from Peggy when Don was trying to find Megan) and the new living arrangement?  It doesn’t seem to have stopped Peggy from still working late at the office, with and without the guys, though I’m sure that will be addressed soon enough.

        • juliamargaret

          I didn’t word that well. I knew and was not surprised that space travel/photography took place in that era, but had never thought through all the implications, such as the fact that these characters would just be seeing photos of the earth from space for the first time, and what that must have felt like. Little things like that are one of the things that make Mad Men so interesting for folks like me born after that era. 

          • Susan Crawford

            I vividly remember looking at these photos with my mother and my grandmother, and the three of us being, as the saying is, totally gobsmacked! I chiefly remember my grandmother saying that she was born before the Wright Brothers’ flight at Kitty Hawk, and now we had sent men into outer space and had these pictures of our planet. Again: I was gobsmacked!

            • roadtrip1000

              When Earth was seen for the first time it was shocking to realize that it was so blue and beautiful. (My family’s almanac had depicted it as a drab green.) Ties in with Beth’s fascination with about Peter’s irises.

            • Sweetbetty

               I thought her comment about Pete’s irises was odd, “They’re so round and so blue”.  I could understand that his irises might be a remarkable shade of blue but aren’t everyone’s irises round?

            • NoNeinNyet

              Plus, it’s weird to hear Alexis Bledel tell someone else how blue their eyes are. I had forgotten just how brilliantly blue hers were until then.

    • http://twitter.com/Fotstan Joe Johnson

      (For whatever reason, my response posts don’t show up where they’re supposed to. Argggh).

      • formerlyAnon

         Thou hast offended the God Disqus. Tribulation shall follow you down the threads of your favorite blogs.

    • Sisyphus .

      The episode is titled “Lady Lazarus” and I kept waiting tensely for someone to stick their head in an oven. Who is coming back from the dead in this episode?

      http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15292

      Rereading the poem I’m struck by how much Holocaust imagery is being manipulated in it (calling back to Ginsberg, perhaps). Weird, though, because Plath wasn’t Jewish and was using those symbols as a way of declaring her feminine power. But that doesn’t seem to apply to Meagan at all, who went out and did something she wanted, but without any of this dark sense of rage or survival. Is this Beth then?

      The other literary reference was the cover of _The Crying of Lot 49_ Pete is reading at the beginning of the episode — Pynchon soon to be a very important voice in experimental, counterculture, postmodern literature.

      Here’s a link if you are interested:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Crying_of_Lot_49

      At one point one of Pete’s speeches sounded incredibly paranoid and disjointed and full of conspiracies (all of which are major themes of the novel) and I’m wondering how this will play out in future episodes (as well as what sort of effect this will have on Pete himself — in the novel everything turns out to be connected to everything else in a huge conspiracy, whereas Pete’s life is full of ordinary, unconnected, rather meaningless events. This could get interesting.)

      Actually, all of Ginsberg’s excessive film references in the ad pitch
      also go back to the sendup of the former child actor in the novel —
      Metzger?

      The other nod to the book is all of the Beatles’ references —- there’s a hilarious parody of the Beatles (complete with lyrics) in Lot 49 with the wannabe-band The Paranoids. (“I may be to fat to Frug, honey /But at least I’m not to slim to Swim.”)

    • Katie Armstrong

      The title of the show, Lady Lazarus, is a heavy-handed hint to a possible suicide. It’s also the title of a poem by Sylvia Plath about her suicide attempts and she ties it to concentration camps. The last line is “And I eat men like air.” 
      I get the feeling that Pete somehow feels like he’s being eaten up by the world.  Howard’s reference to Pete’s father dying in a plane crash made sense because of the insurance angle, but I also think it was a subtle reminder of how Pete never got the approval of his father either. 

      • Glammie

        It’s because of the poem, though, that I don’t think it’s Pete.  It’s very female-centric.  Pete’s not Lady Lazarus–I think it’s got to be Beth.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_OSYAJATXUH3QX7ZDDF52GXG4PU Janie R

      I interpreted the elevator scene as he wanted to go after Megan and was prevented by the elevator not being there and took it as a sign. 

      I love your recaps TLo, I look forward to them so much. They really  make the series more enjoyable. 

      • aquamarine17

        i thought that the moment was too emotion-laden for him to go down in the elevator with her, so he was going to take the next elevator down. He probably went back into the office due to seeing that there was no elevator. It was a double-whammy moment. The goodbye did seem like a big goodbye.

        It was compassionate of him to suggest that she not come back to the office after lunch the way she wanted to. (for both of them)

        • rowsella

           and then again, sometimes a broken elevator is just a broken elevator.  Last I checked, it was Roger that tripped and would be suffering flashbacks/visual hallucinations.

          • Sweetbetty

             Don had the strangling Andrea dream/hallucination a few weeks back.  Of course, he was battling a fever at the time.

      • Susan Crawford

        I think so, too, Janie R. I think Don was hoping to intercept Megan, and the empty elevator shaft obviously stopped any thought of that. Plus, that long lingering look seemed to me to indicate that Don also knew that running after Megan, trying to bargain with her in some way, trying to pull her back into the SCDP orbit would be like jumping down that shaft: death to their whole relationship.

        Which may well be on its way, but not quite yet. A lot will depend on how Don manages at work without Megan’s presence, and a lot will depend upon how Megan progresses with her dream of acting. And a lot will depend on the forces of the era which are clearly bearing down relentlessly on our SCDP crew.

        • Sweetbetty

           ” A lot will depend on how Don manages at work without Megan’s presence,
          and a lot will depend upon how Megan progresses with her dream of
          acting.”          I don’t know….I just don’t see how the marriage can survive this no matter what happens with Megan.  If she fails and comes back to working at SCDP, or any advertising firm, she’ll feel she was a failure at her passion and turn into a dissatisfied, bitter “Betty”.  If she succeeds I don’t think Don will be able to live in her shadow.  Even if she doesn’t succeed to the point of being a celebrity, even if she just becomes another steadily working Broadway actor that no one who doesn’t have an active interest in the theater would know about, she’ll still live a different lifestyle, keeping different hours, hanging out with people Don has nothing in common with.  I just don’t see  a chance for the Draper marriage.

    • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

      Peggy and Stan were sitting awfully close. And usually Peggy works late alone. I think he really has a thing for her.

      • formerlyAnon

         She’d do best with somebody who understands her work & respects her professional abilities – though I’m not sure Stan is going to fill the bill. Maybe he’s evolved, at least with respect to her.  Not that many of us seek out the partners we’d “do best with,” especially in our twenties.

      • cleep1000

        It definitely felt like they were setting this relationship up for more intimacy down the road.

    • idrisr

      The Beatles song Don listens to is “Tomorrow Never Knows”, which is the last song on the 2nd side of Revolver. I at first wondered why would Don start playing the last song of an album, but then on second viewing realized that Megan told him to start with that one.

      Why the hell would Megan tell him to start with that one? She really doesn’t get Don if she thinks that song is going to hold his attention. That sond is like a code on the album, you really should listen to the rest of it first. I think Don could have actually like Revolver if he listened to the whole thing.

      And it’s a killer album, you really should listen to the whole thing.

      • http://twitter.com/Fotstan Joe Johnson

        Are there people out there who haven’t already listened to “Revolver”? If so, how sad.

        • malarkey

          oh hells yeah. I’m sure most of the younger people I know haven’t listened to Revolver all the way through. Did anyone expect to hear Tax Man when the needle dropped on the album???

      • http://twitter.com/Selkiechick Selkiechick

         It did strike me as an odd place to start, and kind of a rough introduction. Taking Sally to see a Hard Day’s night would have done a much better job of getting through. (Though that might have left him bewlidered, too)

        • suzq

          Up until then, ads used jingles that were written by jingle writers.  Barry Manilow made a fortune off of jingle writing through the 60’s and 70’s.  They still do, but it’s really old school. 

          What’s sort of fascinting is that the first jingle (1926) was for Wheaties, a General Mills product.  Fast forward to Cool Whip (same company) and now, the client wants a hit song.  In 1926, there were no hit songs, per se. 

          Jingles dropped in popularity after the 1950’s. A new generation that grew up on popular music on the radio is taking over and clients want their products to be loved as much as popular songs.
          Cool Whip’s current ad uses a version of the 50’s song “Cool Jerk.”  So the trend still continues.

        • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

          I just read an article in the NY Times where Weiner explained how he had to justify using that particular song to Apple, to the point of sharing script pages with them. I can’t remember if links get trapped in the moderation queue the way pictures do, so I’ll just quote the relevant passage:

          To win the company’s approval in this case, Mr. Weiner said, “I had to do a couple things that I don’t like doing, which is share my story line and share my pages.” He added that he received the approval from Apple Corps last fall, about a month before filming started on the episode.“It was hard,” Mr. Weiner said, “because I had to, writing-wise, commit to the story that I thought was worthy of this incredible opportunity. The thing about that song in particular was, the Beatles are, throughout their intense existence, constantly pushing the envelope, and I really wanted to show how far ahead of the culture they were. That song to me is revolutionary, as is that album.” (Asked what he would have done if Apple Corps had once again said no, Mr. Weiner replied: “I don’t know. I would have changed the story.”)

      • Susan Crawford

        I assume Megan – like most of us who recall “Revolver” back in the day – was knocked out by the “newness” of “Tomorrow Never Knows” with its trippy sitar, it’s Indian influence, and the psychedelic imagery. Like everything else in that era, the Beatles were not only revolving, they were evolving, and someone like Megan would have been very attuned to the change in their sound.

        Also, perhaps she was hoping that the song would convey to Don that he could relax about her leaving the agency to pursue acting; to let it go and float downstream and be looser and more approachable. The very fact that she was a wreck about telling Don what she wanted to do indicates his uptightness, and serves to highlight the age and experiencve gap between the two in terms of the zeitgeist of the era.

      • Jacqueline Wessel

        In my crowd of friends back in the day, we would never listen to a song at random from an album. We always started with side 1, track 1 and listened to the complete package from beginning to end. We considered the album format a work of art that should be listened to with respect to that. So, when Megan told Don where to start I said “Nooooo!! You can’t do that!”

        • Qitkat

          It’s my understanding that many artists used to make sure their albums were arranged in a specific order, to create that build-up of a *work of art* just as you’ve said. Even to tell a complete story. Back when albums were important releases, often more so than the individual songs. Some artists may still do that today, but now mostly it has only become about having a top 40 song, to be played over and over ad nauseum on the radio. 

          It’s quite wonderful to find an album that can be appreciated from start to finish. The kind that you would want to take with you to that desert island.

        • Sweetbetty

          That’s like telling someone to just start watching Mad Men with this episode.

        • sarahjane1912

          I hear you! We would want the whole album to ‘wash over us’ go to whoa, rather than cherry pick a particular track. 

          Your observation put the ‘concept album’ approach into my head and — okay so it’s not a really reliable source — but it turns out that, according to Wiki, while the idea of a concept album pre-dates this MM, 1966 was a break-out year for such things. To wit: Pet Sounds [Beach Boys] and other stuff whose names escape me [Zappa?]. Anyhoo … it irked me too that Megan told Don to listen to a particular track first rather than just starting from the beginning and enjoying the lot of it [might have covered her time away at acting class!].

          Loved the montage over the track though. Very ‘The Wire’. ;-)

      • Jacqueline Wessel

        In my crowd of friends back in the day, we would never listen to a song at random from an album. We always started with side 1, track 1 and listened to the complete package from beginning to end. We considered the album format a work of art that should be listened to with respect to that. So, when Megan told Don where to start I said “Nooooo!! You can’t do that!”

    • marywv

       The fat content. If you ever go on WW they extol of Cool Whip as if it is a derivative of Jesus. Ugh

    • marywv

       The fat content. If you ever go on WW they extol of Cool Whip as if it is a derivative of Jesus. Ugh

      • ldancer

        Yes, because stuffing yourself with chemicals is oh so good for your metabolism…ugh indeed!

      • ldancer

        Yes, because stuffing yourself with chemicals is oh so good for your metabolism…ugh indeed!

    • CatherineRhodes

      Brilliant analysis, TLo. You had me at Cool Whip.

    • CatherineRhodes

      Brilliant analysis, TLo. You had me at Cool Whip.

