Mad Style: A Day’s Work

Posted on April 23, 2014

It’s awfully early in the season to be whining, we realize, but we groaned a little when we sat through this episode a third time in order to take costume notes. Episodes that take place mostly in one day are sometimes harder to examine on a costume level because almost every character wears one costume and in order to look at any significance, you have to track it through multiple scenes. That means tons of pictures and collages, which means Lorenzo is now passed out after 20 hours of putting this post together.

Incidentally, this google search serves as the perfect tribute to the kind of work Lorenzo does in putting these posts together. Those screencaps and collages don’t just appear out of nowhere, you know.  The man deserves his props.

Okay, with our weekly whining and back patting over with, let’s get on with it.

 

Here’s Don, picking up almost exactly where we left him at the end of the last episode.

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Still stuck at home in that crappy Bathrobe of Shame. Last season, looking at a very similarly framed shot, we called this Don’s “adultery bathrobe” and linked it to the dress Sally wore to her interview at Miss Porter’s in the same episode. There was similar Sally-linking going on here. First, you can get really crazy and link these opening shots with the opening shots of Season 5, as Sally wakes up in the apartment for the first time. But more obviously, you can just go ahead and once again link this bathrobe to something Sally’s wearing at Miss Porter’s:

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The other girls are in delicate florals. Sally Draper demands your attention in the scene in her vibrant plaid. We thought that was a coat at first, but you get a quick glimpse of the inside as she sits down and you can see it has no lining and is thin enough for light to pass through, which means it’s one of those hideous ’70s-era bathrobes that look like coats but are just scratchy synthetic loungewear.

What makes this work so well is not just the callback to what Don’s wearing, but the fact that her affect now is pure Betty Hofstadt Francis, from the half-lidded expression of bitchy boredom to the way she holds her cigarette. Attention should be paid to just how well Kiernan Shipka is incorporating the work of two other actors in order to portray her character.

Note the monogrammed pendant Don (but actually his secretary Allison) got her for Christmas several years back. It’s extremely noticeable in most of her scenes.

We want to intone about how the butterflies, flowers and owls are perfect girl-bedroom decor of the period (very Brady girls), but that’s kind of silly, since they’re pretty much perfect girl-bedroom decor of any period from 1960 to the present day. Still, all those little figurines, the hook rug art, the Peanuts calendar and especially the “Hang in there, baby” kitten poster,  do tend to sell that late ’60s teen bedroom look perfectly.

 

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Back to Don. We just want to note something we said the very first time this apartment was unveiled to the audience, back in the premiere of season 5:

“We all salivated over that apartment when it first appeared, didn’t we? Trying to drink in every detail at once? We’re heading into a portion of the sixties that, instead of showing us echoes of the fifties (which is mostly what the show was about for its first 3 seasons), is instead going to show us hints of the coming ’70s. There’s a whole lot of brown and autumnal tones here. There was a lot about interior and fashion design in the ’70s to like, but there was just as much about it that was drab and didn’t age well. Don’s apartment is the height of late ’60s moneyed Manhattan sophistication, but to our eyes, it looks just a little cheap; like nothing in this room will last the next ten years.”

That’s exactly where the show is now, and we suspect it’s something of a theme for this season: they’re already living in the ’70s, for the most part, just as the first couple seasons were about how they were all still living in the ’50s. That’s why we detected all that Nixonian conservativism springing up in the clothes last week.

It’s amazing how a busted sliding door, some harsh lighting and a well placed cockroach can take that apartment from glamorous to seedy so easily, but that’s the thing about that late ’60s-into-’70s style; it has a very short shelf life.

 

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Here’s a perfect example of costuming working to play with your expectations as well as to tell you something about the character. We see Don straightening up the apartment and putting on a tie and jacket. When the doorbell rings, we assume there’s a woman on the other side and there is, but it’s not the meeting we thought it was. He’s dressing up in order to play a part. Dawn’s perfectly aware that he’s not working, but he needs to be “Mr. Draper” to her when he opens that door.

 

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And the second she leaves, he immediately drops the facade.

We could say that her sturdy blue plaid coat calls back to Don’s bathrobe, in a way, marking her as one of “Don’s girls,” like Sally’s bathrobe does.

 

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And just as Peggy’s blue plaid scarf serves the same function. (And her Mary Tyler Moore look is even closer to the original than it was last week).

But not Ginsberg’s jacket, which we noted the first time he wore as something that he spent money on, unlike the rest of his thrift store clothing. His look has gone a little downhill since then.

Not surprisingly, flowers were all over the background of this episode, far more than we realized until we started doing a close examination. The pink roses that Peggy fails to notice here are foreshadowing all the flower-based drama to come.

 

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Note how the vase of red roses take on an almost totemic quality the way they’re placed in each scene. They tend to dominate the frame. Also, note how there are flowers on the desk behind Shirley’s and in the reception area behind Peggy.

Note how they’re quite prominent in Peggy’s interaction with Moira, and how the size and placement of the flowers in the frame remain the same, whether they’re the angry red of Peggy’s or the soft pinks and whites of Moira’s:

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And note how Joan’s flowers pop out in the scene where she and Peggy snap at each other in frustration:

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Peggy was positively surrounded by Valentine’s bouquets this episode, which helps to explain why she had her little meltdown. All those flowers must have been playing on her nerves terribly.

And it should be noted that only one other woman at SC&P besides Peggy had a desk without a bouquet on it:

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The good girl in the plaid jumper and the Peter Pan collar, just trying to do her best and winding up with an unexpected promotion. Mad Men is a world of doppelgängers, and right now, Dawn is Peggy Olsen 2.0.

In fact, let’s jump around a bit and unpack that.

 

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One of the hardest lessons Peggy had to learn at her secretarial job (and one she never really mastered) was covering for her boss and making sure he was never put in a compromising or embarrassing position. Much like Peggy often did, Dawn failed at this task utterly, not being there to answer Sally’s questions and not being there to prevent Lou from having to deal with it. Is that fair? Of course not, but the fact remains that the people above her consider it a huge part of her job and she didn’t manage it this time.

And what the hell; let’s just take this connection as far as it can go. What was Peggy wearing the first time she learned that her secretarial job consisted of lying and covering for her boss? Why, a blue plaid with a contrasting collar, of course.

 

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But we found out something about Dawn this episode: she’s bolder than Peggy was in 1960 – and that’s really saying something. Secretary Peggy would have never defended herself to her boss the way Dawn did here. It took Peggy a copywriting job and bailing Don out of jail before she could even bring herself to stop calling him “Mr. Draper.” We like to think it’s the power of the Peter Pan collar. The bigger it gets, the bolder the Peggys of the world get.

Dawn has taken to wearing a suit-style jacket over her dresses. We noticed the same thing last week and assumed it was about showing her competence and comfort in the job. That may still be a valid interpretation, but now we kind of suspect it was meant to foreshadow her rise and the fact that, by the end of the episode, she’s one of only three women to ever have her own office at SC&P. Joan and Peggy have dabbled in menswear-inspired office-wear at various times, as well. They’re really the only three women to have done so in the history of the show.

But if you want to talk bold secretarial wear, the conversation starts and stops with Miss Shirley:

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Sometimes, the best way to define an undefined character is to put her next to someone who serves to contrast everything about her. Dawn’s been in the Mad Men world for a while now, but it took Shirley to really let us know who Dawn is. It wasn’t hard to notice that Dawn wore no makeup, little jewelry and somewhat dowdy clothing. Like early-season Peggy, she’s a working class church-going girl and her clothes reflect that. She is, after all, someone who once claimed all the women who go to her church were harlots, which should give you some idea of just how low-key and good-girl her style is.

 

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In contrast, Shirley’s not only showy, she’s the showiest secretary in the office, which, given her position as one of only two African-American employees in 1969, demonstrates just how wildly bold she is in comparison to Dawn. That’s the shortest skirt ever worn in that office and the fact that she’s wearing it with knee-high boots makes it a pretty fabulous look that more than likely caused some raised eyebrows, especially among the white secretaries. A few other women have worn hoop earrings, but they’ve mostly been a Dawn signature since the moment she was introduced. Even so, Dawn’s hoops are small and demure in comparison to Shirley’s big, dangling gold ones. And of course the biggest tell of all in sussing out their differences is to note that Dawn has relaxed hair and Shirley has an afro. Even moreso than now, black hair was a highly politicized thing in the late ’60s, and afros were largely (and erroneously) considered to represent the Black Power movement, if not the Black Panther Party specifically. We highly doubt Shirley’s literally getting her cues from Angela Davis or making a political statement with her hair, but it would have been seen as threatening or discomfiting by the white establishment she works in.

From the false eyelashes down to the boots, this is pure African-American 1969-trendy, having nothing to do with politics at all. She’s engaged to a man who doesn’t want her to work (and who apparently makes good money himself, given that hers was the largest bouquet except for Joan’s, which Roger paid for) and she doesn’t exactly dress like someone who plans on being there in five years, let alone two. In a way, she’s just continuing the traditions of Joan Holloway and Jane Siegel. She’s a gorgeous, sexy, stylish secretary who’s biding time until she gets married and loves dressing up for work. It’s just that the packaging has drastically changed in the last few years and “gorgeous secretary” doesn’t necessarily mean what it used to.

And yes, we should point out how much red and pink there was throughout this episode. It’s Valentine’s day, after all. Shirley’s red ties her directly to the flowers that belong to her; Joan’s red serves as a contrast to the yellow flowers Roger bought her, and Meredith…

 

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Well, she’s Meredith. Of course she’d wear a pink mini-dress with a bow on it for Valentine’s day.

 

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Some will say that Peggy’s ugly little bow has some red in it, but it looks pretty orange to us. The dominant colors of her outfit are beige and brown, which  serve to illustrate the contrast between her and all the other colorfully dressed women who got flowers this episode. You could say they’re all blooming while she’s dying a little. Janie Bryant once did something like this before with Joan, who has a history of wearing rose dresses, putting her in what we called the “dead rose dress” after her marriage imploded.

 

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And we’ll note that “drab vs. color,” “blooming vs. dying” motif was repeated with Don and the guy from Wells, Rich, Greene, which was a much hipper and more energetic agency than SC&P is at the moment. He’s all super-trendy and of the moment (down to his Valentine’s day pink, in a  scene loaded with references to courting and the handsomeness of Don Draper), while Don is old-fashioned and almost funereal in comparison.

Meanwhile, back at the office…

 

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There’s some slightly odd mirroring action going on here. Notice how Pete and Ted are both jacketless as a way of pointing out their Southern California surroundings while NY suffers through another February, where all the men are wearing their jackets. This also makes a statement about the formality of NY in comparison to the more laid back styles of L.A.

 

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Note also how both secretaries in each office are dressed nearly identically, in green suits with brown flipped hair.

 

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Note that the whole scene is about oppositional pairings, which play out later in the episode. Pete will wind up yelling at Ted over the decisions made in this meeting, Jim will wind up threatening Roger, and Bert will wind up complaining to Joan about her personnel decisions, which will allow her to be responsive to the offer Jim makes to place her in the office next to Roger, which was spurred on by noticing Bert tell her not to go after Roger when he’s angry. Wheels within wheels, man.

 

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Jim and Roger used to look like doppelgangers but there seems to be a concerted effort to draw distinctions now. Last season, we pointed out that Jim’s signature color was a silver-grey and that he floated through the office like a ghost, but now his clothing seems a lot more declarative and noticeable in a scene. It’s like he was deliberately in the background before but openly asserting himself now.

Enough office drama. Time for some Draper drama.

 

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She’s another character with touches of red for Valentine’s day. But she’s also another character who’s paying slight tribute to Peggy Olsen, in her own way. There’s the fact that her coat and hat are so similar to the ones Peggy’s wearing in this episode…

 

 

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…and she’s wearing a jumper, turtleneck and knee socks underneath it, just like Peggy last week, when we noted how childlike her clothes made her look.  She is becoming to Don what Peggy used to be to him (and Anna before that): the woman in his life who knows him best and can handle his honesty. But unlike Peggy and Anna, she’s actually related to Don, which is why she’s dressed in identical colors to his.

 

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Black and gray, with the gold of her pendant playing off the gold of his tie. Two characters with deep ties, connecting even further.  It was obvious the second she took her coat off that they were going to reconcile. The story their costumes were telling foreshadowed it.

And finally, the least likely Peggy doppelgänger of them all:

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The prize for the most ironic costuming of the episode goes to the woman we wrongly dubbed “Malibu Betty,” Miss Bonnie Whiteside. She’s not an updated Betty, like we assumed. She’s a female Pete – except without the hangups. And honestly? She may be the most terrifying character the show’s shown us yet. All the ambition and spite of Pete Campbell, wrapped in a pretty, unassuming package and free of the need for love and approval that’s always held him back. Like many of the women this episode (except Joan) she’s sporting a collar and a really short dress. But her color is a sunny California yellow, all wholesome and uplifting. When she opens her mouth and reveals what a mercenary she is and how unlikely she is to make Pete her king, he’s more turned on than he’s ever been in his life.

The bright yellow of her dress calls back to Joan’s roses:

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Which were, unlike all the other bouquets in this episode, not romantic (Roger may have given them to her, but she sees them as a gift from her son) and used to signal her full entrance into the executive arena. Bonnie, in her bright yellow dress, similarly played down Pete’s flowers for her and played up the full extent of her focus and ambition. You could say that Dawn’s yellow collar had a touch of that career-oriented vibe to it as well. And since Peggy’s career color has always been yellow, we think these instances of it are all callbacks to that.

After all, this:

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Is a clear callback to this, one of the most iconic scenes of the show. The ladies with the boxes and the touches of yellow are the ones who are focused on their careers and not on their romantic life. Peggy may be feeling the frustrations of being without a romantic partner at the moment, but she should comfort herself with the kind of influence she’s had on the women around her. There’s a small but growing army of Peggys. Their color is yellow and their symbol of power is a simple file box.

 

 

 

[Stills: tomandlorenzo.com]

    • Chris

      Peggy’s outfit and behavior in this episode reminded me so much of “Faraway Places” where her outfit was very similar in color and shape, had a scarf bow detail and also had a yellow rose motif through it. In both she has a horrible day, is dealing with older male authority figures who don’t like or respect her and in both episodes acts a lot like Don on his worst days.

      • L’Anne

        And in both, she ends up burning bridges. She ends up taken off the business in “Far Away Places,” and she basically imploded her relationship with Shirley… and possibly with Stan.

        • Chris

          Yes, it’s one of the few times Peggy has a work meltdown. In both you see her lying down and drinking and smoking on her couch, sulking.

          • L’Anne

            A difference here is that she deals with her older male indirectly, rather than that full-frontal, head-on confrontation with Heinz beans. Ted has no clue, in fact, that she is confronting him. She uses a proxy in both. Her hand-job man helps her find her mojo again. That proxy success of satisfying someone when she failed at the pitch. In this case, the proxy for her anger is another woman because the man she wants to direct her ire at isn’t around.

            • Chris

              Yes, she is just like the male executives now, pushing the female secretary around and taking her issues out on her.

    • bill blass

      bravo

      • NDC_IPCentral

        I did your trademark work back in 1982-3, “Bill.”

        Actually, I really did. “You” were a client of IP Central in the ’70s and ’80s.

    • Capt. Renault

      Thanks, guys. Your Mad Style posts are easily the highlight of my week.

    • Chris

      I thought it was interesting that Joan, while dressed in red is not in the vibrant red Shirley wears but a more serious red. It’s almost more like an aged wine color. She still has heart shaped earrings for Valentine’s Day on but she is almost aged out of the holiday. She’s not the red of the roses anymore.

      • KayeBlue

        Yes, she’s 38, divorced, mother of a small child- I assume she is OVER Valentine’s Day. I gotta admit, Roger sending flowers from baby Kevin is precious.

        • megohd

          And I doubt he had his secretary send them, which is interesting in an episode with so much play between secretaries and bosses.

        • not_Bridget

          I don’t know if Roger knows the “language of flowers”–but Yellow Roses stand for friendship, not passion….

          • Chris

            It seemed more like a Mother’s Day arrangement than Valentines to me but maybe that was his point as it was nominally from Joan’s son.

          • Beth

            I don’t think anything is a coincidence in MM, so I’m sure the yellow roses signified friendship.

          • Glammie

            Joan’s made it clear that he’s supposed to toe the line, so he’s doing what she wants.

            Funny, Joan seems happier and mellower since she’s quit focusing on anything romantic. Unlike Peggy, she seems more content without romantic entanglements. Probably because she knows Roger would come if she called him and will always be in love with her, but he’s not worth the bother of a resumed affair.

            • Chris

              Plus she had her marriage. She has a child and a good job and a nice income. She had her years of being the most desired woman in that big office, maybe in their building or floor receiving so many flowers even Don was intimidated. Peggy has never had that. Peggy is stuck in “old maid” territory, pushing 30 and she has hit the glass ceiling. Peggy’s never had the engagement ring or family or been the center of attention for that reason. Many of her romantic entanglements were secret. To her Joan seemed glamorous and infallible- she couldn’t believe anyone had ever broken up with Joan when Joan was giving her advice about Abe before. In a sense Joan is finally getting to have the best of both worlds by moving past pinning everything on her looks and a man. Peggy is like the girl who never got asked to prom and in that office loaded with flowers it just makes all her “failings” in life now that much harder to swallow.

            • KayeBlue

              Pretty people just do have it better, don’t they? I’m still holding out hope Dr. Rapist will be found impaled on a Vietnamese punjabi trap.

            • Chris

              Well Peggy probably *thinks* Joan had it better in some ways because she only saw the handsome doctor and all the admirers. I doubt Joan ever told anyone, let alone Peggy about the real Greg. She was great at keeping up a front, especially with Peggy who was always quite in awe of her in her own way. If this was any other show Joan would have gotten a telegram about Dr. Rapist’s death two months after he left but Mad Men never takes the easy way out.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Maybe she did get that telegram but just didn’t bother telling anyone because Greg matters that little to her. …nah!

            • KayeBlue

              I’m actually of two minds about Joan- I really don’t love her character the way many do. Joan was SO horrible to other women, putting them down not just for having ambitions but also for their appearance, just because she could. In 1963 she was sneering at Peggy for wanting to be included in men’s-only meetings- in 1968/9 she’s a feminist hero? Yes, of course she went through huge life changes, but she’s never apologized or demonstrated any remorse for being a vocal supporter of the sexist patriarchal system (which enabled her to get a partnership) at the expense of other women. I’m glad the show has complicated, imperfect characters, but- Joan’s so lucky that our Pegs is a bit socially awkward and that’s why she’s so kind to Joan- I’d have been tempted to replace her cigs with exploding joke cigars!

            • Chris

              I didn’t always like Joan either. I thought she was very mean to Peggy and to Freddy ( among others) in the first season. She was on top of the world in her own way but she loved being petty and cruel for no reason at times. She has mellowed a lot and life hasn’t always been kind to her. One reason I cut Peggy slack when she acts badly is because we have seen her want other women to succeed and has encouraged them like Phyllis and Megan. Despite the whole problem with the pocketbook, she was kind enough to invite Dawn back to her place when she was sleeping at the office. She also saved Joan’s bacon when she pulled the stunt with the Avon account despite Joan getting snippy with her and trying to show her up in a way with the client. Peggy also backed her when that creep was harassing Joan and drawing vulgar sexual cartoons of her and had him fired. Peggy gets in her own way at times and has a lot of insecurities but she does mean well. That’s why I don’t think she should be crucified when she has the odd day where she acts the way the men do all the time.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Joan has grown into being…maybe not a feminist hero, but an example of a woman’s feminist awakening. Joan’s been through huge life changes, and as a result is changing her behavior and outlook on life. She doesn’t have modern feminist sensibilities (or even 60s-style feminist sensibilities), although I think she’s always known that she was supporting the “sexist patriarchal system”…she just wouldn’t have called it that. For the early sixties and where she was in her life, she made that system work for her. She “knew her place,” played by the rules, and got what she thought she wanted: a successful husband and the role of a homemaker. But then the rules didn’t work so well for her. Dr. Rapey turned out to be not such a great provider as well as a rapist and an overall tool, and she had to go back to work (which she missed doing). She had her child and realized once again that she missed work, that her work was important to her. At the same time, I think she had a growing awareness of her own worth and her value to the company. She’d always done an excellent job, but I work became the focus of her life, along with her child. And then there was the way she got the partnership, manipulated by the men around her into trading on her sexuality in a very humiliating way. I think by then she knew she deserved to be a partner strictly on the merit of her work. She’s confident in her ability to be partner and do her job (including the new accounts job). She always had that confidence, but she’s bringing it to the front of her thinking. And I’m sure that Joan wouldn’t sneer at Peggy now for wanting to be included in men-only meetings. She would want to be included, too. She’s growing and learning. She deserves a lot of credit.

