Mad Style: The Quality of Mercy

Posted on June 19, 2013

Here we go, Miss Porter girls; the penultimate “Mad Style” of season six. Grab yourself a refreshing glass of Tropicana and let’s get started.

Props and costuming wordlessly setting up the conflict to come in this episode; orange vs. cranberry. Megan’s outfit is eye-popping, as so many of her outfits are, trendy, and clearly very expensive. She’s definitely dressing for success, because it’s not really a requirement for a working soap actress to show up on the set looking this dolled up. If anything, it would be more normal for her to be dressed down, since she has to get into makeup and costume at some point. Another subtle way of reinforcing how her marriage helps her career; another subtle reason to tie her to Sharon Tate, who was largely considered to have received major benefits to her career by marrying Roman Polanski. But keep in mind what we said a couple weeks ago: Betty Draper used to be dressed like Grace Kelly because she was, like Grace, a Main Line princess who gave up a glamorous international career to marry and have children. Joan used to reference Marilyn Monroe because she faced a world of men who couldn’t see past her breasts and she had to fight her whole life to be seen as more than her body. But Betty isn’t likely to die in a car accident and Joan isn’t likely to die of a pill overdose. Janie dresses some of the women in the show like the most desirable women of the period to draw parallels, not to predict their fates.

At a different point in the season, we would have made a bigger deal out of that red signaling Don’s prostitution issues but we think that, for the moment, those issues have been shocked out of Don’s system. We’re not suggesting growth on his part; just that at this particular moment, he understands how he screwed up and largely why he screwed up. In fact, it’s why he’s punishing himself so hard here; because it’s not something he can escape or wave away anymore. Fortunately for him, he found a way to transfer his self-loathing to someone else.

 

Don’s plaid bathrobe will do double-duty on the meaning front in a bit. For now, let’s look at Betty, whose clothes keep getting better each time we see her. She’ll never be trendy again the way Megan is, but check out that hem. That may just be the shortest skirt we’ve ever seen Betty Francis wear. But it’s still a respectable outfit; perfectly appropriate for a Republican candidate’s wife, but with a little bit of style to it. Pat Nixon or Betty Ford might wear something like this on their best day.

Blue and yellow; again in a scene signaling a lack of connection; not between Betty and Don. They’re actually in a pretty good place right now. It’s between Betty and Sally. Betty isn’t connecting with her and thinks Sally is mad at her for some reason. The golden yellow here has a slight metallic quality and the wealthier women on the show have always been the ones who wore the metallics to signal their wealth: Betty, Jane Sterling, and Megan, most often.

 

Persistent themes and motifs here: Two people in the Draper apartment, one dressed, the other undressed. Blue/green towel signaling adultery (which is the cause of Don’s misery in these scenes). With the cutting back and forth to Megan and Harry, you get both the “east coast vs. west coast” long-time Mad Men theme, but you also get the “cranberry vs. orange” short-term motif.

 

Well, what else would you put Harry in for a scene “on the coast,” where he tells Don Sunkist’s back in play? He’s not even inhabiting the same world as the other members of SC&P and his costuming once again shows it. Like Abe’s costuming signaling much earlier in the season that not only was he going to leave Peggy, but he was going to leave her over differences in philosophy, Harry’s clothing this season has been signaling more and more that he can’t stay in the corporate, NYC-based world of SC&P much longer. Something’s going to have to change for him, and if this Sunkist deal really goes through, he will have even more leverage to ask for what he wants. Either he walks soon, or SC&P opens a west coast branch. Given the major clients and accounts the newly merged company seems to be bringing in left and right, the latter option seems all but inevitable.

 

You could point out that Don and Megan are clearly the trendier couple here, and that Don in particular is mimicking costuming from Rosemary’s Baby. You could also point out that they can afford to look more dressed-up and glamorous because they didn’t come from the office like Peggy and Ted here. What we liked about this foursome was the way Don was mimicking Ted so clearly, right down to the turtleneck and plaid jacket. That’s a signature Ted Chaough look and Don is standing there, wearing it in dark grey and black, like a figure of judgment against him. It works perfectly on a thematic level because this episode dealt both with doppelgangers and with Don punishing other people for something he did.

As for Peggy and Ted, their color story is very murky. Blues, greens and yellows. Blue and green consistently signal adultery and blue and yellow somewhat less consistently signal a lack of connection. The murkiness in meaning here really works, since we’re still not entirely clear in this scene if this is a full-blown adulterous affair or merely an office infatuation.

You’ve gotta give it to them; they’re one hell of a good-looking couple. We don’t think Megan’s clothes here owe much to Mia Farrow’s from Rosemary’s Baby, but as she talked about how creepy she thought old apartments were, we got the sense that these two are meant to be seen as the post-war apartment building version of the Woodhouses, the young, glamorous good-looking couple of the movie. There’s been quite a bit of horror in this apartment building for the characters this season and just as in Rosemary’s Baby (spoilers ahead), a glamorous young woman’s  husband made a connection with a creepy older neighbor lady (sorry; we hate Sylvia)  in the building; a connection that threatens to destroy the marriage. It’s all quite ominous when you take the Rosemary’s Baby framing and decide not to take it literally.

Of course the character of Guy Woodhouse in the movie was a struggling actor, and quite a few viewers this season seem to think Megan’s been having an affair for a while, so make of that what you will.

 

Again, blue/yellow playing out, this time in a corporate, Don vs. Ted scene. Remember, this motif started when the two agencies merged, giving it an undertone of representing each side of this new whole. It also tends to pop up in scenes where people are not connecting, confronting or being honest with each other, which also works as an interpretation here. Roger’s all in blue, Ted’s all in yellow, and Don’s in yellow and blue, giving the impression that he’s somehow bridging a gap here, when in fact he’s still waging war on Ted. He’s just doing it under the guise of “helping the company.”  Jim is again in a colorless ensemble, surrounded by men in color, illustrating how inscrutable he is. And that wallpaper sure got a lot of meaningful play this season on the whole “orange vs. cranberry” theme.

 

You can’t quite catch it in these shots, but Pete is wearing a red tie here, tying both these characters together. We don’t think Pete’s ever had a secretary work for him as long as Clara has, which means the woman deserves some serious respect for putting up with THAT every day for the last 4  years.

As we said last week, we feel a little bad for not highlighting more of Clara this season, since Janie Bryant’s really gone to town on her costuming, giving her the chance to be pretty much the trendiest out of all the secretaries we’ve seen on this show. This is pure 1968, Edwardian, Hendrix-and-Rolling-Stones-inspired, and yet another example this season of the anti-establishment youth trends making their way directly into the establishment. We loved this look on her and it really stood out how much and how often Clara changes up her style. She’s clearly quite the clotheshorse. Not even Joan in her heyday seemed to have as many outfits and looks as Clara does.

And speaking of standing out, look who pops the brightest and takes all the focus in this scene:

None other than the madly fascinating Bob Benson, all done up in bright greens, blues and orange. He almost looks like a logo himself; purely surface, advertising a false image to the world and masking it with bright, friendly tones. More things to note: All the other men, in comparison to Bob, couldn’t possibly be more establishment and corporate, all in shades of blue, grey, and black – except Ken, who’s in similar (albeit less bright) tones as Bob, giving them a kind of solidarity here.

As we said in our initial review of this episode, our mistake in last week’s Mad Style was assuming that SC&P had some bare-bones form of credentials-checking process. In retrospect, certain things about Bob make a lot more sense, such as the idea of sending a deli tray to Mrs. Sterling’s funeral. No upper-middle-class striver would make a tacky bungle like that. Having said that, we still stand by pretty much every other thing we wrote in our take on Bob; that he’s “culturally gay,” as opposed to the intensely-closeted Sal Romano, that the law and the culture of 1968 make it extremely unlikely that any non-gay man in a corporate setting would pretend to be gay, and that his feelings last week for Pete really were genuine – which make even more sense now, given his class-based ambition. It’s HILARIOUS to make this comparison, but the blue-blooded Peter Dyckman Campbell was essentially Bob Benson’s Betty Hofstadt; the person who was going to erase his humiliatingly low-class origins by loving him back and making him worthy of his aspirations, just like Betty did for slimy little Dick Whitman.

He’s definitely a grifter in the Dick Whitman mold, but we still find it very hard to believe that he’s working some form of long con here. He’s been an employee of SC for a year now, seemingly only wanting to move up the ladder. And if this is some sort of elaborate, year-long scheme to somehow get a hold of the Dyckman family fortune, he’d have to be the dumbest, least competent con man in the history of the game, considering there hasn’t been a fortune for years and the “con” requires two people to work well-paying jobs for long periods of time.

Back to costuming: we’ve noted before that Bob tends to wear pin-striped shirts under his suit. Combined with a striped, patterned tie, it gives him a buzzing, distracting quality in closeups; too much pattern, a feeling of being slightly off. It would have been perfect if he’d just been dressed in blue and green here, so we could point and call him a cheater and a liar, but that orange is distracting.

 

Blue and yellow tones in Betty’s outfit as she tries to connect with the pretty much un-connectable-at-the-moment Sally; a light figure vs. a dark figure.

It feels like Weiner & Co. have spent this season redeeming Betty from the damage their writing did to the character just after the divorce, in season four. Her anger was completely understandable at the time, but they oversold it with scenes of her slapping Sally across the face and firing Carla. She had reasons for those actions, but they weren’t tempered with any scenes to show a more well-rounded Betty. For a good while there, she was just shown as nasty and angry all the time.

We wouldn’t claim her weight loss is solely the reason why she seems so much more centered, self-assured, and focused on being a good wife and mother now, but Betty only functions well when she’s got some self-confidence. When she loses it, she loses everything in her personality. Besides, we tend to think a combination of sessions with Sally’s old therapist, countless Weight Watchers meetings, and a supportive, attentive husband worked to remake Betty into someone who knows herself pretty well, making her a better parent and partner.

This is a long way of saying that, on a purely superficial level, it’s great to see Betty with her style mojo back, but on a much deeper one, it’s great to see Betty happy and self-assured in her life. Sure, she snipes at Sally all the time (and Sally snipes right back), but how is that different from practically every mother-and-teenage-daughter relationship ever?

 

We’re really starting to like Moira. She’s clearly very protective of Ted, the way a good secretary was required to be. And while we’ve seen some slight prickliness coming from her this season, we appreciated the relatively tactful way she spoke of Ted and Peggy’s flirting and the way she immediately looked guilty for bringing it up. Again, Janie Bryant dresses her in clothes that draw attention to her in a scene, much like Clara, and Megan, back when she was a secretary. Background players don’t get such focus-pulling clothes. Moira matters in the story. Whether that means a bigger role down the line, we can’t say. Clara matters as one of the few people in the world on Pete’s side, but that doesn’t necessarily mean she’ll ever get a big storyline out of it.

 

What’s most interesting to us about the costuming here is that once again, a blue-yellow dominance is evident in the clothing of everyone in the room – except for Peggy, who shows no traces of either color. In fact, she is almost colorless except for that focus-pulling, busy print bow. She’s not part of the color dynamic here because she is the person everyone in the scene is talking about or thinking about. This scene is about how everyone else in this scene is reacting to Peggy, who is an almost totally neutral figure, with the only visual interest being a buzzing mass of tumult right over her heart.

This is the third or fourth dress in exactly this shape and style she’s worn this season. She wore a purple version when she found out about the merger, a blue version (slightly different; without a collar) when she and Ted kissed, and a teal version in this episode, when she went to the movies with him. It’s literally her Ted dress. It’s a trick she learned from Joan. When you find a dress that works for you, buy it in every color.

We’re desperately trying to figure out Joan’s status at the moment because the show is frustratingly vague. Did Avon call? Who can tell? She’s certainly acting quite secretarial throughout the episode; shepherding clients to and from the reception area, mentioning the cookies in the conference room, and getting defensive with Don when he questioned her hard on the budget for the St. Joseph’s ad. She clearly knows what’s going on with Peggy and Ted and, like Don, she’s not impressed with how they’re acting. She managed to carry on an affair with a partner that lasted over a decade and practically no one ever saw evidence of it in the office. Of course she’d be a little annoyed with how Peggy’s acting.

She wore this suit the day of the merger, when she ushered Peggy to her new office and said how glad she was to have her back, making the use of it here a little on the ironic side. It’s also the outfit she wore when Bob Benson rescued her, making us wonder if she’s going to figure into whatever’s going to happen next with him.

It’s ENTIRELY too much to ask the writers of this, but please give Joan the Avon account and have her appoint Bob her backup. We want the quintessential gay/fruit fly relationship, dammit. It would be hilarious, the two of them jetting off to Avon headquarters together, laughing the whole way about what an asshole Pete is and how you should never, under any circumstances, fall for a partner.

Ah, well. We can dream.

 

And there’s Don Draper’s adultery bathrobe, in dress form. Taking it further, Sally’s plaid is blue and green.

We kinda thought this dress was a bit too short for Sally. Perfect for the time, but we would have thought Betty would insist on a slightly longer hem than that for this trip. Even so, she’s the height of the good little preppy girl. The lady from Miss Porter’s has a pleated skirt, which is a slightly unusual detail for a suit like that but gives her that extra little touch of preppy that suits the scene. Her autumnal shades speak of back-to-school and serve as a counterpoint to Betty’s creamy pastels and Sally’s dark blue plaid.