    • marywv

       I thought it was meant to reflect Donn’s feelings of impending doom, not necessarily the actual descent of their relationship. Although, Roger seems to imply that Don and Megan’s marriage will end up like his marriage to Jane. I think Don is such a massive control freak that the thought of Megan discovering an identity separate from him gives him anxiety and he internalizes it as a threat. So when she left on the elevator he was thinking, this is it… Maybe I’m reading too much into it.

    • marywv

       I thought it was meant to reflect Donn’s feelings of impending doom, not necessarily the actual descent of their relationship. Although, Roger seems to imply that Don and Megan’s marriage will end up like his marriage to Jane. I think Don is such a massive control freak that the thought of Megan discovering an identity separate from him gives him anxiety and he internalizes it as a threat. So when she left on the elevator he was thinking, this is it… Maybe I’m reading too much into it.

      • ciotogist

        I think that Don is still fighting the last war, marriage-wise.  He thought that if he worked with his wife she wouldn’t get bored (like Betty, who he also met at work, did) and he wouldn’t cheat (no opportunities) and he could have sex with his work-wife (who was Peggy up until this season) and the interesting woman he meets at work (Rachel, Faye, even Bobbie) in the person of Megan. That Megan has her own needs or desires has got to be frightening for him, because she was his solution.

        • rowsella

           Well, when Meghan meets a successful producer/director/actor who is hitting his midlife crisis just right, she may just dump Don as a career move.

          • Sweetbetty

             Or she just may meet such a man, single hopefully, her own age and genuinely fall in love with him and they will be two people who share an interest and way of life in a way she and Don will never be.

    • annamow

      Love you guys.

    • annamow

      Love you guys.

    • AutumnInNY

      Brilliant summation as usual Tlo particularly re the Don and Pete parallel, and Don’s mid-age disconnection. Peggy seems to me very passive/aggressive towards Megan, but Joan always calls a spade a spade and I have to agree with her. I don’t see Megan becoming the next pretty brunette 60’s actress i.e. Mary Tyler Moore/Barbara Parkins/Barbara Feldon and frankly I’ve had my fill of Megan, don’t care for the actress or character. I know she takes a pivotal role due to her marriage to Don, but enough for awhile.
      Hoping we will get back to the Joan story line soon. All she’s had to do the last few are sit at her desk, puff on her cigarette and dole out advice to Don and Peggy. She deserves better,both at SCDP and as a character.

      • amyfromnj

        I agree. This is becoming a show about Megan, and it’s she is just not as interesting.

        • malarkey

          I gotta say I just don’t get the Megan hate. You, Kate, rowsella, and scores of others are all jumping on the “she’s not interesting, she’s horrid, she’s (whatever bad attribute du jour) 

          I think Megan is a fine character for this show, and in fact, I see her as an important character. She’s not as shallow as you all seem to think. Remember this show is ALL about subtlety. Don is, at the moment, very much in love with Megan, and needs her in his daily life. It’s a REAL role reversal for him. He’s dependent on her being there. He frets when she isn’t there. He calls around to find her. Put it all together: he’s crazy about her. 

          She on the other hand, isn’t Betty. She in no way assumes that traditional role like Betty did. Sure, she has advantages as Don’s wife, but she’s aware of this, and she understands how it affects her co-workers, and she actually thinks about this rather than just taking advantage of it. 

          Watch closely, people. Matt Weiner & Co. will always lead you in a direction you didn’t think you were going.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1084733830 Kate Andrews

        And Betty! I never thought I’d say this, but I miss her. 

      • rowsella

         Agreed, Meghan is boring.  There is not a whole lot there, there.

    • AutumnInNY

      Brilliant summation as usual Tlo particularly re the Don and Pete parallel, and Don’s mid-age disconnection. Peggy seems to me very passive/aggressive towards Megan, but Joan always calls a spade a spade and I have to agree with her. I don’t see Megan becoming the next pretty brunette 60’s actress i.e. Mary Tyler Moore/Barbara Parkins/Barbara Feldon and frankly I’ve had my fill of Megan, don’t care for the actress or character. I know she takes a pivotal role due to her marriage to Don, but enough for awhile.
      Hoping we will get back to the Joan story line soon. All she’s had to do the last few are sit at her desk, puff on her cigarette and dole out advice to Don and Peggy. She deserves better,both at SCDP and as a character.

    • http://twitter.com/closetcoach Heidi/Closet Coach

      PIZZA HOUSE!

      • Sweetbetty

         If only caller ID wasn’t 40 years away….

      • juliamargaret

        We laughed so hard at that one. Replayed it twice.

        • fursa_saida

          I DIED. I’m laughing here at work just thinking about it.

    • Sweetbetty

      I just wanted to make a comment here about how MM does a pretty good job of letting us know  what time of year it is.  In the first episode this season they referred to the Memorial Day holiday, there was reference to the Fourth of July, a reference to it being September when Don was driving back to HoJo’s, references to events that we can look up and place the date, and last night there were Halloween decorations.  They were only in Joan’s office and in one scene and no other mention of Halloween was made, but we do know that it’s late October now in the world of MM.

      • sarahjane1912

        Wow. I had to go back and look again for those decorations in Joan’s office [cheers for spotting that!]; all I recall when watching it was “I wonder how TLo will interpret Joan in those glorious autumnal colours”. Now I see that she was, in all probability, merely dressing seasonally. :-)

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Tracy-Alexander/3234141 Tracy Alexander

      Historically the episodes written by Matthew Weiner tend to be more significant ones, so it will be interesting to see how this episode fits into the arcs of this season (or past seasons). This episode also was a bit slower paced and the writing less on the nose…more consistent with seasons past (which I found refreshing). Mad Men writers take note: your boss knows how it’s done.

    • Susan Crawford

      There was an elegiac quality to this episode,wasn’t there? So many of the “certainties” in Don’s life seemed to be fading away while he watched, unable to quite grasp what was happening. From his look of detachment as Ginsberg pitched the men’s cologne to being out of the loop on the current musical trends to the final realization that Megan needed to move on to her REAL dream, Don for once was one step behind.

      In fact, the empty elevator shaft – in addition to being perhaps an omen of things to come – symbolised the once-firm ground on which Don always stood (or wanted others to believe he stood upon) was simply not something reliable any more. Things are changing, indeed.

      I loved the background “chatter” from the radio, too, where words suddenly sprang out into the midst of the day’s activities: “Saigon”; “North Vietnam” – things are changing, and the ground is getting unsteady.

      Megan’s lie put Peggy in an uncomfortable position, as such lies always do to the person who is “used” as a cover-up. Megan didn’t realize, I’m sure, that Peggy’s relationship with Don as well as her own background, made it hard for her to smoothly cover for Megan. Her interaction with Don, her reaction to the ringing phone, and her fleeing the office was brilliantly done. And her confrontation with Megan the next morning was also brilliant.

      First, anger at being used by the boss’s wife; second, anger at what she perceived to be Megan’s sense of entitlement, and her cavalier throw-over of a plum job. But ultimately, Peggy saw something she hadn’t expected: sincerity and devotion to one’s true self. Megan needed to follow HER dream, and this struck a chord with Peggy, who scrapped and clawed and sacrificed (oh, how she sacrificed) to achieve her own dream. “That took a lot of courage.”

      Pete has certainly been in a spiral this season: angry, frustrated, belligerent, discontented and needy. Poor little rich boy who has it all – all the things he himself defines as “success” – and finds that what he has is simply not enough. He has become a kind of black hole that can never be filled. (BTW: I tried to see the title of the book he was reading on the train. Did anyone get it? He certainly seemed absorbed in it, didn’t he?)

      The Don-and-Megan Cool Whip pitch was priceless. It was so much in keeping with the tone and wit of films like “Move Over, Darling” – Doris Day and James Garner as the advertising man and wife, and Doris becoming the unwitting “star” of the ad world because of her gift for “banter”. I fully expected that Megan and Don would actually be cast as the bickering Cool Whip couple, with Megan becomng a break-out star!

      Joan’s office: I have to say that the more I look at it, the more it seems almost archival, the repository of SCDP’s past life. The old “moderne” clock on Joan’s wall; the clutter of cartons; the assorted samples and products scattered about; even the furniture seemed to have been salvaged from the old offices, And in the middle of it, like some sort of voluptuous Janus, sits Joan, looking back at the history, and subtly influencing the future.

      Joan’s cynicism about Megan is understandable. After all, backward-facing Joan has seen more than her share of second wives, and in her observation, their trajectory is well-established. But Megan is a new type for her, and it will take some time for Joan to realize this. Peggy, on the other hand, gets it all too well. There is something happening here / what it is ain’t exactly clear, but Peggy feels the vibes very strongly, and it causes her to pause and reflect on her own dreams and aspirations.

      The Cool Whip taste-test and the banter run-through is one of MM’s best scenes ever. Poor Peggy, filling in for Megan, just can’t capture that light, wry tone that made things pop. Her delivery is stilted, flat and heavy-handed (I almost said “Ham{m}-handed – teehee), and the bit fails utterly. The argument she and Don have afterwards is a masterpiece of misplaced anger.

      Don is furious at Peggy, when in reality he is angry at Megan, and probably at himself for being one step behind; Peggy is lashing out at Don when she is angry about once again being put in the middle with no choice, and because she, too, is angry at Megan, and probably at herself for not having Megan’s brand of guts.

      I wonder what old Roger has up his well-tailored sleeve? Giving Pete two pairs of top of the line skis? Hmmmm. Saying Pete deserved them? Hmmmm. Pete was absolutely floored and understandably suspicious, but his natural greed for recognition overrode his doubt . . . but I think Pete may have been absolutely right to worry a little. Roger’s recent trip may have done many things for him, but Roger – bless his boozy heart – always has Roger first in mind.

      And what was with Ginzo and his questions about clothes? Surely he must have known that there are such things as “costumes” in the theater? I found the clothing and shoes questions, followed by his enthusiastic “break a leg” congrats to Megan a little weird. But then, I think almost everything about Ginzo is a little weird. Even the men’s cologne pitch was a little weird – very much a modern fairy tale. Be careful what you wish for, because it might end up being “more than you can handle” – and an interesting reference to “The Wizard of Oz” film, where a door opens and suddenly the black and white world turns to vivid color. Yes, this season on MM, we’re definitely NOT in Kansas any more!

      • cleep1000

        The cologne pitch seemed ripped from reality. There was a men’s cologne called Hai Karate that featured a man being chased by scores of women – they just couldn’t resist that scent.

        • formerlyAnon

           I remember that series of ads creating inspiring all kinds of parodies – it was a trope (or do I mean meme?) that lasted for years.

          • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

            Hell, it’s still alive and well in Axe commercials.

      • Munchkn

        Thoughtful post, Susan,

        I have one small quibble:  you’ve got your Doris Day-James Garner movies mixed up a bit.  In Move Over, Darling, Doris plays the wife who comes back after she’d been shipwrecked for 7 years. (JG was her “widower” who had just married Polly Bergen.)  In The Thrill of It All, she plays the wife of an OB-GYN played by Garner who becomes the pitchwoman for Happy Soap

        • Susan Crawford

          You’re absolutely right! The film I was thinking of is “The Thrill of it All” – with the wonderful scene of Garner driving his convertible into the pool! And the hilarious scenes of Doris Day brubling about the adorable antics of her children as she pitches for Happy Soap while clad in chiffon negligees. If only SCDP made an ad like that! What fun it would be, no?

          • sarahjane1912

            Oh golly, would you believe I watched ‘The Thrill Of It All’ [again!] only a week or so ago? Such a classic of its time. Agree Doris Day rabbiting on about her kids ["she wanted to smell like her piano teacher"] was hysterical, esp. when one considers who she replaced in the original Happy Soap campaign [a soaped-up naked starlet cooing the virtues of the soap from her Hollywood-style bathroom]. And James Garner, her poor neglected OB/GYN husband, thoroughly emasculated by his wife’s highly paid career …

            I could go on, but I won’t. Chortle! :-)

      • NDC_IPCentral

         Hi, Susan –

        Ginsberg’s “Break a leg” encouragement, to my mind, was an indication that Ginsberg new about show business and its superstitions.  One never voices direct praise to an actor/actress in anticipation of a role – the traditional good luck wish is “break a leg.”  Then again, maybe the remark foreshadows an accident.

        All the best,

        NDC

        • Sweetbetty

           “Ginsberg’s “Break a leg” encouragement, to my mind, was an indication that Ginsberg new about show business”.                         If he knew that then it seems he would know about the clothes and shoes the actors wore.  That whole exchange was just confusing.