            • Chris

              Well that’s the difference between Joan and Peggy. Joan has had bad things happen to her and now she wants opportunities she kind of mocked before. Peggy has always had more of a sense of solidarity. She backed Joan at work more than once with no benefit to herself, just because it was right and she felt a sense of sisterhood. Peggy looked up to Faye and even Joan for a while. Joan initially gave Dawn some authority (over time cards I think it was) because she was mad at Scarlett and Joan almost thought it was a punishment as well as an advance for Dawn. Joan always seems to see other women as competition rather than allies.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              The sexist patriarchal system worked for Joan, and she functioned well within it by competing with other women, especially for men…and everything else. Then it didn’t work, so now she sees the value in opportunities and is finding a different path than she was originally one. Eventually she may come to look at other women as allies. Maybe she already is. The sexist patriarchal system didn’t work so well for Peggy, so she’s been defying it and blazing new trails since the beginning of her career. She encourages and supports other women because she empathizes with them.

              Also did Joan really see Peggy as competition when she started to work with the men, or more as threat to the status quo, which had been working so well in her view?

            • Chris

              I think Joan just couldn’t wrap her head around Peggy. She was almost like an alien to her. Joan thought she was giving Peggy all kinds of pearls of wisdom and Peggy kept trying to be one of the guys. Peggy wasn’t working the way the system was supposed to work and Joan thought she was nuts. Around the time Peggy got Freddy’s office and Joan found out what Greg was really like was the first time we saw Joan doubt she was the one who was right.

            • KayeBlue

              I see where you’re coming from, but I honestly don’t agree that Joan deserved to be a partner or that she was humiliated by prostituting herself for it. Joan had already left Sterling Coo before SCDP was formed; she didn’t work in either of the departments (Accounts or Creative) that merits partnership before now. Partnership is (generally) awarded to people who generate significant revenue for a company. Joan did ‘win’ them a big account in Jaguar, but she would not have suffered retaliation if she had refused (of course, Pete should never have asked). No other partnership was awarded for one account or one campaign. She made her choice, it was probably the smart one for her, but I think Harry Crane, even being the smarmy dweeb he is, has the right to be outraged. That’s why sexual harassment in the form of quid pro quo is illegal now; it’s destructive to the victim/trader AND every other employee. I wish the writers had at least transitioned Joan to Accounts *before* the prostitution-for-Jaguar storyline.

              Truly, I can’t believe she had the gall to claim to Peggy’s face that she had supported Peggy. The fumes from red hair dye must be causing amnesia. It was nice to see her happy for Peggy when Peggy and Abe shacked up. If towards the end Joan shakes Peggy’s hand and says “You know, you’ve said you learned from me, but really, you taught me everything I needed to know”, I’ll feel much better about her character.

            • Chris

              Yeah, that scene by the elevator when Joan said that to Peggy I was totally blown away. I remember thinking “does she really believe that?!”

            • KayeBlue

              I know, right?

              1960- “Look, dear, I don’t know you that well, but you’re the new girl, and you’re not much, so you might as well enjoy it while it lasts.”
              1960- “I heard you were being considered for an account because a client’s wife saw you and thought it would be okay if he worked with you.”
              1962- “I’ve never had your job. I’ve never wanted it”
              1965- ” So all you’ve done is proved to them that I’m a meaningless secretary and you’re another humorless bitch.”

              And that’s not even counting Joan telling Lois that Peggy slept with an account man to get her pitch on Belle Jolie (“I’m not saying Peggy doesn’t have something upstairs, but at Sterling Cooper, things are usually happening downstairs”). So Joan started, or at least actively perpetuated, that horrible rumor that had Peggy depressed on her 26th birthday.

            • Chris

              Plus she maliciously stuck the copier in Peggy’s office. I honestly cannot think of one instance where Joan helped Peggy professionally or even seemed genuinely pleased for her when she succeeded until relatively recently. Joan did give her “advice” (often times unwanted and unsolicited) on personal matters but it was usually said in the meanest way possible until the past couple of seasons. When Peggy thought Joan had overstepped so much on the Avon account she was in real trouble, Peggy told her and basically saved her in the conference room with Ted and Pete. When Joan saw Peggy and Ted crossing the line and becoming talked about, she talked to Don with no heads up to Peggy. I can’t think of one person besides Bob Benson in that office that is or ever has been considered a real friend by Joan.

            • L’Anne

              “This isn’t China. There’s no money in virginity.”
              “That copy writing thing? I thought you were just doing that to get close to Paul!”

              Both 1960. I’ve also interpreted the comment to Lois as a dig at Peggy for gaining so much weight, not a suggestion that she had slept her way into writing copy.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Interesting that Accounts and Creative are entirely staffed by men (except for Peggy). Joan was at SCDP from the beginning in the hotel room, and even before that, when they were moving out of the Sterling-Cooper offices in the dead of night. Yes, she took a hiatus, but she’d put about a decade with the company, and the partners knew how important she would be to starting a new agency and running smoothly. She’s an excellent bookkeeper, extremely organized, always gets the job done, and has great people skills. But those skills, or working in the departments that use them, which are integral to the success of a business, don’t merit partnership. And those departments are the ones that employ women. Meanwhile, if she were a man, she would be a top accounts man by now, and be a partner, no questions asked. She’s just as smart, astute and good at negotiation as any of the men, maybe more so. She may have only brought in one account, but a) her smaller share reflects that, and b) didn’t Roger only have one account, Lucky Strike, for a long time? She’s shown that she has all the abilities needed to be successful in Accounts, and she’s been valuable to the company in other ways for many years, more so than someone like Paul Kinsey, for instance. It’s wrong to deny her a partnership because she didn’t work in a department where women weren’t welcome.

              Peggy has taught Joan, no doubt. But not everything Joan needed to know.

            • KayeBlue

              I don’t see it as “interesting” any more than it’s interesting that they’re all white. It’s a deeply, violently racist and sexist time. It took years of Peggy-women fighting, suing, and enduring to get the still-sexist workplaces we have today.

              I disagree that if Joan were John (and still white), he’d be a top accounts man “no questions asked”. The actual Joan dangerously flubbed the first Avon meeting, needing Peggy to save her. Like you just said, Paul Kinsey wasn’t asked to join, and Ken hasn’t been offered partnerships. No business makes personnel leaders into partners because personnel is necessary for *any* business, while the partners are leaders in the specific business at hand. If Joan were John, he’d have an actual fair shot from the start of his career, which is what Joan is trying to accomplish now, after being made partner for a deeply unfair reason.

            • Chris

              I think Joan would obviously have had many more advantages as a John in the same situation but I agree about the partnership. It’s a tough group there, you have to claw your way in. Look at Harry, he’s incredibly valuable to that agency and they still treat him like the village idiot at times. He’s still not a partner. They needed Pete to create their own agency or I doubt they would have made him partner. A lot of times those meetings are like the cool kids on the playground. They needed Pete and Harry but they roll their eyes at them.

            • Bev Wiesner

              but they only valued Pete becuase of his family ( related to the original Dutch founders of New Amsterdam – hes like a Vanderbilt.)

            • 3hares

              Ken was sort of offered a partnership when they went after DOW. But that was more that Roger was assuming he’d ask for one to do what they wanted. But again, that was a special case.

            • Chris

              A lot of this is Joan’s problem though. Peggy would step up and say “I’m doing this work. I landed this account I deserve this office”. Joan for so long acted like she didn’t care about the work and her happiest day was when she would leave it behind. Things didn’t work out for her as the doctor’s wife and gradually her priorities changed. She couldn’t even admit to herself how much she had loved working on TV with Harry. Even when she was wooing the Avon rep with Peggy she was undermining Peggy at the table. Peggy can’t get out of her own way personally sometimes but Joan can’t professionally. Despite being a partner she never would have even asked for that office on her own. She needed Cutler to give it to her. Joan never even had the idea in the first place. Cooper tells her when she is allowed to leave the room. She told Peggy to stop dressing like a little girl, but Joan has to stop acting like one. If anyone has devalued Joan’s abilities and experience it’s been Joan as much as the others.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              ” If anyone has devalued Joan’s abilities and experience it’s been Joan as much as the others.”

              I think that’s the entire point of her character arc.

              All the characters have problems and issues of their own making. She’s no different from any of them on that front.

            • Chris

              Agreed.

            • 3hares

              Yes, and even after confronted she really tried to stick with her old way of doing things, pretending that there’d been a mix-up with Avon while Pete was calling her out on doing what she actually did, which was swipe the client to get the account for herself.

            • Glammie

              Of course Joan was humiliated by it, but she figured it was worth the trade. As for “deserving”–well, she deserved it in that she was able to negotiate for it. I’d say since then she’s been working hard to deserve it–handling Avon and now a second account. It’s a challenge for her, but she’s getting better.

              As for apologizing for past behavior, I think we’re seeing more of a paying-it-forward situation with Dawn. It’s interesting to note that she hasn’t told Dawn (apparently) to change her look and by promoting Dawn to office manager/personnel she gave a quiet FU to Bert, while moving Shirley to Lou was an FU to Lou’s “I know you can’t fire her.” Definite evolution here with Joan’s characer.

            • HiddenMickey

              I doubt only achievements in the Accounts or Creative department merit partnerships. Lane Pryce was in neither of those and in fact Joan’s job today was exactly his job back then (the books and logistics, basically). Joan knows everything about the company which is why he was tapped, at the dead of the night, to help them escape and form SCDP. They could’ve never done it without her.

              I actually think that moving as an account mad to handle ONE measly Avon account is a demotion for her. She won’t know what’s going on in the office anymore and that will give Cutler more room to do his tricks. Very sneaky.

            • 3hares

              But Lane didn’t merit a partnership. He got his because of strange circumstances, same as Joan did. That is, when I say “merit” I don’t mean whether or not he’s actually deserved based on his job. I agree that Joan is integral to the company, but the jobs that she and Lane had weren’t putting either of them on a partner track.

            • Glammie

              Agreed, though I don’t know that Joan is living the best of both worlds. She doesn’t have a partner and she clearly wanted to be married successfully, but what she has suits her–money, a career, her own child. The younger Joan once told Peggy that she’d never wanted Peggy’s career, but it turns out that a version of Peggy’s career suits Joan just fine, much more than the traditional wife role where she tried to prop up her bozo of a husband. She seems like the happiest single person on the show.

              As for poor Pegs, yeah, some secret affairs, but she was with Abe for a while and that was public. So I’d say she was asked to the prom, but not by the right guy. But she’s always been a bit odd and weirdly passive in her romantic relationships. She’s sublimated her unsatisfactory love life into her work. Now that that’s not working–ugh.

              I actually love how MM ties together Peggy’s poor taste in men with her poor taste in clothes–she doesn’t have an instinct for either men or fashion, so she always gets both just a bit wrong. She dresses better than she did (remember that sad ponytail Season 1?), but never with the flair of Joan, Megan or Betty–women who are confident about their sex appeal. (Hmmm, wonder if we’ll see Betty soon?)

            • Chris

              I don’t think Peggy feels like she has ever been desirable. Don rejected her overture when she first started despite having a reputation as a Lothario. Pete dumped her originally when the other guys thought she was too fat (and that was just an affair). She was a secret affair with Duck. Abe rejected her after she built her life around his choices in many ways. Ted swore he was leaving his wife for her, slept with her and came back the next day and told her he was moving his whole family to CA just to get away from her. Stan made a pass at her but he just took the next girl that came along when she said no. Peggy’s only validation has been through work and now Lou is just crushing her.

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              I think a friend told me that maybe Peggy’s sister and Mom had a hand in her self-image.

      • leighanne

        Joan has the more serious red on, but still wears a large heart necklace for the occasion. I would not have seen it except for the stills above.

      • Lilithcat

        “I’ve always wanted to see you in wine-colour.” . . . “Port or sherry?”she demanded. . . “Claret,” said Wimsey. “Chateau Margaux 1893 or thereabouts. I’m not particular to a year or two.”

        • Chris

          I will always salute a Lord Peter Wimsey-Harriet Vane reference!

      • Adibug

        Her dress also calls back to the green one she wore for
        thanksgiving, with the belt, loose chiffon sleeves and relaxed collar. When she
        made it clear to Roger he could be in her life, but her main focus would be her
        son.

    • http://ayearofmommyhood.blogspot.com/ Tabby_abby

      I gasped when I saw Shirley. She was a butterfly in a room with moths.

      Nothing else to add except I wore a version of Sally’s dress in the mid 90s and did not look as awesome as her.

      • leighanne

        Shirley did look amazing. I gasped when I saw how short her skirt was in the office.

        • Spicytomato1

          I gasped, too. And while I think she looks great and I get that hemlines had risen by then, I really wonder if secretaries really wore skirts/dresses quite that short, especially in an office full of so many good old boys? Even now I’d think a hemline that short would get some serious side eye, if not an outright reprimand.

          • leighanne

            Joan would have sent her home three or four years ago!

            • Beth

              I thought the same thing. I loved what Shirley wore, and I know creative industries have way more leeway in fashion, but I still thought it was not office-appropriate.

        • CanIbeFrank

          It seems so incredibly inappropriate, that it was so short! No one would ever wear a skirt that short in an office today (if I’m wrong, someone let me know!). In fact, today her dress would called a tunic and we’d wear leggings under it. However, I will admit I had a very similar dress in 5th grade in 1975, with the big collar and everything and i remember it being crazy short–I couldn’t even bend down to get a drink at the drinking fountain. I had to do a deep knee bend. Now, if my daughter (whose in 5th grade) wore something that short, I’d send her straight back to her room to change!

          • MilaXX

            10 years ago I had a coworker who wore super short minis like that. She was leggy and model thin but with curves. I kid you not HR came to the department and did a special presentation on proper work attire.

            • lillyvonschtupp

              And this is only 10 years ago. Do you think the good ol’ boys would have allowed it 45 years before?

            • MilaXX

              I’m not sure. I think in the 60’s they did get away with crazy hem lengths. I also think some may have been afraid to press the issue out of fear of a law suit. In the 80’s folks were more afraid of sexual harassment suits, so I can see why they would speak on it.

            • lillyvonschtupp

              Were there such a thing as sexual harassment lawsuits back in 1969? I highly doubt it, considering how many secretaries spread their legs for their bosses (at least on the show), but I’m just asking.

            • MilaXX

              No you misunderstand in 69 the concern was racial discrimination. In the 80’s the reason my office did the HR thing was concern of sexual harrassment

            • lillyvonschtupp

              Okay, I get it. I just didn’t know when sexual harassment became an issue. My mother sued for sexual harassment in the mid 80s and won. And I didn’t really hear the interpretation of sexual harassment until I saw the Clearance Thomas-Anita Hill fiasco.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              I remember sexual harassment becoming an issue in the late 70s/early 80s, reading about in newspaper and and magazines…it seemed like making an issue of it and making it illegal was kind of a new thing (harassment has been around probably forever).

            • Aurumgirl

              I have my kindergarten photo, taken in 1969, where my teacher, Mrs. Mosey, wears a dress that’s just as long as both Shirley’s and Bonnie’s. That was the style then. Mini skirts were very micro mini, and when the skirt lengths dropped again they did so for a good long time. So long everyone is shocked by what was commonplace, even in a work environment, back in the late 60’s.

          • katiessh

            you’re not wrong. I would wear that kind of dress while going out, but even then I’d have to be careful when I’m sitting down. I think fashion has probably actually got more conservative for all the sheer and nakedness we’re seeing on the red carpet it would still be seen as unprofessional to have such short hem-lines or a lot of cleavage

          • Alloy Jane

            Yeeeah, guilty. I’ve worn dresses that short to work, but not at conventional offices so it’s not like it was a terrible big deal. Well, once a coworker was snapping pictures and caught me crossing my legs and we were all OMG! and he was like “That was NOT deliberate!!!” It was funny and actually a decent picture of me once you cropped the bottom half.

          • Not applicable

            I asked a friend of mine who was working in an traditional office at this this time- she said it wasn’t the norm, but younger girls would wear mini dresses- but you were supposed to wear hose. ALWAYS. Weirdly, even when skirts were longer bare legs would have been a bigger infraction.

            • CanIbeFrank

              Bare legs is a fairly recent trend. I’m 49 and getting to wear pantyhose was one of the biggest rites of passage there was! Tights and knee-high socks were for kids, so when we got our first pair of pantyhose (maybe 5th or 6th grade, and this was mid-70s), it was a BIG DEAL.

            • Not applicable

              same here! getting those first hose was a big deal. I remember being taught how to put them on… :)

              And, not for nothing, but I worked for a very conservative (insurance) company where I was informed that the dress code for women was to wear hose or tights with skirts and no open toed shoes or sandals! But this- was 2006… I no longer work there- but the policy remains…

            • Alice Teeple

              It was still sort of like that when I was growing up. I remember my first pair of pantyhose. I was 11 and promptly ripped a ladder in them. L’Eggs were great – remember the plastic egg they came in?

            • Chris

              Yes and they were great for all different holiday projects!

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              They even made special Christmas eggs in gold and metallic red and green. (Sheer Energy came in silver eggs, IIRC)

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Same here. I got my first pantyhose in 6th grade, maybe 7th, at about the same time. I quickly learned to hate the darn things. They’re fragile, uncomfortable, and hot in the summer and cold in the winter. I was required to wear them when I worked in a bookstore in the late 80s, including one very hot summer. I’m so glad they’re not de rigueur anymore. At least not as much.

            • Glammie

              Ugh, I remember reading that the average life span of a pair of pantyhose was nine days. Hated the things and they were totally required for office wear. When did that stop? Early 90s?

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              I don’t remember. I was in grad school at the time, so I rarely wore pantyhose. I think mine had a much shorter life span than 9 days.

            • VastAmphibians

              A little later than that, I would say. I got my first job in an office in 2001 and while I was certainly allowed to wear pants, if I was wearing a skirt, I was expected to be wearing pantyhose. That job was in financial services, though, so it may have been a little more conservative than if it were another industry. I moved to a creative environment in 2008 and I’ve been bare-legged ever since!

            • http://www.tragicsandwich.com/ Tragic Sandwich

              Late 90s. Sex and the City killed them, thankfully.

            • Glammie

              I grew up around a small ad agency and there was a time when the secretary was wearing super-short skirts. Being attractive and sexy was part of the job and the agency’s image. The non-secretaries wore less extreme stuff. So short skirts were okay, but with hose and jeans were verboten for a good long time afterwards.

          • acerbia

            I work in advertising in San Francisco, and some of my co-workers wear outfits that rival this for hemline length. Often worn with ripped tights. Of course, we don’t really follow typical office conventions in many ways — lots of swearing, ribald humor, busting out drinks at 4pm (we have a few alcohol clients who keep us stocked). If you’re funny and get your work done well, it doesn’t matter how you dress or what you say. It’s the best fucking place I’ve ever worked.

        • charlotte

          Although my honest reaction was “Did she forget her pants?”

          • malarson2

            Same. And then I had a brief moment of relief when they showed her in a wide shot in the break room door and I thought – for a brief second – that she was wearing tights under it with those boots. Now, I know that may seem really horrible, considering her skin tone, but it is where my brain went for a very short sliver of time.

          • Not applicable

            I just keep thinking of the Brady Bunch. I know Marsha & Jan were teens- but MAN were those dresses short!!