 

Josephine clearly does not care to dress Dorothy up like a drag queen, the way Manolo did. It should be noted that, while Dorothy is considerably less glamorous than she appeared last week, Josephine did in fact dress her far more appropriately for her station and even her personality. That’s why her Manolo ensembles were so hilarious; because they were so over-the-top they bordered on inappropriate.

We don’t pretend to have any advanced knowledge of elderly dementia, but we think the show does a very good job of portraying it in shades. Dorothy’s not a drooling idiot or raving lunatic. Her grasp on reality may not be as tight as was, but she has her moments of lucidity and even gets in a good line every now and then at Pete’s expense. In a weird, highly dysfunctional way, we thought this scene showed the love underneath all the sniping in their relationship.

 

Just a snapshot of a perfectly art-directed teenage girl’s room in 1968; from the heavy floral motif, to the butterflies, to the inspirational posters, to the puppies on the mantel and the Snoopy on the windowsill, it’s all very much of its time.  A “What if the Brady girls were rich east coast bitches?” kind of thing.

 

Sally and the blonde are connected through their preppy plaids. They’re the ones who stay with the boys. The blonde and the other girl are connected through color. They’re the ones who belong here.

 

Glen and Rolo are two privileged east coast prepsters dabbling in counter-culture styles, but it’s all a put-on. Once they take their jackets off, they’re pretty much as preppy and establishment as any two teenagers could be at the time, even with the pot and the ugly toe-sandals Rolo brought to the party:

Tons of preppy plaids here.

 

They’ll both be in fraternities by 1972 and on the executive track by 1976; count on it. They’re certainly never going to have to worry about Vietnam.

There was vigorous disagreement as to our take on this scene, but having watched it six times now, we’re standing by it. Rolo was a jerk and Sally absolutely should have put a stop to him, but when she told Glen he tried to force her, she was definitely exaggerating. Once Sally said no and stood up, he stayed there on the floor, insulting her. Even when Glen came out, he stayed on the floor and called her a tease. A privileged dick of a teenage boy who needed to be put in his place, yes. Someone who was attempting to rape Sally, no. And she knew that. These scenes were about the many ways in which she’s trying to get away from her father’s influence by embracing her mother’s desires for her, but she keeps demonstrating the falseness of the statement “My father never gave me anything.” From her blue plaid to her smoking and drinking to the need to punish someone else, Sally’s story this episode was about how she’s more like Don than she ever wants to be.

Note that Rolo is wearing a black turtleneck, just like Don, the man Sally really wants to punish. Stand-ins within stand-ins in this story.

 

Peggy wore this suit in the first episode of the season, when she was dealing with the headphone client who was scared about the ear jokes made on Johnny Carson. So on that level, we can say it’s her “dealing with a difficult client” suit. But we’re kind of thrilled, because we picked up on the very persistent blue and green motif right at the beginning, with this suit (“Peggy wears a lot of blues and greens in this episode, possibly signaling a new set of power colors to replace her old, mid-Century, mustard yellow power color. The blue-and-green color combo was extremely popular during this colorful period, as was the pink-and-orange one. They come back in and out of style, but they’re fairly strongly identified with the late sixties.”)  We had no idea at the time how far it was going to go this season, but we love that we noted it so early.

 

Put her next to Ted, also done up in blue and green, and the adultery motif gets even stronger. It’s notable here that Don is only in gray and black; a figure of judgment, just like the grey and black he wore in the movie theater. Joan also stands out boldly, as one of the few observers in the room who knows exactly what everyone is talking about.

 

Bob is wearing a second orange, green and blue tie and we think we know why with this scene. Ever the company man (on the surface at least), he’s deliberately working the orange from the new SC&P logo (seen on his coffee cup, because coffee cups are practically totems to Bob Benson) in to his outfits, trying to sell that image even harder. It’s an example of why Pete surrendered to him here. Bob’s a charmer on a world-class level, right up there with the 1954 version of Don. Pete knows he can’t win fighting someone like that. The partners all but told him they’d take him off Chevy he tried to take Bob off it. What Pete did here was ensure that he has a subservient ally on his side. We think the potential for this relationship is enormous. We hope they don’t write Bob out after this season. A gay (or at the very least, not entirely heterosexual) Dick Whitman as Pete Campbell’s bitch is one of the best new ideas to come to the show since Lane Pryce fired the partners. As long as Pete doesn’t mistreat Bob (which is not assured at all), this could do them both a ton of good in their careers.

Notable here that Pete is essentially wearing a prep school tie, speaking to the massive class differences between the two men. Bob’s also jacket-less, which gives him a sense of being without his armor. The only other time we can remember him not wearing a jacket is when he encountered Jim Cutler in the hallway; another moment where someone else seemed to have the upper hand on him.

 

And finally:

Betty got what she always wanted; a daughter just like her, right down to the complementary blue tones and the smoking. We wonder if she’s going to press the issue with Sally, since it’s clear she knows there’s something going on between her and Don. That’s a look of motherly concern, but she may just want to leave it be, since whatever it is that happened gave her the perfect daughter in the end.

At least on the surface.

 

 

[Stills: tomandlorenzo.com]

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  • Moriginal

    Yay! It’s Mad Sausage Wednesday! I mean…. sorry it’s been a long week already. Thanks TLo.

    • Sagecreek

      I’m sure I’m the only one who’s been refreshing like mad for two hours. Right?

      • natasha2marie

        No, I’ve been doing the same thing!

        • bxbourgie

          As have I. My happiness as I refreshed the page and Mad Style popped up was magical!

      • Crystal

        Nope. Me too!

  • Jen

    I love these style reviews, they’re always so amazingly detailed! I wish I could analyse the costumes as well as you, it helps make the themes even more interesting :)

  • Nicole Sauvage

    Great review as always. I have been struck every week this season with the doublings and repetitions presented by the show itself–your breakdown of the costuming underlines it all so effectively.

    Gotta ask: Does anyone know if AMC will make those coffee mugs (either the new SC&P or the old SCDP) available for purchase (please please please)?

    • Alice Teeple

      I want one of all of them! They have to be available at some point. Why are they so prominent all of a sudden? I want a CGC mug!

      • William Partin
        • nlpnt

          It’s interesting how much more dated this logo is than the old one – you could imagine a media company still proudly using the SDCP logo while the SC&P one screams its’ era in a way that’ll be thoroughly outdated by 1980 or so.

          • Alice Teeple

            That might be a subtle point. Maybe SC&P won’t last through 1980.

        • Alice Teeple

          This is awesome! Are there any officially put out by AMC yet? I’d feel a little weird getting a contraband mug. Even though it’s bombdiggity. I would love one of each mug design…the CGC logo was so awesome.

  • siriuslover

    “The murkiness in meaning here really works, since we’re still not entirely clear in this scene if this is a full-blown adulterous affair or merely an office infatuation.”

    Thank you! And yes, the adultery motif gets stronger. I see them as getting ever perilously closer to the edge, but not quite there yet. But then, I was laughed out of town (not by you guys) for suggesting that on the boards on Sunday night! ;)

    Love the discussion of Sally and Betty.

    • Chris

      I got the impression that Ted and Peggy have not engaged in an affair as siriuslover states. If they were having an affair why go to the movies? Wouldn’t they get a hotel room instead? People engaging in a full blown affair with something to hide would not be acting so friendly around the office (unless they are complete idiots).They would go the opposite way to compensate. That is why they are always with each other at the office it’s the only time they have have together. It’s also why Ted is so stunned when Don says all that about Peggy to him, it never even entered Ted’s mind it could be seen that way. Because nothing physical is happening they both think it is “innocent” and not apparent to the others. I do think next week this will change in some way.

      • KayeBlue

        I agree. I think they’re having a “love” affair. They love making each other feel special and brilliant, etc, etc. They’re not in it just for sex (which doesn’t make it less adulterous, IMO).

        • Joan Arkham

          Agreed. I think they’re doing the “everything is innocent as long as we don’t have sex, we can just be good friends” dance.

      • leighanne

        Completely agree and this is why Don’s calling out Ted is all the more offensive to Peggy. He killed off whatever special friendship/flirtation Peggy & Ted had in the office and ensured those moments won’t happen again (or so she thinks at the moment). I can see something else happening between those two in the next episode.

        • Chris

          Yes, agree 100%. They had created some “safe” cheating obeying the letter of the law if not the spirit and Don destroyed it. I’m not saying Ted and Peggy were in the right but there is so little happiness in that office some genuine joy was a refreshing change.

          • leighanne

            Yes, it was a welcome change. I didn’t mind those scenes in the office as much as some others did (seeing Peggy grin like she did was so great).

      • MilaXX

        I get the impression the “affair” has not reached the physical level. Then again, I kinda side eye Ted in this relationship. I think when things are going good he feels comfortable being super flirty with Peggy. Perhaps he tells himself as long he he doesn’t act on it, he’s just being a good boss. I would bet good money the minute Peggy ever acted like she wanted to treat this as a real relationship/affair, Ted would once again pull back and get super professional again. Denial or not, it’s an affair of sorts. Ted (and Peggy) are just lying to themselves about what it is, much like Ted is lying to himself that this merger is ever going to work.

        • Chris

          Don blew up the facade for Ted and now he has to face it. He spoke of Ted and Peggy in the cheapest way and totally destroyed Ted’s image of what they were. And Don just LOVED doing it. It was the most energized I’ve seen him since he found out about a chance at Chevy.

          • Alice Teeple

            Part of me was wondering if Peggy was listening in on the intercom in Joan’s office. Probably not this time, though…Joan is ONTO HERRRR.

          • NoveltyRocker

            Yup. And I loved watching him do it. There’s all this talk this season about Don not being much fun anymore. I’m not sure it’s that he’s so much more reckless in his patterns as that we haven’t been treated to as many moments like these where he’s calling others on their delusions. We got to witness that power again but this time around we see what it can cost a person to wield it. The loneliness in that last shot really hit me. I don’t know if Don really sees how he played things as monstrous but more heroic—forcing people to realizations that will set them on truer (according to his beliefs) paths. He hasn’t really met a match when it comes to consciously “corralling” people in order to control outcomes. It all reminds me of the Lisa character in Girl, Interrupted lamenting, why wouldn’t anybody bother to “push MY buttons!?”

        • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

          I think you’re dead on about Ted flirting with Peggy when things are going well. When things aren’t, he tends to shut her out.

          • FayeMac

            I feel that when there is an in-office affair – the man usually comes out better than the woman. Especially in 1968. Peggy has her credibility at stake. Up until Don brought reality to the open, they were like two little kids making mud pies together. I agree with you however, Peggy stands to be the one who is hurt the most.

          • Glammie

            True. Peggy’s got some protection because she’s high up, but Ted’s a partner and that trumps copy chief. Funny, we’re just entering the era where the whole office politics/affairs thing starts to matter. Wasn’t the same when the bulk of women in office were secretaries.

        • Glammie

          Yep. Ted comes off as boyish and a bit naive compared to the other players. Probably part of what Peggy likes about him. But he’s married and signs are that he doesn’t want to blow up his marriage. It’s funny though, it’s not clear to me why Ted went from keep–your-distance an episode or so ago to the giggles and random touches of this episode. But I guess the work on the aspirin ad gave him an excuse. The relationship’s getting less professional and more lovey-dovey, which isn’t a good sign.

          Peggy needs to find another guy outside the office, but one who respects her.

      • siriuslover

        I agree completely with your assessment. I’m not sure where we disagree?

        • Chris

          I was reacting to the TLO quote that they weren’t sure where Peggy and Ted stood. I’m convinced no physical affair happened yet. I misread yours and will edit mine!

          • siriuslover

            You know, I cannot get used the to the way Disqus handles conversations. It’s hard to track who is responding to whom!

          • Chris

            Yes it’s very wonky depending on how you sort it, especially on an iPad. Sorry about the mix up! I should have read more carefully but I edited my remarks to show I agree with yours.

      • http://howtofaint.tumblr.com/ How to Faint

        I’ve never forgotten what Don said movies were for–and we know Peggy proved him right at least once.

      • cat

        Does anyone else think the movie theater is where Peggy likes to get her “inappropriate” on? Remember that other stranger w/ in the theater with Peggy? I can’t recall, was a bag of popcorn involved?

        • Chris

          I think that was just once- the day she was pretending to be Don. First she barked at the Heniz bean client and tried to “Don” him into liking the “bean ballet” then she tried lying on the couch, then she went to the movies and had that seedy encounter with striped pants guy.

          The last time she went to the movies Don came in and sat with her. Movies are Don’s “thing” when he is stumped or needs to clear his head. Plus he is supposedly always up on the latest releases.

          Popcorn comment made me laugh, the only time I remember seeing that was in a French Movie from the early 80′s.

          • Bonjour

            Yesss! Truffaut’s Argent de Poche, French release 1976, USA a little later. Popcorn scene is a classic. Take Rollo, put him in a movie theatre with a bag of popcorn, you got it — only French kid didn’t get as lucky as Peggy’s early movie friend…

          • Chris

            I was thinking of La Boum with Sophie Marceau from 1980 but “Pocket Change” as it was called over here makes perfect sense! It was probably where the kid in La Boum saw the trick! Lol. I love learning new movie trivia.

          • Bonjour

            Actually I think you’re right and I confused the two, Chris. They are both so great and prob Andre Jacquemetton knows them inside and out!