    • CatherineRhodes

      Interesting to note that at 32 years old, Pete seems like an old man. His hair is thinning and he’s walking with a bit of a stoop (no way that’s accidental with a terrific actor like Vincent Kartheiser). Life expectancy for men in 1966 was only 67 years old, but Pete seems especially geriatric.

      I agree with your analysis that this plot turn doesn’t have much support, but there are lots of surprises this season. Who could have predicted that Megan and Don would be soulmates or that Betty would be a compulsive eater? With Mad Men, we put ourselves in the hands of the writers, take the sugar cube, and follow them on the journey hoping for insights along the way.

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        So true about Pete. What’s more, when you see him relaxed and happy (undressed and messy hair), he looks so handsome and young.

    • greenwich_matron

      I couldn’t help but wonder if Ginsberg’s questions about costumes weren’t a shout out to TLo.

      • http://twitter.com/Fotstan Joe Johnson

        Would be nice to think so, but this season was filmed last fall and winter.

        • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

          TLo’s been doing Mad Style posts for longer than that.

      • Laylalola

        He has what borders on a fetish for shoes — there was that dark Cinderella tale he wove — and with him it of course makes me think of all those concentration camp shoes piled high, but it’s unclear that he even was old enough to remember the camp.

        • greenwich_matron

          (shudder)

      • Sweetbetty

         I snickered at those questions to.  Were these burning thoughts he’s had for years?  Hadn’t they ever put on any plays when he was in school?  They certainly did reflect his oddness, which may have been the whole point.

        • sarahjane1912

          Those questions were downright weird. I still can’t work out why he asked them when I am sure he must have known the answer. After all, when he’s prevented from continuing the costume questions he immediately offers his paw to Megan and says ‘Break a leg’ to wish her luck. That’s something stage types say because they believe that saying ‘good luck’ is bad luck. So if he knows that … ;-)

          • http://www.GiftedCollector.com Nancy Abrams

            Not only did the “break a leg” remark seem odd to me in light of his ignorance about costumes, what about Megan owing him money for lunch? Why would she be borrowing money from him, of all people?

            • Sweetbetty

               Yes, yes, yes.  I had all those thoughts too.  The “break a leg” thing, Megan needing to borrow lunch money, and borrowing it from probably the lowest paid person on her team.  None of it made sense.

            • 3hares

              I don’t think her borrowing money is weird. She borrows it because she forgets to bring money for lunch and then asks the nearest person to cover it. Since Megan has so much money she then forgets she owes him. I think he was telling the truth.

            • greenwich_matron

              I wondered if she just assumed he was buying. I can see him being awkward about it and her being used to men treating (nothing implied about her, even in the eighties, I had male coworkers who didn’t think I should buy my coffee when I was with them).

            • JeanProuvaire

              Yeah, that was what really confused me. I couldn’t believe filthy-rich Megan with her apartment the size of a small country would be repeatedly borrowing lunch money from the guy who, until recently, couldn’t afford more than one pair of pants. Who could be clueless enough not to realize that Ginsberg is poor as dirt? Megan usually seems conscientious about how she’s affecting the other people on the creative team, too, not liking to cause them trouble.

              I think her just assuming he’d pay because of gender roles is the only explanation that makes sense, but still, ugh.

            • rowsella

               It’s a pretty girl thing.  My husband comments on it as he sees it in action at work.  Apparently there is one gal who is regularly getting lunch purchased for her from one of the guys.  Dh thinks she is leading him on with no intention of acquiescing to a date.

            • sarahjane1912

              See, now with all the weird comments made by Ginzo in this scene, I am still torn as to whether Megan DID actually borrow money from him. 

              Don’t ask me why, it’s just a feeling and I don’t have a particular reason as to why he would make something like this up, but it’s entirely possible he was just expressing himself in this way to vent about her sudden departure, and pretended she’d borrowed money from him as an excuse to do so.

              If it were true and he DID need the money back, I would have thought that it would be easier to ask Don for it rather than the object of the loan [who, if my arithmetic is correct, has been borrowing steadily for a while]. Then again, saying that he couldn’t ask Don for it is the safety valve for his story too. He has people thinking that Megan is an entitled b!tch who can take from the poor [with no recourse for them] and quit her job [because she feels like it] too.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

              Wealthy people can be clueless about money – Megan might assume that the dollar or two she borrows for lunch means as little to Ginsberg as it does to her. Wealthy people can also be obnoxiously cheap. And remember two episodes with Don:
              * Don has to have Peggy bail him out and then “forgets” to repay her until she reminds him: “That’s a lot of money for me.”
              * Betty makes a comment that Don “doesn’t know anything about money” (paraphrased).

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3KCDEX4FOTCFHZP6WLKSOOKUVM Danielle

              But Megan’s only been wealthy for a few months.  Before she married Don, she was a struggling actress who got a job as a secretary to pay the bills.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

              Yes, but her parents are clearly comfortable, suggesting that she grew up with wealth, and the fact that she had pretty damn nice clothes even as a secretary suggests that they were helping her out. She wasn’t, for example, a working-class kid from Brooklyn like Peggy, who had to acquire a work wardrobe piece by piece.

            • greenwich_matron

              Wealthy people can be clueless about cash, but nobody “forgets” to repay money borrowed from someone they barely know. Also, her father is a socialist living on an academic’s salary. He would be not be cavalier about cash. Either Ginsberg is wrong, Megan thinks Ginsberg treated and she wasn’t expected to pay back, or she is really rude and selfish.

          • fnarf

            Everybody on God’s green earth knows that stage people say “break a leg” instead of “good luck”. It’s the ONE thing they know. It made perfect sense for Ginsburg to say it; also for him to be awkward and weird about the costumes — he’s a weird guy.

            • http://www.lindamerrill.com Linda Merrill

               Totally agree. I think he felt he needed to be “conversational” to Megan and show support by asking questions. And clothes and shoes were the first thing he thought of.  And yes, nearly everyone knows about “break a leg”, even if they don’t know why it’s said. It’s def more well known than the superstition that one must refer to Macbeth as “The Scottish Play” when in a theater.

        • cleep1000

          My initial reaction was, he’s thinking about “free clothes” since he has so few of them. But who knows? It could mean a lot of different things. Maybe he’s a cross-dresser. Or, something about the concentration camps – how they were stripped naked. Leave it to Weiner to keep us guessing.

    • lauraq99

      Lazarus can refer to St Lazarus of Bethany, who comes back to life after death.  Jesus’ final miracle.  I am trying to work out a connection to this, with Don’s reference to Cool Whip as a ‘miracle’ and the mysticism of the empty elevator shaft.  That happened just after Megan left Sterling Cooper in a box, the elevator, with all her things in box.  What do you think? I can’t quite get it straight in my head.

      • AliciaChamisa

        I thought about St. Lazarus too, with the parallel of Megan finding a new life to pursue after ending her office life. Maybe others can follow the symbolism farther along?

      • Glammie

        “Lady Lazarus” is the name of a poem by Sylivia Plath–about repeated suicide attempts and “I eat men like air.”  It was part of a group of poems she wrote not long before offing herself in a gas oven.  Published in 1965–one of the poems that established her post-humous reputation.

        • http://www.lindamerrill.com Linda Merrill

           Yes, but Plath was referring to the biblical Lazarus in her poem. The symbolism of rising from the dead is there. Per Wikipedia:

          The poem also alludes to the phoenix. The speaker of this poem describes her unsuccessful attempts at
          committing suicide not as failures, but as successful resurrections,
          like those described in the tales of the biblical character Lazarus
          and the phoenix. By the end of the poem, the speaker has transformed
          into a firebird, effectively marking her rebirth, which some critics
          liken to a demonic transformation

          I think it’s Megan that’s the Lady Lazarus. She had to kill off one part of herself in order to become her true self. (not unlike Don rising from the ashes of Dick Whitman, or vice versa…)  At the moment, Megan believes her true self is an actress. And it clearly is a talent. Her skills and successes at SCDP were when she was “acting” a role. The Traditional Wife to Don for the Heinz’ and the “Just Taste It” wife. A good friend of mine was always the star of our h.s. plays and musicals and won many acting awards. She went on to become a great success in public relations. She regularly used her acting skills in client presentations, which were simply performances to her. She put on a character to pitch a campaign. And as I said, she was very successful.

          • Glammie

            Given that Plath killed herself (suicide attempt no. 3) shortly after writing the poem and the grim imagery of the poem–it is *not* a poem about successful self-discovery about one’s true passion.  In Lady Lazarus and other poems that Plath wrote shortly before her death, the creative impulse is also a self-destructive one–i.e. the line “The blood jet is poetry, there is no stopping it.”

            And, of course, Plath is making a reference to Lazarus from the Bible, but the title of the show is very much a reference to the Plath poem and the mythos that surrounds its creation.  Plath was dead when her husband had the poems published.  “Lady Lazarus” is a dark, brilliant suicidal poem, an attempt, perhaps, to have some sense of control over those self-destructive emotions and pull art from them.  Ulitmately, of course, the depression won.

            If there’s a Lady Lazarus, it’s *not* Megan.  She’s shown none of that kind of emotional depth or self-destructiveness.  It *does* fit Beth and it does, in a way, fit Don if you swap genders. 

            This is one case where I think a Wikipedia gloss doesn’t capture the essence of the poem.

            • http://www.lindamerrill.com Linda Merrill

               All you say may be true. However, we certainly don’t know if it fits Beth. She’s been in one episode – she has no emotional depth as far as we know and while she seemed a bit off, we don’t know if she’s really self-destructive or just careless and bored. She could simply be a vehicle to show the depth of Pete’s problems. Megan, on the other hand, shows actual depth by wanting to be more authentic to herself and not just sell beans. And, while I do not pretend to be a Plath or poetry scholar, it’s hard to imagine someone referring to Lazarus without expressly implying a connection to the concept of resurrection, or a better life ahead, a Phoenix rising – take your pick. So yes, Plath was likely grasping at something to hold onto, to pull herself up and out of her hole. She ultimately lost her battle, but that doesn’t change the poem as she wrote it.

            • Glammie

              Actually, we know a fair amount about Beth.  We know from this episode and earlier ones that her husband is cheating on her.  We know–and this is something that we don’t know about Megan–that she engages in high-risk behavior.  An adulterous hook-up with a man you just met is, by definition, high-risk behavior.  And, unlike Betty, Beth let Peter know where she lived and who she was.  We also know, from what she said, that she used to take risks.  Her husband’s complained in earlier episodes about her moodiness and unhappiness. 

              I am familiar with Plath’s poetry and life story.  “Lady Lazarus”, to put it mildly, is pretty ironic when taken in its context.  It’s one of a series of dark poems in which, in some ways, she’s talking herself into another suicide attempt.  There’s nothing in the poem about a better life ahead.  I suggest reading it and the other poems in Ariel to get a better sense of it.  “Dying is an art/like everything else/I do it exceptionally well/I do it so it feels like hell.” 

              Doesn’t come close to describing anything like Megan’s trajectory.  We’ve so no sign that she has any sort of obsession with death.  You do see traces of that with both Pete and Beth (her talk of the pictures of Earth from outer space.)

    • suzq

      SDCP is back to client work!  Hooray!  “Why do they always get to choose?” could also be asked of the clients.  SDCP is still using the “client is boss” model.  This is in stark contrast to ad agencies of today, who have a strong corporate identity of their own.  You see some of this on AMC’s other show, “The Pitch.”  I mentioned in another comment that the first jingle was for Wheaties (General Mills) in 1926.  Like many things in America, the jingle peaked in popularity in the 1950’s.  So the whole concept of finding a popular song to match a product is quite alien to SDCP.  It’s no wonder they struggle.

      Cool Whip currently uses a version of the 50’s song, “Cool Jerk” in its commercials today.

      • Sweetbetty

        Actually, “Cool Jerk” was released in 1966, right where MM is now.

      • fnarf

        The concept of finding a popular song to match a product was quite alien to EVERYBODY in ’66. It wasn’t done; certainly not a rock’n’roll song. There was no incidental rock’n’roll on TV (i.e., not performed by the groups in a variety show). The models for TV commercial music were Bert Kaempfert, Ray Conniff, Herb Alpert, Anita Kerr — light, bubbly music, orchestral and choral — not groups like the Beatles. No guitars! Adults still very much considered pop rock, including the Beatles, as music for children. A song like “Tomorrow Never Knows” just confused adults (and more than a few teens). Adults at that time were not even hearing it as music. Don was hearing it as another premonition of death.