            • Spicytomato1

              Yes! And always worn with nude pantyhose and flat, often frumpy, shoes. Shirley’s dress and ensemble has a lot more sass and style.

        • AZU403

          Her skirt was definitely about 4-5 inches too short for an office in 1969. A night out partying, maybe.
          Interestingly, I got a short, sort of hippie dress in 1971, and by 1976 it was too short to wear except as a top. Ditto for the dress type that Shirley was wearing (and did she ever look sensational in red!), which became really popular in the early Seventies. By 1980 it was unwearable without slacks, and didn’t look right then, either.

        • http://www.tragicsandwich.com/ Tragic Sandwich

          Mr. Sandwich burst out laughing when I said, “I have NEVER had the confidence to wear a skirt that short. In fact, that’s the length I want my tops to be. When I wear pants under them.”

          As far as I can remember, there’s only been one time it’s come up in the show–but some of the characters on Mad Men must have been watching Star Trek. The first series ended its third and last season in 1969, and all the women wore micro-minis and were presented as professional (if often lovestruck and subordinate).

      • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

        yes to this

      • KayeBlue

        Poor Lane- if only he could see the office now, his eyes would pop right out of his head!

      • MeowMix

        There was a brief jumper trend that happened in the 90s. I had a similar one as well.

        • Not applicable

          me too!

        • Shug

          And in approximately 2007-2009 – I have a gray tweed jumper from Banana that I used to wear to internship.

      • Chris

        Shirley reminded me a lot of “Thelma” the sister on “Good Times.” I remember thinking she was SO pretty and fashionable when I watched it as a little girl. The time frame is a little later but the hair, collared dresses and general 70’s look is the same. She also wore a lot of hoop earrings and took no flack from anyone. She was my favorite character and I watched that show religiously.

        • Alice Teeple

          YES! I loved Thelma, she always looked so pretty!

        • sojourneryouth

          Yes! I also loved Willona with her sass and wonderful one-liners. A great show in many ways, even though it reinforced soooo many stereotypes.

          • Chris

            I loved Willona too, she worked in the dress shop and had all the latest outfits. Not to get too far afield but I think “Good Times” while full of stereotypes was really groundbreaking. Not only was it one of only a couple of shows that didn’t have an all white cast, it showed a wonderful, close knit family that was truly struggling with big issues. I can’t think of another show where the main characters were so poor they were trying to pay their rent, facing racism etc. I know as a little girl living in suburbia it was the first time I had been exposed to so many social issues and people in such different circumstances.

    • http://theargiehome.blogspot.com/ Gus Casals

      I watched the show twice, the second relaxing and in full blown HD, and I never noticed Joan’s flowers in the background when she’s talking to Peggy. Awesome job, as usual.
      Love also the Anna-Peggy-Sally sequence, had not thought of it that way, but it does make a lot of sense.
      And “A small army of Peggys”? Flawless.

    • texashistorian

      Thank you for explaining so much of this for me. I’m not always the brightest to pick up these clues. My favorite parts of the episode: Dawn’s smack-down of Lou, and her triumphant smile when she sits in her own.damned.office.

      • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

        I cheered out loud when I realized that Dawn had been promoted. :)

      • CanIbeFrank

        Yes, it was soooooo awesome when Dawn called Lou out on his total B.S. LOVED that. Loved it loved it loved it. Also loved Joan’s standing up for Dawn against Bert too. It’s so wonderful seeing women realizing they have power and can speak up. THANK YOU to all the women who helped change the ways of the world. We’re still not totally there, but it’s the real-life Dawns, Joans and Peggys too, who are our heroes.

      • Jen M

        Yep, I guessed Joan would promote Dawn about 5 hot seconds before it happened and was so thrilled when I was right. I may be wrong, because I wasn’t actually alive at that time, but it seems like a pretty big deal to put an African-American woman in a position of power (even a nominal position of power, such as personnel manager) at that point in history.

      • Candice Booth

        I got so much satisfaction from Dawn sitting down and smiling.

    • siriuslover

      Oh what a great analysis. I love the Peggy analysis and how it’s woven throughout. I didn’t notice the first viewing, but that still with Sally and Lou shows that she still is a child looking for her dad. See how her right sock is slightly askew and starting to slip down?

    • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

      Lorenzo definitely deserves the pat on the back for the collages! Thank you Uncle Lo!

      • Chris

        I feel like I miss so much of the show until I see his screencaps. The details he captures are just amazing. Maybe it’s because I am a bit nearsighted but seeing the Mad Style pictures and commentary brings the episode alive in a whole different way from just watching in on the TV.

        • MilaXX

          This is one of those shows I watch more time than I care to admit. On Sunday I watch once with twitter & then catch the west coast repeat. I then wait for the Mad Style post to rewatch after reading.

      • decormaven

        Many thanks indeed. Lo’s screencaps often help me pick up details that are missed in multi-viewings of the episodes.

    • Froggae

      “What was Peggy wearing the first time she learned that her secretarial job consisted of lying and covering for her boss? Why, a blue plaid with a contrasting collar, of course.”
      OMG, perfect.

      • L’Anne

        Isn’t that the same dress she wore when she chided Lois for not knowing how to “cover” for Draper?

    • Chris

      Just seeing that “Hang In There Baby” poster brought the whole of the 70’s (that I was old enough to remember) back to me!

      • Elana Bryan

        I owned that poster, and the T-Shirt… 1970s flashback!

      • YousmelllikeAnnaWintour

        They really nailed the decor in the girls’ room, didn’t they?

        • Chris

          It’s perfect- that pillow and the Peanuts calendar!

          • Eric Stott

            In a bottom drawer some place I have that calendar.

      • Alice Teeple

        I remember seeing them in Troll book orders in the mid-80s when I was in school! hahahaha

    • KayeBlue

      Said it before, I’ll say it again- how did women sit down in 1969 skirts?! At least Bonnie’s in warm California, Shirley must have been freezing cold!

      Sally’s worn her SBD necklace in almost every one of her scenes (her dressy dress in “At The Codfish Ball” and when she met Glenn at the museum in “Commissions & Fees” being exceptions I remember)- she wished he could have been there to give her. Don owes her better apologies and explanations, not to mention being a decent role model, but she longs for her daddy. Poor kid.

      I miss Joan’s fabulous early-Sixties updos. A loaf of bread appears to have been stuck to the back of her scalp.

      • Chris

        I thought her bun seemed low for that time. In pictures of my Mom from that time it is very high on the back top of her head.

        • KayeBlue

          I’ll buy that as a newly-wealthy (or more comfortable) Madison Ave partner, she’s getting the very latest style from her hairdresser. Can you imagine what Joan spends on hairdos? She must go twice a week!

          I’m reminded of a great line from ‘The Crimson Petal & The White’- “Sometimes, fashion looks to the swan for inspiration. Sometimes, perversely… the turkey”.

          • Chris

            I think it’s also a subtle way of trying to age Joan. A higher hairdo reads as younger, where the lower bun seems older.

            • KayeBlue

              Truth. Her V-Day outfit is gorgeous, but it’s also practically Victorian.

        • Thom-Cat

          Women of Joan’s age and younger would wear “falls” are as we know them hair pieces. so as to have a fuller but less fuss hairstyle. something she could pin that morning and take out that night. my mother wore them even in high school, and also had a few wigs for fun and bad hair days…

          • KayeBlue

            My grandmother (who is 1 year younger than Joan) used to call those mini-wigs her “head pets”. :-)

            • Ginger Thomas

              My mother had one of those “wiglets” — and my aunt had a long fall, which she wore with a scarf around her head to hide the front edge.

          • Chris

            Yes, mine did too but at that time she wore hers much higher up.

      • Ginger Thomas

        I’m a bit younger than Sally Draper, so I was in high school in the early 70s, when all teenage girls tried to wear skirts that short. Sitting wasn’t too bad; we didn’t cross our legs too much, and we’d keep something in our laps so the boys couldn’t look up our skirts. Bending over was much more of a problem. We did what I later found out is called the bunny dip. Also, windy days could be tricky. There was a constant war in my school and with my mother about skirts being too short.

        • KayeBlue

          Teen girls will always want to wear their skirts short- I was in high school 8 years ago. I just can’t imagine how Shirley tolerates sitting on a cold subway seat with her entire backside touching it.

          • Ginger Thomas

            She was cold! It only helps a little that she would have pantyhose (or tights) on.

            • AZU403

              You’re telling me, cold! I still remember 1969’s raw, rainy Ash Wednesday, across the Hudson River in New Jersey, going from church to school in culottes and knee socks, and how my legs were red for hours.

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            I dunno…in the late 70s/early 80s, when I was in high school, skirts were long, about midcalf length, and miniskirts seemed really old-fashioned and outdated. One of my friends got a miniskirt when we were junior, but she was an exception. And that skirt was just maybe 2-3 inches above the knee.

            • ldancer

              I was really into wearing tiny black lycra-cotton blend miniskirts, very tight, with stockings and boots, as part of my late 80’s/early 90’s punk uniform. Very short, shorter than anything I’d wear now, in NYC and Boston winters. I can still feel the bracing cold in my quads.

              Shirley’s look made my jaw drop, mostly from sheer pleasure because she just looked so fantastic, but yeah, that skirt was dangerously short. That length just looks so vulnerable.

              Not a fashion note, but I want to say that I loved the code-switching of Shirley and Dawn in the break room. I hope Mad Men shows us more of that. That felt very real.

      • MilaXX

        I noticed Shirley had on tights. That way you really don’t see anything, but I suspect the fact that she’s behind a desk may also help matters.

      • NDC_IPCentral

        Pantyhose. The bare-legged fashion now was not the mode 45 years ago. In fact, pantyhose were still somewhat new; I remember getting them for the first time in ’68 or ’69. Dollars to doughnuts a few of the older women we see in this 1969 world are still wearing stockings with garter belts.

        • not_Bridget

          Peggy wore pantyhose in an earlier season–research (by us!) revealed that they had been invented by then. They just weren’t common. Miniskirts made them necessary. Shirley’s are dark enough to look like tights–and her legs wouldn’t flash whitely, anyway.

          Joan would be the one to warn her of inappropriate attire, but we didn’t hear a peep. However, it’s easy to see that Dawn is the more career-oriented. (Shirley’s natural ‘do means “Black Pride”–which wasn’t always political. Or, at least, not militantly political.)

        • KayeBlue

          Maybe *somewhat* new, but Topaz PANTYHOSE has been an SCDP client since 1965. Peggy even said she was wearing them at she and Ken won the business- it’s made clear that it’s an established company with television, print, etc, ads. :-)

          According to Wiki, pantyhose were invented in the 1950s and did in fact surpass “stocking” sales for the first time in 1970.

          • L’Anne

            The montage opening of season 2’s “Maidenform” shows Peggy putting on panty hose.

            • KayeBlue

              Oooh good point! That’s our Pegs, a trailblazer in everything from undergarments to cohabitation.

      • Jacqueline Wessel

        Shirley was wearing boots and she probably had a fabulous maxi coat to keep her warm.

    • KinoEye

      Excellent work with the collages, Lorenzo! All the back-pats in the world to you both.

      I don’t have anything to add to this great assessment, except for the fact that I definitely noticed shades of Betty Draper in Sally. As a former smoker, the way each person holds their cigarette is unique and can tell you a lot about that person. How intuitive of her to incorporate that into her performance.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        It doesn’t surprise me. Growing up, she saw how her mother held the cigarette, so of course when she started smoking, that’s how she would hold it. In universe, Sally would have seen Betty smoke more than she saw Don smoke.

        • Shug

          I find myself smoking like Betty sometimes. Helps me pretend my habit can be glamorous and isn’t straight up trashy. :)

        • KinoEye

          Exactly. It’s the details that make a performance, and Kiernan’s hitting all those little grace notes.

    • Chris

      I only just noticed from the pictures above what an amazing coat Shirley has. It’s almost as luxe looking as Joan’s except Joan of course has that expensive fur collar. Shirley does not dress like the other women on a secretary’s budget.

    • Terri Ellis

      Thank you for the highlight of my midweek. The one thing I noticed was that Dawn didn’t speak up until she realized the meaning of Lou’s comment that “you can’t fire her, just move her elsewhere”. Dawn has now realized that the white folks she works for are a little afraid of her- she could sue them for being fired! Not really, but that’s what they think. She won’t push the envelope (like Shirley might), but it’s a good thing to keep in her back pocket. Loving the boots of the era!

    • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

      Thoughts:
      Dawn is defintely a Peggy, I wonder if their clothing choices for her will also depict the rise of her career beyond a secretary. Shirley is completely Jane 2.0. Something has got to be going on with Cutler and Moira right?

      • Susan Collier

        Jane 2.0, or maybe Megan 2.0. I thought of her when TLo mentioned Shirley’s penchant for showy clothing and short skirts in the office. And that she’s not long for office life.

        • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

          I don’t think Shirley or Dawn will be secretaries for long. Dawn because she will probably get promoted and Shirley because she is totally a Jane or Megan.

          • Kate Andrews

            Dawn did get promoted — she has Joan’s old job now.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              I thought she just got the office. She was promoted?

            • Kate Andrews

              Yep — Joan’s a full-time account man, so Dawn will handle the personnel. I know, they’re so subtle on here.

            • Susan Collier

              I hope that this means that Lou gets stuck with Meredith as his secretary!

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              I am pretty sure he will and Peggy will get Moira. A boss she hates and a secretary that hates her.

            • Ginger Thomas

              I think he got Shirley — they were walking together at the end — and Meredith is back at reception.

            • bxbourgie

              Lou did indeed get Shirley… and I have a feeling Shirley will be taking none of Lou’s mess, especially since she seems to have very little interest in being there.. just biding her time until she gets married.

            • lisbeth borden

              I said this on the recap, but I think Peggy getting Moira would be fabulous, if Moira is Ted’s other mistress, as I suspect.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              OMH if ted has another mistress….I just don’t even know…

            • lisbeth borden

              Right? Like if that hits Peggy–That Ted is a douche who totally duped her just for a one-time fling, that he does it to a lot of women, she is going to DIE.
              Moira & Ted hugged last episode, one wearing blue, the other green.

            • Ginger Thomas

              I think that if Ted and Moire actually were involved, they wouldn’t have hugged in the office.

            • Chris

              Absolutely, him laughing with Peggy and touching her waist got Ted “outed” with everyone. He freaked out when Peggy touched his hand inadvertently in an ad pitch with clients. He’s a bundle of guilt and nerves. To him it was probably a fatherly hug. He exiled himself from NY over Peggy, No way he’s messing around with Moira. If anyone, it’s Cutler.

            • L’Anne

              I really think all of us Bitter Kittens need a pillow with “Is that Shalimar?” stitched on it.

            • greenmelinda

              Is that Shalimar?

            • lisbeth borden

              Perhaps the blue & green hug last week was reflective of an UNREQUITED attraction that Moira has for Ted. She’s always been too much in his business.

            • L’Anne

              I guess I don’t understand what you mean by “too much in his business.” The way it seems to me she’s been shown is as a good secretary who stays on top of things for him– takes minutes for meetings, distributes memos, etc. Peggy and Ted were so indiscreet that Moira, Joan, and Don (and even Megan at the movies) all seemed put off by their behavior. Moira’s reaction is a normal for a good secretary who cares about her boss. After all, that kind of hi-jinx can blow up professionally (see how Don had to handle the budget situation with the aspirin) or even personally. She, Don, and Joan were all seeing a man whose professional judgement — thus possibly his reputation– over what would look to them like a fling.

            • Chris

              Well last season they made a point of showing her as overly pushy with Joan at first demanding things on Ted’s authority (Ted had to rein her in with a disapproving “Moira”), walking right after Ted and him shutting his office door in her face to keep her out, and how she disloyally pointed out Ted and Peggy in the conference room to Don because she was presumably jealous. (You are supposed to cover for your boss, not point out his transgressions to his rival at work who is making him miserable). In that sense she was too much in Ted’s business and not acting the way Dawn would to protect Don even when he messed up.

            • L’Anne

              I remember that first scene after the merger with Joan, and I remember thinking that girl is terse. Unclench, honey! I did attribute much of that interaction as confusion for all concerned and not knowing who was who and who did what. I think Moira was trying to make sure she did what Ted asked for in getting copies of everything. Ted gave her the “Moira” and I took that to be a “Dial it back” comment.

              I’m not remembering the other scene. Can you remember the episode name? The one I’m thinking of is the second to the last episode, and she points them out to Don. But they’re in the room with Joan, going over the St. Joseph’s pitch. And the curtains weren’t pulled. She might have been wrong in pointing them out, but she was only pointing out the obvious.

              None of this is to mean I like Moira. She’s really had so little development that I can’t really say that she’s anything, though she does seem to be a good secretary. I do think she could be an issue for Peggy because she does seem to be protective and cautious about Ted.

              I just think I’m replying to more to the issue that she and Ted have been having an affair. And I just don’t see that at all. I do think Peggy is misreading Ted at times, and the person he is, but I don’t think an affair with Moira is part of that misread.

            • decormaven

              S6 Quality of Mercy.

            • L’Anne

              I have to agree with this. It just seems that they have a good working relationship, have worked together for awhile, and have a boss-secretary friendship. She was broken up when Gleason died. She had a friendly hug with her boss, who has been gone for three months.

              If she schtupping anyone, it would be Jim “is that Shalimar?” Cutler.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              But he’s so depressed…can he be faking that?

            • lisbeth borden

              In my experience—YES, douches can be pouty & feel sorry for themselves when they can’t get their way. I’m just having fun, hoping Ted is NOT the guy Peggy ends up with, and trying to think of anything that will end it for good. Ted does NOT deserve her.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              Agreed

            • Chris

              I still like Ted. I’m not in favor of adultery but I do think he screwed up and he is trying to do what is right after having done wrong. I think he and Peggy would make a great team but I also hate the idea of a man dumping his wife and kids. He did mess with Peggy but he also did a lot of good for her professionally by hiring her as copy chief and showing her how a good boss treats the people who work for him. (Peggy is the only employee he seems to have treated poorly due to his own issues). If his marriage is really over I would like to see him with Peggy. I think they could have an amazing partnership.

            • Alice Teeple

              I’m wondering if Ted’s mopiness is going to contribute to a split anyway with Nan. Maybe she’ll get tired of him not being home/available. I feel bad for poor Ted. Everyone wants to see his head on a pike, but he’s one of the few around there with a conscience (for better or worse).

            • Candice Booth

              I don’t think Ted has another mistress because he did seem to want to salvage his marriage by moving away from temptation. Pete was also annoyed at Ted’s moral high ground because he doesn’t know that he also has been close to Peggy.

            • Chris

              I will never believe that. The guy is sitting making airplane models during a conference call he is so depressed over everything. Even work doesn’t mean anything to him. Peggy was his one time sin and he’s punishing himself over it.

            • lisbeth borden

              Regardless, when it comes to Ted (and possibly Ted & Peggy) Moira is TROUBLE, I can feel it!

            • Chris

              Oh I agree with that 100%!!

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              so the question is he more about upset about the cheating or the not being with Peggy?

            • Chris

              Completely just my guess: depressed about Peggy who he has connected with work now (which he is also neglecting) but also because he is a moral guy at heart, probably beating himself up over cheating on Nan and his family.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              I got the distinct impression before peggy had a melt down at the coffee machine…that he was going to say something

            • insomniacattack

              Ted was about to say something. He said “so…” and then Peggy started calling for Stan. My reading is that Peggy wasn’t ready to have a conversation with Ted, while Ted seemed to have placed himself in that situation to have a conversation with her. He must have known that she comes into the office on the weekend, knew there would be few if any other people in the office on a Saturday morning, and so saw it as an opportunity to catch her alone. His plan backfired, so he ran off.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              Exactly, he ran off and probably won’t try to talk to her again for awhile

            • Gatto Nero

              I think it’s both.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              yes knowing Ted, you are right.

            • Gatto Nero

              And, I’m guessing, still a little obsessed with her.