    • Lisa

      I don’t think that Ted would have touched her on the waist as he did if they weren’t already sleeping together. The only reason that they weren’t to begin with was because he was restraining himself severely. So once he let go, that would have been that, I think.

      • Chris

        I think it’s an “I don’t get to touch her any other way so I will enjoy a casual moment to touch her innocently when I can.” It’s Don’s view that makes the touch seem so important, much like when Peggy put her hand on Ted’s arm in sympathy (supposedly) in his office and Don stopped dead on the stairs. I also Ted wouldn’t appear so chipper and happy if he did a complete 180 on his moral stance and started cheating. He’s a guy that even if he did cheat would torture himself over it.

        • Verascity

          This was my take on it as well.

        • Alice Teeple

          What struck me about the waist touch was what Ted said as he was touching her…”radiant young mother.” With Peggy advancing on Don The Baby. That must have opened up a whole can of issues with Mr. Draper, considering he seems to have wrapped Peggy up into this whole pseudo-mother figure and is seeing her as a whore with Ted. I think it really comes back to that dichotomy for him. Don was acting more like an angry child seeing his mother with a man, which ties into the whole Sally guilt. So of course he’d take it out on Ted.

          • imspinningaround

            And I just thought of something else: Ted’s “radiant young mother” line (and Don’s side eye there) also has subtext in that Don and Peggy are the only people in that room who know that Peggy, y’know, ACTUALLY had a baby.

          • Anne

            I thought of that too. I had nearly the same kind of *gasp* moment in that scene as I did when Pete’s mother said “for the sake of the child you have together” in the previous episode. Anybody else think that Peggy’s baby is going to come to light at some point, somehow?

          • housefulofboys

            That’s really interesting, that Peggy’s baby has come up several times in the last 2 episodes (the St. Joseph presentation, with Pete’s mom, and with Pete in the diner last week). You can reach further looking for “lost boys” to Roger being unrecognized as Kevin’s father, and losing his mother at the beginning of the season; Pete being called un-loveable by his own mother; and of course the elephant in the room, Don. I don’t really think Peggy’s baby is going to show up, it’s just one of those themes that keeps repeating.

          • Anne

            I don’t necessarily think that the baby is going to show up or be the tangible subject of a plotline, but it’s hovering awfully close to the surface right now. Up to this point it’s been mentioned so rarely that I can’t help but wonder if it means anything that it’s been brought up–though not deliberately–in two consecutive episodes.

            Anyway, we’ll see!

          • Chris

            There have been quite a few mentions or call backs lately. The only people in the office who know she even had a baby are Don and Pete. As awful as Don has been I just cannot imagine him squealing that on her when he knows it literally almost broke her. I agree though it doesn’t seem random how many times it’s been obliquely brought up lately. Makes me a little concerned.

          • http://bidonica.wordpress.com/ Poggy

            It may even be a way for Weiner & Co. to react to criticism about Peggy seemingly forgetting about that event in her life, so they bring it up thorugh these hints. To be honest, I find it believable that Peggy just doesn’t dwell on it and if she does, it doesn’t happen outwardly – she compartimentalizes just as much as Don in this respect, and if the show didn’t focus on Don so much, we actually wouldn’t see much of his internal life either. So yeah I guess it’s going to be brought up thematically but tbh I can’t see how this can come back and affect Peggy in terms of plot development, especillay knowing this is the penultimate season – no room for a scenario where the child has grown up enough to go and track down his biological parents. If anything, it can come back in relation with Pete, but I can’t see the child himself showing up anytime soon.

          • Anne

            Oh, for sure. I don’t really think the child is going to appear physically somehow. But I wonder if maybe they’ve been bringing it up on purpose so that it’s fresh in Peggy’s mind–for whatever reason.

          • Spicytomato1

            I hadn’t thought of that but you’re onto a very interesting theory, I think. I gasped when Pete’s mom said what she did and for them to do it again does seem significant.

          • swiss_miss

            I don’t think so, seems to soap opera for me. At least not literally, maybe symbolically. I could imagine that she might have to decide soon if she wants to have kids or not, maybe.

      • housefulofboys

        I’m torn on this, my gut instinct says they haven’t “gone there” yet, but the fact that he actually touched her, and on the waist – not the hand or the elbow or the shoulder – seems so intimate. If any of my bosses had ever touched me that way my spidey-senses would be tingling!

        • bxbourgie

          The difference tho is that Peggy WANTS him to touch her, so she doesn’t mind. I’m sure if that was Cutler she’d give him the side eye of death.

          • Chris

            Yes! They both enjoy it. Ted is so oblivious he probably doesn’t think anything of it.

          • Glammie

            But he’s *not* oblivious–he told Peggy that she couldn’t touch him in a meeting a couple of episodes ago. He’s now allowing these touches and initiating them. It’s not clear what’s changed, but something has.

            Don was mean, but dead on about what he said to him. He doesn’t actually accuse Ted of having an affair with Peggy, but of being in love with her. Don, like Joan, is very good at sussing out those sort of things.

          • Chris

            The touch was his hand on her waist pushing her forward. The emphasis was Don’s from his point of view just like Peggy putting her hand on Ted’s arm in his office when Gleason died and he stopped right on the stairs. They are hardly making out. I think Ted realized he over reacted before and probably thinks this is normal. I don’t think anything is going on with Clara and Pete because she straightened his tie.

            Don definitely implied something was going on, in a winking sarcastic way, so much so Ted said “don’t talk about her like that!”

          • Glammie

            Really? I’ve worked in a lot of offices and my male bosses never touched me that way. The touch isn’t in isolation–it goes with the budget lapse and the movie break. I’m married and I can’t imagine my husband thinking it was okay if another man did this in front of him. If anything, I’ve learned men are more conscious of this sort of thing (and frankly a bit more territorial) than are women. The touch is casually intimate.

            And Ted’s aware of this–again, the hand comment. I know that you consider Don to be the baddie, but nothing indicates that he’s out of touch when it comes to reading interactions between people. What he’s seeing is there. I think the more legit question are about the way Don interfered, which was cruel and meant to humiliate Ted.

            And a lot of Ted’s reaction is guilt–he knows, as a married man, his feelings for Peggy aren’t okay.

            Or let me put it this way, would Ted do any of this in front of his wife?

          • Chris

            I didn’t think the hand on the waist was that big a deal. People would definitely do that where I work to move someone out of the way etc. if they were coming by and they were friends (not strangers obviously) and I wouldn’t think anything of it. What makes it a big deal is what we know about Peggy and Ted. Don saw Peggy touch his arm and noted it, but it wasn’t until the movies that he suspected anything. That and the huge fact that Ted basically told Don he was pushing the boundaries of the commercial for Peggy because he thought it was so good and she was so excited about it. That was like a red flag to a bull for Don.

            I’m interested to know what Nan and Ted have discussed. She clearly knows about Peggy and saw the way Ted was around her at the banquet. It’s one reason why I think things have to come to a head one way or another with Peggy and Ted. After everything that went down with all the different people there is no way they could pull off some discreet affair. It seems like it would have to be all or nothing. Either do a Betty/Henry and start a life together (which would be so so messy ) or move to different firms (or coasts).

          • housefulofboys

            Sorry, but I think a superior’s hand on a young woman’s waist is not casual and not ordinary office protocol. From this woman’s perspective, it is an intimate gesture. If a coworker (male or female) wanted me to step aside in a crowded room I would expect them to simply ask me, or touch me on the shoulder or arm. I’m trying to imagine a circumstance when I would feel comfortable with my boss touching me on the waist, and I simply can’t. Maybe that’s why the writers wrote it this way.

          • Heather

            Totally beg to differ. Touch is proprietary.

          • Aurumgirl

            But he has done some of it in front of his wife. The award night behaviour was pretty obvious, and Nan saw it. Ted had eyes for no one but Peggy. He even sat next to her at the dinner table, back turned to Nan, oblivious to Abe standing over him, and to Nan saying, “You’re in the wrong seat”. In more ways than one. Nan has seen it and she’s aware and she’s even been frank about it.

            The point is he’s unaware of the way he’s acting, when everyone else isn’t. Even when others point it out to him, he can’t help himself. This is why Don is always pointing out to Peggy that he’s not the Mr. Nice Guy he seems to be.

          • MartyBellerMask

            Man, no wonder Nan is depressed. Allegedly.

          • Glammie

            He’s been aware enough to back off at times, but, yes, then he goes right back in.

            And, yep, he ignores his wife. No wonder she looks a bit worn out.

            I’m sure that Peggy thinking he’s wonderful isn’t making her easier to resist.

            I’m inclined to think that Ted is one-part oblivious and two-parts doesn’t-want-to-admit-it-to-himself. I mean he knew enough to know what Don was doing to him in the aspirin meeting.

            In other words, Don’s instincts are right, but he handled it in a way that completely alienated Peggy so it probably won’t do a damn bit of good–quite possibly the opposite.

          • Aurumgirl

            You know, you’re right, Don’s rejection of Mr. Nice is going to drive Peggy right to him emotionally, since Ted is right now shutting her out. It’s like a father with a teenaged daughter who brings home an unsuitable boy friend her father dislikes–he says “that guy’s no good for you”, and the girl just runs after him harder! Bad parenting 101. This reinforces the idea of Peggy as “Don’s other daughter”, and yet another beloved woman he’s alienated.

          • Glammie

            And he humiliated Ted–and we know Ted feels competitive with him. Ted’s pretty much treated like the little boy by his “peers”–Cutler, Don, his wife. Peggy admires him.

            I just put my prediction up for the finale–Ted and Peggy do the deed, while Joan goes after Avon. Which would also mean a switch in focus between Joan and Peggy, which would make for a nice arc.

            Also Don v. Sally, Don v. Peggy–it’s the Generation Gap. Never trust anyone over 30–so Peggy and Don are just on opposite sides.

          • desertwind

            Ted blows hot & cold with Peggy depending on how he’s feeling about himself at the moment.

            I think Ted’s issue with Peggy “touching me” in that meeting was because he thought he’d blown the pitch and wanted someone to blame. Peggy said she didn’t know what he was talking about and I believe her. With all that had happened since The Kiss she’d worked hard to put away any notion of an actual love affair.

            Ted then brought up his kiss/feeling issue because he wanted to rationalize & gain control of his disappointment with how he’d handled the pitch. Still blaming Peggy for his feckup.

            I guess you can say I’ve never really been on the Ted train. He is a nice guy, but he ain’t “strong” and he ain’t “virtuous.”

          • Glammie

            Good points. He’s not malevolent, but he doesn’t take full responsibility for his actions–he’s boyish, basically. His name was on his agency, but it’s clear that he was looking to Gleason for guidance. Don’t know how aware he is of Cutler’s amorality.

            It just makes Don’s maneuver on him all the more interesting–good advice given for bad reasons. I don’t even get the feeling Don dislikes Ted as much as there’s no way he’s going to let him dominate. (Men! No, not all men, but I’ve seen guys do this sort of thing–dick swinging basically and no one swings a dick like Dick Whitman.)

          • Bob Ross

            What I thought was weird was that if Peggy was in love with Ted and not acting on it, any kind of confirmation by others that Ted was in love with her would make an affair way more likely in my experience. If she thought he loved her, she would be more willing to make her feelings known to him.

          • Glammie

            Yeah, we saw him backing away from her with the don’t-touch-my-hand stuff, but in the last two episodes it’s gotten chummier and chummier and people like Pete are mentioning it.

          • Chris

            I am inferring (since it was never covered on the show) Ted and Peggy are operating under the agreement that there will be no affair, therefore Ted has relaxed and doesn’t think Peggy is sending him “signs” by touching his hand etc. but they both have relaxed too much. They have spent a lot of time together recently working on Ocean Spray and have been traveling (with Pete as a chaperone) and working a lot of hours. They have gotten comfortable, too comfortable, especially around others. In their minds everything is probably totally innocent because they had that talk, and they have no idea how others are looking at them.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            Haven’t we gone around and around on the topic of whether they’ve consummated their affair enough? People aren’t going to be swayed from their opinions on this one.

          • Chris

            OK.

          • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

            The way their relationship has played out, I for one have no idea whether they have slept together or not. After Ted ignored her breakup with Abe, I assumed they were done and now the pendulum is has completed gone the other way…and who knows are Don’s meeting deal if it shifts
            again. Mad men is one of the few shows where the viewer isn’t always shown the next step in the following episode. Not sure if I am making sense here.

      • Debbie

        Ted also flipped out at Peggy after she “accidentally” touched his hand during a presentation a few episodes ago. Its almost like he’s saying its ok for him to do it to her but not for Peggy to do it to Ted.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Ted needs control.
          Dammit Peggy. Back off, stop doing this to yourself. Hook up with Stan, just get it out of your system. Make it public knowledge. Ted will be turned off, problem solved.
          And I don’t think it would hurt her career-wise like it would if she slept with her married boss.

          • Glammie

            Yep, I’m not a Pegistan shipper, but that’s a much better match-up than Ted. Namely, he’s not *married.*

          • Chris

            The point is, for right or wrong, Peggy is genuinely in love with Ted. She isn’t just looking for a hookup. She was clearly attracted to Stan and I don’t think it was even Abe that kept her from hooking up with Stan, I think it was how she felt about Ted. I hope Peggy and Ted don’t have an affair because I think it would cheapen their feelings. Part of what Peggy loves about Ted is that he is good and doesn’t just jump into affairs and cheat. I don’t want him to cheat and she to be the catalyst. Plus it’s nice to see some actual romance that isn’t just based on sex. All the relationships on the show seem to start with sex and have little to do with friendship or romance.