        On a commercial? It never would have occurred to anyone. Rock music, and previously released pop songs, didn’t move into TV commercials until fifteen years after this. Remember the huge stink when “Revolution” was used in a Nike ad? That was 1987.

        I think this was seriously anachronistic in the show last night.

        • Glammie

          The stink over “Revolution” wasn’t about Nike using a rock song, but about the Beatles being used for a commercial–it was viewed as selling out.

          I was a young kid in the 60s and my parents were around Don’s age (one older, one younger).  They didn’t own Beatles albums, but, wow, the music was everywhere.  They knew it and they knew the big pop groups.  The Beatles were just so huge that it went way past listening to music.  So someone like Don wouldn’t buy the albums, but the Beatles were kind of part of the general conversations.  

          Light pseudo-rock did show up in commercials–sort of the same way the Monkees showed up on TV as a neutered version of rock and roll.  (RIP Davy Jones).

          • fnarf

            There was nothing remotely neutered or pseudo about the Monkees. They were a brilliant pop group, one of the very best of their age, and their TV show was groundbreaking. The Beatles themselves were big fans. 

            As for the music being “everywhere”, it was — if you were in the age group, if you listened to Top 40 radio. Your sentence is key “I was a young kid in the 60s”. I was too, and I was immersed in the Beatles, and everything Pop — but my parents weren’t. My mother ventured about as far as Simon and Garfunkel, but that’s it; my dad, and a lot of other people like him, actively hated the Beatles and everything about them. And most adults’ exposure to their music was through cover versions, mostly easy-listening. Among people Don’s age, the Hollyridge Strings sold more copies of Beatles music than the Beatles did.

            • Glammie

              I actually agree with you, but the Monkees weren’t intended to be as talented as they actually were.   The Monkees, themselves, fought to be more than what was originally intended by the producers.  

              I was too young of a kid to have access to pop music without the adults managing things.  My father liked Sinatra, while my mother was responsible, like yours, for the Simon & Garfunkel in the house.  That said, there were also some other interesting things–my mother, for some strange reason, liked Janice Joplin.  Neither would ever have gone to a rock concert, but bits and pieces of youth culture did work their way into the lives of the older generation. Both parents could identify all the Beatles–and slightly younger trying-hard-to-be-hip friends would bring over various record albums.  There was also, I was told *much* later, a couple of rounds of pot-smoking.  

    • BettyGurruchaga

      I enjoyed the episode last night. I enjoyed the clashes of ages and transition, which has been a theme this season. One thing I came away with is that Megan comes from a generation in that if you don’t like something , or you are unhappy, then do something to change it. Something unheard of for the older generation. They were taught just to suck it up and be happy with it. 
      Such as Roger accepting his fate in the ad agency since youth, Peggy in disbelief that Megan wants to leave, ( while wearing a catholic uniform dress ), Pete ( did his dad die around his age? ) fighting with what he believes is a purgatory stage of his life clearly affected by all the women influences of his life. Even the Beatles are changing from the music the client is looking for into their St. Pepper period. It is all a fast moving transitional period, and we are all viewing it helplessly, like Don.
      Funny also how the younger generation gave Megan the thumbs up and good luck  while the older generation thinks she just wants to be a house frau and have babies.

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com Nancy Abrams

        Funny also how the younger generation gave Megan the thumbs up and good luck  while the older generation thinks she just wants to be a house frau and have babies.
        Some time in the mid ’70s, my mother remarked that my (baby boom) generation of women made sure that our own wishes were fulfilled alongside those of our husbands and children whereas her generation put the family first and then got any leftovers for themselves. It’s always striking to see how the natural generation gap was expanded by Women’s Lib.

      • Verascity

        Pete ( did his dad die around his age? ) 

        Pete’s father died in the American Airlines crash in 1962, so no.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

          And we see his dad in an episode in season 1 or 2 and he’s probably late 50s/maybe 60.

    • hth16w

       Megan did not ask Peggy to lie for her. She lied to Peggy about where she was going.

      • PaulaBerman

        When she didn’t come home on time, of course Don was going to call the office. This is not the first time– Don called Peggy during the HoJo fiasco as well, so Megan had to know that Peggy could well be asked as to Megan’s whereabouts.

        • http://www.lindamerrill.com Linda Merrill

           But did Megan know Don called Peggy during the HoJo thing? I don’t think Megan gave it a thought. She lied to Peggy with the story that always got her out of work – that Don wanted her with him. It was the most believable thing to say and one that Peggy couldn’t argue with. If she really thought Don would call Peggy, she would have told Peggy the same lie she initially told Don, that she was meeting friends for drinks.

          • PaulaBerman

            Except that Megan didn’t tell Don ANYTHING. She just did not come home. She told Don the lie about drinks after he called the office looking for her and Peggy didn’t cover for her. That makes me think that she either thought Don would just assume she was working and not call, or that Peggy would cover her ass if he did. Why she would think Peggy would lie to Don I don’t know, so maybe she just didn’t think that through, and came up with some BS (that involved dissing Peggy with Don) to deflect.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1241487378 Lauren Lynch Fox

      So when does Don become the old Don again? Meghan looked like a teenager in capri pants (oh so Mary Tyler Moore) and he looked like her father as she ran out the door. It was kind of creepy.

    • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

      “I don’t want her to end up like Betty. Or her mom.”
      More proof that Don’s feelings for Megan are (at least in part) paternal. Especially after last week, I felt like Megan is just a stand-in for Sally. He really misses his daughter.

      • http://www.lindamerrill.com Linda Merrill

         Why is that paternalistic? I agree, there have been moments that he treats her like a child, but there have been moments she acts like one. As TLo said, Don was acknowledging Betty’s deep unhappiness and the part he played in it. And clearly, Megan’s Mom is an unhappy woman which he wouldn’t want to see in Megan either. I think it was one of his kinder more enlightened moments.

    • brookemeghan

      They might be building up to Pete killing someone. All of that desperation and aggression towards women looks like it is headed in a bad direction. And the cut between his scene and Megan lying prone on the floor was eerie.

    • Laylalola

      I think I gasped out loud two different times last night at Pete’s self-destructive recklessness — sex in the living room, when conceivably the husband could come home any second, and then the kiss when the husband was in the next room. There is definitely a different vibe altogether with this cheating than any other I’ve seen on the show to date. (And he’s the one who latched on to the “It’s well known people have a death wish” spin long ago, which I just kept thinking about in those scenes.

      Peggy had every right to be pissed at Meghan and should have been harder on her in my opinion — I think she actually let Meghan walk all over her. Meghan effin lied to Peggy — they were supposed to be working together, and Meghan lied and said Don had called her to dinner. I mean the whole issue of putting Peggy in the position of having to lie to Don or cover for Meghan’s lie to Don comes ON TOP OF that first gross lie to Peggy herself. I mean it really was jaw dropping.    

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        Well, he knew her husband was in the city with his mistress.
        But the kiss— risky behavior indeed.

    • http://www.youtube.com/user/toodleskitty79?feature=guide AWS

      Spot-on critique as always TLo.  Dang, your writing is so good…

      I do not feel sorry for Pete but he is the sorriest of human beings.  He is NEVER satisfied, never content, therefore he’ll never be happy.  As he was becoming infatuated with Beth, I could not get the line out of my head from a Tori Amos song, Silent All These Years:  “… so you found a girl who thinks really deep thoughts / what’s so amazing about really deep thoughts…”  Because Pete thinks he found beauty and heart and brains in Beth when he already has that at home!

      TLo wrote: “This is why he and Don will never be close with each other; because Don is defined by his ability to make people want.”  -I never thought of them this way but it’s so true.  Thank you for this. 
       
      Don… dunno what Megan’s dream means for him but I have an eerie feeling it ain’t good.  Wouldn’t it be cool if Don and Roger went on an acid trip?  :-)

      • Sweetbetty

        “Wouldn’t it be cool if Don and Roger went on an acid trip?  :-)”              Add in Pete.  Don and Roger would have an euphoric, enlightening experience and Pete would be climbing the walls and screaming.

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/toodleskitty79?feature=guide AWS

           That is why PETE is NOT invited!  ;-)

        • formerlyAnon

           I dunno. I wouldn’t want to trip with anyone who’s got as much bottled up as Don.

      • Sweetbetty

        “Wouldn’t it be cool if Don and Roger went on an acid trip?  :-)”              Add in Pete.  Don and Roger would have an euphoric, enlightening experience and Pete would be climbing the walls and screaming.

    • Laylalola

      I just wanted to say, sometimes an elevator shaft is just an elevator shaft. ;) I prefer to take that scene literally, which raises questions again about Don (and what kind of deeply disturbing person prefers NOT to immediately pick up the phone to alert Time Life security and possibly prevent an accidental death(s).)  

      • http://www.GiftedCollector.com Nancy Abrams

        Don would never make that call. He’d tell the receptionist to do it.

        • Sweetbetty

           Yes, of course.  And for all we know, he did.  I guess the writers didn’t feel it was important to show that but by my own reaction and others’ comments here, the omission was certainly noticed.

    • HeatherD9

       I, too, think it might be Lane.
       My fellow bitter kittens have valid points… However, I keep thinking of the scene in which Pete tells Layne that Trudy’s “with child”.  That’s when Layne makes a snarky comment, then comes ’round the pillar & offers congrats.  It flashes by v. quickly, but the paperwork that Pete has on his desk is the fateful LIFE INSURANCE.  I remember seeing that & thinking… It would be too “Double Indemnity”/ “It’s a Wonderful Life” to kill off Pete just as he’s getting the life he’s been selling for the last few years.  Of course, he does look v much like the credits. 

      However, we all thought it was going to be Roger falling through the ad world last year.  Lane, on the other hand, is near this world but not of this world.  Also, they’ve taken that character about as far as he can go.  Think of all the fabulous bunnys & flings that would show up to the funeral!

      Hmmm then again…  When one considers;  Adam, Gene, & Anna….  I might be a little more concerned for someone directly related to Don. 

    • http://www.facebook.com/rdbeyer Dean Beyer

      A couple episodes back when pitching the footwear campaign the client said the actress should “look French.” I predict Megan is going to get her big acting break in a SCDP commercial for shoes.

      And while I’m predicting things… Joan and Roger have both ended their marriages and neither of those endings had anything to do with the other. They can get together without baggage now. Plus, it’s not far out to think that Roger is the father of Joan’s baby (I guess that’s sort of baggage).

      AND, someone is falling down that elevator shaft (anyone remember LA Law?).

      • formerlyAnon

         Megan acting in an SCDP commercial is the first thing I thought of when Don & Megan were hashing out her new path. It’ll be his way of keeping her tied to him. What I can’t decide is if it will go wrong because it will be weird, awkward and forced, or because she’ll be really good and it will lead to an expanding of her career horizons.

      • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

        Roger is definitely the father of Joan’s baby.

    • beebee10

      There’s something a little slack in the episode for me as well as the last one. 

      And I think it’s that Don and Meghan are trying to have a good marriage, and it’s hard to care because we don’t really know her or care too much about her yet. (Altho, I “like” the character.)  The writers are moving her character and their relationship forward so quickly that I think Meghan is the one to buy it this season because this will be more tragedy for Don and I think that tragedy is the center of MM. 
      She’s just not too compelling as she isn’t battling an inner demon, as most of the other characters are. She’s so sunny and optomistic. She’s kind of the perfect spouse for Don and I don’t think that will be interesting to watch for the next 2 seasons.  

    • Offbalance

      The weird thing is that Alexis Bledel is essentially playing Rory Gilmore’s grandmother here.   Although I sincerely believe that Emily Gilmore would never screw Pete Campbell, she both stole Richard away from his former girlfriend, and the “Beth” character said “I used to be like this – I used to be reckless.”   Plus, both Emily and Beth’s husbands seem to work in insurance, and be “good at it.”  How odd the paralells are. 

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=584364405 Sabrina Abhyankar

        that’s a pretty cool  observation!

    • susu11

      Did anybody else get an odd sense of foreboding when Megan tells Don, “I love you. You’re everything I hoped you’d be” For me, it definitely tied into the Cool Whip metaphor of the evening- the illusion and expectations that they had for each other as spouses. Along with Joan’s line to Don about Megan “not disappearing” after she quits SCDP, it feels more and more like this marriage is going to come to an end.

      (Great recap TLo!)