            • http://toongrrl.deviantart.com/ Toongrrl

              If there was a fight, who’d win? : )

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              No, Bert won’t allow a black secretary at the front desk — Shirley is going to Lou.

            • 3boysful

              I thought of that, too! He’s going to be having big-time regret . . . .

            • snarkykitten

              I thought it was determined that Shirley became Lou’s secretary and Meredith went back to being reception. Lou totally deserves a Meredith though.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              I missed this completely

            • TLJezebel

              Thanks for clearing that up. I missed it too.

            • MilaXX

              Yes and much like how Peggy was promoted to copywriter because Don was mad at Pete, Dawn got her position because Bert & Peggy pissed Joan off so much that she took the account position.

            • Cheryl

              My impression, perhaps incorrectly was that Dawn was now the office manager and head of personnel. I didn’t think it was merely a new office.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              I think you are right, I just missed it

      • KayeBlue

        I think Moira’s just an office wife. She fulfills the exact role of his wife- supportive, staid, traditional. She’s the physical embodiment of everything that (rightly, IMO) stops Ted from running away with Peggy.

        • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

          Moira makes me wonder sometimes…there always seems to be more with her.

          • Chris

            I’ve always been suspicious of Moira.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              Right there is just something about her.

            • Chris

              Right from the start she challenged Joan on the stairs when CGC was moving in. Her presence in the conference room at the first meetings and how closely she is always monitoring Ted etc. Now that Cutler is running things she seems to have moved up as the most important secretary. We also saw her walking in from lunch off the elevator with Cutler last season. She’s placed prominently a lot.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              Right, I thought it would happen last season. Maybe it will happen when she becomes Peggy’s secretary.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              Is that a guess, or do we know for sure? With musical secretaries it was hard to figure out where everyone ended up when the episode ended.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              It’s a guess

          • KayeBlue

            Like the Black Widow agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent of C.H.A.O.U.G.H.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              yes

          • Kitten_Mittens

            Her hair is full of secrets!

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              That’s why its so BIG. Mean Girls is on Netflix btw

            • Kitten_Mittens

              Just watched it on Netflix this past weekend, so the line was on my mind :)

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              Yes, my netlifx subscription is finally paying off. Watched it three times already!

            • Chris

              And her Dad invented toaster strudel.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              This applies to Kitten_Mittens and Chris. I never expected to see “Mean Girls” references in Mad Style. I’m not complaining mind you, I’m just surprised to see them.

            • Chris

              I jumped on the bandwagon. I can’t help myself with Mean Girls quotes. It’s like a compulsion and it’s applicable to almost any situation.

      • charlotte

        Do you remember the scene in which Peggy demands more money from Roger for her extra work? I’d love to see a scene like that with Dawn, but I guess there would have to be a couple more seasons.

        • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

          Of course, that scene was the best! Idk her telling off Lou was pretty impressive.

        • Chris

          I don’t know if Dawn will ever be like that exactly. Peggy picked up that behavior from working with “the guys”. I’m not sure Dawn would ever consider that “appropriate” behavior. Peggy had to adapt to be like one of the guys in many ways while Dawn’s job is still fully a “female” job. She’s in charge of the secretaries not competing with the other “boys”. Like Class Versus Sass says, her telling off of Lou was her big moment.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          I don’t think it would happen with Dawn. Dawn has recieved a full promotion. She has a different job title, so I’d assume her salary would reflect that. She’s gone from secretary to office manager (or whatever Joan’s old title was).

          • artsykelly

            Wasn’t she the Traffic person?

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              They called it directing traffic, but I thought the official title was something different. No matter what you call, Dawn has a new job that pays better than her previous job. I wonder if she’ll start dressing a bit nicer, not more trendy, but new clothes of a better quality.

          • Sonny

            I think one of Joan’s doors said “Personnel Manager”

    • Kate Andrews

      Fabulous as always, fellas! I like Joan’s heart pendant. It looks like a modern update on her holiday-themed pins.

      • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

        I like the pendant too, although it seems strange to wear it on top of all the bow and floof around her neck.

        • Kate Andrews

          Yeah — I wouldn’t wear it that way!

    • madge

      “There’s a small but growing army of Peggys. Their color is yellow and their symbol of power is a simple file box.”

      This line gave me chills. There are so many of us Peggys now, standing on our own feet and trying to figure things out. I really hope she gets to before this show is over, at least a bit.

      • shopgirl716

        As I segue into my late ’40’s I realize you’re always trying to figure it out, you just quit having public meltdowns over not having what you want. I think Peggy’s gonna get there. She’s no dummy.

      • NDC_IPCentral

        Read Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In. I just finished it a few days ago. I’m a lot older than you, Madge, and your army of current Peggys, but what Peggy and Joan and Dawn went through is what working women of my generation (ten years younger than P, J & D back then) did as well. Sandberg’s book tells you to raise your hand, sit at the table and assert yourself. Seeing some of that in this week’s “Mad Men” episode reinforced the validity of Ms. Sandberg’s message today.

        • artsykelly

          Sandberg’s message is generally good, but it’s a little tone deaf. She doesn’t take into enough consideration the realities of most women’s lives. It isn’t simply a confidence issue, we need a working environment that is more accepting of mothers and other women who are in caretaking roles. The US is one of the only countries that doesn’t have paid maternity leaves.

    • Kate Andrews

      I’m not sure how it’s achieved, but it impresses me how old Don looks in some of these shots, when Jon Hamm looks a lot younger out of character. Maybe some lighting mixed with good acting? Anyway, the character has really aged.

      • Chris

        It always strikes me when I see him out of Don Draper costume how much younger he looks. I think they are painting shadows and bags under his eyes. It’s so subtle and natural, they do a great job.

        • Spicytomato1

          Yes, and last season he was always so pasty and sweaty, which I always thought was amazing makeup work.

          On a related note, I have been thinking that Jim/Harry Hamlin looks so old…like Hamm, is it the character? Or has he really aged that much (I haven’t seen a “civilian” photo of him anytime recently) in real life?

          • PastryGoddess

            No he hasn’t aged that much. In real life he looks younger

            • Gatto Nero

              Also, in real-life appearances JH is likely wearing makeup to enhance his looks.

          • 3boysful

            Agree re Jim/HH. He almost has a turkey neck in the show.

          • Chris

            He looks younger in ‘real” life. Those fashions and styles automatically add years to everyone too. Something about those old style glasses just makes everyone look like a senior citizen.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              Oh good. I thought Michael Kuzack had really turned into a grandfather, and was having a bit of trouble with that. The space-time continium (young actors get old, older actors were once young) can be difficult for someone who watches a lot of reruns.

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              Well, Michael Kuzack *could* be a grandfather by now, if he and Grace had had a kid. Totally off-topic, but those two should have stayed together. I never believed in Grace and Victor. (Nothing wrong with Victor, of course.)

            • http://www.tragicsandwich.com/ Tragic Sandwich

              I remember seeing an interview with Christina Hendricks after season one or two. She said that people, upon meeting her when they’d only seen her as Joan, invariably said, “But you’re a baby!”

      • KayeBlue

        My best friend said, rightly, that it’s a testament to Jon Hamm as an actor that he is so handsome, but makes his character seem aged and verging on disgusting.

        • Kate Andrews

          I saw Daniel Craig on Broadway, and his character was a beleaguered cop, and just his posture and a truly sad-looking mustache totally transformed him. I’ve never seen anything like it. He was the furthest thing from James Bond.

      • MilaXX

        Not just old, but old & tired. In fact anytime we see Don in a scene where he’s not “on” he looks plain old worn out.

    • Susan Collier

      Wow, guys.
      My husband noted that he had Sally’s Peanuts calendar. It’s era-perfect.

      • AnneElliot

        I took a closer look at that owl hanging on her wall and I think it’s a hooked rug — I remember that was all the rage for crafting in the 1970s.

        • Susan Collier

          Yes! Latch hook. I never did finish my kitty cat one.

        • shopgirl716

          I had a hooked rug kit. I keep looking for macrame but haven’t seen any. The grass wall covering in Don’s apartment is really hideous.

        • Kitten_Mittens

          I made the exact same hooked rug in the 90s! Funny that they didn’t change the owl pattern or design at all.

          • sweetlilvoice

            The 60s were a big 90s influence…I remember trying on a horrible brand new polyester shirt and all my Mom could say was how retro it was.

    • 3hares

      That comparison of Bonnie and Peggy makes me remember Pete’s hunting fantasy. Back then he really stuck to the way gender roles were supposed to work (he brings home the deer and eats it; she cooks) but he’d really rather hunt with the woman.

      I love how Joan’s always themed for the holiday, like here in her dark red dress with the heart pendant.

      Totally would never have noticed the yellow connection and I love it!

      Is there anything to be said about those striped ties (the one Don wears when he greets Dawn)? In the first ep Ken was wearing a similar tie and I think it tied him to Freddy, and now Pete and Don seem to be wearing them. I don’t suppose the tie at all hints that he’s another ally of Don’s?

      Thank you for all the work you all do on these posts!

    • T. Sticks

      The level of detail on the show, but moreso in Mad Style, is delicious. Looking at these pictures makes me think how fun it must be to work on the show. I would love to come up with the vintage doodads that line Peggy’s desk — the coconut pencil holder! And is that a mimeograph machine?? — and Sally’s groovy boarding school room. It is just so much fun to see these things as if directly captured from my childhood! Thank you TLo, for every little detail! I love your analysis!!

      • Teresa

        I’m loving the close look at all the background doodads, too. It would be my dream job to go looking for those things. This week I especially noticed the lucite grapes on Don’s table, lots of colored Blenko glass, everybody’s big Rolodex, all the beige IBM typewriters, the hobnail lamp at the diner. Plus, I’ve noted 2-3 dog statues in lousy Lou’s office. Maybe he saves his love for canines.

    • French_Swede

      When I saw Ginsberg in the elevator wearing that hat, all I could think was that the flaps that were snapped up over his ears looked like the antennae Uncle Martin sported in “My Favorite Martian” … and his very, very strange behavior.

      Can anyone decipher what that pink button on his hat says?

      • Chris

        It’s something about Nixon but I can’t read it all.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Oh, that’s a good one too. I posted a different comparison, but I think I like yours better. ;)

      • Victoria Ramirez

        “Nixon is Rosemary’s Baby”

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          How on earth did you manage to read it? Good work!

    • Leigh Pennebaker

      I love these posts! I look forward to the day you guys get Honorary Doctorates for your amazing scholarship on the intricate details of this show. It will happen. The best of the blogosphere, right here!!!

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Or, hopefully, publish a coffeebook collection of commentary and collages, for great profit.

        • KayeBlue

          I would buy soooooo many copies of that.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          After the show is done, you should totally pitch the idea to AMC, and see if you can get the rights, or some sort of profit split from the book.

        • Spicytomato1

          Or a textbook. I would go back to college and take that course. And textbooks don’t run cheap!

    • http://brianfortedesigns.com/ BForte

      I practically screamed “HEM LINE!” when we got the first shot of Shirley’s outfit. For every reason, can you even imagine her walking around Sterling Cooper in 1960?

      • Prairie

        The epitome of gorgeous.

      • Kate Andrews

        I think we’ve all worked with folks who trample all over the corporate dress code — Shirley is skirting it (pun intended). I’ll bet part of the reason is that she’s dressed for her date that evening.

    • skitzfiggitous

      I would like to throw a little bit of Blog Technicality appreciation at you guys by thanking you for the pop-up image links, as opposed to redirect links. It’s a small thing, but an improvement that really helps with keeping the reader in the current episode storyline. Thanks for all the little (and big) things y’all do for us minions.

    • larrythesandboy

      “And it should be noted that only one other woman at SC&P besides Peggy had a desk without a bouquet on it”

      Not only that – in the final screenshot of Dawn, what’s peeping out of her storage box? A cat! (Mrs O. to Peggy, “You’re lonely – get a cat”). Actually I think there’s another one among Dawn’s belongings.

      • Chris

        Yes, Dawn has a few cat items on her desk.

        • sweetlilvoice

          I love that and I loved how we saw Dawn finally personalizing her desk. She has the tastes of a little old lady, at least to modern eyes. :)

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            She’d be well into her 60s by now, even close to 70, although I hesitate to say she’d be a little old lady.

    • shopgirl716

      Masterful, as usual.

    • MartyBellerMask

      I want to say that Ginsberg’s hat is very Catcher in the Rye. Has that been said before? I’m sure he wore it last year. There’s not much to say that T Lo didn’t nail already! ;)

      • sweetlilvoice

        I thought that as well about the hat.

    • Prairie

      Wonderful analysis! Thank you!

    • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

      ALL HAIL LORENZO! <333

      I'm appreciating Sally's room's decor for the first time. So much stuff! Must have been fun to put together. I love that cat poster — and that's a LOT of owls!

      I also love your commentary on Bonnie and her similarities to Pete, without Pete's issues. Very nice!

    • rockin robin

      I wonder if Shirley also continues the covering theme for secretaries. I think maybe in Peggy’s (admittedly twisted) perspective, Shirley had failed to cover for her in the “protect her from humiliation” sense.

      • Susan Collier

        Wow, yes. She’s one of the guys in this episode, right down to the temper tantrum to her secretary and then Joan.

      • Chris

        I think that’s a huge part of it. Racism probably led Peggy to think the flowers were hers but it’s her idea of what a secretary should do and be for her boss that really pushed her over the edge with Shirley.

        • AZU403

          I don’t know whether it was racism or plain old class bias. When Shirley and Dawn were griping about their dopey bosses, they sounded like any other pair of office workers. I always say, sometimes being a jerk is equal opportunity!

      • KayeBlue

        As TLo said last week, Peggy probably feels like the rules only apply to her.

        Of course, the “rule” that “Execs can throw temper tantrums at their secretaries” is a shitty one.

      • SayWhaaatNow

        “Failed to cover”, hmm…think that has anything to do with the length of her skirt? :P

    • lisbeth borden

      I definitely think Moira’s role will be expanding this season. That chartreuse & black herringbone (that looks green from afar) practically vibrated with energy. And seated under the blue wave canvas during the conference call, you couldn’t take your eyes off Moira in that scene.

      For all the Valentine’s red, there was a lot of ‘girl power’ yellow all over this episode also. And money-green was EVERYWHERE.

    • CatherineRhodes

      Brilliant! Lorenzo, it was worth the 20 hours.

      • siriuslover

        Yes, the man DOES INDEED deserve his props! Well done, as always!

    • French_Swede

      Lou has a Clio award … it’s sitting behind his desk. I suppose, at one time, he took credit for someone’s hard work.

      I died a little when I saw Don dressed up just for Dawn’s two minute visit. He’s all about appearances.

      • siriuslover

        Me too, but understandable. Would you want someone who worked with you see you in your underwear with Ritz cracker bits dribbling down your chin? At least he hasn’t hit THAT bottom (yet).

        • Spicytomato1

          True but wouldn’t nice pants and a shirt be adequate for most guys? Putting on full business attire, including the starched shirt and slicked hair, really seemed like overkill. But I suppose anything less than a full suit wouldn’t be enough “armor” for Don.

          • not_Bridget

            “Business Casual” had not yet been invented…

            • Spicytomato1

              Not for several decades. But he’s dressed down with Megan and his family before or for casual parties. I’d think pants and a shirt wouldn’t seem scandalous to Dawn considering she knew he was just hanging around his apartment. Unless he wants her, too, to think he’s always in important meetings.

            • decormaven

              That suit is armor for him; he wanted to look battle ready for Dawn’s visit. Not to get into with her, but to uphold the appearance of being in charge. I’m ready for Don to go back to the Athletic Club and get in a few laps. He definitely needs to clear his head.

            • Glammie

              Yep, but I really think he’s okay. Hasn’t totally crashed and burned the way he did post-divorce. Keeping up appearances is actually a good thing. He still cares enough to do it.

          • Gatto Nero

            Clearly he values Dawn’s opinion of him.

          • sweetlilvoice

            Her visit might be his only reason to bathe/shave, so it’s a good thing she’s stopping by. I loved how she called Don first after Sally’s visit. And Sally is so ballsy…going to the apartment, wanting money, giving her Dad shit. I loved it and I love her.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              Sally going to the office and then the apartment were among the smartest things she could have done. I wouldn’t call it ballsy. She lost her purse and needed money. Going to her father, who doesn’t work that far away from Grand Central was the logical and best idea. What she said/her attitude, that was ballsy.

      • Gatto Nero

        It was sad but hopeful at the same time. He still has enough pride to care about his appearance, and enough respect for Dawn to look professional for her.

      • BKagainwiththesweatpants

        I assumed that was Don’s Clio (“because everything you do belongs to the agency!” as he once said to Peggy), but come to think of it, didn’t he throw/break it in a snit a couple of seasons ago?

        • http://www.GiftedCollector.com/ The Gifted Collector

          An award winning art director that I worked with was allowed to take his trophy home for one night so he could show it to his children. He was reminded that it had to be in the office the next morning so it could be placed on display next to the dozens already there, many of which were also awards he had won.

        • sweetlilvoice

          One of the secretary’s fixed it…I think Megan?

          • decormaven

            Correct. Megan fixed it. I’m pretty sure that must be Lou’s award. As bitter as he is about Don, I don’t think he’d want anything in the office that signals “Don” to staff or clients.

      • techne

        Dawn is in a position to report back to the office on Don’s status. I think he is suiting up for her visits so she has nothing to report. What did he wear for his workday with Freddie in his living room?

    • Aurumgirl

      That expression on Sally’s face during her phone call to her room mates is 100% Don Draper dismissive. It’s the same mannerism he uses before he dismisses someone verbally.

      • lisbeth borden

        Watching Kiernan Shipka grow into such a talent over these years has been a delight, like watching a flower bloom. Sally has to carry so much weight this year for Don’s story, and it’s great we have such a young actress who can stand toe-to-toe with Jon Hamm to pull it off. I think Kiernan’s been criminally overlooked for awards and nominations.

        • JohannaEG

          I am so hoping for a Working-Girl era Sally Draper spin-off.

          • Trist

            And a Dawn and Shirley spin-off (but they have to be roommates, like Laverne and Shirley, with Shirley’s fiance as the commitment phobe Carmine).

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            Hmmm….that would be interesting. Sally will graduate from college when women are really making inroads into the corporate world, but she’d still be a trailblazer in certain positions. I see her going into business (or maybe law or politics). But not an Mrs. degree. Or maybe she’ll study Italian and bond with Betty that way.

        • Aurumgirl

          Me too, she’s ingenious. But I think part of that is she’d be competing against adult actresses, and I don’t think that would go over well in the business. It’s also a bit unfair: she’s really too young to be cast in roles and older actress would be believable in; and in effect Sally’s just an extremely well written child character. It’s a shame there’s no category, really, for someone like Kiernan Shipka.

          • 3hares

            I get the impression the opposite is just as often true, with people wanting to give awards to kids. I think it’s completely correct that the awards go to the adults. Acting as an adult is harder and KS gets ridiculously overpraised constantly, imo. This is not to say I don’t think she’s good–she’s great. But I think it’s actually very fair–and better for her–to just get credit for being a good child actress holding up her end (no mean feat on a show like this) and getting the advantage of working with a lot of good adult mentors.

            • Glammie

              Yep. She’s good, but her character’s well-written and she’s well-directed. She has some real potential—i.e. her ability to subtly mimic January Jones and Jon Hamm–but she’s not being asked to do things like Elisabeth Moss going through 6 different emotions in 14 lines in two minutes or becoming just a completely different person from head to toe like Vincent Kartheiser. Sally’s mostly a reactive character–and she doesn’t have to swing between comic and serious the way the adults do–Kartheiser again, John Slattery, Christina Hendricks, Jon Hamm. (Actually, one of the indicators that Jessica Pare’s one of the weaker leads is that lack of comic timing. She plays it pretty straight. January Jones has had funnier moments.)

    • French_Swede

      Contrasting the NY and LA offices, NY is all windows and steel and sharp angles, while in LA the offices look like they’re in someone’s home. The rich pile carpeting and wood furniture look very comfy and homey compared to New York.