          • Glammie

            “Something” by Ralph Waldo Emerson. Peggy doesn’t actually know much about Ted, which indicates infatuation more than love. And he’s married. Decent guys don’t kiss another woman and then blow hot and cold.

            I’m not sure precisely why MW has made sure Peggy has the worst taste ever in men, but Ted, being married and her boss, isn’t really an exception to the rule. If they get involved, he’s not going to leave his wife, but his blowing hot and cold could string Peggy along for years. (Because Peggy tends to be insanely passive in her relationships.)

            Actually, I think, instead of Joan, Dr. Faye needs to return and have a heart-to-heart with Peggy.

          • Chris

            I disagree that she doesn’t know Ted, she has worked side by side with him for two years now. She was his right hand person at CGC as well. She may not know Ralph Waldo Emerson very well but it not the same as not knowing him.

            I don’t know if I believe it even could be an affair strung along like that. Nan isn’t stupid and she even knows about Peggy. Unless she is a Trudy type willing to look the other way that isn’t going to fly (no pun intended). Plus MW made it a point to show Ted as someone who thinks cheating is wrong so my guess is he would leave his wife (which I think would be awful for the family).

            I love Dr. Faye and would be so happy to see her show up but she is almost as bad as Joan when it comes to men. She even compromised her professional principles to help Don and his business and he rewarded her by marrying Megan. I don’t know if she is the one to help.

          • Alice Teeple

            Here’s another adultery parallel no one has really brought up: Henry and Betty. Henry went after Betty while she was 8 months pregnant and initiated an affair with her while she was unhappily married to Don, which led to a fairly happy (albeit vaguely kinky) marriage. Everyone is expecting a Ted/Peggy affair to end badly, but there is always the possibility that it DOES work out between them, and they end up becoming the advertising power couple Don envisioned for Megan and himself. That would be another slap in the face for Don, in the “I’m seeing what could have been” vein.

          • Glammie

            They didn’t have an affair before the divorce. I’d say Henry showed his attraction, but stayed mostly in the lines until Betty showed herself ready to make an exit. He actually *did* avoid her and was extremely conscious of how things looked. Betty didn’t exit until she found out about Dick Whitman and Henry made it clear he’d marry her. And it was subtle enough that Don picked up nothing.

            But Ted isn’t, as far as we know, in a disastrous marriage.

          • Chris

            Henry kissed Betty same as Ted did to Peggy, only far more passionately and more than once im pretty sure. Betty had an infant with her when she went for that divorce which would have been seen as far more scandalous. Don didn’t know anything because he didn’t care and had no clue what was going on with Betty. Roger knew, so presumably enough people knew that it got to him.

          • Glammie

            Yep he kissed after that meeting, but then made sure she initiated contact–he didn’t come to that meeting she held. He kept up the deniability–good politico that he is. They met at out of the way places.

            And, yes, Don cared once he knew–for control issues if nothing else. But Betty’s as good at being devious as Don is. Henry will never know that she slept with Don at sleep-away camp.

            Scandal’s not the point. Don and Betty had a marriage where both were miserable. Ted doesn’t have, from what we see, a miserable marriage and he has young kids. Part of what makes Don not a nice guy is that his infidelities trashed his marriage.

          • Aurumgirl

            Ted’s are about to, too. There is a real delineation between Ted and Henry: Henry decided on Betty instantly and he was always sincere about the relationship he wanted to have with her. He wasn’t interested in tawdry sex; he wasn’t interested in having an affair with her. He wanted to be with her legitimately, and he did everything possible to make it happen, including giving Betty all the time she needed to make a decision in his favour, as well. No gaslighting, no moving forward/stepping back, no “deciding” when they’d be together and when they’d not be together. He simply said, when you decide you want me too, I’ll be here.

            Ted is the opposite of that: he’s playing with Peggy, plain and simple; and he’s playing with the firm as well. Hot and cold with both of them, and forgetful of Nan and his boys, too.

          • Glammie

            Good summary of Henry v. Ted’s behavior–lots of warning signs that an affair with Ted will not well for Peggy. In fact, it’s so bad, I’d say that the affair’s inevitable. Too many dramatic possibilities for MW to resist.

          • housefulofboys

            Yeah, I remember thinking that Henry was really hot back then (well, he still is a silver fox!), just because he DID let Betty know how he felt but kept completely controlled and reserved until she made up her own mind to take it further. Sorry, but that’s what a real man does…

          • Chris

            I disagree about the controlled and reserved bit. Putting your hands on a complete strangers stomach is far more out there than someone you know very well touching your waist. Henry was passionately kissing a married woman with three children and encouraging her to leave her husband. It all ended well but by the rationale that is being used on Ted, Henry isn’t a “good man” either then.

          • quitasarah

            Unfortunately, even today, complete strangers feel it’s perfectly acceptable to touch a pregnant woman’s stomach, usually without asking. This would not have been considered intimate touching. The kiss on the other hand…

          • housefulofboys

            Yeah, pregnant bellies are public property. I had a total stranger come up to me in the grocery store store one time, but her hand on my belly and tell me how huge I was. Please!

          • Chris

            Men do that? I have never seen a man approach a pregnant woman and do that. Other women I believe. And to do it in the 1960s at a formal house party like that and say “I wish you were waiting for me” was borderline creepy. I was happily surprised at how nice Henry turned out to be.

          • Glammie

            Yes–I was at an awards dinner and a gay director I knew did it to me. And no, he didn’t ask if he could. Which isn’t to say Henry doesn’t have a creep factor–he does.

          • Tracy M

            Yes, men do that. Women too. All the time. In my experience (3 babies) it’s often older women and men- and they don’t mean anything threatening by it, but it’s definitely common enough that most pregnant women have experienced it.

          • Aurumgirl

            Oh yes they do do that. And they did it far more frequently back then, when women weren’t speaking out about it. People still think they can reach out and touch a woman’s pregnant belly, even in public.

          • Chris

            That’s just creepy. I will bow to the experts experiences in these matters then, and accept it as fact but it seems really weird to me.

          • formerlyAnon

            Men do that.
            Women as well.

          • Chris

            I cannot believe that strange men in this day and age (I don’t mean friends) come up and touch pregnant women’s stomachs as they please. Women are more touchy with other women, especially older women but we are talking specifically about men touching women.

          • quitasarah

            Might happen more with women than men, but it definitely happens with men too. Gross!

          • Glammie

            He’s not. He’s more responsible than Don, but he’s not “good”. We see few such men–Ken Cosgrove seems to be the exception and he seems to have become a bit brittle and jaded by his time in the ad biz. Being an ad guy has taken an obvious and bloody toll on him.

            And as quitasarah points out–if you’re pregnant people will touch your stomach. There’s some damn free pass then. And, of course, the touch *did* mean something.

            And Henry kissed Betty–after she initiated contact and asked for his help–but he would have stopped there if she’d wanted it too and avoided her.

          • Chris

            I’d argue Ken isn’t an angel either, chasing Allison across the room and pulling her dress up in font of everyone to look at her panties! And he is the one that knew where to get the prostitutes one time right? But he does appear to be faithful to Cynthia.

            There is almost no one I can think of on Mad Men who is absolutely good and hasn’t done anything immoral or wrong. Everyone has their good and bad points but I do feel MW has gone out of his way to show Ted as a pretty good guy, not perfect but compared to the group at SC, good.

          • Glammie

            Okay, I’d say Ken matured where the others didn’t and outgrew his earlier shenanigans. And, of course, no one’s an angel on Mad Men–except Anna, which is probably why they killed her off.

            By the same token, no one’s pure evil. Though I think the juror’s out on Cutler.

          • Chris

            Oh something has to be up with Cutler but I’m not sure what it is. I’m thinking this finale is going to be a roller-coaster. If MW leaves all these loose ends dangling I will be very disappointed.

          • Glammie

            My guess for the finale is that Ted and Peggy do get together with no ifs, ands, and doubts. Cutler may (though this may be next season) do something to undercut the SC side of things. This time, Ted just humiliated by Don, won’t protest. We won’t see much of Sally, Betty and all–I think that part of the story was mostly finished last week, though I suppose they could bring in the whacked-out ’68 elections through Betty and co. I think the Avon pitch will come up–may even be the center of the episode. Maybe Chevy will implode at the same time, but that could be next year as well–since it seems to be the Vega and the Vega was a flop.

            Let’s see, I think something will happen with Megan’s job–she’ll be fired with her characters being killed–or she’ll sleep with Arlene to save her part. Something that will undermine the Draper marriage without it actually falling apart. I suppose pregnancy’s another possibility, but I think the story went there already.

            Oh, we may see Bob Benson do something smooth at a client meeting.

            And of all these things, I’m only going to lay a bet on Avon. I think Joanie will pull it off–and, in a sense, we’ll see Peggy and Joan switch places–Peggy will have the married-man affair and Joan will focus on her career.

            And what color is Joan wearing this episode–hot pink lipstick. Hello, Avon calling.

            Of course, knowing Weiner, he’ll throw a real ricochet into all of this–kill off Bert or something.

          • Aurumgirl

            I think MW has gone out of his way to contrast Ted’s approach with Peggy as one based on encouragement and idealism where Don would have been critical and demanding (and at this point in her professional life, Peggy will flourish under encouragement far more than she will under critique). But he’s also gone out of his way to portray Ted as just as dangerous as Don. It’s just being done more subtly. When Don says Ted’s not the guy Peggy thinks he is, he’s right, and we can all see it, too. Ted’s the boyish, idealistic, youthful, and colourful version of Don, really. They are equally lacking in self-awareness, but in different ways; and both are using Peggy as a pawn in their rivalry, Ted just doesn’t know he is. Which makes him no less guilty.

          • Alice Teeple

            I’m not saying that Betty and Henry are an exact parallel, but they definitely pushed the boundaries of appropriate behavior before she left Don. It was definitely weird that her being pregnant with Gene didn’t fend Henry’s advances off in the least. Henry made himself available and devoted to Betty, which gave her the impetus to leave Don. With Ted and Peggy, it’s a similar “grass is greener on the other side” situation, but handled much differently. We assume Ted and Nan have had a solid marriage, but we don’t know enough about them to assess anything other than probably mutual boredom. Maybe no drama or hatred between them is even necessary. I honestly have no idea where this train’s headed, but it really could go either way and make a compelling story.

          • Glammie

            No question that Henry has a weird streak, but then Betty’s weird, so maybe that’s what she has to have. And, yes, the story could go either way.

            We know that Ted’s a workaholic and that his wife is pretty patient and direct when she talks to him. That alone, makes her a bit different from Betty. My observation from life is that once kids are involved, it takes a lot more to break up a marriage.

          • Bob Ross

            Roger had a solid marriage too, until Jane came along. He cheated, and I’m sure she knew, but he never blew it up until Jane. But if Jane hit on me, I would shove someone out the window for her..lol It’s like Angelina Jolie, as a women, I assume you merely hope she is not interested in your man, because if she is, your toast.

          • Chris

            I wouldn’t call Roger’s marriage solid. He was carrying on an affair with Joan for years, supplemented, it seems, with hookers too at times. Mona put up with it because of the family and because after all those years she liked being Mrs. Sterling. Roger, the hypocrite, doesn’t even like Mona to have a boyfriend though, even after divorcing her how many years ago?

          • Aurumgirl

            Henry wasn’t Betty’s impetus, he was Betty’s escape hatch. She could leave Don and not have to worry about how she would support 3 children. The impetus she needed to leave Don was found in that box in the drawer.

          • Chris

            Great minds! I just referenced Henry and Betty above! Isn’t that scenario what happened in real life with the woman Peggy is based on partly?

          • Alice Teeple

            You mean Myra Janco? Yeah, similar. I think Draper Daniels had already left his first wife by the time he started going after Myra, but it’s a little unclear. And he and Myra had worked together a few years before he proposed out of the blue and ended up persuading her to leave her fiance. Daniels was described as an amiable prankster and ruthless businessman. I don’t know the whole story, but the Daniels 2.0 pair ended up becoming very powerful in advertising, and the first Mrs. Daniels ended up having a career of her own.

          • Orange Girl

            I thought it was interesting that Megan even made the comparison to her own relationship with Don. Foreshadowing?

          • Glammie

            Faye, I expect, has learned from her mistakes. She knew the stats about the Dons of this world and ignored them. She could give Pegs a good talking-to.

            Most people believe adultery is wrong. A lot of them commit it anyway. It’s amazing what people will rationalize. So, yes, I can see Ted having an affair, feeling guilty, stopping, rationalizing again and Peggy going on and on the way she has. He’s already started to do this.

            And Nan probably *would* put up with a certain amount to keep her family together. Wouldn’t help the marriage though.

            Peggy idealizes–and that means she doesn’t always see men clearly. Hell, she lived with Abe and never really got why the relationship was never going to work. Ted’s been nice to her and doesn’t treat her like an ex-secretary. Then he shows a romantic interest in her. And, there, bingo Peggy’s pretty much in love without knowing the ins and outs of him. No sign at all that she’s seeing him clearly–i.e. married men shouldn’t kiss their subordinates. Or that her job could be put at risk by all of this.