      • Sweetbetty

         “You’re everything I hoped you’d be”.                   And Don repeated the same thing to her.  And the word “hoped” is past tense.  They had both been everything the other had hoped they’d be right up until then, but it was all changing now.  Megan isn’t what Don hoped she’d be and although he’s acting like he’s OK with her decision now he won’t be able to keep that front up for long so he won’t be what she hoped he’d be either.

      • mimi fabila

        Also sensed deliberate hesitation when Don replies with a pensive “you too” after she tells him.  All of this – like her Beef Bourgignon, hard to swallow.

    • lostonpolk

      The Beatles!!!  Yay!!!

      In so many shows and movies that take place in the sixties, they reference the Beatles without ever using their music (presumably because permission is so hard to get).  This inevitably leads to an imcomplete picture of that time; Beatles music was always considered “the soundtrack of the sixties”.  Kind of like watching an opera with the music removed.  After a couple of seasons, I figured that Mad Men would suffer the same fate.  How great it is then that someone, somewhere, to the steps necessary to get at least one song in an episode, and what a perfect song to choose.  A Golden Globe for that someone, and here’s to more Beatles music in the future!

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        I think there were copyright issues that have recently been resolved. They used “Baby You’re a Rich Man” for the closing credits of “The Social Network”, and hearing it kind of blew my mind. I had never heard the Beatles (ACTUAL Beatles doing their OWN songs) in a non-Beatles movie before. I checked on imdb at the time and confirmed that almost no examples existed before that movie came out.
        :)

        • Qitkat

          I may be quite mistaken here, as I’m just pulling up some vague memories, but my impression is that Michael Jackson owned a large amount of the Beatles’ catalogue; Paul McCartney had tried to buy it back from him and they had never come to terms financially; since Michael’s death, Paul has regained control of his own music. So now he can make his own decisions as to usage of the songs.

          • LANDRU3000

            More and more Beatles songs have been showing up in ads since MJ’s demise.

          • LANDRU3000

            More and more Beatles songs have been showing up in ads since MJ’s demise.

          • Laylalola

            I have no idea — I do know that American Idol suddenly had not one but two years of contestants performing Beatles songs as part of early theme week competitions. I don’t actually watch but my mother does — and it shocked me, I couldn’t believe they got permission to sing so many Beatles songs.

            • aquamarine17

              the Beatles catalog of music was not available for commercials until very recently. they held out for a long long time. 

          • Qitkat

            Just to set the record straight, some of what I posted had a germ of the truth here, but after doing some research on the subject, I’ve discovered that the rights to use Beatles’ music is far far more complex and difficult to sum up than is possible to state here. As for usage of the particular song in this episode, the article referenced by others in the New York Times explained it best how Matthew Weiner got permission.

      • Groucho_Marks

        There’s an interesting article on Forbes about the use of “Tomorrow Never Knows.”  A few highlights:  Weiner received permission to proceed because Paul and Ringo are both huge fans of Mad Men.  It’s estimated that Weiner paid $250K to use the song. 

        Here

    • aquamarine17

      Tom and Lorenzo, what a great essay this week. Thanks. I am wondering if Megan is the one who dies this season, since Don as Widower would be great material for him as main character. He would have lost his best friend, Anna, and Megan, someone with whom he was able to grow. It could catapult him into the hippie world. Some older people (they weren’t really very old, but were over 30, as the saying went) did turn on, tune in, and drop out. I was a hippie girl and met and witnessed the older hippies. My main point is though, that Don might become a widower. Pete could actually get shot in that house of his train friend, but I don’t think he will commit suicide. 

      • Amy Fee Garner

        I can’t quite put my finger on exactly what it is, but for me the signs are pointing to Megan dying unexpectedly as well.  I thought so earlier in the season, and the eerie elevator scene gave me the same chills.

        • Munchkn

           She did look dead, didn’t she?

        • Jodie_S

          Although I can envision an agonizing story-line with Don and Megan as their marriage dissolves, I also get the feeling that it might be Megan. She is a pretty likable person who’s trying to live a more authentic life. I’m not sure I would miss Pete if he disappeared, but I would miss Megan and it feels like she might be the more tragic loss.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jane-Morris/1076502799 Jane Morris

      I thought the whole thing with Don last night was that he was actually happy for a while there, with Megan at his side in the workplace and now he has to go back to the life he used to have, a life that is actually unconnected to his wife who he only sees at home (and now with her classes, not even there).  He understood immediately what her choice meant for him. He was really whipped cream for a while  there. Now he’s Cool Whip again.

    • egl48

      I think Peggy was angry at Megan because Don matters more to Peggy than he matters to Megan.  The job wasn’t the real issue.  And by telling Peggy that Don marries actresses and models, Joan was trying to get Peggy to see that she will never have Don, and she should stop putting her energy there.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=584364405 Sabrina Abhyankar

        I think if Joan thinks Peggy wants Don, she’s wrong. I think Joan is wrong a fair amount of the time though, considering the wise person she’s intended to be. I mean a lot of the time she is spot-on, but she’s not perfect and working from an increasingly outmoded sense of what women and men expect out of their relationships with each other. 

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/TOZFY757EGHOEILBQQBT7UYPAU Monique

          “Joan. What a good idea.” “Go home to that lucky husband of yours.” And Joan, “I can’t imagine how handsome that man must be embarrassed.”  I’m waiting too see whether a Don-Roger-Roger’s son-Joan-Don dynamic takes center. Don’s had gained alot by knowing when to follow Roger’s lead.

    • http://twitter.com/sarahohmygod Sarah Oleksyk

      Don and Megan are, in several ways, perfect for each other: they’re both consummate actors. Watching the two of them roll out a scene for the rest of the office flawlessly made it clear. Don’s been acting the part of “Don” his entire professional life – he acted a part to get into Sterling Cooper, he acted a part to get most of the extramarital tail he scored when he was married to Betty, and for the first time now he’s only acting part-time, when he needs to.

      Also, I think Rizzo’s ass should get its own credit on the show, since it’s stolen every scene it’s in.

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        Or his chest. :)
        BTW, he played Ponyboy on the very short-lived late-80’s (or early-90’s?) TV series version of the Outsiders. It was a great show, and he was great in it. I actually had a Jay Ferguson poster on my wall at one time. So needless to say, I am happy to see him in this role.

      • TonyGo

         He works those Ban-Lon sport shirts like they owe him rent money.  Mrowrrrrr!

    • 3hares

      It’s funny, but to me the reasons for Pete’s discontent seem as obvious as Betty’s, who also “had it all.” Pete never wanted to live in the suburbs or have a baby, particularly. But his life currently is working really hard, coming home after his family is asleep, and actually not getting praise and respect for it at work. He and his wife seem to be living in different worlds at the moment. Of course a lot of it is just Pete himself and his natural personality that’s always been that way, but the same was true for Betty. I was amazed at how young and handsome and happy he looked in the scene after he and Beth had sex—when he’d apparently managed to plunge himself into a fantasy romance because he was just that desperate.

      • sarahjane1912

        And Pete HATES living in the ‘burbs. The conversation he had with Beth about ‘the city’ [he wistful; missing it] wasn’t the season’s first reference to the fact that he feels hemmed in and out of his comfort zone trapped in suburbia. 

        • 3hares

          Oh god, yes. I loved how this ep again had Pete being angry at swipes at NYC from Beth (who just picked up another NY hobo). He doesn’t seem to like driving either.

      • Susan Crawford

        I think Pete wants the trappings that spell success, wealth and power. He’s willing to work to get them – and to scheme and connive, if that’s what it takes. He got the house in the upper-middle-class suburb, not because he really wanted it but partly because (a) it was the expected thing for rising young professional couples and (b) he wanted to mimic Don (not realizing that what lay ahead for Don was a return to the big city life).

        I think Pete does know that despite his monetary success, despite his title and his fancy dinners with clients, he is NOT truly respected. His wife has settled comfortably into the suburban wife and mother routine, and he even ended up in a ridiculous fistfight in the office – which he lost. And everything he thought he had nailed down seems to be curling up at the edges.

        I agree that Pete has been ripe for some kind of fantasy for a long while – he needs something else to try to fill the black hole, and along came Beth. Perhaps Pete acted because he had a kind of “rescue” fantasy – a damsel locked out of her car on a cold night, her hubby philandering downtown. Perhaps he truly felt needed at that moment, and clearly he WAS. Maybe not quite for the reasons he supposed, but . . .

        And you are right, 3hares – Pete did suddenly look calm and relaxed and (dare I say it?) happy after having sex with Beth. His subsequent ambush of her at the house in company with The Philanderer was classic Pete: a little desperate; a little icky; a lot dangerous. I await further developments on the Pete front with bated breath! He needs a good, hot story line.

    • SassieCassy

      All of my posts arent replying for some reason.

    • SassieCassy

      They are double posting also.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/DBSIHWVY4ECXGNXAXFXJMSCNIE Katrin

      I agree that Don should have given her more of a chance to rehearse, but I think it would have been more like Peggy to demand it. She doesn’t seem like the type who goes into a meeting unprepared. And here she was, not even knowing the catch line of their pitch?

    • sweetlilvoice

      I haven’t read all the comments yet, but Tomorrow Never Knows is based on The Tibetan Book of the Dead which was referenced in “Far Away Places” during the LSD trip.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ENBX3563Q4ZNCVRGSJVFIB7OAA Thom

      I had to look up “Lady Lazarus”: it’s a Sylvia Plath poem about a woman, supported by ‘Herr Doktor’ and other Nazi Germany reference, who regularly dies and is resurrected. In her mind, though, the woman wants to die and remain dead. Death here infers relief and release, and every morning, after they wake up to their lives as a ‘happily’ married suburbanite father and a faithful wife/co-worker, they plod through their day feeling restless and stir-crazy (emphasis on the ‘crazy’).

      I got a kick out of seeing another ‘Betty Draper’ archetype in Beth (Betty, Beth -> Elizabeth), but her loneliness and despair was emphasized (she’s so lonely that *anyone* can tell she wants company). I’m still trying to figure out her ‘pictures of Earth’ comment.

      Speaking of Betty, I was eerily reminded of her as Megan greeted Don home from work but the cooking’s too hot for him.

      Joan seems much more ‘mature’ in the past two episodes: between guiding Peggy, now Don, plus her colored commentary as a voice of experience, she seems much like the ‘Mother Willow’ that her wood-gnarl-looking print dress implies.

      I also had to laugh at Peggy’s awkward attempt to dodge Don’s phone call, and was a little reminded of her as a secretary, caught off-guard by Betty. I love how no-nonsense she is now, though: Peggy won’t put up with Megan’s ambivalence or Don’s attitude. She dressed in all her office-wear standards this episode, and she was all about her career, with no time for others’ drama.

      Y’all should also look up the “Inside the Episode” clips on Youtube: it’s amazingly insightful to the character developments, and Matt Weiner utters the best summary: “He offered her the orange sherbet ice cream, his favorite, and she doesn’t like it”.

    • Elizabeth Silverstein

      Not sure if anyone else has said this because I have not read all of the comments, but I think your observation that Beth is Betty from five years ago is perfectly adroit, I didn’t even notice, but now that TLo have pointed it out, I would add that they have the same name – Betty and Beth are both short for Elizabeth.

    • nycfan

      To be fair, Don had to listen to most of Side 2 of the album before turning off Tomorrow Never Knows in disgust or confusion — it is the last song on side 2 of the album. I thought he clearly put the needle down at the beginning of the album, which cued not the song but the montage to the last song on the album (Tomorrow Never Knows). I’ll also note that the song implores the listener to “surrender to the void” … not unlike the elevator hallucination or, if real, serious problem completely ignored by Don.

      Also, I wasn’t clear whether Don understood that the proposed song purported to be a Beatles sound was the Beatles or not, but his reaction indicated that he knew the song was all-wrong (as he usually points out the client is all wrong about what they want).  In any event, they were all thinking 1964 Beatles, not the newly psychedelic Beatles.

      It didn’t make sense that Megan didn’t at least do the Cool Whip routine with Don, though; that would hardly have been an imposition on her decision to quit (two DAYS notice could have worked) and I suspect he’ll still try to lean on her to be an entertaining duo for clients, though her night work as an aspiring actress will likely hamper that terribly.  Still, the Peggy/Don version was an amusing disaster and reinforced their almost sibling relationship the way Peggy yelled at him to shut up since he wasn’t even really mad at her.