      • 3hares

        Is that what Harry’s office in NYC looks more like?

      • http://www.tragicsandwich.com/ Tragic Sandwich

        I keep thinking the L.A. offices are in a hotel, like when they first started SCDP. They have that characterless fake home-y feel.

    • ovarB

      Herman Miller is currently promoting their Eames Shell Chair so I cannot help but to drink in all the Eames goodness going on. Side note…there was a great article from about two days ago about how the show works with Herman Miller to get so many of the period details just right. The funny thing is that you will NOT see the iconic Eames Lounge chair on the show because that would be too “cliche.”

      • boweryboy

        Interesting. Yet the chair Don is sitting in is a close fascimile of the iconic Eames lounge chair.

    • http://www.jaimieteekell.com/ Jaimie

      That closing line.

    • Kitten_Mittens

      I squealed with delight when I saw that owl in the girls’ dorm rooms. I had the EXACT same owl in my room in the 90s, it was a “make your own carpet” kit from a craft store, and I thought it was the coolest thing ever.

      • AmeliaEve

        I did not have the owl, but I had the Peanuts calendar and the little glossy paper chest of drawers. Also those stiff, vivid paper flowers on the florist’s wire. Flashback city.

      • Malia C.

        “in my room in the 90s”

        Christ I’m old ;)

        • Kitten_Mittens

          Haha, except I was probably way too old to have it or to be excited about making my own carpet hanging…

    • ♠♥zee♣♦

      One of the better mad style posts I’ve read. I love them all but the connections and statements here are huge.

    • Tricia

      Kudos, guys. This was fantastic as always.
      Oh, and Joan’s flowers were from Roger? I missed that detail. Still need to rewatch this episode, but I really loved it. That final scene killed me.

      • MilaXX

        Yes as she’s moving upstairs she comments on the flowers from her son Kevin and then thanks Roger. The idea is Roger sent them and signed the card from Kevin.

        • Tricia

          Ahh, ok. :) I think the ship has sailed, but I’ll always hope a little for a Joan/Roger reunion.

        • Musicologie

          I love the layers of meaning in the line, “They’re from my son. Thank you.” I also read it as a tiny, “Thank you for my son.”

    • leighanne

      Peggy and Ted both have on cream colored shirts with brown and orange ties/bows. Thousands of miles away, but still a bit of connection perhaps…

      • Chris

        I think there is definitely still a connection. He’s in some kind of a depression in LA and she’s working herself up into a lather in NY over roses she thinks are from him.

        • Alloy Jane

          I love that image, “working herself up into a lather.” She sure was soapy with bitterness and misdirected rage.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Nice call!

      • Not applicable

        yah- It may be over, but they are not over each other.

    • ashtangajunkie

      “Their colour is yellow and their symbol of power is a simple file box.”

      That might be my favourite line ever written about Mad Men.

    • Bonnie B

      LOVE that last sentence – fabulous post, as always!

    • Lilah

      You guys ARE fabulous. You hit on so many things I didn’t even see. Thank you!

    • Alice Teeple

      So damn good. You really did a nice job with Sally, especially.

    • Malia C.

      I am probably just 1/3 of the way through your (ever awesome) MadCap but I so want to say how much I love Dawn. I and others here in the Lounge were ecstatic with her finale on Sunday night. What a waste that whole Bob Benson business was last season when Weiner could have been giving us more Dawn.

    • julesj

      Lorenzo’s Google search is mind-boggling! I always wondered how he found all the pictures for the Mad Men posts. Thank you, Lorenzo! Your hard work is appreciated!

      • PastryGoddess

        Actually Lorenzo created all of those images you see in that google search. That’s how fabulous he is.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        Yes, as PastryGoddess said above, he screencaps, crops, creates, and uploads each collage.

        • decormaven

          Bowing down for real.

    • Gatto Nero

      Just stellar — so rich. I hope Lorenzo knows (and Tom, too) how much we look forward to and value these insights.
      This may have been mentioned already, but I noticed in the shots of Don and Dawn that they are color-matched somewhat. Secret collaborators in the SC&P skirmishes.
      I always read Mad Style before rewatching an episode. Makes the experience much more meaningful.

    • NDC_IPCentral

      Superb.

      Thank you most, most sincerely, Tom and Lorenzo. You’ve brightened immeasurably a dull day.

    • greenmelinda

      I’m a bit disappointed T&L did not mention the potentially obvious placement of the coat hook once Peggy closed her office door post-meltdown. That’s the second time we’ve been drawn to the door where Lane hung himself. I’m just assuming this means Peggy is floundering right now, dying on the inside. And her childlike outburst to Shirley was a bit like hanging herself [on her own words].

    • Malia C.

      Is it just makeup and lighting that makes Harry Hamlin so frightenly gaunt? I don’t mean it in any kind of body-shaming way, but boy, his face is just so hollowed out.

    • mowa5

      Thank you so much for these posts, your insights add another wonderful layer of enjoyment of my favorite show. I watch the show differently now. I appreciate your commitment to this.

    • Cheryl

      Thank you gentlemen, this is fabulous.

    • FibonacciSequins

      Your analysis gives me such added appreciation for each episode. Thank you!

    • Not applicable

      I’m a little surprised this blog didn’t make a note that Peggy’s costuming is really doing her no favors. This era of the poly knits in browns and rust colors weren’t easy styles to wear for many people (I’m thinking back to many a grade school teacher.) I assume they were very comfortable styles- but those double knits are almost universally unflattering.

      Props to Elizabeth Moss- she is embracing this character so fully. She is a very attractive woman who has a great figure- but Pegs is starting to look a little dowdy– I won’t go all the way to dumpy- but that mini dress does her no favors. Knowing how meticulous Janie Bryant is, I’m guessing the bad fit was 100% intentional. Peggy- despite the girl power she has inspired, has lost her mojo. And the secretaries gossiping about her just shows it’s been happening for a while. She’s becoming that woman in the office that nobody likes. Maybe not quite the ‘humorless bitch’ Joan predicted- but circling that neighborhood, looking for a parking space.

      • AmeliaEve

        It has just struck me what Peggy’s brown and orange outfit looks like: a classic Brownie uniform, beret included.

        You can see by the back views of the zipper that this is a single garment, not a skirt and blouse. My aunt, who was a working journalist at that time, had loads of these pre-coordinated outfits that matched everything together for you, as if you couldn’t handle separates. Some would have jackets or vests, sometimes with an embedded blouse that was a false front inside the other garment. For some reason, many of them seemed to feature bracelet-length sleeves. Maybe it was supposed to feminize pieces that were somewhat menswear-inspired.

        I’ll bet Peggy was a big fan of Leslie Fay dresses.

        • Chris

          It does look like those old Brownie uniforms! Great catch!

          • Not applicable

            I think the Browine uniforms were much cuter! :)

        • Not applicable

          I had to look up a Leslie Fay dress- I didn’t know what that was! But, I DO remember the dresses you’re describing with the ‘faux’ shirt and sometimes even with a vest that was completely attached except for working buttons/zip in the front.

          I was just noticing how bad the fit was- even the foundation garments seem less supportive and it’s not helping a girl out. But it totally makes sense- Peggy isn’t paying as much attention to herself post Ted & with the career adrift. If I’m remembering correctly- is she even 30 yet? She’s still a young woman, dressing in little girl styles– and not well.

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          The thing is, Peggy really can’t handle separates, so maybe it’s a good thing for her. She needs a friend to help her with clothes.

      • not_Bridget

        Poly knits were not comfortable. (Especially here on the Gulf Coast.) They were stiff & did not breathe. (Modern polyester is much better.)

        Let’s hope that Peggy will improve….

        • Not applicable

          I assumed they were comfortable b/c my grandmother wore them and she was all done with fussy clothes by that point in her life. She sorta got stuck in those 70s clothes- the knit pants and sleeveless button downs- but we lived in the Midwest and she always said she was cold. Maybe it worked for her. But I just remember seeing her in a tailored suit and how much nicer she looked. She was very slender- but those knits made her legs & backside look so much bigger than they were. Zero tailoring and fit…stretched in all the worst places… flared at the bottom. yick.

          • Glammie

            They weren’t comfortable because the fabric didn’t breathe, but they were low-maintenance. Wash-and-wear, no ironing, no dry-cleaning. My mother bought me not one, but two bright purple double-knit pants suits when I was a kid. Sigh.

            • Not applicable

              no worries- this is a circle of trust. ;)

            • Glammie

              LOL. Thing is, double-knit was considered just amazing at the time, all bright, smooth and colorful. Not like wrinkly dowdy cotton. I think it gave me permanent fear of polyester. I’ve been a natural-fabrics type my entire life.

            • Not applicable

              haha! yes- I think it had that effect on many women- but, despite some its lesser qualities- it was an amazing thing- no ironing for pete’s sake! I mean- that alone had to be an upsell for ANY housewife or working woman…

              I had a knit shirt & long skirt that was the second generation of this trend. I bought it in the mid 90s when I was headed abroad to study. It was a black ‘suit’ if you will, but it was so awesome & comfortable and looked professional. It was perfect for travel- I could sleep on the plane/train and be comfy like PJs and then arrive at my destination wrinkle-free– hand wash it in my sink. Miracle. I sort of wish I still had it…

            • Glammie

              I’ve had some of those sort of pieces and they are great for travel. A definite improvement over double-knit–that stuff was so thick. I kind of associate the second generation of comfy no-wrinkle workwear with the rise of Donna Karan–it’s kind of how she made her mark. Brought back the body suit (which I didn’t like either go-round. )

            • Not applicable

              You’re right! Donna Karan! (mine was a total knock off, of course) but yes- she did bring back these poly separates for work.

      • Chris

        They are dowdy-ing Peggy up now to show her inner unhappiness just as they made her look prettier and more feminine when she was in love with Ted last season. She had all those pretty, flattering dresses when she was in sync with Ted. She was the “beautiful young mother” of the commercial and now she’s the mean old maid Shirley asks “who would send flowers to her?”

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Given that the characters often wear the same outfit twice, maybe we’ll see a couple of those pretty, flattering dresses again. But under what circumstances? Ted and Peggy are on again? Peggy meets someone new and exciting? Neither, she just rewears one of those flattering dresses in a really unflattering way (wrong accessories or something)? Can’t wait to find out!

    • Valdri8

      Work of epic proportions, wonderful uncles of fabulousness!

      Scratchy Synthetic Loungewear is a great punk rock band name

    • Frank_821

      After a couple days and the Tlo madstyle recap, I got to thinking about Lou. He is a dinosaur, a champion of mediocrity and behaved like a petulant child towards Dawn, but in the grand scheme of things he was right to request a different secretary. As he rightly points out she’s Don’s girl. Her first loyalty is to him.

      That brings us to Shirley. Watching the episode I kind of felt annoyed by her and felt limited sympathy. At first I couldn’t understand why since Peggy was abysmal towards her. But Tlo nailed it. Shirley, despite being an able employee, has no real career aspirations. She doesn’t care about SC and she doesn’t care about Peggy. In fact it appears she has some disdain for her. From the brief time we saw Phyllis last season, it was clear she was Peggy’s girl. Shirley is not. Nor is it likely she will be any boss’ girl.

      It occurred to me, Peggy’s sublimal racism aside, we probably would not have had that embarrassing blow up if it was Phyllis who had the flowers. In fact Phyllis may have corrected her from the get go. It felt like their relationship was close enough to allow her to do that.

      • Chris

        I think it’s a couple of things. There is an everyday racism at that office that Dawn has had to learn to deal with and overlook or put up with to get by and potentially get ahead there. There is also sexism and a pecking order or class system where it’s expected that the secretaries will put up with a load of bull and bad treatment by their “superiors”. Shirley, who does not need the job and doesn’t seem to have any big career aspirations is putting up with NONE of it if she can help it.

        • Not applicable

          did you ever watch Everybody Hates Chris? His mother’s character was a little Shirley-esque. She put up with no one’s shit because her husband had a good job. So her character on the show was prone to telling off her bosses. Because it was written by Chris Rock- it was just hilarious.

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            The mother’s almost catch phrase was “my man has two jobs.” “Everybody Hates Chris” was a great show, totally different from “Mad Men”

            • Not applicable

              yes- I know it was totally different- but would have *almost* been the same time period (late 70s) and the sass was what made me think of it- that Shirley doesn’t really need the job and isn’t concerned about pleasing anyone at SC&P

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              I wasn’t thinking in terms of era, I was thinking drama vs. sitcoms. I agree with you, it’s the same basic character type.

            • Not applicable

              oh- yes, totally. Did you watch the show very long? I kept losing it b/c they changed the time so much in this market… the first season was HILARIOUS!

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              “Everybody Hates Chris” takes place smack in the middle of the 80s. Shirley would be roughly Chris’ mom’s age (within about 5 years).

            • Not applicable

              was it really?? I thought it was the 70s?? wow- missed that entirely!

            • Kathryn Sanderson

              You can tell by the music. Definitely 80s. There are other things too, like the movies they talk about.

      • http://www.snoskred.org/ Snoskred

        But if what you say about Shirley were true, she would have claimed those flowers as her own from the very first moment. If she had no career aspirations and she does not care about SC or Peggy, she would have said hey, those flowers are from my Fiancee, how did they end up on your desk?

        There has to be a reason why Shirley kept her mouth shut. I don’t know what the reason is but I’m going with she does want to keep her job, even if for a limited time only..

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Peggy kept cutting her off. Every time she was getting ready to speak, Peggy gave her an order or something. Shirley’s pretty darned assertive, but Peggy was being a total steamroller.

    • Gatto Nero

      We always knew that the “Don/Dawn” naming was no accident. But this episode, when it comes to light that they’re secret allies, it all suddenly makes more sense.

    • Lilithcat

      her affect now is pure Betty Hofstadt Francis

      And she looks like her, too. For a split second, I thought it was Betty!

      • MartyBellerMask

        Betty is still around, even though she’s not.

    • LuluinLaLa

      I just want to say that these Mad Style posts are simply the best thing about the entire Internet. Thank you, TLo, for this gift.

      • Lady Bug

        I agree, I never really paid attention to the styling and costuming on Mad Men before, but now I find these “Mad Style” reports so insightful. It’s fun the rewatch the older episodes on DVD and notice the costuming choices.

    • Frankie Carter

      I spent about ten minutes wondering exactly how I could get away with wearing a skirt that short to work. Do they even SEW dresses like that anymore?

      LO, I wonder if Mad Men’s fashions this season will show up on Banana Republic runways again this fall– they are credited as bringing back the sheath, after all. I can’t imagine any designer selling workwear that short with a straight face.

      Dawn’s hair bothers me sooooo much. Ugh. My mother had a wig like that and it gave me nightmares when it was on the resting head at night.

      • Malia C.

        Holy cow, I agree. I might be old but while I knew skirts got really short way back when, I still could not believe Shirley (and some unnamed girl in a tracking shot) got away with that in a corporate office. Am I Grandpa Simpson? :/

        • Frankie Carter

          All I could think about was how much her legs must have been aching in NYC February cold, tights or not.

    • Grumpy Girl

      Why is Joan carrying that white handbag with her brown leatherish coat, in February? I did not think the “white before Labor Day” rule was that flexible in the 60s.

      • Chris

        I think it’s her briefcase. She has a black handbag with a scarf on it as well. She took the briefcase with her on the Avon meeting before. It may be a 60’s thing like white boots weren’t just for summer and there was a lot of white luggage and accessories then.

      • Qitkat

        I agree that it’s her briefcase, and in the shot with Pete, we also see that Bonnie has one, leaning against the wall in the empty apartment.

        • decormaven

          It’s her briefcase. She brought it to her meeting with the professor in S7/E1.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I thought white before Labor Day applied only to shoes and clothes, not bags. I questioned a white handbag/briefcase in New York City at all. For someone working with it on a regualr basis, it would get dirty really quickly.

        • Laylalola

          The woman with the Avon account might be the one possible exception in all of NYC.

      • judybrowni

        I believe that was an attache case, which in white would appear more feminine.

        I think Joan was also carrying a handbag.

    • Bonsai

      My mother made that needlepoint butterfly pillow in Sally’s dorm room. We had it in the living room throughout much of the 70s

    • MartyBellerMask

      Ooh! It’s JAG! Or whatever his name was. I never watched the show, but that’s David James Elliott in the purple shirt and paisley tie! That’s why I love these recaps. I didn’t place him before. He’s gotta be coming back, right?

      • Shawn EH

        It’s rare for Don to have actual competition in the looks department, so I’d bet yes!

    • MartyBellerMask

      One last thing. Pete’s posture in that last shot. Vincent Kartheiser kills me. So good.

      • Little_Olive

        That man so deserves. at the very least, an Emmy. He has managed to make Pete lighter, happier, hyped by new possibilities and still so very Pete. All the props to him.
        And while we’re at it, and I’ve said it before, Jim (I don’t know the name of the actor).

        • MartyBellerMask

          Harry Hamlin!
          He was nominated for a guest actor Emmy last year. :)

          • Lady Bug

            I love his Jim Cutler-so droll. LOL. Harry Hamlin is great.

        • Spicytomato1

          Agreed about VK deserving an Emmy. I just read an interesting interview with Matthew Wiener about VK and he says, in all seriousness and with much respect and awe, that he’s one of the best actors he’s ever seen.

          • Laylalola

            He almost has to be. VK not only doesn’t look or sound like Pete, he apparently doesn’t behave or think or move like Pete in real life, either.

          • Lady Bug

            He’s a phenomenal actor. As MW mentioned in the interview, the irony is, he’s such a good actor that many people assume that he’s just being himself when he plays Pete. Which is probably one of the reasons he tends to be overlooked by the Emmys and sometimes by fans of the show as well.

            • Spicytomato1

              I know, I was struck by that comment, too. Isn’t that bizarre that people assume he’s *not* acting and have a hard time separating Pete from Vincent? I think I generally assume that actors are very likely quite different from the characters they play and not the reverse.

            • Lady Bug

              Apropos of nothing, when I was a kid, I remember disliking Mike O’Malley of Nikelodeon GUTS because he bore the same name as an abusive uncle in one of the American Girls books. ;) But then again, I was 8 years old at the time. It’s weird when adults can’t seem to separate a character with the actor.

              David Dukes, the actor who played Edith Bunker’s would be rapist on All In the Family apparently received threats after they aired the episode.

              I can’t imagine how disturbing and annoying that must be for the actors.

            • MartyBellerMask

              I thought it was interesting what he said about how it plays out in VK’s interviews. The interviewer projects their Pete baggage onto him, so he can’t help but start the interview on the defensive. And that’s where his bizarre answers/ rumors start.
              Terry Gross needs to interview him. That will set everyone straight.

            • Lady Bug

              In one way, I’d imagine it’s flattering to think that your acting is so realistic, that people keep confusing you with the character. In another, more profound way-I’d imagine it’s also deeply annoying that people project their hatred towards a T.V. character onto you :)

      • Glammie

        Yep, he acts from head-to-toe, there’s a profile of him in NYMag that has a great Q&A with Matt Weiner about him–how VK’s pratfall made the expense of building the staircase worth it. And what fun it is to write Pete-being-outraged scenes. He also said that he thought Pete had shown real growth over the series.

        I miss Trudy though–I want her and Bonnie to have lunch and torture Pete. Maybe at Disneyland.

        • Lady Bug

          I would absolutely LOVE a Bonnie-Trudy scene. OMG, Pete Campbell at Disney World wearing a Mickey Ears hat, I absolutely love it.

      • Lady Bug

        I know. :) I think in many ways, VK has the hardest job of any of the principles (who I think are all PHENOMENAL actors) on MM. His character was deliberately set-up to be the antagonist to Hamm’s Don Draper. Yet, Pete Campbell is in my eyes, the most complex, compelling and human-for good and bad, character on the show. Sometimes I feel that I should “hate” Pete Campbell-because that seems to be the consensus on the internet. But, I don’t. He can be devious, petty and annoying, but he’s also deeply hurt, vulnerable, loyal and insightful. Kartheiser brings a great deal of nuance to his performance.