          • Chris

            Peggy already offered to leave and I disagree that she doesn’t know the professional risks. She is an experienced person with a large portfolio and award nominations to her name. She wouldn’t find it difficult to get a job somewhere else if she had to. She isn’t in Joan’s position.

            Neither she nor Abe were objective about their relationship and as Abe was the one with the professional misgivings (that didn’t keep him from probably living off Peggy to a degree) he was either the one who saw far less clearly or was just manipulative, talking about their future and kids harboring that kind of resentment. He was really horrible -telling her he loved her and talking about their future and getting her to buy that dump and then saying all that really hateful stuff to her.

            Ted and Nan have already gone on retreat and had some real problems over things like too much work and missing dinner so I didn’t get the impression at all she was going to put up with an affair, especially since she is already clued in but we will see.

          • Glammie

            Ted’s wife has two young sons and a good lifestyle. She won’t bolt at the first affair, she’s got too much invested in the marriage right now. The retreat and the discussions indicate that she keeps tabs on her marriage.

            Peggy can get another job, but not necessarily at the same level–copy chief at a top agency. Copywriter, yes. She’s got some contacts, not tons. So it’s a risk.

          • formerlyAnon

            Plus, Ted and his wife are apparently at least moderately practicing members of a church that simply Does. Not. Recognize. Divorce. It’s not merely frowned upon, it simply doesn’t exist in doctrine. Separations, yes and in extreme cases annulments. Not divorces. I don’t know how divorce rates among practicing Catholics stack up to the general church-going population today, but they did lag behind the norm as divorce became more common from the ’50s to the ’70s.

          • 3hares

            Ted and his wife aren’t Catholic. We don’t know what type of Christian they are, I don’t think, but definitely not Catholic.

          • formerlyAnon

            Well, then that argument about how unlikely he is to leave his wife, or she to dump him, is entirely wrong! (Thanks for correcting me.)

          • formerlyAnon

            wrong place

          • FloridaLlamaLover

            Oh, there are a LOT of divorced Catholics at our church and church school. On one field trip, I drove, and out of six boys in the car, my son was the only kid with two married parents. Technically, the church does recognize the legal divorce as the end of a couple’s civil union, but to remarry in a Catholic ceremony, either one of the former spouses has to have died or seek an annulment.Annulments are difficult to achieve, but are possible.

          • Bob Ross

            I think Peggy, despite everyone on here loving her, as a character is totally ripe to to be the other woman. She is idealizing him too much and is one of those women who will say he told me his marriage was bad..yada, yada, yada. Its either that type or the Joan mercenary type who sleep with married men in my experience. She knew what Ted was doing touching her, she liked it, which is why she gave Don so much guff when he called out Ted about it. If she has not slept with Ted, she was about to, for sure.

          • Glammie

            Yep. Peggy has always had this oddly naive streak. She’s very bright, but at the same time she doesn’t pick up things about people. Which is part of the reason she can forge ahead the way she does. She’s really the only woman on the show who could be pregnant for nine months and not notice. She doesn’t really look inward much more than Don does.

            I also think Peggy’s self-esteem as a woman is poor. On some level, she doesn’t seem to think she deserves or can get a man who will fully commit to her who’s also attractive and successful. She’s not glamorous the way Betty, Joan and Megan are. Peggy hasn’t been able to make her male colleagues dream–so Ted’s romantic approach seems to dazzle her. Not only does she see nothing wrong with him, she doesn’t even want to consider the possibility that there might be. Certainly, the last person from whom she wants to hear about it is Don.

          • Chris

            Say what you like about Peggy she has never been shown to be mercenary. She could have had Pete taking care of her and the child for life. Even when she told him, she basically absolved him of all moral responsibility saying it was her choice. If Peggy was interested in trading sex for money or power she hardly would have tied herself to Abe for so long. We do know Peggy will sleep with a married man if she loves him, she did it with Pete. I just really hope she won’t this time.

          • housefulofboys

            This. Sure she probably knows his favorite color and what he eats for breakfast, and they have worked closely together for the past year, but their giddy/giggly demeanor impresses me as naive and superficial. They both want so much to see the best in each other – there is real affection there – but there is no indication that they have a soul-felt connection, at least not yet. For instance, I can imagine Peggy sharing tidbits of her catholic upbringing with jokes and eye-rolls about here mom and sister and the priest (from season 2?), but I bet anything that she hasn’t told him about her pregnancy, or the fact that playgrounds make her sad.

          • Chris

            I don’t think we have any idea what Peggy and Ted know about each other for sure or what they have discussed that isn’t shown. They surely know each other as well if not better than other married couples on the show (not that that is necessarily saying much). I’m sure Peggy hasn’t mentioned her child because so far as we know Pete, the father, is the only one she has ever told. Everyone else who knew was family or Don -because he made it his business to push beyond the story the family was handing out and go in person. Peggy didn’t tell him either. Peggy took Don’s advice to move forward as not looking back but based on what she told Stan she has dealt with her loss in some way. How her relationship with Ted evolves will be interesting to see.

          • Glammie

            Again–”Something” by Ralph Waldo Emerson and Ted in his turtleneck tells us that there’s not a lot of depth to Peggy’s perception of Ted.

            Don’s had a couple of lines where he’s said to Peggy–you don’t know him and he doesn’t know you. Which isn’t to say that Peggy and Ted couldn’t have more in common if they knew–but we haven’t seen an intimate emotional moment between them because there hasn’t been one. In fact, he was pretty damn cold when she told him she’d broken up with her boyfriend.

          • Glammie

            Yep. If he weren’t married, they might have real potential as a couple. He does admire her and it’s nice to see Peggy treated that way, but he is married and he’s not being careful.

            Neither of them was thinking about the client when working on the St. Joseph’s commercial and they both should have been..

          • formerlyAnon

            You describe my frustration with Peggy’s love life over the years very well. Basically, I think it’s just not the most important area of her life – so she lets herself fall into these situations and if it’s more-or-less working (that is, is not a complete and total disaster in the moment), seems happy to let things ride.

            She seems to be more enthused about Ted than average – maybe because of the admired work mentor angle? – but he’s possibly worse for her than anyone we’ve yet seen. This is unlikely to end pretty and Peggy will bear the brunt of the fallout.

          • MartyBellerMask

            I’m not shipping for Peggy and Stan either. I know she is in love with Ted. But she can’t have him and it is going to mess up her career and her psyche. (It already is.)
            She needs to close the door on the idea of being with Ted, and if rebound sex with another guy will lower her value in Ted’s eyes, then that’s what she needs. Plus, sleeping with Stan is like a win-win. I only suggest Stan because he’s visible (to Ted and everyone in the office), and she trusts him.

          • Chris

            I think Peggy and Stan could be great, but not now. He’s come a long way from the uber masculine jerky guy he started as to Ginsberg’s “mother hen” who openly admires Peggy’s margarine knowledge. She needs to resolve her Ted feelings and jumping in with Stan probably wouldn’t do it.

          • Heather

            I’m not sure I agree… what I see is infatuation, barely contained and with really poor boundaries, on both sides. The kind of thing that two drowning, flailing people are likely to fall into.

          • Chris

            Well Ted and all the people who observed them have very specifically used the word love which is not a word we see used on Mad Men a great deal. Ted is a grown man -I’m pretty sure he knows what his feelings are. No one said crush, infatuation or lust. I thought it was pretty singular. Don got engaged to Megan and I don’t know if he used the word. Did Betty and Henry? Peggy and Pete had an affair and it was never said, until by Pete over a year later. He fell in love after the affair. TLO have used it to to describe Peggy’s feelings for Pete at the time. I feel confident in saying they feel they are in love although I don’t know if Peggy has articulated it like that.

          • Bob Ross

            I think its almost a forgone conclusion if they both like each other and are starting to see each other outside the office (movies), the sex is going to be there soon. I agree with you Peggy likes Ted for being “good”, but many women have fallen into affairs with married men precisely because they get fooled by the good guy, good father he is so great thing. When a guy is single and acting like that, women are on their guard and judge them by whether to date them, and make them wait like a normal courtship. When the guy is married, its oh he is such a good guy, I like him, then they go out and have drinks. Its “innocent” then the touching starts like here then boom, they are sleeping with a married guy.

        • Aurumgirl

          Bingo. He wants to have the decision making power in that relationship, Peggy isn’t aware of that. And that’s going to hurt when she realizes it.

    • formerlyAnon

      I don’t think they’re there yet for 2 reasons:
      1) I think we’d have to see a lot more Ted angst in conjunction with that step, and
      2) I think they’d be much more self-consciously policing their public reactions to each other if they’d stepped over that line.

  • rage_on_the_page

    So maybe it’s all pointing to Megan getting pregnant, not dying? Rosemary’s Baby, Sharon Tate…

    • Joan Arkham

      Hmm. Neither of those pregnancies turned out so well though…

      • rage_on_the_page

        Not much about their life together forecasts this one going well, either!

      • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

        That may be the point. ;)

      • MartyBellerMask

        Nor Megan’s first.

    • MK03

      God, I hope not. The last thing Don needs is yet another kid to ruin.

      • Heather

        Or support!

  • mlle

    Sally’s blue coat on the way and to Miss Porter’s struck me as very Betty – the blues are different, but it’s reminiscent of the sad marriage coat (which would tie in to Sally’s disappointment with Don in this episode).

    • KayeBlue

      Oooh, that’s right-on.

    • imspinningaround

      The “My people are Nordic coat”?? Ooooooh, good catch!

      • mlle

        Thank you! And, yep, that’s the one. I went back and looked at pictures – though Sally’s is more late 60s, with its oversized buttons, I think the colour family, the wide lapels and the general preppiness are why I linked them. This episode seemed to suggest that she’d take out her frustration with her father by becoming her mother.

    • http://angrynerdgirl.net/ Jessi03

      That’s what I thought when I saw it. But then, I also saw Don’s bathrobe as a “sad marriage” robe.

  • ach0611

    Janie Bryant should pay you to write these reviews. She’s brilliant but you make her work shine even brighter by so diligently discussing everything she does in these episodes. Even though I’ve read every Mad Style post I’m ALWAYS surprised by the details you pick up on in each episode. “Note that Rolo is wearing a black turtleneck, just like Don, the man Sally really wants to punish. Stand-ins within stand-ins in this story.” Great.

    • housefulofboys

      I know! I feel like I’m pretty observant, but I face-slap myself every week when I read these. It’s all so clear (when I have it explained to me!)

    • quitasarah

      The Rolo/Don comparison is the only thing that convinced me that Rolo was a stand-in for Don in Sally’s eyes. In my comments on Monday I thought he was simply a creep (which he undoubtably is…)

    • Kwei-lin Lum

      And the reviews are extremely intelligent while written in language that is easily understandable. Excellent communication by Tom and Lorenzo!

    • TritoneTelephone

      Seriously! I hope someone at AMC is paying you guys, if not Janie Bryant herself. Then again, I’d hate to lose the sassy, critical edge you’re currently free to take on. The point is, I would not have been nearly as interested in this show if I didn’t have you to explain it to me (especially in the earlier seasons)!!

  • bxbourgie

    Brilliant as always. I noticed upon first watch that Ted and Peggy were in similar shades in their scenes together. At the theater, pitching the aspirin ad and again in the meeting with the St. Joseph’s people. They’re in an emotional affair for sure, and I think Ted probably thinks that as long as he doesn’t cross that physical boundary, technically he’s doing nothing wrong. Peggy loves him, but knows he won’t cheat, so she’s just happy that they’re playing nice together in the office and she can flirt with him and still feel he’s a good man.

    • imspinningaround

      I already upvoted this, but why should I bother writing my own comment when someone else sums up my thoughts so exactly? :)

    • Chris

      Yes that’s what I wrote too- but I think something is happening next episode. Peggy is wearing her powder blue “Ted kissed me” dress and Ted is back in a turtleneck almost the same color as her dress and a green jacket. I suspect there will be more kissing.

      • bxbourgie

        Are you talking about the promo that came on at the end of this last episode? It was just scenes from older episodes, nothing new unfortunately. Not that those promos are helpful anyway, but they didn’t even give us one for the finale episode.

        • mlle

          When I saw that thing, I burst out laughing because it was the opposite of a promo. I know Weiner likes to be oblique (last week’s dramatic shot of Megan rubbing her face turned out to be… part of waking up and getting out of bed), but I’ve already watched this season, and I know what happened.

        • Chris

          No it’s based on the interviews. MW did the same thing last year too, no promos for the final episode.

        • Alice Teeple

          I think what Chris means is that the promo for the finale might be reflecting talking points like the “last week on Mad Men” blips before the show airs.

          • Chris

            No I mean the interviews in the AMC inside episode 612 or whatever ones they are on. They are always done after the episode is shot when they are filming a subsequent episode. The clothes must be from the last episode that hasn’t aired yet. Peggy is wearing the blue dress Ted kissed her in and Ted’s turtleneck matches the blue almost exactly and he has paired it with a green jacket. I’m just surmising but it seems like it is a call back to the outfits when he kissed her. Also in a different interview Kevin Rahm said something about Peggy and Ted’s “initial kiss” which made me think he slipped up and gave something away, because if you have an initial kiss that means there is a subsequent one.

          • Alice Teeple

            OHH!! That makes more sense! You’re right. Come to think of it, I was wondering why we hadn’t seen Megan in that awesome Priscilla Presley dress, or Ted in his green turtleneck on the show yet. That means Joan is in that really cute purple number (that I want) in the last episode! And you’re right, Rahm’s wording is pretty interesting.