    • http://twitter.com/DuckBitey Duck Bitey

      So now that Megan is back to being a actress (or at least attempting to be), is she really that different from Bethany Van Nuys? Maybe this is what is bothering Don…

      • malarkey

        I think what bothers Don is that him & Megan make a fabulous advertising “team” and he can’t understand why she doesn’t want that~ I think he’s bewildered that she’s not interested in the business, and he’s really attached to her. She’s his connection to the younger ‘hip’ generation.

    • nycfan

      BTW, despite the growing buzz that Pete won’t live through this season, I’ve had that feeling not about Pete, despite all the omens and the rifle looming since season 1 (despite Chekov’s stricture about a gun appearing in the first act having to be fired by the third act), but about Lane.  He seems to be suffering as much or more than Pete, is deeply unhappy in his marriage, has hinted at money problems, has confessed his fear of being “found out” as sham (whether or not he is one) and is the son of an abusive father, I dunno, there is a lot of smoke around Pete but Lane seems like the type.  I think Pete would be to horrified by the social embarrassment of his own suicide to kill himself.

      • Logo Girl

        My thought is Trudy. It would be more ironic in some way that Pete is so dark and bitter and has such a swirl of violent imagery around him and with her being so sunny and positive… Plus he seems to take her for granted. I sure would hope not because I LOVE Allison Brie, but that is really my strongest guess.

        • LesYeuxHiboux

           Trudy popped into my mind as well. She nearly broke down before with her infertility woes, what happens when Tammy is no longer her socially-appropriate accessory? Pete’s too busy looking at high school girls and other people’s wives to attend to his own. Trudy has always been brittle, because she works so hard to maintain the perfection (Pete even commented that she lies around in a housecoat most of the day, which could be a tired new mom or a sign of depression).

          • Chaiaiai

            Hmm, this is what I was getting at in my earlier comment about suicide sometimes being the act of the “unlikely” person.  I could see Trudy because, again, what do we really see of her life?  Or for that matter, what about Henry?   Or even Glen? It feels a little disturbing to wonder but I can’t help it.

    • bluefish

      It’s like you two gentlemen read my mind in writing these comments.  Thank you! Can hardly wait for the weekly Mad Men fashion round-up which has become a highlight of my week.

    • judybrowni

      Sylvia Plath’s poem “Lady Lazarus” is too dense to analyze here. In part, it’s about remaking yourself as a new woman, and in part, it’s about surviving suicide attempts. Megan remakes herself, but the scent of suicide pervades this episode. Pete mentions in the opening scene that his life insurance policy covers suicide “after two years” (which have already passed).  Pete at first follows Beth into her house because he fears she’s suicidal (it’s the second clip above). The elevator door opens to an empty shaft—terrifying, foreboding. Megan cooks barefoot (you’re not supposed to because you risk electrocution). The Beatles song that Don plays, Tomorrow Never Knows, repeats the lyric “It is not dying,” and we see Megan in acting class, lying corpse-like on the floor. That’s a lot of death imagery, and it fills me with dread. I can’t instantly or easily tie all these images together with the poem and deliver a neat interpretation. Should I? Is interpretation the point? The 1960s are, in part, a time of dread. We hear news reports about Vietnam twice during the episode. War, fear, violence, change . . . society as a whole may be killing itself and arising Lazarus-like. Does the Draper marriage survive this? We don’t know. I don’t believe we’re meant to know. I do believe we’re meant to fear.

      http://blogs.indiewire.com/pressplay/mad-men-recap-7-lady-lazarus# 

      Pete as suicide feels almost too on the nose for me. I’d see Beth as the more obviously suicidal, but perhaps it’s because my own mother was a housewife suicide of the period.

      However, John Hamm has said that someone will die this season, and perhaps she’s too minor a cast member to rate that warning.

    • Laylalola

      Don had just taken Sally to a Beatles concert that summer — and we’re only nearing Halloween 1966 as of this episode. I guess I don’t understand why there’s so much confusion generally (in comments on this board and elsewhere) over whether Don thought the proposed ad song sounded along the lines of the early Beatles chased-in-the-streets-by-screaming mobs /Ed Sullivan “I Wanna Hold Your Hand”/Help! movie. I mean Don’s not THAT old or that out of it. That the Beatles are moving on wasn’t the sound or Beatles era the client was pitching. 

      Edited: Maybe it was the summer before, actually. But his memory surely isn’t so short-term he wouldn’t know a year later whether the proposed song sounded like the early Beatles.

      • Mary Hernandez

        I agree with you that Don would have known who the Beatles were and they had been referenced before. I also think that Don makes a point to know important popular culture. However, him being able to distinguish between their earlier work and their later work would mean that he was paying attention to them.  He doesn’t seem to be particularly musically inclined so I don’t see him following any music particularly.  So it makes sense that while he would know who they were but he wouldn’t know too much about them.

        • fnarf

          Quite so. To people Don’s age they were just another bunch of longhairs making noise for the kids to scream at. He might have heard a snippet here and there in passing, and obviously knew the tune to “I Want To Hold Your Hand”, but he wouldn’t have followed them closely and certainly wouldn’t have known they were “moving on”.

          Don strikes me as more the Herb Alpert or Ray Conniff type, maybe Andy Williams, maybe, maybe some cocktail jazz, if he listens to anything at all. Given his country background, it’s not impossible that, like my dad (who was almost the same age) he might have known an Eddy Arnold or Roger Miller song or two. But not teeny-bopper stuff. Not the Beatles. Not even Sgt. Pepper’s next year. He’s too old. He’s not into music. 

          And it would never have occurred to anyone in 1966 to pitch the Beatles for a commercial, or even the Wedgwoods.

          • sarahjane1912

            Interesting that one has to guess at Don’s music choices when he’s ‘relaxing’. We don’t really know anything about that, do we? When he was living with Betty, the TV was their ‘sound of choice’ and Megan seems to rule the school in terms of the music in their apartment [not just the 'Revolver' album, but it was her choice of band for Don's 40th ... and as we all remember, he wasn't happy at ALL about that for numerous reasons!]. When music surrounds Don, it’s as background/soundtrack/Betty making a grand entrance at their Valentines Day dinner out etc etc] … nothing seems to suggest him personally. Although I do think the music backing ‘The Wheel’ ep [when he was making his presentation] was so so good at the time.
            And yet we know Pete shows off his stereo listening to Beethoven [even while bitter kittens conjectured that he probably listened to Mantovani in his down time!].

      • http://twitter.com/TMamBo Therese Bohn

         Hi Laylalola,
           Yeah, the Shea Stadium concert was in summer of ’65, about 15 months earlier in this episode’s timeline. At that time their big hits were ‘Help’ and ‘Ticket To Ride’, which, though splendid, were a whole other planet compared to “Tomorrow Never Knows.”   I loved how this episode ended, and totally thrilled that MW got an actual Beatle song.  There have been other shows set in the  ’60’s (American Dreams, later episodes of ‘Laverne & Shirley’) but they could only mention the Beatles, never play the actual songs, which made their believability fragile. This was very believable that Megan would be anxious for Don to hear “Tomorrow…”; it being the most revolutionary track on the album.  And Don couldn’t take it all.  Now, to be fair, at the end of the day, ‘Tomorrow… is not a restful song, although it tells you to turn off your mind. But I wish Don could have heard the whole album in sequence, then he’d appreciate it more.             

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/M476USE6GD6VEE4RO6JA22VRLI Kriesa

        Maybe he really did wear earplugs to the concert (it seems like I remember him telling Sally he was going to).

    • Logo Girl

      I was wondering if Ginsberg’s reaction to the ersatz “Beatles” tune had something to do with it being a cheesy (Cool Whip?) version of Kurt Weill’s “September Song”, with Weill being an exiled German-Jewish composer, and the song being published immediately before WWII. Don’t quite have a full theory on it, but he did say it made him “sick” or something.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344922354 Eric Scheirer Stott

        That wasn’t Weil’s September Song (1938) it was “September in the rain” (1937) by Warren and Dubin. I think he was just sick because they thought a tarted up cover version of a 30’s standard sounded just like the Beatles.

        • Logo Girl

          Ah you are right. What I get when I watch when I’m half asleep!

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344922354 Eric Scheirer Stott

             Here’s a beautiful laid back version of it from 1963- though not the version they played. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvB6rrnzDM8  It’s a lovely song.

        • malarkey

          Apparently the Beatles did a cover of ‘September in the Rain’ and had it on their demo tape for Decca Records (who turned them down). Very good, Mr. Weiner!

    • Glammie

      Okay I made it through the first couple of pages of comments, so forgive me if this came up later–but re: who dies and how–“Lady Lazarus” is a Sylvia Plath poem about suicide–repeated attempts and surviving them.  Sooooo . . . what’s the tie-in to the episode.

      I’m inclined to think there will be suicide attempt or success–possibly Beth’s, since she seems unstable and impulsive.  I actually don’t think it will be Pete–he’s too useful a character and he’s got a fair amount of self-love.  Layne, as others have mentioned, is a possibility.  If it were real people, I’d put up Don if Megan left him, but I don’t think MM is about to put down the star of the show.  

      But the show’s weirdly full of people capable of offing themselves or dying.  The least likely characters would be Peggy and Joan–as in would-never-happen.  But the rest?  Both Roger and Bert can keel over at any time.  Roger’s been living on borrowed time since Season One.  Though the loss of either Roger and Bert would make me very, very sad.

      I don’t see an attempt by Betty’s–she’s not happy, but she’s not *that* unhappy either.  Megan?  Don’t know her real well, but she seems like she doesn’t get stuck in emotional holes.  

      One possibility is Harry.  He’s kind of a mess right now AND his character was originally intended to fall out the window in Season One.  Weiner, though, liked Rich Somers’ performance and changed the plotline.  

      But right now my money’s on Beth because of the title of the episode.  She and Megan were the two most prominent women last night.  She’s a name actress, which also makes me think there’s a longer story line.

      • http://julia-here.livejournal.com/ Julia

        I haven’t read “Lady Lazarus” for a while, but doesn’t that poem allude to Ophelia? I’ve been linking the poem,  “turn off your mind, relax, and float downstream” and Megan’s relaxation exersize and coming up with a sixties take on the Millais painting. (http://www2.tate.org.uk/ophelia/) which, if I remember right, was used in a perfume ad sometime before 1970.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ENBX3563Q4ZNCVRGSJVFIB7OAA Thom

         Thinking of suicide as an attempt to escape the pain of a life not worth living, Pete and Megan (and Beth) are all unhappy with their circumstances, and each contemplating (to varying extents) a radical upheaval to escape their misery. Pete’s unhappy as a suburbanite working father, Megan is unhappy to be sacrificing her ambitions to be the “great woman” standing behind ‘great man’ Don, and Beth is unhappy to be left so alone by Howard. Megan successfully commits career ‘suicide’ (leaving her success as a copywriter to pursue acting), while Pete and Beth look for greater satisfaction in their personal lives, with Beth seriously suppressing her urges after her one hysterical ‘attempt’, and Pete, after unsuccessfully trying to assuage Beth’s suspicions of Howard, seems willing to give up his life with Trudy and his daughter for Beth.

        • Sweetbetty

           “Beth seriously suppressing her urges after her one hysterical ‘attempt’ “.           I’m still not sure what to make of Beth drawing that heart on the car window then erasing it.  Was she telling Pete she cared for him, then erased it before her hubby could see it?  Or was she saying that there was no possibility of a romance so to forget about it?  Or was she saying that her love that she had had for her husband is now gone?  Or is it something else entirely?

          • Glammie

            It was a message for Pete that she cared for him.  If she wanted to forget everything she wouldn’t have made eye contact with him, let alone drew a heart.  The desperation of that hook-up was pretty disturbing.

            • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344922354 Eric Scheirer Stott

               Maybe she cared, but it also meant “wipe this out of your life”

            • Glammie

              Possibly, but her husband was in the car and, presumably, she doesn’t want him seeing her draw hearts and make eyes at other men.

        • Glammie

          I don’t actually think Megan’s sacrificed that much.  She’d already given up on acting and was working as a secretary when she met Don.  Now she gets to go back to it, but with the security of Don’s money.  And if she changes her mind about copywriting, it’s likely that she can come back on board.  My strong hunch about Megan is that she doesn’t know what she wants to do, but she’s actually *not* that great an actress.

          As for Peter–he’s always been unhappy, intense and weird hasn’t he?  I think the affair with Beth will continue, but I don’t see any possibility of it ending happily.  Both of them are giving off all sorts of weird vibes.