    • Rebecca Bailey

      I love these posts! I found it interesting that Peggy’s and Shirley’s outfits were complete opposites except for the colors, which really tied them together. Shirley’s was obviously more youthful, busier and full of flowers (poor Peggy)! Red/orange dominated Shirley while Peggy’s red/orange was limited to her tie/scarf where there were a few flowers. Shirley’s outfit has small amounts of blue, the same blue as Peggy’s scarf. The collars are similar, but Peggy’s is short-sleeved-long skirted and Shirley’s is long-sleeved-short-skirted. The bottom part’s of their outfits even tie in with their skin colors. Shirley’s wearing white boots, and Peggy’s skirt is brown. Just looking at them, you see red, cream/white, and brown. And I can’t forget their heads, as Peggy’s poofy white hat mirrors the silhouette of Shirley’s afro. They complement each other nicely! They seem pretty connected, so maybe there is more Peggy/Shirley stories to come. Peggy also ties in with Joan, with her tie, the same color as Joan’s bronzy red outfit, which has a similar tie. But most interesting of all, is that the inside of Peggy’s coat is satin red! Same color as the roses. Girl doesn’t need roses, she’s already got them, it’s just that no-one can see them.

      • leighanne

        I *loved* Pegs’ coat with the satin red lining! Every so often she has a glam moment..

    • Chris

      I just realized Don’s plaid robe is the same blue plaid Sally was wearing many seasons ago when she threw herself down on her bed in the old Draper house, then Betty wore it in a similar dress and also threw herself down on Sally’s bed in the same way. It’s the patented “Draper sad plaid.”

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        So true. Also, try saying “Draper sad plaid” three times fast. It’s really hard.

    • Vanessa

      Roger looked so 19th century banker in his outfit with the velvet collar and the trilby (?) hat. I still think Jim looks like a ghost–made me think of the great robber-barons being supplanted by the far less colorful corporation men (in grey flannel suits).

      • Chris

        Roger is more traditional looking with the hat and all the softer touches like the velvet trim on the coat and the scarf. Cutler looks more modern and stark. There’s nothing soft about him- he’s all sharp edges and solid grey.

        • Lady Bug

          Roger also has some more flourishes in his outfit-the little feather in his hat, the redish silk scarf. Culter just screams ‘corporate’

          • Shawn EH

            Corporate shark, while Roger is having his dandy moment.

    • PaulainATL

      Beautiful, TLo! I LOVE the smart commentary and screen shots. My brain can’t pick up all that detail and I love to see all I missed in the background. You guys are AMAZING!!! Can’t tell you how much I enjoy your Mad Style posts.

    • Lady Bug

      Re: Bonnie as a more ambitious, driven, independent, mercenary Pete-very interesting. It’s one I didn’t notice on the first viewing, but now I want to re-watch those scenes. You know who Bonnie reminded me of after reading “Mad Style”?-Bob Benson. Both of them have this classic’Barbie & Ken’ look to them (picture them side by side, it’s like Barbie & Ken come to life). Both are drawn into Pete Campbell’s world (or he’s drawn into theirs). Both are much more “dangerous” for lack of a better word than they appear on the surface. Bonnie is not just MalibuBetty and Bob is not just the Best Little Office Boy in the World. These are people who are driven, have a vision and pity to anyone who gets in their way.

      At the same time, they both also seem to reflect the different aspects of Pete’s personality. Bob was able to pick up on Pete’s loneliness. He gave Pete something he probably hasn’t felt for a long time-a feeling of being valued, liked and approved of. Bonnie on the other hand, seems to represent Pete as a cutthroat business person. Somehow I have a feeling that Bonnie has her own ‘hunting fantasy’ that makes Pete’s hunting fantasy from season 1 as innocuous as little Gene’s storybooks.

      Bonnie might be the best thing to ever happen to Pete, but pity him if he ever gets on her bad side!

      • DeniseSchipani

        Very well said! On my second viewing last night (in preparation for this post!) I was watching Miss Bonnie hard for clues but I missed the Bob and Bonnie/Ken and Barbie thing. and you’re right — they both are cluing into something in Pete, or he in them. Poor Pete. He’s so wound up and confused and hapless all the time. He never acts – he reacts. An aside: I want a t-shirt that says “Not good, Bob!”

      • MartyBellerMask

        I love this!!

    • NMMagpie

      I see Jim as more of a spectre than a ghost. There is something sinister in all that he does. Ghost is too harmless a term for him.

      I love the images of the elevator scene. Everyone, except for Stan is in plaids, possible communicating tension of some sort. Stan is all in solids, just handling what happens in the day.

      • Trist

        I keep thinking Jim represents Death somehow. He always seems to be looking around for his next mark, and there’s just something so chilly about him! Though at the same time I really enjoy this character, and love Harry Hamlin in the role.

        • NMMagpie

          I agree. Those shots in the elevator (going down, I assume) are terrific. He looks so grim but not defeated.

          • Trist

            Ha, yes, “going down.” Let’s see – Roger may be going down to hell because he may be unredeemable, but if Jim is going down to hell, it’s only because he’s Satan ;-)

        • Glammie

          I’m more with the Satan than Death school–ever since he got the entire agency juiced up on drugs and then Peeping Tommed his late partner’s daughter having sex. Cutler’s not a nice guy, even among the sleezeballs of SC&P, he’s particularly awful. He’s a well-done snake though, happily digesting SCDP bit by bit, with only Pete showing any awareness of what’s really going on. Poor Pete. He so wants to be a ruthless shark, but he keeps having feelings.

          • Trist

            What a great image – Jim as a snake “happily digesting SCDP bit by bit.” Cracked me up. Also Pete and his darn feelings. Though hey – what about the fact that he actually raped a girl? Is that just a story lost to time?

            • 3hares

              He raped the girl and also has and had feelings. The two things aren’t incompatible.

            • Glammie

              Yeah, and I’d say that’s an example of Pete’s impulsiveness at its most destructive. When I say Pete has feelings, I don’t mean that in a good way–he’s extremely needy emotionally and selfish. It says a lot about Vincent Kartheiser that we can feel any empathy for Pete, who’s an awful guy in a lot of ways. On the other hand, I don’t feel like Pete gets off on quietly crushing people the way Cutler does.

          • decormaven

            On the nose. He infected them with the injections from the Speedball Dr., he’s factionalized them, and he’s pulverizing them to bits. A strategist if I’ve ever seen one.

            • Glammie

              Yep, though it’s kind of nihilistic. The creativity’s also being leeched out of the agency. Lou’s a second-rater and at some point the client’s are going to notice that the work’s not as inspired. Which is why Don can have lunch and have two guys chat him up. He straightens up and people will want to give him a second chance–that’s his big advantage. No point, really, in destroying that edge. But then, Cutler wasn’t counting on Ted Chaough tanking at the same time. I’m sure his idea was to have Ted head creative after easing out Don.

            • decormaven

              Yes, Lou is a hack. Couple of dud campaigns and somebody’s going to call it- maybe Cooper.

            • Glammie

              Yep. Lou’s basically lazy, he’s not pushing to get the best possible ad. Just don’t buy that the situation can last much longer, but maybe that will be the end of the seven-episode arc, Don’s back at SC&P. He’s clearly meant to be on his game, Ted’s clearly out to lunch and Lou ain’t even in it. SC&P won’t really have a choice.

            • decormaven

              Ted will probably cut a deal to sell the agency to McCann Erickson. Like the ME exec who stopped to take Don’s pulse at the lunch date, that firm is keeping its antenna up on the old Sterling Cooper folks. They evaded the ME net when ME snacked up Puttnam, Powell and Lowe.

          • Bella Bluth

            Pete said he felt like he “was in some kind of limbo”. Don reading Dante last season, a potential “rebirth” this season, vs. Cutler as represented and outlined above (excllent post, Glammie!). Pete is stuck between the two…

    • Malia C.

      I’ve rewatched this episode a few times and I must say when you have that kind of loyalty to a boss…. it is very special.

    • Robin Murray

      Did anyone else notice that Shirley told Dawn her boyfriend/husband sent her “12 red roses,” when clearly he sent her more like 36? (Seeing these screencaps reconfirmed my initial estimate.) I can’t figure why she would have said this. If she was embarrassed about the extravagant number, why mention any number? I’m still scratching my head over this one.

      • judybrowni

        A former florist up above says she caught carnations mingling in, but still estimated about 18 roses.

        I think that was a slip between the script and the set dresser, who wanted a bigger splash of color in a bouquet that would play such a big part.

        • Robin Murray

          Thanks for pointing out the carnations at the bottom — a clever way to give a floral arrangement more “oomph,” adding inexpensive red carnations to a vase of red roses. As you said, I still think there were 18-24 roses in that vase, though. I’ll be a little excited if this was a script/set dresser issue, because you almost never see those in Mad Men. (I almost never catch them, anyway.)

          • judybrowni

            The set dressers also were reproducing bouquets of the period, according to the AMC video.

    • another_laura

      “Their color is yellow and their symbol of power is a simple file box.” Great line, guys. And so true.

      • Mary Nease

        Seriously, I got chills.

    • Maureen O’Gorman

      This episode reminded me a little of “mystery date”.

    • Anne

      Miss Bonnie Whiteside looks so familiar…Then it occurred that she looks like Anna’s niece!! I don’t remember her name. She was attending a local soCal college, I think.

      Excuse me if I’m repeating a anyone’s previously posted observation!

      • Not applicable

        I thought she looked just like Bethanny VanNeis (the fix up for Don by Jane Sterling)

        • Anne

          Yes!! That’s it!! :-) BVN is probably still back in NY, though.

          That would be a weird connection for Don (and too outlandish of a plot twist in the MM world) if she turned out to be Anna’s niece, and a “female Pete”!!

        • Chris

          She does, I was half expecting her to say “acca-awesome.”

          • Alloy Jane

            Or maybe vomit during her speech to Pete?

    • dirtside

      I also notice that in the Roger/Jim elevator scene, Roger’s basically wearing his traditional boring three-piece, but he’s got that loud patterned scarf trying to erupt from underneath. Definitely a callback to his dabbling with orgies and acid.

    • Mad Woman

      I initially thought Joan’s flowers were from Bob Benson–yellow, not all roses, but beautiful in a friendly way.

      • judybrowni

        I think Bob might have better taste,

    • NeenaJ

      These screenshots and references really make the Mad Men experience for me. Reading your Mad Style posts for Season 5 made me want to watch the show. So, I binged on Mad Men via Netflix. Now, I’m a huge fan of you and the show! Thanks so much for all of your efforts!

    • http://www.youtube.com/user/TheOctocornNetwork International Model

      1) What is it about Mad Men that take actors from really terrible shows (Drop Dead Diva, Days of Our Lives, Once Upon a Time) and shines a new light on them? Jessy Schram went from being a sad and painful to watch Cinderella to Lady Pete. Acting! 2) “Act of God” – I feel like Bonnie’s monologue there was a clue to something in the series. 3) Miss Shirley is everything – dead on about the new Joan/Jane.

      • DeniseSchipani

        I felt that way about Bonnie’s little speech, too…

      • Supernumerary

        To be fair, the writing on Mad Men is also leagues above Once Upon a Time, which is more of the popcorn entertainment sort. Maybe those actors seem so blah because they don’t have much material to work with.

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/TheOctocornNetwork International Model

          You are being more than generous to Once Upon a Time.

          • Supernumerary

            Thank you for noticing how hard I tried to be tactful.

      • fursa_saida

        I read a really great piece by someone who works in entertainment who basically said, pretty much any actor you see on screen–who actually made it that far–is a good actor, talented. But so much happens in the writing, direction, editing, etc., and for most of us, the acting is the one thing we feel like we can really notice and critique, so we chalk everything up to someone being a bad actor. Obviously this doesn’t mean that a good actor can never turn in a bad performance, just that when someone seems untalented, there are decent odds that there are problems of at least equal weight elsewhere in the overall product. Mad Men is a show that is near-flawless on all of those less-immediately-tangible levels, so it makes sense that actors who appear lackluster in other circumstances are likely to shine there.

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/TheOctocornNetwork International Model

          Absolutely, especially for the younger actors who haven’t been established yet. I would argue the Xanadu Principle, though. (Has Xanadu ever been referenced for its acting or in a Mad Style post comments?)

          The Xanadu Principle illuminates talent vs. production using the two male leads, Michael Beck and Gene Kelly. Gene, a veteran and noted perfectionist, works his ass off in this movie and, even to those who hate this movie have to give respect to the work Gene did in his old age and against such a poorly thought out production. He makes his castmates shine in every scene. No one can make Gene Kelly look terrible, not even oversized bowties and life sized pinball machine sets. That is talent.

          By contrast, Xanadu was Michael Beck’s follow up to The Warriors, which he gives an excellent performance as gang leader Swan (and wears an open leather vest shirtless with arms to die for). He comes off as a poofy haired and scowling even when smiling…except in his scenes with Gene Kelly. Again, he could be miscast as a moody artist coming off of his turn as a moody gang leader or The Warriors was edited to perfection. I don’t think it was as I believe there are two versions, but there is one scene that is very beautiful that is due to the acting choice – the scene with Swan and Mercy on the train where he stops her from fixing herself up. It’s a scene that reminds me of Brando in On the Water Front putting on Eva Marie Sant’s glove. Both resonate due to the choices from the actor.I’m sad that Michael Beck never really got another shot at a lead role.

          I think what Gene knew, and what I takeaway from the Xanadu Principle is, was to always be at the top of your game, no matter the job. It’ll show even in the worst of situations.

          • somebody blonde

            I think that people can definitely be talented actors and still get utterly screwed over by miscasting. Think of what we see on RuPaul’s Drag Race, when the queens do acting challenges or even when they’re doing the lip sync. Latrice Royale was the best lip-syncer of Motown and old school soul the show has ever had. She also managed to channel Ethel Merman on All Stars, but when she had to do a country song, that was just too much of a stretch for her. It’s why you kind of see two kinds of actors: some who play mostly the same kinds of characters in a small range (John Wayne, Morgan Freeman, Audrey Hepburn), and chameleons who disappear into any kind of role (Daniel Day Lewis, Sean Penn, Meryl Streep). The latter category is much better at adapting to bad casting.

        • Lady Bug

          Is the article online? I’d love to read it

      • MartyBellerMask

        Judging Amy! So many actors from Judging Amy! Seems like nearly very time I look up a Mad Men guest star, I see that they were on that show at one time or another. I seriously wonder if they might have a casting director in common.

      • judybrowni

        Since I never watched those terrible shows, I enjoy the new faces popping up.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Saved By The Bell would be another terrible show… and you are not missing much!

    • jilly_d

      Well done, boys. *slow clap*

    • Not applicable

      Notice in the shot with Roger & Jim that Roger– looks so old in comparison. The age difference cannot be that great- but Roger is clearly styled as old fashioned with that heavy hat, a velvet lapel and paisley silk scarf. Jim, by comparison is tone on tone sleek… looks professional and modern.

      So Roger’s little drug commune certainly isn’t keeping him young.

    • Lattis

      I love the way Kiernan Shipka played the scene with Lou. The screen cap with her hands gripping her coat says it all – she brooks no bullshit from Lou and stands stolidly and skeptically blocking his doorway. In some ways she still has the ability that smaller children have of cutting through the social niceties because they are unaware of them. She is clearly not impressed by his position, or his incompetent dismissal of her. It was lovely to see.

      I also like how her coat in that scene has a sort of military vibe. The embroidered flowers could be read as medals on a military coat and the red beret could also be seen as military headwear.

    • Lattis

      Also – Roger looks so sad and weary. I love snappy, improper Roger. This sad Roger is sad. :(

    • Aisling O’Doherty

      This isn’t style related but does anyone remember Season 1 episode 12 (Nixon v Kennedy) where Peggy is crying because Sonny, the elevator operator, and a janitor were unfairly blamed (and fired) for the theft of money from Peggy’s locker. My has she changed! Now she’s probably too self-absorbed to even notice if someone else was fired. Up to now, I was always a Peggy fan but I was sickened by her behavior in this episode. She deserves her spinsterhood!

    • KT

      Bravo, as always.

    • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

      did anyone else think peggy looked like a girl scout leader in her drab beige blouse and brown skirt with the orange tie around her neck? juvenile and matronly at the same time, and not attractive in any way.

    • Chris J

      Didn’t Faye have an office? Or was she just using one as an outside consultant?

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I think she was using one as an outside consultant. She wasn’t a regular employee of SC

        • Chris

          Yes, she had a very pretty regular office of her own (wherever it was that she worked) that they showed when Don called to break up with her. She had a lot of stuff at SCDP because I remember her packing boxes when they broke ties with her firm.

    • Alloy Jane

      I really hope Janie reads these. I can imagine as a costumer that the hard work you put into a show is hardly ever recognized by people outside of the industry. But here you have created something so intensely analytical and fascinating that it drives people to watch the show. Mad Style is the only reason I started watching. Not that I notice half the stuff you talk about, but these recaps bring a depth to the story that I frequently miss for not being attentive. Oh! And check out that picture of Dawn and Joan standing together! They’re making the same face and it makes them look rather alike, but with a few tweaks here and there. But those eyebrows, they really do put so much effort into the details. They show two women with latent power coming into their own and learning how to wield it.

    • Johnny Neill

      Any idea of the make of harry Hamlin/Jim Cutler’s glasses? They are perfect!

    • Jess Ballinger

      I’ve never watched the show, but I adore these critiques. Thank you both!

    • lbee

      As a Joan-like figure (professionally anyway..sigh) myself, I just want to point out that this episode of admin ass-kicking aired the week of Administrative Professionals Week. All hail the Army of Peggys! Hurrah!

    • PowerfulBusiness

      Still anxiously awaiting our first Don/Peggy scene of the season! C’mon Weiner, we only have 12 episodes left EVER to have Moss and Hamm share the screen!

    • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

      I want to know what’s happening with Betty and Bobby. They’ve been conspicuously absent. Hope we get to them next ep.
      Spot on commentary as usual, and I always save a couple of Lo’s collages to a personal inspiration folder for outfit ideas and general art ideas, so I definitely appreciate them (they also form part of my computer’s cycling backgrounds).
      What’s with Ginsberg? I feel like he’d never been this hostile to Peggy before, except when she and Ted were canoodling. It doesn’t seem like jealousy though. I’m worried about him.
      What happened to Peggy’s Life mag friends (aside from HBO’s Girls)? She lose them all with Abe? I suppose accidentally stabbing your boyfriend will do that.

      • sweetlilvoice

        This is a great idea–I’ve started saving my favorite scenes into my backgrounds folder too! Thank you Lorenzo, you are both amazing!

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          On my computer, I have my Mad Men Fashion file. As I watch the episodes, I think about which looks I want to download on Wednesday. Don’t worry, they just sit in a file on my computer.

      • MartyBellerMask

        I wondered about the friends too. Seems reasonable to assume Abe got them in the breakup.

        • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

          It really sucks though. I’ve been that girl (losing all the mutuals in the breakup, but not because I stabbed the guy) – it makes moving on so fucking hard. Poor Pegs.

      • Laylalola

        I was just wondering about the LIFE magazine friends — but SC&P is the new new firm, and it’s been a while since they moved out of the Time-Life building. At least I don’t think they’ve been in the Time-Life building for years now.

      • Alloy Jane

        Does anyone wonder about baby Gene? Poor kid. He’s even more of a nonentity than Bobby.

      • ybbed

        Peggy’s being an ass to her colleagues and they don’t like her anymore. It is no wonder they are somewhat hostile to her.

    • Trist

      Did anyone else pick up on that together the two stories told about fires seem to tell one continuous story? In the last episode, Megan warns Don not to toss his cigarette from her balcony, because it can cause a fire and “they somehow know how to figure out who starts the fire.” She is focused on how such an act might hurt the person who sets it in motion, not others that might be hurt by the act, even though she herself could be hurt, even killed, by it. Maybe the idea is that whatever he does is going to hurt him more than it hurts her? In this episode, Bonnie relays to Pete what sounds like the end of Megan’s story — how a fire in the hills destroyed a home she was about to make a small fortune off of. But her reaction to that devastation is to shrug it off and let it push her toward bigger and better conquests. Together these stories seem to suggest the idea that a person may wind up in more pain and trouble from their own actions than the people they act upon.