          • Chris

            Yes Joan is in the purple. It was the partners picture color from the first episode. I hope this means good things professionally for her like Avon! I’m the wannabe Nancy Drew of Mad Men.

      • OrigamiRose

        I think all the scenes shown in the preview for the finale are from episodes 1-12. Nothing from episode 13 is revealed.

        • Chris

          No from the interviews discussing the episode. They are always done after the episode is shot. It’s how I knew Peggy would have the red Chanel suit on in the final episode last season. That is what she and Ted are wearing in the interviews for the past two recaps. She has not reworn that dress and he hasn’t worn that outfit yet. It has to be from the last episode.

          • OrigamiRose

            Ah okay, sorry – just talking about two different video sets. You have a good eagle eye then!

          • Chris

            No worries! I am always hunting for clothes clues. Even just to see if something new will be shown.

  • Sobaika

    “What if the Brady girls were rich east coast bitches?” – I need this Bizarro version of the Bradys in my life.

    I loved the final scene – I don’t think a whole lot of January Jones’ acting skills, but she is perfectly cast as Betty and delivers consistently. The quick flash of emotions across her face in that perfectly constructed scene was very well done.

    • rechercher

      Speaking of teenage girl rooms, I would love to see some stills of the wall opposite the bed in Sally’s room at the apartment. They panned across her room as she walked toward the door to confront Don in 6-10, but the set decorations were hard to make out (I tried freeze-framing). I wonder if Megan will redecorate if Sally is away at school…

  • Anne

    The seats in the movie theater are what used to be Peggy’s power color! What does it meeeeeeean?

    • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

      What I’ve noticed about Peggy’s power color is that she hasn’t worn it very much this season.

      • quitasarah

        TLo addressed this in the recap. Mustard was her mid-century career color (maybe her pre-leaving SDCP color?), but now it seems to be blue or blue/green. She wore the same dress to meet with St. Josephs as she did in the beginning of the season with the headphones folks.

        • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

          I don’t really blue or blue/green are actually power colors for her, though. She’s been wearing them a lot, but they aren’t necessarily associated with success. Mostly, they’re just associated with Ted.

          • quitasarah

            Ok, I’m corrected, they called it her “dealing with a difficult client” outfit. But they did make the point that she’s moved on from her mid-century power color, but can’t recall if it’s in this recap…

          • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

            I’m pretty sure you’re correct they’ve advanced that idea, but mostly, I think she’s not in her power color because she hasn’t been in a power situation all season.

    • Angela Langdale

      and the carpet and walls are the cranberry! two juices fighting again…

      • Anne

        Peggy has juice experience now.

    • TheDivineMissAnn

      I noticed that too! I also noted (in the screen cap) that Megan retrieving her purse from the aisle seat. To me that is strange because it leaves your purse vulnerable to theft, and NYC during that period was crime ridden. Was that included to show her naivete perhaps?

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QFW22QV426LUOEPGASPZJWJMDE MishaFoomin

        I saw her purse in the aisle seat too but was not thinking of that time period, but of now! “What stupid idiot puts their purse in an aisle seat?? It should be away from there and by Don.” Jeez.

    • MK03

      That mustard yellow is starting to invade interior design.

  • bxbourgie

    Peggy loves those fussy bow dresses. You guys pointed out the one in the conference room this episode, the purple one, and the light blue one minus the bow, but I just noticed she’s wearing one in the movie theater as well. Love her looks this season, so much more mature than those hideous school girl plaids she used to wear.

    • Aurumgirl

      In this episode, the dress Peggy’s wearing in that ad scene with Don and Joan actually links her up with Sally–her solid colour princess line dress with plain pussy bow is the positive/negative of Sally’s plaid dress with solid coloured pussy bow. They’re both Don’s “daughters”, after all.

    • TheDivineMissAnn

      Take away the odd side pockets on that beige colored dress and I would wear it in a heartbeat.

      • teensmom99

        My mother had so many versions of the Peggy fussy-bow dress. They looked contemporary without being crazy.

  • Vanessa

    Red used to be Joan’s seduction color–thus also a way to deal with difficult clients…

  • KayeBlue

    I think puberty is going to be kind to Marten Weiner- he may get “Neville Longbottom Syndrome” and turn out all right after all!

    I love that 70′s bedroom. It’s not terribly different from my late-90′s early-teen bedroom.

    I think T. Lo’s analysis of Sally’s statement re: Soon To Be Rapist Rollo is correct. I just didn’t want to believe that Weiner & Co would sink so low to go to the “girl makes a false rape accusation” plot device. Rape victims are so infrequently believed, but the media continues to portray rape accusations as something women use to manipulate men, which is extremely misogynistic. I’ve worked with rape crisis counseling for years… seen friends and family survive sexual assault… and so many victims suffer so much because people believe they’re “just making it up”.

    • Sagecreek

      Glen is growing out of his creepiness, isn’t he? So glad to see it!

      • AudreysMom

        hmmm maybe. I cringed at that jacket with all the ‘stop the war’ buttons. I knew plenty of teenagers who thought they were jumping on the bandwagon by covering their jackets, backpacks and purses with anti-war buttons but didn’t have a clue what was really going on, or did anything more. This not only was very fitting for a kid like Glen but was a great bit of Janie doing her homework.

        • decormaven

          And props to TLo for the screencap. I wanted a closer look at those buttons- all collectibles.

      • urbantravels

        Glen really is becoming a bit of a looker. He’s grown, got some bone structure in his face, lost most of the doughiness, and definitely projects more confidence now, rather than that desperate self-consciousness that made him seem creepy. I wonder in what other ways he’s changed.

    • sugarkane105

      I thought the same thing about the girls’ bedroom! It’s amazing how all those florals, peace signs, and bold colors came back in the late 90′s. I definitely had a lot of the same decor going on.

      • Glammie

        Those damn daisies were *everywhere*. My sleeping bag (perfect for slumber parties, not so much camping) had daisies all over it. Flower power!

        • Kwei-lin Lum

          They’re still around, or were around very recently in stores. Big revival 10-15 years ago has made them classic.

          • Spicytomato1

            Yes but nothing compares to the original versions. I love everything in the dorm room, such nostalgia. My mom has gotten numerous earfuls over the years from me berating her for not being a pack rat and hanging onto all of that stuff! Not to mention the furniture and the fashions, too.

        • something

          We had the harvest gold and avocado green stick on rubber daisies in our early 1970s bath tub. We thought they were very cool!

          • Glammie

            We had rubber daisies too. Yellow, I think, because the bathroom was yellow. It seemed like everybody had them.

      • ybbed

        Boy my first comment sure wound up in the wrong spot, but what I loved about those rooms were all the wool crewel embroidery pictures on the walls, they were quite the popular craft back then, and then eventually wound up all over jeans and other clothing.

    • quitasarah

      Even if I now buy the Sally-punishing-Rolo-because-she-can’t-punish-Don hypothesis based on the costume analysis, I think her “he tried to force me” is still ambiguous enough that we don’t need to take as she was falsely crying rape. He DID try to force her, to talk/shame her into doing whatever it is he wanted to do. I still believe that her smile while Glen was pummeling Rolo to be at least partially because, unlike Don, she has a man in her life who will protect her and has her back. And because creepy Rolo was getting what he deserved.

      • 3hares

        Rolo himself often gets left out of these discussions of the part where Glen comes out of the room. Rolo isn’t just sitting quietly or denying that he forced Sally. He does a better job of painting himself as a predator than Sally does with her line about his forcing her. He says she’s lying, but specifically he calls her a “lying little tease”–telling Glen that Sally intentionally teased him into hitting on her and then denied him. Then he says Glen just wanted the good looking girl. I think that convinces Glen to hit him as much as anything Sally says. He pretty much tells Glen that yes, he’s entitled to whatever he wants with Sally or any other girl he might have found there just for showing up.

      • Aurumgirl

        I wholeheartedly agree.

    • something

      Yes. And why would women make it up? So they can be treated like whores by the police, the courts, the media, and sometimes their family, friends, and community? It doesn’t make any sense because it’s not true. I’m not saying false accusations never happen but they are very rare. What is common is being raped and not reporting it. Women see how those who come forward are treated and decide pressing charges isn’t worth it. It makes about as much sense to pretend to raped as it does to pretend to be gay.

    • Jose Bejarano

      I met Marten, Matthew and the twenty other Weiner men the other day. I have never met children more polite in my entire life. Mr. Weiner has done a stand up job raising his fifty sons.

  • Vanessa

    “her Manolo ensembles were so hilarious; because they were so over-the-top they bordered on inappropriate.”

    He was dressing her like a Barbie doll, wasn’t he? And she finally was the one to wear the iconic Jackie O pink suit and pillbox hat (last episode).

    • MartyBellerMask

      I miss Manolo already. I hope we see him again.

      But it begs the question: Was he *really* a nurse? I want to think yes, but at this point? And does it really matter anyway?

      • jen_wang

        I kind of assumed that he was like Bob, someone with fake credentials but lots of charm.

  • czarina

    And, of course, Sally is no longer wearing the necklace with her initials that Don gave to her as a Christmas present when Betty started divorce proceedings.

    • Sagecreek

      Awwww. I did not catch that.

    • Elena Sophoula

      nice catch! i meant to look out for that. thanks!

  • Vanessa

    I loved Clara’s line about Pete’s gun, “You’ll never shoot anything but a squirrel with that”. It gave me a totally different perspective on her.

    • Frank_821

      Note despite how petulant he can be, pete seems to really like and value Clara

    • Chris

      Clara is an excellent secretary and must have the patience of Job to deal with Pete. He used the same line on her this season he used to his secretary back in season one “You are tied to me, what happens to me happens to you.”

      • MartyBellerMask

        Was it Hildy? Hildy wasn’t a very good secretary.

        • MK03

          She wasn’t? I seem to remember she was at least competent. I mean, she was no Lois…

          • MartyBellerMask

            LOL! No, she was no Lois. :) But she didn’t like Pete very much and didn’t seem to have his interests at the top of her priority list.

        • Chris

          Thanks! That’s it. Yes she wasn’t very good. He asked her to to let him know when Roger and Don were done meeting and she very snidely said something like “Oh OK I’ll just sit here and do nothing but stare at his door.”

    • AudreysMom

      kind of OT, but the actress who plays Clara has the most incredibly long neck. Janie’s selection of the Edwardian collar was perfect for the time and Clara was just the character to wear it. Notice still how you can see part of her neck peeking out. Those collars on most of us back then brushed our jawlines.

      • Alice Teeple

        I think she is striking in a very 60s way! She has an unusual beauty to her that is definitely not modern, but very post-British Invasion. I love how Janie is dressing her. As someone with a long neck herself, I appreciate a good lacy jabot collar. Actually, for that matter….I hope Ted’s back in a turtleneck soon. I like those, too.

    • MartyBellerMask

      I loved that little bit of insight. I think that’s the most we’ve ever learned about her since… ever?

    • NoveltyRocker

      Reminds us Pete ain’t gonna suicide by bb gun.

  • Sarah

    Hate to be that guy but I thought the new deal was with Sunkist (which would make Don drinking Tropicana all the more ironic.)

    • golden_valley

      Back then Sunkist was a California brand while Tropicana was a Florida brand. The orange growers divided up the country informally so Tropicana was probably more available in New York markets. I remember that bottle well. It was heavy.

      • Sarah

        I like it when accurate tidbits like that serve the narrative!

      • bxbourgie

        They REALLY did their research didn’t they? Wow.

      • Alice Teeple

        You’re right! Even when I was a kid in the early 80s, my family in Philly were solid Tropicana drinkers, because that was the brand they’d always known. By then trucking had made food transportation easier of course, but your assessment makes so much sense. (This is also an interesting tie-in to Roger’s daughter talking about refrigerated trucks earlier in the season.)

      • DeniseSchipani

        I had all but forgotten those bottles! I’m not even that old (47) but how easy is it to forget that EVERYTHING liquid was in glass, not plastic?

        • MartyBellerMask

          When did The Graduate come out? PLASTICS!

          • housefulofboys

            1967
            ETA: the year The Graduate came out.

          • Lanus

            <—Born in 69. Name not a coincidence. (LOL, I forgot what ID I had logged in with — my name is Elaine.)

        • MK03

          I wish we could go back to doing that. After all, glass doesn’t leach horrible chemicals into everything…

        • Spicytomato1

          I’m about the same age and I still have such vivid memories of the 8-packs of returnable Pepsi bottles that my mom kept by the back door. Too bad we can’t put the plastic bottle genie back into the bottle, so to speak.

  • imspinningaround

    Re: Pete’s acquiescence at the end

    Somebody on /r/madmen pointed out that 20 years in the future, Bob and Pete will be Smithers and Mr. Burns, and the more I think about it the more accurate the comparison is.

    • OrigamiRose

      Now I have this image of Bob booting up a computer with a Pete Campbell screensaver welcoming him with, “Hello Bob. I’d like to. Turn. You. On.”

      • Eric Stott

        Pete may see the advantages of an assistant who doesn’t look at him with disgust.

        • OrigamiRose

          Clara doesn’t seem to look at him with disgust, except perhaps for his lack of knowledge about hunting rifles :)

          • SFree

            But Clara is not an assistant.