      • sweetlilvoice

        Thank you! I’m so glad someone made the connection to Plath’s poem. I had to check my copy to see if it came out in ’66. It came out a few years earlier.

        I haven’t read all the comments, so if others have the made the connection too…it just proves that smart people read this blog! 

        • Glammie

          I did get through the earlier replies and the Plath poem’s brought up a couple of times.  It’s all got me thinking back to all those suicidal poets–Ann Sexton, John Berryman–such a weird, chaotic period.  

    • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

      Loved Alexis Bledel – she was perfect and clearly playing a rather disturbed woman.
      I also loved how after Megan came home and lied to Don’s face about where she was, he sat there in his bed propped up on pillows like Betty use to sit when waiting for Don. ha!
       

    • fnarf

      This is going to make me a pariah around here, but I have a feeling that if anyone’s going to die it’s going to be Megan.

      The lyric from “Tomorrow Never Knows” is from the Tibetan Book of the Dead. Now, maybe Megan saying “play this one” was her preparing him for his own journey to the other side, but Mad Men without Don ceases to exist, so it can’t be him. I think the only death Pete is going to suffer is a metaphorical one when that guy catches him in his ridiculous little “love affair” with his wife.

      No, I think the abyss Don was staring down into in that elevator shaft was the impossibility of his life without Megan. I think Weiner is about to inject some serious horror into our lives with this show. Did you see her laying on the floor in her acting class?

      • Glammie

        Interesting.  Wouldn’t rule it out, but if Megan dies, I don’t think it will be a suicide–simply because Don’s already been there done that with his brother in the first season.  Doesn’t mean that I don’t think she’ll walk.  I don’t believe we’re going to see things keeping getting better and better for Don and Megan.  

        Right now, though, I don’t see a build-up to a Megan suicide.  She’s not trapped.  The last time there was a Tibetan Book of the Dead reference though was *Roger’s* acid trip.  And it was Roger who was kind of giving up last night and it’s Roger who seems to not be able to get new clients.  It’s Roger whose marriage is breaking up.  

        However, my little TV viewer’s heart would break if John Slattery left.  

        I think Pete’s too obvious right now.  

        • fnarf

          Oh, I agree — not a suicide.

          • Glammie

            Yes, she doesn’t appear to be self-destructive–doesn’t mean she won’t be killed off.  She doesn’t fit in well in some ways and that seems to be deliberate on the part of the writers.  One way or another, it doesn’t feel like she’ll be around forever.  I do expect Ginsburg to hang around despite his weirdness.  But a character who hates advertising in a show about an ad agency?  How’s that going to work?  

            My gut sense of it, also, is that she won’t succeed as an actress.  Joan may have been cynical, but Joan’s often right–perceptive.  It was interesting that she and Peggy had the scene where Joan pretty much tacitly acknowledged that Peggy was a bit in love with Don, but Don wasn’t going to go for Peggy, his true soulmate in many ways, he was always going after the dreamgirl.

    • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gabriella M

      No comment on Ginsburg’s strange reaction to the faux-Beatles at the end of the episode? I wasn’t totally on board with him being unhinged last time we talked about him, but now…

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        What got me was his depiction of women as crazed and in peril (as in “The Birds”). He seems to have some woman issues.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/M476USE6GD6VEE4RO6JA22VRLI Kriesa

        I just thought he was being the late 60s equivalent of a hipster. “Your terrible taste in music is causing me physical pain!”

        • greenwich_matron

          For those too young to remember, “hipster” was a term used in the 50’s and 60’s to describe a hipster. 

    • anasmomma

      Pete has never liked woman…or moreover, never liked his own mother?

    • http://twitter.com/kgj Kelly J

      I haven’t seen a mention about the title scene and the connection to suicide.  I’ve always assumed that it was Don jumping.  Maybe it is Pete?

    • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

      One last observation- in the car ride scene, the Beth character and her musings on the homeless reminded me of the character Helen Jordan from the movie “Happiness”. Helen was a drama-queen and poet, a would-be Sylvia Plath who wrote depressing poetry and bemoaned her privileged life. Beautiful in looks, but a horrible bitch in personality. She’d say things like how she wish she’d been raped, so it would improve her poetry.
      So Pete’s line about being “dramatic”, and then finding out about the Plath connection with the title, well it all seemed very fitting.

    • noelster_sf

      megan’s green leather slicker. that’s it. that’s all. 

    • http://twitter.com/pennyeager Penny Eager

      Ooh that’s interesting! With his newfound LSD-induced business savvy, Roger will land SCDP one last massive account before he kicks the bucket! Oh, but Joan will be sad…

    • http://www.joannao.blogspot.com JoannaOC

      In the old ad agency building, there was an elevator man. Now you don’t know what you’ll get when the door opens. [*lay down all thoughts, surrender to the void. it is shining, it is shining*]

      Wake up, Don. I want to tell you something important while you’re half asleep!

      why do they always get what they want?
      why shouldn’t she get what she wants?

      “Non-dairy Cool Whip. You can taste the difference!”

    • http://www.lindamerrill.com Linda Merrill

      I don’t think anyone will die this season. I think all the death metaphors, as TLo has observed, relate the disintegration of everything around them. Major changes are happening, lots of turbulence and death was all around in the 60’s from Vietnam, the Kennedy’s and MLK, to rioting, the drug culture, etc. It’s the death of “innocence”. Reality, like whipped cream, is being taken over by expedient, artificial substitutes like Cool Whip. It’s an overarching societal death we’re experiencing, not character-specific. I could be wrong, but I feel like it’s too much of a focus of every episode to have such import put on any one character, except maybe Don. And it’s not Don.

      I also feel that there is a dawning realization in Peggy that the Ad biz isn’t all that for her. She loves the challenge of having gotten past boundaries, and is good at it and likes much of it, true. But when people like Dawn (yes, I do feel her name means something more than the Don/Dawn gag) and Megan are willing to say it’s not what they want, Peggy’s immediate response always feels more defensive than merely surprised or bewildered. Generally, if we feel we have to defend our own choices, or we need validation from other’s to want to make our same choices, then we’re deeply questioning ourselves, whether we know it or not. If that makes any sense. Finally, Stan made a comment about Megan walking away saying something like it’s not a surprise that Megan’s not interested in the Ad business. All the work and success in selling Heinz was, at the end of the day, about “baked beans in a can”. I’ve know several people who are very successful in PR and advertising who eventually lost interest because at the end of the day, they were sick of putting sizzle into a can of beans.

      • Glammie

        John Hamm said someone would die this season.

        • greenwich_matron

          Hasn’t someone died every season? Pete’s father, Betty’s father, Ida, Anna, probably some others. 

          • Sweetbetty

             Yes, that’s true.  That’s why when I heard/read Jon Hamm say that I didn’t know if he was really giving something away or just tossing off an insignificant crumb to satisfy the interviewer.

            • greenwich_matron

              Given that the episode about Betty’s cancer was called “Tea Leaves,” I think we may be getting played.

    • Megan Patterson

      I dunno, I think part of Pete’s malaise is that he is sooo not a country boy. He grew up in New York, he loves New York, and now all of a sudden he’s not living there? 

      • http://twitter.com/TMamBo Therese Bohn

         Pete once said “If I’m gonna die, I’ll die in Manhattan”. (Meditations in an Emergency, S2) Hmmm.

    • librarygrrl64

      A. Alexis Bledel was wonderful…but she will always be sweet, smart, snarky Rory Gilmore to me.
      B. It has taken me a while to reconcile myself to both Megan and to Jessica Pare, but I enjoyed both of them immensely in this episode.
      C. A few great laugh-out-loud moments from Peggy and Stan and Michael. LOVE them!
      D. Great Peggy episode overall.

    • http://profiles.google.com/neighbourhood.gal Sarah Holcomb

      I can’t possibly read through all of these comments (and quite likely neither can T and Lo), but I think it is very interesting the way Pete Campbell’s lips are always so shiny. I can’t tell if this is supposed to make him look childish or sleezy or both. Do any of the other male characters regularly wear lip gloss?

    • filmcricket

      I have a feeling if Kurt & Smitty were still with us we’d see a bit of that from them. They had both brought a bit of beatnik style (sweaters, turtlenecks) into the office and it wouldn’t surprise me if at least one of them had grown his hair out by now.

    • Sweetvegan

      And irony of ironies – Mad Men *got* the Beatles!!! The Beatles are infamous for not allowing their original recordings to be used in commercials, TV shows and movies. (As they mentioned in this very episode!) How they convinced the right people to allow Tomorrow Never Knows to be used in an episode of Mad Men is nothing short of a miracle.

      • Logo Girl

        Seeing that the actual recordings are still owned by members or their wives, while I won’t take a guess at the thoughts of Paul or Ringo or Olivia Harrison, but I would not be surprised if Yoko Ono was thrilled to have this song on a show that was so strongly feminist.

      • sweetlilvoice

        I imagine the royalties are pretty impressive. I also know that Michael Jackson owned most of the Beatles songs but the rights reverted after his death on a lot of those. While he was alive, the Beatles still got a lot of money from them but they couldn’t control everything. Revolution was used in a Nike commercial years ago.

        • Sweetvegan

          But the version of Revolution in the Nike ad was not the Beatles. Someone else covered it. Lots of covers of Beatles songs have been used in TV, movies, etc. But it’s been nearly impossible to get the original Beatles recordings. Owning the rights to the recordings is different from the copyright to the songs. Getting the rights for Mad Men was a *very* big deal!  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/07/mad-men-the-beatles-tomorrow-never-knows_n_1498023.html

    • Damien W

      Another bad omen for Pete in this episode: Beth observes what a bad novice driver he is, after he runs a stop sign. Will his car swerve off the road one day soon?

      I also love how they were unconsciously introducing their inner selves to each other; Beth can’t take the City because of all the homeless people, because she feels too much for them. And Pete cheerily suggests that she’ll get over it, almost like a cold…just like he has.

      • Sweetbetty

         “Another bad omen for Pete in this episode: Beth observes what a bad
        novice driver he is, after he runs a stop sign. Will his car swerve off
        the road one day soon?”            Hmmm, yes, I can see it happening, with Beth in the car with him as they sneak off to a motel for an illicit afternoon.  He’s distracted by her proximity and a poor driver anyhow…..                

        • Glammie

          A disastrous echo of Don’s affair and accident with Bobbie Barrett?

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_HU6TW5A67UOLM5IPLN6INMAVZ4 Martin C

      One of the best scenes for me was when Pete was in the phone booth and called Harry as he was exiting the elevator. Then later passing to Harry the role of initiator. Always the upper hand. The scene just says so much about Pete and how he sees the world around him. Excellent excellent writing right there.

      • Sweetbetty

         Poor Harry, twice in that show he was sucked cluelessly into Pete’s troubled world and had no idea what was going on.

    • nosniveling

      nice article in the NYT about the getting of the Beatles song- http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/07/how-mad-men-landed-the-beatles-all-you-need-is-love-and-250000/?ref=television

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1129137319 Paula Pertile

      I loved Joan’s hair. It looked softer, but still “Joan”. 

      The elevator – when Meghan’s elevator left, Don waited a sec then punched the elevator button – almost like he’d forgotten to tell her something and was trying to get it back. Then the other empty one opened, like – “too bad dude, she’s gone”. Really gone.

      Cool Whip. How many vats of that passed through our kitchen. My mom still uses it. You’ve not lived until you’ve had this special side dish/ dessert: mix together a tub of Cool Whip, a package of DRY Jello, and cottage cheese. Serve. Eat. Gag.

      You’re welcome.

      Thanks, as always.

    • JulieTy

      BEATLES AGAIN: Not to beat a dead horse, but the New York Times had a nice piece on “Tomorrow Never Knows” and “A Hard Day’s Night” in “Lady Lazarus:”

      http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/07/how-mad-men-landed-the-beatles-all-you-need-is-love-and-250000/

      And the article’s author also took the view that Megan gave Don the album, but he chose the track:

      “Near the end of the “Mad Men” episode, titled “Lady Lazarus”and written by Mr. Weiner, the advertising executive Don Draper (played by Jon Hamm) finds himself struggling to understand youth culture and is given a copy of the Beatles album “Revolver,” a new release in the summer of 1966.
      But instead of starting his listening experience with the album’s acerbic lead-off track, “Taxman,” Draper instead skips to its final – and, shall we say, more experimental – song, “Tomorrow Never Knows,” contemplating it for a few puzzled moments before he shuts it off. “I rest my case.   :-)

    • greenwich_matron

      Given that she has her own little vortex of endless need at home, I can imagine that Joan is getting tired of being SCDP’s mother as well. She deserves hazard pay for being forced to listen to everyone else’s personal problems when no one seems to even acknowledge hers.