      I felt like this was one of the first times we saw Don have any real self-awareness regarding his relationship with Sally. His taking her (and her brothers) to the whorehouse at the end of last season seemed self-serving – he’d burned his bridges at work (fire again!) and was on a tear of “honesty,” maybe feeling like he might as well burn it all down at once. But in this episode it felt to me that he realized that coming clean about his past wasn’t enough – it neither burned his bridge to his daughter nor allowed them to start afresh with a healthy relationship. Maybe he finally sees that his dishonesty and actions caused real pain in her life and – miracle though it may be – she is still willing to give him the opportunity to make amends and become a truly caring father. Margaret kind of illustrates this theme, in her scene with Roger – she is going to forgive him his transgressions and move on, while he can’t even begin to enumerate his transgressions and so cannot learn from them. Is there hope for Roger? I hope Don, for his and Sally’s sakes, truly sees the light.

      Maybe there were style themes holding the two fire scenes and the scene with Roger and his daughter together?

      • 3hares

        The fire stories really are great. I expect part of it is just practical–those fires are a pressing concern in the area that everyone would be aware of, so it’s an easy shorthand to say they’re in California now and need to get used to a different culture. But still, it also hooks into the feeling of danger and dread that could be set off at any moment, like they’re in a powder keg and a careless move could not only burn your house down but houses miles away. Anyone who’s read Helter Skelter probably made a connection to the Tate-LaBianca murders when Megan talked about the noises in the canyon being weird, plus the sound there was coyotes which put Don in mind of Dracula’s castle and wolves howling outside the door. So I feel like the fire stories are maybe one of those things that weren’t completely intentional on the writer’s part (like they maybe didn’t sit down and say they wanted to continue Megan’s story with Bonnie’s story) but are still a genuine thematic connection because it’s on their minds.

        And yeah, it’s interesting that there’s two attitudes expressed about it. Neither person is worried about people being killed–they both assume that they will be okay because they sort of see themselves as invincible because death is something that happens to other people, so they’re both talking as people who live with the danger every day. Megan doesn’t want to get blamed for starting a fire; Bonnie’s ready to move on to the next house and accept that some of them will burn down. Plus Bonnie makes that wonderful distinction between things that are truly powerful (fires/acts of God) and problems that are solvable if you can just figure out the solution (like the SC&P leadership).

        • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

          i’m thinking the Bel Aire fire was around the time of mad men, but i’m not sure which year. it wiped out a huge number of homes in the hollywood hills, but i can’t remember if it included benedict canyon. will look it up later.

          • http://www.tragicsandwich.com/ Tragic Sandwich

            That was in 1961, and the Hollywood Hills are part of the Santa Monica Mountains, but east of Bel Air. The fire did get as far east as Benedict Canyon–but are we sure that’s where Megan lives? I don’t remember them mentioning a specific canyon, and my guess would have been Laurel, not Benedict. But maybe I missed a line.

            • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

              i had forgotten it was that early. i would have been in middle school, in burbank. i remember watching the hills on fire across
              the san fernando valley, burning for days and days. my brother is a total nut for fires, in fact my whole family was kind of crazy that way. fortunately, he became a fire fighter and not an arsonist. he must have just gotten his drivers’ license, because i remember he and i driving around after the fire was out and looking at all the burned homes, nothing left but swimming pools and chimneys. but re: meagan’s residence, i think i must have assumed it was benedict canyon just because that’s where the manson murders were. i thought is was hilarious that don didn’t know if the view was the valley or downtown L.A. seen one view, seen ‘em all…wildfires were a common occurrence in growing up in socal, so i’m not counting that out as a possible mad men disaster.

            • http://www.tragicsandwich.com/ Tragic Sandwich

              I liked that, too–and I think it also shows that Don doesn’t know or care enough about LA. to find out what he’s looking at, much less what does it mean.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Sally still loves her father. She’s in the process of figuring it all out, and so is he. She will never have the conversation that Margaret and Roger had, because Sally will have a different relationship with Don. Hopefully a better one.

        • Glammie

          Yeah, Don actually apologized about something real (his being caught en flagrante delicto) and Sally actually said “I love you.” to the real, deeply flawed Don. I’m sure we were meant to contrast that to the artificial reconciliation between Margaret and Roger. Roger, with all of his silver-spoon privilege, actually comes off as more of a lost soul than Don. Don and Sally share a meal, Roger and Margaret really don’t. And Roger’s son doesn’t know who he is.

      • Lady Bug

        That’s a great point about the fire. I hadn’t even thought of that.

      • judybrowni

        Yes, I recognized that call back to cigarettes causing fires in L.A. in both episodes: but that’s because it’s something we’re warned about every dry season in Los Angeles.

        Which during the drought in nearly every month now.

        (And news stories pin the fires on tossed cigarettes!)

        • Trist

          I agree that my interpretation of what those stories mean may not be what the script writers intended, but I feel confident the stories are not just in there because it’s California and we’re warned about fires here. I am constantly blown away by the how the writers call back to previous episodes and seasons — and blown away by how Tom and Lorenzo are able to point out so many of the various thematic threads (in regards to fashion, storylines, and camera work!) holding the show together.

          • judybrowni

            I agree with your interpretation.

            I just picked up on the reference because it’s so L.A.

            • Trist

              Apologies – I realize I misread your response. In this case, my interpretation was definitely incorrect! Thanks for your nice response.

    • bigeasybridget

      When you mentioned that there was a flower motif everywhere, I started noticing something interesting – everywhere but in people’s clothes. Everyone, but one glaring exception was wearing a plaid, geometric design, or solid. Flowers on all the desks, but the one women who’s flowers got ripped off – Shirley’s! And her floral is so bold, it almost further adds insult to Peggy’s injury – not only is she showing off her ring, but she’s already covered in flowers, and the hippest woman in the place.

      • somebody blonde

        Yeah, Shirley’s like the new Megan to Dawn’s new Peggy: magazine-cover fashionable, casual about her job, succeeding in her personal life.

      • Laylalola

        Sally’s coat — the one she’s wearing when she goes into SCP — has strings of flowers and hearts on it. I have no idea how that would be interpreted. But I love the coat.

    • Guest

      Amazing post. All the work really shows. I really want Sally’s plaid coat. It’s just fabulous!

    • http://trufcreative.com/ monomatica

      Amazing post. All the work really shows. I live for them. I am blown away each week by the art direction & styling on this show, but don’t see the connections until I read these. Love that you noticed Sally’s pendant and all the yellow. I’m gonna need to watch this episode again. P.S. Hook rugs!!! I used to love those!!

    • DeniseSchipani

      My sister had that owl hooked rug on her (paneled) bedroom wall.

    • judybrowni

      I had a monogrammed circle pin that aped Sally’s pendant.

      And at my high school in 1968, the dress for popular girls was “collegiate,” rather than hippy — what would be known as Preppy a decade or more later — such as what Sally and her schoolmates are wearing: plaids, jumpers, knee socks, penny loafers.

      That hideous green in the figurines and hooked rugs, yup, found in my college dorm.

      One error I noticed: Shirley talks of “a dozen” red roses in her bouquet, but the set decorators obviously went for the bigger splash of red two dozen.

      • Lisa Petrison

        I noticed that about the roses too. There were some red carnations in that bouquet, but I still think there were at least 18 roses in it.

        My grandparents were florists and so I spent a lot of time in their shop (I would have been 5 in 1969). I would have guessed that Shirley’s bouquet cost more than Joan’s, which had a lot of inexpensive mums in it in addition to the yellow roses.

        • judybrowni

          I’m watching Mad Men on my computer, so I didn’t notice the carnations!

          I’d imagine red rose are more expensive than just about any other flower, on Valentine’s Day.

          • Lisa Petrison

            If you watch the style post on the AMC Mad Men site (that starts out with Janie discussing Joan’s dress), you can see both bouquets up close.

          • Kathryn Sanderson

            Yep, and they jack up the prices by a lot.

    • Qitkat

      Some time earlier I tried to post a link that never appeared. The reference T Lo made to “wheels within wheels” really caught my attention. If you look for the lyrics of the song “The Windmills of your Mind” you may be struck as I am by the similarities to the show, how lifes’ journeys play out, endlessly spinning and intertwining.

      • decormaven

        The song that comes to my mind is Talking Heads’ “Slippery People” – “Turn like a wheel inside a wheel.”

        • Qitkat

          That’s a good song too, I didn’t know it, but listened and read the lyrics. lol, I missed a lot of early 80s music, busy with young kids.

          “Windmills” was released originally in July 1968, by the original British singer Noel Harrison, charted first in Great Britain in March 1969 as a single, featured in the film The Thomas Crown Affair (won Oscars and Golden Globes for Best Original Song) of 1968, and subsequently covered by many others through the years. Sting’s version was used in the 1999 remake of the film.

          Way more than you wanted to know, or even asked for, eh? :) It’s a great phrase at any rate.

          • decormaven

            There’s never enough about music trivia. Glad there’s a fellow fan here. I love the songs chosen for Mad Men; they’re usually right on the money.

            • Qitkat

              I agree, someone is seriously looking out for the best song choices for MM. It always matters to me what songs are used in TV shows. I’ve been known to grab my iPad while watching and quickly research lyrics that resonate with me.

            • decormaven

              Discovered music is so wonderful. I had never heard Sharon Jones & the Dap Kings til one of their songs was used for a Kraft dressing commercial. I’ve used the Shazam app to identify music in stores; my current love is Songza. Whoever puts their playlists together is a genius; deep cuts, one-hit wonders, you name it.

            • Qitkat

              Thanks for the suggestions. My searching is usually random, I’ll try those.

          • gogobooty

            Dusty Springfield forever!

            • Qitkat

              Dusty always had wonderful versions of songs. Nobody quite like her has ever come along again.

              Sometimes I think all the shows like the Voice, American Idol, etc. have actually kept the most unique voices off our airwaves. There’s a packaged slick production of almost everything heard on mainstream radio anymore, with autotune so common. I’m not so sure that she would fit in with today’s styles.

    • Trist

      Some people are commenting that Shirley seems like she is just sticking it out in the working world until she marries her fiance. Was this mentioned explicitly in the scripts? Or are we inadvertently falling into the sexism of the show itself by assuming marriage means a woman quits her job? I’m not sure.

      • judybrowni

        It was still be possible and assumed in 1969.

        Second Wave feminism, a couple recessions (and Republican Presidents) later, and it won’t be assumed — or affordable, for any but the wealthy.

        • Trist

          You’re right – I totally agree that in the world of the show it might be assumed. I just wasn’t sure if Shirley herself said she was going to quit once she married? I think her character might be more interesting if she plans to keep working, and is just making different choices (in terms of attitude and dress) than the woman who are just waiting for someone to put a ring on it.

          • Alloy Jane

            When Dawn tells Shirley that her fiancé would rather she had a job, Shirley contradicts her. That more or less implies that she’s biding her time til her wedding.

            • Trist

              Ah, that’s what I was looking for, thanks. I didn’t pick up on that.

            • Sonny

              Or she wants to keep working and her fiance would rather her be a housewife. She doesn’t NEED the job though, which makes me interested in how she’s going to react to SDCP’s bullshit.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          Was it necessarily assumed in the African-American community, though?

      • DeniseSchipani

        Dawn admonishes her at first for wanting her flowers back, saying she should keep her mouth shut and keep her job, and Shirley is dismissive. she says she wants the flowers because her fiance gave them to her,and when Dawn says, “he’d rather you have your job,” Shirley replies, “You KNOW that isn’t true.” so it’s not as though we can assume Shirley would definitely quit, we can assume that she won’t “need” to work after she gets married, and that her fiance would want it that way.

    • MarinaCat

      What on earth is with Peggy’s hair style? I don’t understand it!

      • judybrowni

        Believe it or not, Peggy’s hairstyle is very of the moment, if not the most fashionable.

        I could show you my high school year book (and wore something similar myself, until a too short cut grew out..)

    • Kelly

      TLo – forgive me if you’ve answered this already, but is Shirley wearing brown tights or bare legs? And if it’s bare legs, is that scandalous? She’s soooooooooo rad.

      • judybrowni

        Either way, that was something fashionable girls could yet away with in a hip New York office in 1969.

      • Kathryn Sanderson

        I couldn’t tell, but it’s February in NYC, so I vote for brown tights or pantyhose.

    • http://www.geekrex.com/ Alexander Knox

      Don and Dave (“the hipster Don” he was having lunch with) are like mirror images of each other, even their hair-styles go in opposite directions…it helps that the “Jon Hamm of the 90’s”, David James Elliott was cast to play that role. I desperately hope we see more of him and perhaps that’s where Don eventually ends up.

    • dash1211

      After Sally returns to the table after calling her roommates, she and Don discuss the funeral she attended. He says to her, “Life goes on.” She replies, “I’m so many people.” The look he gives her says everything. It’s a stunning scene.

    • decormaven

      Was that hideous plastic-looking plant near the sliding glass doors in the apartment when Megan was there? I need to review Lo’s screencaps of the apartment last year because a lot of decorative touches seem to be missing. It’s looking rather downbeat/rental furniture now.
      While not fashion related, who else chuckled about Sally being so upset about misplacing her address book? “It’s everyone I know!!” Oh, kid!

      • ashley

        I was thinking Glens digits must be in there!

        • Laylalola

          Well sure. But really, I remember writing letters quite a lot and having pen pals as a kid in the late 1970s. Long-distance calling was too expensive or only done with family members. It would be decades before cell phones and texting.

          • ashley

            very true. i just wondered if they call each other at school like they did past seasons

    • Christopher Chase

      The orange wallpaper behind Joan during the conference call: I’m surprised it hasn’t been torn apart yet! This wall paper is on Shameless, Two Broke Girls, Madmen (duh), and is seemingly all over in “reality” too (including a new bar, Davey Wayne’sm in Hollywood). I’m so bothered by it, and I catch only 2% of what you two blog about…was hoping it would get a snarky comment in an article!

      • decormaven

        We saw it last season in Ted’s office at SCP. I think this is Ted’s office where the meeting is being held.

        • Christopher Chase

          Right. I just hoped there’d be a snarky “this is everywhere and it’s not appropriate wallpaper anyway” comment so I could finally feel good about noticing SOMETHING :)

          • decormaven

            I think of it as “Let’s Make a Deal” wallpaper- looks like what was used on Doors 1, 2, and 3. I think it’s a hoot this show is influencing current design. There are a ton of Mad Men decorating pins on Pinterest.

    • section 34

      Nice analysis, as always. Thanks for your effort.

      Unlike some of last season, and last week, I found this very entertaining. That said, do they have to make Peggy unlikable too? A 2-hour movie is fine without having a character to root for, but I think it will hurt the show’s legacy if at the end of 7 seasons, we don’t end up with Peggy triumphant in some sense — and likable.

      • Chris

        I think they are going to make Peggy hit rock bottom before they start bringing her up. Based on the previews I’m afraid creepy Lou is going to try to get her or Don fired next episode. But then again what can you really tell from the previews?

        • Kit Jackson 1967

          This sort of parallels Don then.

          • Chris

            Yes, I was wondering if it is the thing that makes them seek each other out.

            • Glammie

              I don’t think Lou can get Don fired. He’s just not in a position to do that and Cutler doesn’t have the partner votes–Roger and Pete won’t because Don’s a potential ally. Ted owes Don for the LA position. That leaves Joan and Bert and they don’t have a compelling reason to try and buy out Don. Lou v. Peggy though seems like it could go. Peggy’s big allies have been Don and Ted. Now that Ted’s gone and Peggy’s mad at him, she may relent a bit toward Don. It’s been a long time, though, since Peggy could talk to Don in a non-resentful way.

            • Chris

              I would have said that before, but after the Don ouster I just don’t know. I would have said with 100% certainty that Ted never would have agreed to put Don on leave after Don giving CA to him and knowing there would be no head creative guy in NY. Pete and Joan are minor partners percentage wise. Roger, Bert, Cutler and Ted are the big shareholders and they are the ones who will make the big decisions. Roger was completely overwhelmed on the conference call and Ted doesn’t seem to care about anything. He seems to be following his own advice of “stay out of it”. It would be quite the creative kick in the pants to Don in a way if he did get bought out because it would rile him up and untie his hands. Based on the previews I’m more concerned about Peggy but I don’t know if I have ever guessed right before just based on those.

            • Glammie

              Can Don be bought out? Yes. Does Lou have the clout to do it? No. He’s just filler. Also, if Don is fired, he’ll have some leeway to look for other work. The rest of SC&P may be mad at Don and think he’s out of control, but they don’t want to compete against him. Don was put on ice with salary in part because SC&P doesn’t want him anywhere else. Also, Don is also a big partner–so assuming Roger would vote with him–Cutler would have to have both Bert and Ted voting with him. It’s just not worth it to Cutler to do it–not if it means cutting Don loose. Certainly not with Lou has been shown to be such a hack. Bert’s mercenary, but he’s not dumb. Actually, affable though he is, I think Bert and Cutler are a bit alike. When Cutler put out his feeler about the agency’s ex-wife with alimony, no one bit. Bert, at least, would let Don have a hearing and Don is certainly capable of making a sales pitch to save his job when he’s not mid-breakdown.

              So, yeah, Peggy’s at risk. In the real world, she should just look for another job.

    • lillyvonschtupp

      Once again, its Hollywood playing. Shirley would not have been hired with her Afro IRL, Also weren’t the ladies wearing mini dresses and skirts that short in the office in the late 60s? Even Peggy’s skirt would have had tongues wagging at that period.

      • Lady Bug

        Yeah, the Afro had me wondering as well. The show does such a great job with historical details, I’m just wondering how likely it would have been for a woman, or man, with an Afro to be hired by a major Madison Avenue ad agency? Especially considering that Cooper was disturbed by the idea of conservative Dawn be the front office receptionist, I doubt he would have signed off on hiring a woman with an Afro as a secretary.

    • CatherineRhodes

      We shouldn’t be too harsh with Peggy: Her whole world is imploding. She goes home to be reminded of a failed relationship and comes to work and is reminded of another failed relationship. Her work was always a source of pride, but now her ideas are ridiculed. She paid a heavy price to leave her expected role of wife and mother behind, and there is no clear payoff for the sacrifice.

      If I were Peggy’s best friend, I would tell her to sell the apartment immediately and to look for a new job pronto. A change of workplace and home setting would do Peggy a world of good.

      • Chris

        I feel bad for Peggy, she makes mistakes but I think she tries to do good. It’s hard to break out of a way of doing things when it’s all you have ever known. I think she will eventually turn it around. I agree that apartment of hers is doing her no good. She has no Sanctuary anymore. I think she gets mad every time she comes home to that place.

      • Trist

        It’s funny that it wasn’t really her idea that was ridiculed — it was her poor revision of Don’s idea, brought to her by Freddy. I wonder why in these two episodes we aren’t seeing her doing any actual work. Don’s on enforced sabbatical, yet is still working (through Freddie), whereas Peggy is still at work but has spent her onscreen at-office time either getting ideas from Freddy, whom she belittles cruelly, or focussing all her energies on the absent Ted.

        In any case, I think your advice is spot-on! Run, Peggy, run! (Though as has been noted elsewhere: maybe don’t sell the apartment building but lease it and hire a property management company, because it’s gonna be worth a fortune in a couple of decades!)

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Selling is a bad idea. She should keep the building, but move out. She could hire someone to be a building manager/super and fix all of the tenent’s plumbing/relates issues. There’s no reason Peggy couldn’t afford to live someplace better, and still collect the rent money from the apartments. In a few decades, that building is going to be worth major money.

        • somebody blonde

          Definitely she should stop living there, though. She hates that apartment.

    • lillyvonschtupp

      The actress who plays Shirley is gorgeous!

      • Lady Bug

        Shirley is stylin’, I bet she can’t wait until she and Charles(?) are married so she can say goodbye to SC&P forever.