          • OrigamiRose

            Yes she is – she’s Pete’s secretary (executive assistant in contemporary terms).

          • SFree

            In contemporary terms, but not in 1968. The secretaries are not treated as assistants. More like servants/typists and someone to cover for the boss.

          • OrigamiRose

            Okay but maybe we are getting off on a semantics tangent in relation to a Simpsons parallel. It wasn’t meant to get contemporary terms vs. 1968. Also, I would suggest that adjusting her boss’ tie suggests that Pete sees her as more than a typist.

          • SFree

            That’s the servant part of her job. Although I do think they have a nuanced relationship, I don’t think he’d be happy if she 1) called herself his assistant or 2) acted too uppity. That’s all I’m trying to say. The proof is that Peggy is the ONLY person who has ever been elevated from the secretarial pool. Except Joanie, of course, but that’s a very different situation.

          • OrigamiRose

            Well, as we already said, the term “assistant” is a contemporary one and I would not expect her to use it. However, the reason – well one of the reasons – the term came into vogue was because it more truly reflected the complete role of the secretary, who was not a mere typist or servant, but a right hand, a friend, a gatekeeper of access. I’ve heard people still use the term “secretary” – not older people, mind you, but younger ones – and it is always employed in a derogatory fashion, as shorthand to make someone feel like a servile, faceless pissant.

          • Alice Teeple

            Elevated, career-wise. We have a few women who got promoted to Wives…!

          • Glammie

            Megan as well, but also a different situation. Peggy’s the only one who’s done it on pure talent. Though it’s interesting that Megan had talent–so who knows what other abilities lurk in the secretarial pool?

          • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ foodycatAlicia

            Nah – I’ve had bosses get me to tie their ties, run the lint brush over them etc. As @SFree60:disqus said, that’s the servant part of a PA job.

          • Alice Teeple

            That was such a delightful detail, her knowing about hunting rifles while wearing that crazy Edwardian getup with the bumpit hair. I am wondering if Clara is also from West Virginia.

          • FayeMac

            I think the first time I heard the term “admin assistant” being used instead of ‘secretary’ was in the very early 80′s – it might have been around earlier – I just don’t recall.

          • Glammie

            I kind of remember it coming in around the mid-70s–there was kind of a rebellion about being “just a secretary”, so . . . the title changed.

          • Alice Teeple

            We were always told to call the ladies in our school “secretaries.” That was in the early 80s-mid 90s. I think they started calling them “administrative assistants” sometime around the late 90s, where I was from.

  • surfergirl70

    I gasped at the connection between Don’s bathrobe and Sally’s dress. Well done, gentlemen.

  • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

    Great post and I am with you on the Joan and Bob fantasy: how fun would that be???

    • jtabz

      Me, too. I’d watch the bejeezus out of that plot thread.

    • Glammie

      Yep, and Peggy writes the copy.

  • Chris

    I disagree about your assessment of Moira. She is what I would consider the anti-Joan or the anti-Dawn. She is standing up staring and glaring at Ted and Peggy causing Don to stop, notice and talk to her about it. She also makes a snarky remark to another partner she must know has been causing Ted a hard time and is his rival. She is also dressed in Don’s colors not Ted’s. We have never seen her dressed in grey before.

    Imagine Dawn calling attention to Don doing anything she would consider inappropriate, or Joan. It’s unthinkable, as they embody the cool professional who protects and defends their boss. If he’s drunk and rowdy hide him away, if he’s hungover send him to the couch and “keep the drunks away,” clean up his messes, smashed glass and always cover for him even if he is out at a hotel with his mistress.

    Almost every scene with Moira since she appeared has shown her at least slightly overstepping her bounds, Cutler asks her “Why are you here this is a creative meeting?” The first time she appears at CGC. She confronts Joan over the master list causing Ted to call her name and pull her back, she is at the partners meeting and sits staring for a while when a partner asks someone to get a chair, Ted literally shuts his door in her face to keep her from following in at his heels, she makes sure to twist the knife on Peggy at the end. She isn’t a self effacing consummate professional secretary like Dawn or Joan.

    • bxbourgie

      I agree with you actually. Joan would have called her out for that, just like she did with Peggy when she told Joan about Don leaving in the middle of the day, back when he was seeing that hippie chick. And Peggy got on the other secretary, lawnmower girl, when she was talking crap about Don… again leaving in the middle of the day.

    • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

      Now I want to go back an re-watch every episode for what is going on with Moira. I hadn’t noticed any of this!

      • Chris

        She really doesn’t like Peggy. I have been speculating for a while if she is just territorial, has a crush on Ted, feels threatened etc. maybe she heard him yelling “I never should have kissed you ” to Peggy? He was right by the door. Maybe she is loyal to Nan? Some people thought Ted was messing around with her but I never bought that. He was too freaked out at himself for kissing Peggy. That was a first for him. I think Moira is trouble, personally.

        • bxbourgie

          My feeling is that she’s in love with him too. In my mind I picture him doing to her what he’s doing to Peggy before Peggy went to CGC. All smiley and gentlemanly and giving up his seat for her. Maybe doing the “I’m not really cheating if it’s not physical” thing he’s doing with Peggy. I think maybe she used to be on the receiving end of all of that till Peggy showed up.

        • Alice Teeple

          I think it is something along the lines of, Ted appreciates beauty in women and likes attention from pretty girls, but has never been genuinely interested. For him it was always about appearances – remember how Gleason pointed out that Ted was really a pretty boring guy, after all that bluster in the office about him being a pilot and being Captain Chivalry? Nan’s remark about “having a young copywriter in his plane” smacks of Ted offhandedly talking about “the girl with the bar cart he brings out at presentations.” My guess is, Moira probably enjoyed his aloof attention for some time, and since she’s on a first-name basis with Nan, probably knows her too. What’s different about Peggy is that he’s not interested in her as an accessory – he’s interested in the whole picture. I didn’t get that Moira’s face registered “guilt” about talking to Don, to me she looked like she knew exactly what she was doing and was glad to say it out loud. She’s definitely stirring up some trouble. It’s paralleling Megan’s soap opera storyline!

          • Chris

            Yes she was only too happy to vent to Don. That’s why it was so significant she was in that grey like him. She was on his team -she wanted Ted and Peggy (mostly Peggy) taken down.

        • gabbilevy

          I’m not sure what her game is, but looking at those screencaps, I’m thinking she’s somehow tied to Peggy (and Joan, for that matter) because in that scene, she’s got a solid jacket with busy stripes messing around her chest, as do both Peggy and Joan in the immediate scene that follows.

          In fact, Joan’s suit looks very much like the brighter, more brilliant and expensive version of Moira’s, both blue with the neckline filled with a busy print. Joan and Moira on one side, tied to, but playing opposite Peggy.

          As to what it means.. no idea.

        • jen_wang

          I’ve been thinking territorial? She really does seem to have a thing going on with Jim Cutler…

    • SFree

      I think she might ultimately be rewarded for this behavior. They need to promote another woman besides Peggy! And now Don has noticed her …

    • egurl

      Moira definitely rubs me the wrong way. You can tell she’s partially motivated by a dislike of Peggy, a dislike that seems mutual.

      • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

        I don’t see that. Moira doesn’t seem like she’s on Peggy’s radar.

        • egurl

          The camera lingers on Peggy’s face when Moira’s being bitchy towards her, typically when she wants to see Ted.

          • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

            I didn’t catch this, I have to go back and rewatch. I do think that Moira disapproves of Peggy though

    • FayeMac

      wow, what if Moira is Don’s next dip into “inappropriate behavior”

      • Glammie

        Nah. Moira seems too sharp for that.

        • avidreader02

          I agree…. but SOMETHING is there. Moira just appears, just like Megan did, at random times too often. And didn’t Don stare at her when he was high, saying “Don’t I know you?”
          I don’t think Don and she will have an affair… but as I type that, I can’t help but think that she would be the perfect way for Don to feel like he is beating Ted. Again.

          • housefulofboys

            That moment when he stared at her like that has stuck in my mind, too. MW doesn’t do that sort of thing without there being a reason.

          • Glammie

            Hmmm–well, we’ve one episode left so any affair probably won’t be this season. There are an awful lot of irons in the fire right now, wonder how it’s all going to resolve next week.

            My hope is that Joan gets Avon.

    • Elizabetta1022

      Hired by Nan, perhaps?

    • Qitkat

      Good points, along with those in the replies to this comment. But I would add that possibly Moira is jealous of Peggy, professionally jealous. She must know how Peggy moved up in the advertising game, beginning as a secretary just like her. If Moira has been a secretary for 4 years (I’ll have to take others’ word on that, I don’t recall), she most likely feels that is her lot in life, whether she’s happy about it or not. She may get her “revenge” by being a troublemaker.

      • Chris

        It could be, it’s Joan and Peggy she has butted heads with. We don’t know her motivations. She was really happy to be next to Ted at that first partners meeting. I don’t know if it’s personal, professional or both but she really has it in for Peggy and doesn’t try to hide it.

      • jen_wang

        I love Peggy, but she can be a touch dismissive of secretaries, despite (or because of) having been one. There’s a little exchange at one point where she barges into Ted’s office without waiting for Moira to buzz her in, things that can seem like little oversteps of Moira’s territory/authority. She doesn’t do the stuff that could make herself more likable to other women in the office (unlike Joan, who used to excel at that kind of thing).

    • Aurumgirl

      Moira is Ted’s previous Peggy, I’d bet.

  • Jordan Wester

    I love how Kiernan Shipka seems to channel Don’s expressions, especially next to Betty.

    • Glammie

      Yeah, she’s a wonderful mimic—she holds her cigarette like Betty–and that little smile after the whole to do at Miss Porter’s is pure malevolent Betty. Kiernan’s got a real knack.

  • msdamselfly

    I can envision Don and co. relocating to CA next season. It could be a big part of his midlife change and a reason to split from Megan if she wants to continue in soaps.

    • Danielle

      Or they could both move and not split up. Relocating to LA wouldn’t be a bad move for an actress.

    • Glammie

      Realistically, they’d open a branch as that’s what agencies do instead of wholesale relocating. I wonder, though, if Don won’t go, but be left behind the way he’s being left behind by the changing times. Maybe Ted’s marriage will break up and he and Peggy go out west together to live happily ever after.

  • Eric Stott

    That crewel work picture of sunflowers in the dorm room – we had one of those! It hung at home until styles changed (Avocado Green good bye!) and then it went up to the summer cottage (along with Avocado Green appliances that were too good to dump)

    • Susan Collier

      I had a suitcase just like Sally’s with the diagonal zippered pocket and everything, but it had a funky blue/gold ’70s plaid.

    • Heather

      Ah, the days of yore, when appliances were not disposable.

      • MilaXX

        My sister still has an avocado green oven that came with her house. She upgraded most of the avocado green in the kitchen, but the stove still works so she kept it.

        • mlle

          My parents had a range from the 50s until a few years ago. They’ve never redone the kitchen, so it fit much better with the space than its replacement does.

    • SFree

      All that crewel! Did you see the bag hanging on the doorknob? It was such a thing in those days and then totally died out, like the avocado green.

      • decormaven

        Also the needlework yardstick holder on the blond girl’s bedroom door.

    • Spicytomato1

      Better in the summer cottage than in the landfill, where I fear ours likely ended up. Man do I wish I could get all that stuff back…

  • charlotte

    “And there’s Don Draper’s adultery bathrobe, in dress form.” Did I mention that I love you two?

  • El_D_El

    Shouldn’t it be late summer at this point in the season? Why was Pete’s mom in that huge fur?

    • Susan Collier

      It’s probably October, judging by the foliage outside the car. We pieced together that last episode was September/October 1968 because folks were watching Hawaii Five-O, which premiered that fall.

    • OrigamiRose

      It’s late October – Don references Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis, a marriage that happened on October 20. And after the episode aired, AMC released a ‘press release’ about the new agency logo dated October 28th.

    • Chris

      Each episode has been one month after the previous on this season. That and the other references mentioned make it October 1968.

  • Qitkat

    Whatever Peggy’s colors mean, I love how she is dressing this season. The most flattering clothes ever for her, no longer schoolgirl, corporate but feminine. She thinks she is in charge of her personal life, and career. But at the moment, it’s still in the hands, at least at the office, of powerful men, who will befriend her, utilize her talents, and move on when necessary. She made her own powerful move in calling Don a monster; it will be interesting to follow what happens to their dynamic, once so very special, far more special, really, than we were ever lead to believe the dynamic was between her and Ted. That is an infatuation; Peggy and Don used to have mutual respect and a personal level of understanding of one another that went far beyond the office. She probably has never told Ted about the baby. Even with all the angst, she and Don have a more intimate relationship. One that has increasingly become more and more in jeopardy.

    • mlle

      I also love Peggy’s outfits. This is the first year I’ve wanted her clothing more than Joan’s.

      From my recollection, she started dressing better when she decided to leave SCDP last year, so hopefully the sartorial improvement will stick once the story with Ted winds down (or blows up).

    • Chris

      I agree and disagree with what you have said. I love that Peggy has taken her own style and ran with it. She looks lovely, professional and strong but still completely her. She is not trying to be Joan or dress like someone else. I disagree about the work relationship with Ted. He has fostered confidence in her, given her responsibility, and shown her she can be a leader without being a bully. The New Years Eve sequence showed her learning a boss can be thoughtful and effective. He also gave her validation she was worth more monetarily and professionally. Don continually treated her like he was doing her a favor. The most significant thing Don did was reach out to Peggy in the hospital and it was probably the only really altruistic thing I can think of him doing. Peggy learned a lot from him as he is brilliant at creative but she learned a lot of bad things she had to unlearn too.