    • http://profiles.google.com/valencia.lucia87 Lucía Valencia

      I just can’t put my finger on it to figure out why, but I just can’t seem to like Megan. I found her specially irritating on this episode and I suspect it has more to do with Jessica Pare’s perfomance, I just don’t buy it, her, the whole character. And I really can’t explain why, it’s probably just me anyways.

      • greenwich_matron

        One thing that no one has mentioned: After Peggy confronted Megan about lying, she went into the cool whip meeting assuming that Megan would be to affected to attend the meeting. Megan then breezes in like she doesn’t have a care in the world. It’s difficult to deal with someone when you know that you have no idea what they are thinking.

      • http://twitter.com/dixielou8 Ashley

        I feel the same way Lucia, Megan just feels so fake to me. I’ve not liked her from the get-go and I have been really irritated with her during each episode.

        • Sweetbetty

          Yeah, it’s hard to feel any empathy for someone who’s tall, gorgeous, wears beautiful clothes (even as a single girl), goes from a job where her main duty was to page through magazines to the secretary of one of the top guys by the quirk of the old secretary dropping dead in her chair, marrying said top guy, being handed a job others would kill to have, etc., etc., etc.  Sure, we’re shown there is underlying angst in her life, but who doesn’t have issues.

          • http://twitter.com/dixielou8 Ashley

            I dont know if it’s Megan or Jessica Paré that I dont like.

          • rowsella

             Well, her parents argue and fight…. Her life must be hell.  Come to think of it, during the consciousness raising late sixties getting in touch with you id to deliver authenticity in your acting performance– Perhaps Megan is a tad unprepared for class.  I think she might need a drug problem.

            • Sweetbetty

               ” Well, her parents argue and fight…. Her life must be hell.”     That’s what I meant when I said, “there is underlying angst in her life, but who doesn’t have issues.”  

            • Amy Greiner

              It’s Megan for me. Those teeth just grate me.

    • Glammie

      Oh, that was the book Pete was reading.  I wasn’t able to see it.  Wow, Plath and Pynchon–curiouser and curiouser.  

      Plath wasn’t Jewish, but her father who died when she was a kid was a German immigrant–and there’s a lot of stuff about him in the Ariel poems.  “Daddy” naturally, which also has Holocaust/Nazi imagery in it–Plath’s father is a Nazi in it, while she “may be a bit of a Jew.”

      Ginsberg, Pete, the unstable Beth, Don looking down the abyss–something’s up and it’s not good.

    • A Reeves

      I have read all the comments–what can I say? I’m a bored housewife without the distractions of new never before seen photos of the Earth from space to contemplate, nor Beth’s other distractions.

      I thought it so odd Megan told Don to “start here” on the Beatles’ album. One reading of it is simply that MW knew Don’s characyer wouldn’t “get” to that song if he started from the beginning–so it was a “cheat” to get to the song quickly. But, on reflection, it really shows the increasing distance between Don and Megan.  Again, Don asks for one thing–try the sherbet, what do the Beatles of the pitch (A Hard Day’s Night) sound like–and he gets something totally unexpected and unsettling in return. I thought the song so weird–(I confess, I’d never heard it before. I was only two in 1966.)

      I didn’t like the elevator, it was overkill. I felt it did a diservice to the actors. The long goodbye at the doors was enough. That marriage is over.

      As for everything else, who knows what’s going to happen. I have never watched this show in “real time” before–previously it was just with all the dvd’s–but because of you TLo and your community, I am watching this with the rest of the world. It’s an interesting experience.

      Thanks.

      • Glammie

        Yep, there’s a hollowness to the marriage.  Both play parts, neither really knows the other, even when they think they do.  

        I kind of expect Megan to drift off somehow, maybe not even this season, but the marriage doesn’t feel permanent.

    • http://profiles.google.com/beckygsayers becky sayers

      *death watch* Pete in a ski accident courtesy of Roger Sterling

    • zoubisou

      Am I the only one who saw the elevator thing and immediately thought someone was going to die…like, that day? Brought me back to L.A. Law when Rosalind Shays fell to her death down an elevator shaft. (Shaft? Is that the right word?)

      Also, T and L I know you probably have jobs and lives but we need a little mad style up in here!

      • A Reeves

        Mad Style is posted on Wednesdays. I get anxious for it too!

    • MissusBee

      Don: Why shouldn’t Megan follow her dreams? God forbid she ends up like Betty or her mother…

      Don Draper, proto-feminist?? 

      Also re suicide – Lady Lazarus – Sylvia Plath poem about the woman who overcomes death (albeit spiritual/metaphorical, patriarchal-oppression-death) but of course, the poet didn’t manage to get past her problems and killed herself in a suitably housewifely manner (gas oven), which reminded me of Alexis Bledel with oven glove and sending the kids to her mothers. Is Beth just killing time before she kills herself? 

      OR Will Megan get depressed with her acting rejection and find it all too much? I thought the post Zou Bisou shot of her on the balcony in her ‘Angel-Sleeves-Of-Doom’ outfit was quite foreshadowy. Plus Don and the elevator shaft – did it mean his wife was disappearing down a black hole?

      A side issue: my money’s been on Roger dying for a while, after the early heart problems. He is now having a new lease of life and that would make his death more of a shock for his colleagues and the audience. And he has no-one to leave his money to except JOAN’S BABY. Not sure he’s a suicide candidate, although acid can have some far-reaching effects. 

      • Sweetbetty

         “And he (Roger) has no-one to leave his money to except JOAN’S BABY.”             He has his grown-up-and-married daughter.  Though if he knew the end was near I think he would see that the baby/Joan got something.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_OSYAJATXUH3QX7ZDDF52GXG4PU Janie R

        oh.. Maybe he’ll leave his partnership to Joan!

        • P M

           Now THERE’S an idea! Of course, Pete’ll have something whingy to say about it. STILL – if it happened…..

    • MissusBee

      Oh no… I’ve convinced myself it’s going to be Megan now. Like she’s one of these superficially sunny, elusive characters that no-one ‘gets’ and then they’re GONE and everyone’s like ‘we never knew…’.

      Sob. Someone talk me down from my impossibly glamorous ledge. 

      Thanks. (sniff). Feel better. Oooh sandwich…

      • HeatherD9

         There, there MissusBee,

        “Everything’s going to be fine” to quote Don.

        Oh, wait, now that I think about it, the *actual*  Don Draper, Adam Whitman, Grandpa Gene, Anna Draper, Miss Blankenship…  Hmmm…  Maybe Megan should pack her fabulous wardrobe & go live somewhere safer for a while.

         I know!  She’d be perfect for the London stage!  No one would mind her teeth, her Canadian citizenship will help with a work visa & she can go shopping for Mary Quant frocks.

        Now we just need a Martha Stewart type to help Trudy w her decorating, a fabulous TLo character to help Peggy dress & some serious therapy for Pete & we’re good.   Then we could turn our attention to characters like Dawn & Joan.

        Yup — that should do it.  Mais non?

        ‘Til then, please have some tea & sandwiches at the Russian Tea Room on me!

        H:D

    • http://twitter.com/dixielou8 Ashley

      I feel like we are missing a lot of people this season. Whats going on with Betty? What about Trudy? We’ve seen her maybe twice this season. Granted its only been what, 7 episodes? Still I cant help but think about all the side characters. Lane? Where has he been? I’m just sitting with a lot of questions today.

      And how about that fight between Don and Peggy! What a show-down. Was really kind of glad to see Peggy sticking up for herself. I fist-pumped and and shouted “Go Peggy” to the TV screen last night.

      • Sweetbetty

         “Granted its only been what, 7 episodes?”  But isn’t that over half-way through the season?  How many episodes are in a MM season?  I’m still surprised there was only the slightest mention of Abe (and wasn’t Peggy sassy when she threw that at Don) after last weeks episode being so much about Peggy and him.

      • http://profiles.google.com/valencia.lucia87 Lucía Valencia

        I agree Ashley, I was hoping for Betty to make an appearance on this episode, Im dying to get an insight on her life. More Bety and waayy less Megan, please.

    • purkoy28

      about who might commit suicide, in the first ep. this season Howard and Pete were talking about their respective wives becoming “back to normal” after their pregnancies when Howard referenced his wife “always crying”, which leads me to believe Beth is depressed and will be the one to kick the bucket if anyone will. 

    • purkoy28

      In the elevator scene, when Don looks down into the empty shaft, I felt it represented Megans escape from the corporate world, and her escape from advertising (and maybe Don?) and Don is stuck in that world, forever, with no escape. He was literally stranded by Megan and left all alone in the world that corrupted him, and lets face it, Megans constant presence at work is the reason Don has been such a good boy,lol.

    • purkoy28

      Does anyone know if the weather in the episodes are based on actual weather reports from that day in 1966 or is it based on the mood of the episode and characters? (ie: it was raining on the day Megan announced she was quitting SCDP)

    • purkoy28

      I agree with all the anti Megan comments. I find her irritating, I was hoping for someone to call her or Don on the fact that Megan was handed a job and being constantly patted on the back for her work when all shes doing is coupons and errands, she wouldnt have been a c/w if she wasn’t Dons wife. Even before her Heinz idea, Don only would ask her in his office to go over story boards( ie: ep.1) when all she was doing was coupons. Also, whats with Don saying 20 firms would hire her? Only if he pulled some strings. Poor Peggy is there first, last to leave, and doing Dons job and still wasn’t rising as fast as Megan did in a few months, and the nerve Don has in accusing Peggy of being “threatened by everything about Megan”, he just assumes everyone is jealous of her. Megan could tell Don she didn’t want to go to Howard Johnsons or needs to stay late, but she doesnt because she likes the perks but wants sympathy for being married to Don. Boo Hoo no one will cry for you Megan. Also, why is Megan always at Peggys desk? She should work on the sofa and let Pegs have the desk she earned! Has anyone seen Don get as excited by one of Peggy’s many great ideas as he did over 1 idea Megan had by fluke, not because shes an advertising genius.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/CW5LKKJDK3YKBQNJ3YRGRPYZJY Katherine

      As we see more of Ginsberg, the more I become convinced that the man will one day make Don obsolete the way Pete’s done to Roger. There are pretty big parallels, both are outsiders to the Manhattan elite, there were issues with the circumstances of both of their births, etc. I would think that when Don first started out, his approach for dealing with clients would have been considered to be rather Unorthorodox much like Ginsberg’s is today. Don hinted at this when he told Megan “it took him years to figure out how to think like a client”. We’ve seen clients have a hard time swallowing Ginsberg’s approach. As time goes on, for the first time we see Ginsberg pitch really click with a client.  Sure we’ve seen clients come around to Ginsberg’s work because he’s that good, but they usually do it despite being uncomfortable or disliking his pitch.  Ginsberg clicking with the artsy gay clients is a sure sign he’s supplanting Don.  I really doubt Don could have come up with a pitch to satisfy those clients the way Ginsberg did.  It hinges on appealing to a younger and groovier generation and Don hasn’t shown that he has the ability to handle it.  Ads that appeal to the boomers may make up a minority of the business in 1968 but give it a few years of the Youthquake and that’s going to change in a huge way and the niche will become the majority.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YYKK5LDOSRAPJXINSD253PYMIA Kathryn

      In the LSD episode, they were listening to “I Just Wasn’t Made for These Times” from the Beach Boys’ “Pet Sounds.” If anyone on the show isn’t made for these times, it’s Roger. And didn’t he say something about “fading away” in the first or second episode this season. As in “old soldiers never die, they just fade away” or, to keep the 60s references going, “why don’t you all f-f-fade away..”
      ….

    • larrythesandboy

      Re ‘don’t cook in your bare feet’ – didn’t Anna say she was cooking in bare feet when she slipped and broke her leg?

    • P M

      (pant pant pant – running here – I finally watched today)

      Peggy ordering the guys like Lucy was THE BOMB.

      And it’s always awe-inspiring to watch Joan Holloway in her native habitat. (bows down to her masterfulness in the office)

    • Sabastian

      its funny that pete and that housewife are married in real life, lol the irony.