    • lillyvonschtupp

      I noticed Don’s alarm clock when he overslept to 12:34. It’s like a countdown, He needs to be prodded to function, a sign of his depression and shame.

    • LeelaST

      I had such a negative reaction to the length of Shirley’s dress. Meredith’s looks almost as short in the photos, as does Bonnie’s (but she’s her own boss and is in “California” which seems to be code for “anything goes”) but during the episode Shirley’s stood out. I can’t believe there wasn’t an office dress code of sorts; unless this also speaks to the less than equal treatment/low esteem women “enjoyed” at the time.

      • not_Bridget

        There weren’t Dress Codes yet. One knew how to dress. You don’t see anybody reminding the executives they had to wear suits. (The creative types (after Sal) were allowed a bit of leeway.) If somebody offended, a superior would let them know. In an earlier season, Jane unbuttoned her blouse a bit; Joan noticed the guys drooling & instructed her to button up. Joan is always covered–but she’d stop traffic in a burkha.

        Soon, the heinous maxiskirt would appear. Then the pantsuit. All in thick polyester. As time passed, people forgot the unwritten rules & HR (no longer “Personnel”) instituted Dress Codes.

        • Kathryn Sanderson

          …and John T. Malloy wrote “Dress for Success” and ushered in the 80s vogue for navy blue suits and white blouses with floppy bows.

          When I see clips of what Barbara Walters on the Today show in the 70s, I’m appalled at some of the stuff she’s wearing. In one, she had a bandanna on her head, and her dress was sort of calico-ish. WTF. Not suits or tailored dresses like women in TV news wear now.

    • Alloy Jane

      I already loved Sesame Street but that clip is baller. And she def is a hip Shirley.

      • snarkalicious

        Damn straight. There was a time when Sesame Street was seriously legit.

    • Laylalola

      I am so dying to hear Cutler’s conversation with Joan about the Avon account. And not just because of the characters. But Avon? Wasn’t that at about its height? And did it have advertising other than those mini-catalog/fliers that Avon reps directly distributed?

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I would love to Joan in account woman mode. I also want to see how Ken will react to her being part of his department full time.

        • oat327

          Hopefully, he’ll just be thankful for the extra help, but it’ll be interesting to see how they both deal with the power shifts, because as a partner, she is more senior than him at the firm, even if she’s in “his” department.

    • salty

      TLO, I’ve been a devout BK from the beginning, so before I make my first commentary contribution let me simply say this: THANK YOU!

      Without further adieu, some observations:

      1. Shades of Red neckpieces (I’ll include wine/burgundy): Don’s first tie, Sally’s scarf, Peggy’s bow, Joan’s bow, Pete’s tie, ROGER’S SCARF. My theory? We’re looking at the future TEAM DRAPER. Dawn is noticeably missing from this list because she is acting as Don’s spy, but her true colors show through in her coat, as you noted.

      2. Joan’s red dress in the partner’s meeting = the red painting in the LA office. Both stand out against the greens, blues, and grays, demanding attention. Also brings us back to a time when Joan’s status in the office amounted to more than a work of art in the office, something nice to look at, a clear callback to Roger’s favorite (RED!) dress of hers, one of her most memorable: the one that makes her “look like a present.” Joan’s arc has seen her transformation from pretty object, to person–to partner.

      3. Cooper’s blue tie foreshadows his siding with Jim in this meeting, and perhaps the future as well.

      4. Bonnie is wearing Peggy’s power color, with Joan’s ruffles.

      5. Headscarves and headbands are all the rage among our LA girls.

      6. The colors of Peggy’s plaid scarf are the inverse Ginsberg’s plaid coat.

      This is absolutely my favorite game.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        I don’t think Cooper is making it out of this season alive, so who he sides with doesn’t really matter. I love the idea of team Draper.

      • Lady Bug

        Very interesting about the color scheme-Team Draper vs. Team Cutler. As I mentioned in the “A Day’s Work” Review, I can very well see a scenario where Don, Peggy and Pete form their own ad agency in LA (that is, if Don decides to continue to work in advertising).

      • mellow-tone

        Re: Team Draper and Cutler colors, I think its interesting to note that in tonight’s episode, if I remember correctly (spoiler alert?) Peggy was only shown in solid blue dresses – especially when coupled with her cutting remark to Don. Hmm.

    • Mars Tokyo

      And dig that vagina wallpaper in the conference room. And the suggestive blue artwork.

      • MissKimP

        I’m glad I’m not the only one to have noticed that!

      • insomniacattack

        That’s not the conference room, that’s Ted’s office. I find it interesting that both sides of the conference call took place in each of Ted’s offices but he wasn’t (mentally) anywhere. More limbo.

    • whorange

      Lorenzo, thank you for the glorious screencaps week after week. Like a gold medal figure skater, you make it look fluid and effortless. But, honey, we know you got blisters on your fingers come Tuesday. Your designs are admired and cherished by millions (if not zillions!) xo

    • SylviaFowler

      Betty IS the female Pete. They’re both empathy-free, selfish, tantrum-throwing, narcissists.

      • somebody blonde

        The main difference, though, is that Betty is completely unambitious and passive- when she’s miserable, she waits for something to happen to her to fix it. Pete struggles and struggles to do something to make himself happy and basically never succeeds.

    • bingo

      *bows* you fellas are amazing. thank you for these posts. thank you kindly.

    • Columbinia

      I love that big, impossibly white, shoulder strap briefcase that Joan is carrying. It’s a practical, business-like piece rendered in impractical, luxury white. And Joan’s double carrying. She’s got her brown suede purse (tote?) with a scarf tied to the handle over one arm and the white briefcase slung over her shoulder on the same side. All the carrying of multiple holdy-thingies just screams juggling multiple roles, as Joan is. It’s also a very cluttered look, not clean like a guy wearing a suit and carrying a single briefcase by its single handle. Women spend a lot of time picking up and carrying things in this episode — except for Sally, who impossibly enough lost her purse. There’s a whole page of Freud in that. Plus she gets her friends to carry her shopping bags back to school. So Sally is the only female in the show with her hands free and not loaded down with … stuff, especially stuff that encloses space and holds stuff, to go back to Freud.

      • Kit Jackson 1967

        Sally, by loosing her purse, lost her womanhood. Instead of being this independant young woman off an adventure in the city, she became a girl who needs her father’s help.

        • Glammie

          I wonder about that–she chooses not to have her friends pay her train fare, but to seek out her father instead. She uses her lost purse as a bit of an excuse–even though she’s pissed at Don and wouldn’t admit to herself that she wants to see him.

          • Kit Jackson 1967

            That’s a good point. She didn’t have to go and see him. She could have just let her friends pay for her train fare.

            • judybrowni

              Address book, people.

              This, before cell phones. was a priority.

            • Glammie

              I’m pre cell-phone. I even have an address book, but would I have gone about on my own in NYC at 14 just to get an address book back? No. Sally didn’t seem particularly frantic when she hit the office or Don’s apartment. Sullen and then upset over Don not having his job and not being straight with her. Does she even mention the lost address book to Don?

            • 3hares

              A lot of Don’s bonding with his kids happens because somebody else forces them on him–often Sally herself.

            • Kit Jackson 1967

              I would take it one step further. His bonding with his kids happens in secret. He took Bobby to see “Planet of the Apes,” following the letter, but no the spirit of Betty’s punishment (no TV). I think Don may have said, “don’t tell your mother.” This will be a shared secret between Don and Sally.

            • Glammie

              Interesting–Don’s a secretive guy at the best of times–compartmentalizes. Now, he’s letting his kids into tiny bits of his secret world.

    • dmkava

      I do miss Betty though

      • Lady Bug

        I do too! She’ll be back on the next episode

      • BaidoaSomalia

        I can’t wait to see what she’s wearing!

    • Michelle Lim

      Bravo! Another great write up.

    • radioactive badger

      Another NYC-LA connection is that of Don’s and Pete’s ties. The colors are different, but with similar tones and in the same style. It’s a basic, unremarkable style, except every other tie wearing man on the show was wearing something much more distinctive. Pete is now 2 for 2 in having some sort of style similarity to Don, so it will be interesting to see if this trend continues and what it might mean for Pete. I don’t think it will be anything good since Don keeps on almost dying at pool parties and both of this season’s episodes have mentioned wild fires.

      • 3hares

        I think last week Freddy and Ken were wearing similar ties too.

      • Lady Bug

        The mention of wild fires & sunny California in the first two-episodes of the seasons, juxtaposed with cold, icy New York City in the throes of winter reminds me of Robert Frost’s poem: Fire and Ice:

        Some say the world will end in fire,

        Some say in ice.

        From what I’ve tasted of desire

        I hold with those who favor fire.

        But if it had to perish twice,

        I think I know enough of hate

        To say that for destruction ice

        Is also great

        And would suffice.

        • radioactive badger

          That’s a good call.

    • malarson2

      After thinking about it for a day or so, I realized that every major female character in this episode had either a bow, collar, or a scarf on their chests. Even Sally with her short red/pink scarf. Collars street hint way down low, or big(gish) ties built into blouses and dresses. Joan, Peggy, Dawn, Shirley, Meredith, Sally, and even Ms. Bonnie Whiteside, to an extent. Soooo, pointing to their hearts or covering them up?

    • insomniacattack

      I’ve been thinking more about the use of office space in connection with the limbo/purgatory motif.

      When Pete and Ted went off to LA, Pete’s office was taken over by Ken, but Ted retained his. In the first two episodes of this season, we’ve seen Pete make a real effort to turn California into a means to improve his life. While he may feel like he’s dead, and he is indeed in a sort of limbo between his obligations in NY, which he seems to ignore, his lack of recognition in his job, and the enticing things in his new life in LA, he is moving forward. That’s what purgatory is all about: going through the steps of purification in order to enter heaven.

      Pete’s progress in LA parallels Don’s in NY. Don’s in limbo with work and in all of relationships. Even his residency is indeterminate—or, as they like to say on the show, he’s “bicoastal”. But Don wants to fix things. He is taking steps toward his purification, his drive with Sally being a major step toward that. And while Ken’s move to Pete’s office seems to be permanent, closing NY to Pete, Lou’s occupation of Don’s office does not have the same definitiveness.

      Then there’s Ted, who has an office in NY and an office in LA, and doesn’t seem to inhabit either. I think it’s interesting that both sides of that conference call took place in one of Ted’s offices, but Ted wasn’t (mentally) in either. He’s in limbo, but he doesn’t seem to be working his way through like Pete and Don. He’s moping in the past, in a place that doesn’t exist, refusing to move forward.

      And how about Peggy? She’s back in an office that looks like the one she had right before she left SCDP for CGC. As others have pointed out, this might be Lane’s old office. A man who felt he had no choices committed suicide in that office, and now that’s the place Peggy inhabits. The dress hanging on the back of the door is like a specter reminding us of her own (perceived) lack of choices. She broke out once, but now she’s right back where she was before in her own little SCP limbo. No wonder she’s reluctant to make another move. But to leave purgatory she may need to trade that office in for another somewhere else.

      • 3hares

        Love this! Though I’m curious–how is Pete ignoring his obligations in NY?

        Interesting that this is in the same ep where Joan and Dawn get new offices that seem exactly right for their new positions. Joan gives up her limbo office with two doors where she did two jobs. Dawn gives up the desk where she served two bosses. Now both women are settled more comfortably where they belong.

        • somebody blonde

          I assume that’s a reference to the child he happens to have with Trudy that he never seems to have payed any attention to.

          • 3hares

            I don’t get where this idea that Pete never pays attention to her comes from. We only see Tammy herself onscreen a handful of times, but most of those times she’s with Pete, and he references her regularly in perfectly normal ways.

            • insomniacattack

              Well, he is 3,000 miles away from her, which means he can’t be paying much attention. I know people today who have kids with people they are not with who would like to move elsewhere but don’t for the kid’s sake.

              Also, good call on Joan and Dawn! I was thinking about them initially and then forgot. You said it better than I would have anyway.

            • Glammie

              Yeah, it’s interesting to me that Don has shown increased interest in his kids since he crashed and burned last season. He’s always had a soft spot for kids, but his relationship with his kids is a bigger deal for Don than the other men because, I think, of his lack of family. It does make me wonder that if part of the reason Don no longer wants to go to California is because he wants, in his way, to be closer to his kids–at least occasionally.

              Wonder who Bobby will be this year?

            • somebody blonde

              I don’t remember him ever holding her. They’ve made a point of showing other characters with children holding them. And he really doesn’t reference her very often. Kind of like how we basically get no sense that Don pays any attention to his youngest kid.

            • 3hares

              Off the top of my head: Once Pete was holding her right after she was born. Trudy was once shown feeding her when she was home during the day and on the phone with Don. They brought the kid down at the dinner party–Trudy held her and Pete stood beside them. There was a scene where Pete was stroking her hair while she slept and another where he was reading a story to her while she was tucked into his arm on the couch. Otherwise he’s mentioned her in regular ways–has spit up on his suit, wants to hug her after the MLK assassination, asks where she is when she’s not in the room, mentions her having been sick, says he spent Xmas with her. For a show that barely shows family life, these seem like pretty normal indications of a father with a child on it.

              So I’m not seeing where the show’s made more of a point to show other characters holding the kids more than Pete. I don’t remember Roger having many big bonding scenes with Kevin–though I remember him picking him up when Joan brought him to the office. In fact, his story deals more with him not being reliable about it. I assume Harry Crane has a normal relationship with his kids despite him rarely saying anything positive about them, much less being shown with them. Joan’s held her kid a fair amount, but she’s a single mother. Don gets the most screentime and most focus on his home life so we’ve seen him interact with his kids the most.

            • smh4748

              I’m not sure that’s entirely Pete’s fault. When Trudy kicked him out, she told him in no uncertain terms what her rules were, and they were that Pete would only be around when she asked him to be. Though she appeared to have softened somewhat toward him at the end of last season before he moved, she also still seemed very firm in her decision to be apart from him (he says something to the effect that “this isn’t what (he) wanted” and she says “Well. Now you know that.” It’s sad for Tammy, but I’m not sure Pete would have figured as a huge part of her life, even if he had stayed in NYC.

              Additionally, there is so much that happens off-screen in the show, and so much time that passes, it’s a mistake (I think) to draw conclusions like “Pete doesn’t care about his kid” based on what we get to see in 45 minutes each week. If he was openly dismissive of her, or said something like “I wish she’d never been born!” then I could see that. But I just don’t think there is evidence to conclude that he’s a totally uninterested parent.

    • dschubba

      I doubt Dawn’s hair is supposed to read as relaxed, in-universe. I think it’s meant to be a boring, passable wig. Going back to her introduction, when I see it, I have no problem imagining Dawn sitting next to her mother during Sunday services, probably wearing the same hair.

      • SunnyGirl

        * relaxed as in, chemically treated, not relaxed as in calm

        • dschubba

          That’s what I meant. I think she’s wearing an unassuming, unadventurous wig as opposed to relaxing her hair.

          • SunnyGirl

            oh, I see! Hm. Was that a common thing to do?!

            • dschubba

              For older women. I can imagine Dawn taking her fashion cues from her mother, as opposed to her contemporaries, like Shirley. It might be too much of a stretch, but I think it’s Dawn’s version of S1 Peggy’s prim ponytail.

    • somebody blonde

      Kiernan Shipka is going to be such a powerhouse in 3 or 4 years.

    • Bella Bluth

      Once i heard the wor “girl” in this episode, i couldn’t not hear it. Don say’s “good girl” to Dawn, the conversation at the boarding school about the mother’s comment on the “working girl”, Stan tells Peggy she “really is a girl”, Joan has to “move the girls around”, and of course, the scene of “That Girl”. Then someone points out Peggy is dressed in a girl scout theme? i’m not smart enough to do the analysis.

      • Laylalola

        Second Wave feminism has been just beneath the surface by this point for a few years, and by now in NYC there’s been activist demonstrations of types. But it’s still another year before the Redstockings organized, or Sisterhood Is Powerful would be published, or Our Bodies Ourselves, or Ms. Magazine etc. — I mean, “girl” is still very much in play at that time.

      • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

        did someone in the episode make a girl scout remark, or was it just me in the comments? i think it was the ugly red/orange tie with the drab beige and brown outfit. more like the troop leader than like the children’s outfits. those mothers wore some true crap. anyways, i think it was common in those days to refer to your secretary as “your girl” and it may still be today in manhattan offices. sexism lives.

      • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

        did someone in the episode make a girl scout remark, or was it just me in the comments? i think it was the ugly red/orange tie with the drab beige and brown outfit. more like the troop leader than like the children’s outfits. those mothers wore some true crap. anyways, i think it was common in those days to refer to your secretary as “your girl” and it may still be today in manhattan offices. sexism lives.

    • Karen

      Wanting more Megan and more Shirley, but am particularly interested in Betty…”Here’s to you, Mrs. Francis…Jesus loves you more than you will know…”

      • Lady Bug

        Mrs. Francis will make an appearance on Sunday night.

    • Elizabeth Moore

      Have you guys ever notice that you refer to Dawn as “a girl”? A lot?

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        I know that we used “good girl” and “Don’s girl” to compare her to Peggy. I also know that I can spend a day and a half writing four thousand exhausting words on a topic and someone will ignore the actual content in order to do something stupid and pointless, like count the times one word is used.

    • http://weirdinedgewise.blogspot.com ONEWEIRDWORD

      and file boxes haven’t changed at all over the years.
      What a great write-up, TLo! You’ve got such great insights!

    • natty_bat

      Lots of talk about Shirley’s outfit, so I might be repeating someone, but it took me until the Mad Style post to decide what seemed familiar to me about it. That is some Lt. Nyota Uhura realness being served up. The skirt/hose/boots combo just needs a tricorder to make her ready for an away mission.

    • Bella Bluth

      Thank you so very much, Tom and Lorenzo. I enjoy reading your analysis (and viewing the collages) as much as I do actually viewing the show. You give me so much to think about. I really, really appreciate what you do here for us!

      • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

        so true. i always save the episode to watch again after i read mad style and the TLo recap. i always take in so much more the second time.

    • http://www.wordydoodles.com WordyDoodles

      I was struck by Roger’s line, something like “Maybe it was the hat,” when he came in the office and shared how he was insulted on the street. It was one of the only times in the show I can think of when costuming makes it into the lines. So it seemed like hats were primed to be an important part of the storytelling.

      • cpetersky

        Actually, by this time, most men weren’t wearing hats on the street. Roger’s dressing a little old school at this point, and the only other men wearing hats, other than squares like him, would be Orthodox Jews.

        • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

          that’s what i thought, some ignorant bigot took him to be hassidic. and his was a typical response for the time, not outrage that someone would make an anti-semetic remark, but “do i look like a jew?” it reminds me of the time my mom got an anonymous phone call after we sold our house, saying something in a threatening manner about the buyers’ having “colored blood.” instead of being furious at this racist indignity, she said, “well, they didn’t look colored to me.”

    • Luke

      Is it just me, or is there something a little Holden Caulfield about Ginsberg’s hat and jacket combo? Like he just doesn’t want to face the fact that he’s a grown up and has a job in an office with a bunch of grey-haired old phonies like Sterling and Cutler.

      • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

        he seems to be living in his own world these days.

    • John G. Hill

      These are always fun. As far as Don’s future, I see all the comments about some in the agency thinking about how to get rid of Don. Has anybody noticed that without Don Draper, the agency seems to be creatively going nowhere, and that office politics are taking over the creative juice?

    • Vtg Fashion Library

      Those aren’t Peter Pan collars that Dawn’s been wearing. They’re dog ear collars, which had a brief period of popularity in the late 60s and early 70s.

    • NinjaCate

      The more I think about it, the more annoyed I am with Peggy’s behaviour in this episode. Seeing the screencap of the roses on Shirley’s desk again, just sitting there, why in heaven’s name would Peggy assume they were her’s? Wouldn’t Shirley have put them in her office if they were? I’m very inclined to agree with your assessment that she never would have mad that assessment if her secretary were white.