      • Qitkat

        I don’t disagree with what you have said about Peggy and Ted’s working relationship. He has showed her all the things you have mentioned. But Don is Peggy’s *first love* in the sense of him setting her on the professional road she is on today. I think deep down they both miss the working relationship and comraderie they really did have for quite some time, even when it did involve lots of bickering, misunderstandings and manipulation. The bonding she and Don evidenced in The Suitcase was profound. We’ve never been privy to a scene of that magnitude with Ted and Peggy.

        • Chris

          Oh Don was the biggest part of her life for years, absolutely. She has only worked for Ted a year and a half? Two? My only complaint is that the Peggy-Don relationship was so one sided. It was 99% her helping him. As Peggy said, she was his punching bag when he failed or was disappointed.

          • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

            I’m not convinced Ted wouldn’t do the same thing to her, too, though.

          • Chris

            Oh he has shown repeatedly he thinks she is incredibly talented and how much he respects her. He would never toss money in her face (or any woman’s) or act like he was doing her a favor by letting her work there. From day one, long before he would have developed a crush, he told her what a great eye and creative mind she had. A huge part of his love for her is based on his professional admiration. We have never seen Ted treat anyone really poorly or disrespectfully so I doubt he would start with Peggy. She worked for him for a year or so and he was like a dream boss for her.

          • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

            Don knows how incredibly talented Peggy is as well and respects her professional talent. The thing with both, though, is that they both see her as a sign of their power, not powerful on her own. Their treatment of her manifests differently because of their different issues. Don sees her as a mother, and through that as a whore, while Ted sees her as a potential romantic partner. What this means, though, is that neither men sees or values her purely based on her talent and ability, and both men’s treatment of her is entirely dependent on how things are going in their lives personally and professionally, not based on Peggy’s actual talent or accomplishments. Which is why Ted was fawning all over one of Peggy’s ideas in this episode that was neither as good as he thought it was nor practical for the client. He was carrying on with her the way he was in this episode because he felt like he’d recently scored a victory over Don and was making the most of his trophy, Peggy. When the balance of power shifts again, he’ll be tossing her out of the office and giving her the cold shoulder again.

          • SFree

            And this is the reason Peggy never really know where she stands.

          • Glammie

            Yep. The first we ever heard of Ted was as a competitor with Don. When he’s with his dying partner, he’s obsessing about how to deal with Don Draper. He may care for Peggy, but he’s a workaholic and he’s kind of obsessed with the still-mysterious Don Draper. They both care about Peggy without really seeing her and she’s getting used as a pawn in their alpha-male maneuverings.

            Unfortunately, Peggy is still dependent on male power. Hmmmm, all the more reason to root for Joan getting Avon and having Peggy write copy. That would be serious girl power.

          • desertwind

            Ted’s obsession with Don was one of Nan’s points (in addition to the young copywriter in your plane point).

          • Glammie

            Oh good catch. That’s right. So there’s a real question mark about how much of Ted’s interest in Peggy has to do with his fascination with Don. Peggy is, I think, seen a bit as Don’s creation and her loyalty to Ted clearly hurts Don. So to what extent is Ted playing off this? It’s not entirely clear. Don and Peggy obviously have different takes on the matter.

          • Qitkat

            Someday when I revisit the entire show, I will keep an eye out for whether I agree that the relationship was that one-sided. For now it is not how I remember it, more like 80/20. Which is still inequitable, but you might agree that the 50/50 relationship she thought she had with Ted isn’t really that at all. I suppose it is a given that supervisor/employee relationships are never equal. Heck it’s hard to find employee/employee relationships to be on the same level. Many times someone is always seeking to undermine a peer or take credit where it’s not deserved. My son in the construction industry talks about this issue as fairly common.

          • Chris

            I need to rewatch too. I was really trying to think of instances where Don was nice to Peggy but beyond the hospital I am stumped. It seems like any time she asked for a raise or anything he belittled her. He only came to her apartment to get her to join SCDP after he told her “we’re moving lets go” and she told him off. The whole suitcase episode came about because he was keeping her there on her birthday (which she kind of wanted to miss). He would never seem to give her any recognition the way Ted does which is why she kind of basks in it now. Fr eddy Rumson is the one who discovered her and gave her her first chance and she got Roger to give her the good office. Maybe Don’s rotten behavior is blinding me to past good things? Can anyone refresh my memory?

          • Qitkat

            I have forgotten about Freddy’s and Roger’s parts in her ascension. I thought I would wait til the entire show is over before I rewatched, but maybe it would make a good winter’s activity to refresh myself on all I have forgotten, before the series finale season. I hope I’m not just viewing Don and Peggy’s past with rose-colored glasses.

          • Chris

            I had thought of them that way too for the longest time. Probably until he threw that money at her face. I had loved the suitcase episode at the time and their relationship. Then by last season I started thinking back and things seemed so much different than I remembered. I don’t know if I was as influenced by the idea of Don as the “hero” so he must be doing something good, or that I hadn’t seen Peggy work with anyone else so I thought that was the best she could do. I had forgotten how kind Freddy was to her. When she met with Ted I was sure he would be a dirtbag because we saw him through Don’s eyes before but I thought wouldn’t it be great if he really did love her work and celebrate it at fancy restaurants? Now I’m not sure if I have gone too far anti-Don but cannot remember any good Peggy Don stuff.

        • Jordan Wester

          I don’t think of Don as Peggy’s first love, but rather as a father figure to her. Especially that scene in season 2 where they’re talking about Mohawk Airlines. Don prompts her and she runs through a couple lines like, “What did you bring me Daddy?” It was creepy, & I don’t doubt there’s a sexual undercurrent to their relationship, but I view their relationship as father/daughter.
          Interestingly, Pete obviously viewed Don as a father/mentor as well, which makes the Pete/Peggy dynamic still interesting. They’re totally Don’s spiritual children.

          • Qitkat

            Oh, No, No, No!
            Perhaps *first love* was the wrong term, as I only meant it creatively. He mentored her, he gave her an opportunity that she never even knew would be possible when she began to work for the firm, probably against his better judgment sometimes, and she learned to fly. I don’t think she was in love with him, I don’t think they have a creepy relationship. If there ever was a sexual undertone, it has not been there for a very long time.
            I actually haven’t watched the early seasons over again, and don’t recall the Mohawk specifics.

          • Jordan Wester

            Oh, yes, first love creatively, definitely :) Peggy and Don had an odd relationship early on. In the pilot she touches his hand and he tells her he’s her boss, not her boyfriend. She stammers and says, “I hope you don’t think I’m the kind of girl…” And then there’s the feeling in the office that either Don was sleeping with Peggy or that Peggy was too unattractive for Don to sleep with (which she even brings up to Don).
            The early seasons are heartbreaking. Watching the young versions of the characters while knowing how they’re going to implode is really hard.

          • Chris

            And they look so young! Peggy and Pete look like kids to my eyes. Knowing what will happen with Peggy and seeing her go through it all is heartbreaking.

          • Jordan Wester

            They are so fresh faced! I actually hated Pete until the end of season 2 when he tells Peggy that she’s perfect, he wished he’d picked her and how he loves her. And then Peggy just levels with him and destroys his world. You can just see the enormous loss play across Vincent Kartheiser’s face- about him rejecting the idea of adoption with Trudy while he has a child out there somewhere, of losing his chance at being loved and seen by someone in the way he wants, and of realizing that everything he thought was real and true, isn’t. They revisited that at the end of season 5 with Beth.
            And Peggy is back in love with an unavailable married man who on their first meeting validated her fragile ego. Sigh. This show kills me.

      • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

        I agree with this, but I also think Ted sees her as a battle trophy in his war on Don. Ted hasn’t been as cruel as Don has in the past, perhaps, but his treatment of Peggy has on more than one occasion been just as dismissive.

        • Chris

          I’m divided on that. Peggy isn’t a partner so it’s not crazy that Ted would want to go partner to partner on things. Also I feel like he is being protective and not wanting her involved in the fighting etc. particularly when it’s him and Don. It’s a little condescending but a big part of chivalry is. Like Lord Peter Whimsey said chivalry is largely about the men wanting to have all the fun. Or something like that. The final step in Peggy’s evolution will be when she is the boss. (Or at least co-boss) I’m thinking MW is saving that for the final season.

          • mlle

            I would love for Peggy to make partner without having to move to a new agency. She could end the story on even footing with Don, and there would be all this interesting character stuff about the ways she’s evolved vs. the ways he’s stayed the same. It would be enough to keep fans debating what happened after the final credits forever.

          • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

            She’ll never make partner as long as Don and Ted are fighting over who gets to have her as their protegee.

          • mlle

            I don’t think that’s actually where the story will go, since the partnership is already large enough, they already have one woman partner, and there’s not enough show left for an “I choose me” storyline for Peggy. It’s just an idea I’d find interesting.

          • Glammie

            On the other hand, if Joan brings in Avon and Peggy controls creative. She’ll be fine, though. She’s young to be a partner and doesn’t have the clout to negotiate for it.

          • formerlyAnon

            I think she’s got to leave. Either set up on her own or as partner somewhere else. Otherwise even if she DOES make partner, it will be under some kind of shade, not as bad as Joan, but with a flavor of someone’s protege, or somehow it being a “joint effort.” I can’t substantiate that with facts, but emotionally l’m sure of it.

          • Alice Teeple

            MASSIVE BONUS POINTS FOR BRINGING UP LORD PETER. You have noooo idea.

        • Alice Teeple

          I don’t think Ted sees her as a battle trophy against Don as much as he sees her as a trophy, period. He puts Peggy on a pedestal and has from the beginning – first as the best poach from SCDP, then, as they worked together, he started to transfer those feelings to a romantic level. It all came to a head when he was about to lose Frank Gleason – a parallel to that storyline between Peggy and Don on the night that Anna died. With Don and Peggy, that ended up in a fight and a truce; with Ted and Peggy, it ended up with a kiss and a lot of guilt-fueled anguish.

          I think to Ted, Peggy represents the entire package: ambition, brains, beauty, and a creative energizer. To Peggy, he incorporates the praise and respect she’s hungered for for years, and supports/protects her. I can see the parallel between CGC and SCDP fighting against behemoths like JWT. Ted already tried surrendering with a truce with Don (like Pete did with Bob), but it failed. If Peggy and Ted “merge,” however, they stand to gain more footing in the hierarchy. Both see each other as secret weapons in their ambition. If Ted and Peggy do bite the bullet and end up together as a creative (if not romantic) team, they will be a force of nature that could destroy Don Draper professionally, and hit him very hard personally.

          • Chris

            I think that’s a great analysis. Ted really does put her up on a pedestal. I do think they could make a great team.

          • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

            I think if they teamed up professionally, that might be true, but romantically, I just feel like it would be destined for a bad end and when it does end, Peggy will be the one who stands to lose the most–her job, her reputation, her confidence. And at this point, I don’t know if they can team up professionally without the romantic stuff getting in the way.

            I think I have a different opinion of Ted. I don’t think he’s as unambiguously good as people think he is. He might be nicer than Don, but that’s not saying a lot. He’s been hot and cold toward Peggy, largely depending on how other things are going in his life, and while people have attempted to give this a “good guy” justification–he’s trying so hard not to cheat on his wife!–ultimately, dudes who don’t want to cheat on their wives and know someone is a serious temptation for them don’t continue to carry on with that person and put themselves in situations where the temptation might become stronger. He would be keeping a professional distance from her. Instead, he’s happy to be tempted so long as his professional life is going well. I think he’s flattered by her attention and admiration–probably flattered more because he realizes how talented she is and understands that her attention and admiration is worth more–but I don’t think it goes very far beyond that. His infatuation with her is mostly about his ego–a lot like Don, honestly–and I can’t help but feel like at some point, possibly in the finale, that’s going to become apparently.

      • Paige

        While Don and Peggy’s relationship is not entirely even, Don challenges Peggy professionally in ways Ted won’t because he is in love with her. Don’s tactics may not always be the kindest, but he respects her opinions and believes in her talent.

        • Glammie

          Also, Ted’s just not as good as Don is as creative director. He’s not as persuasive, he’s not as good at pinpointing the right tactic. Ted needs Peggy to challenge Don because he doesn’t have the talent on his own.

    • Sagecreek

      I know she looked ragged the morning after Abe’s stabbing, but that dress was seriously great.

    • SFree

      I do love Peggy’s outfits. She really stands out from all the other women, and rightfully so. But I don’t think she feels in charge of either her personal life or her career. Like other characters, what she looks like on the outside is very different than what she feels.

      • Qitkat

        I meant she *thinks* she is in charge of her personal life, as in, she is deluding herself, but if she were to be more introspective, she would realize she feels very fragile and vulnerable in that arena right now.

    • 1tsplove

      Oh my gosh, I am so surprised to read all this adoration for Peggy’s looks this season. Other than the light blue dress she wore when her & Ted kissed, I’ve felt like most of her dresses feel frumpy and make her look older than she is. These dresses she has in every color remind me of a Hillary Clinton power suit! Perhaps though that is a sign of her conservatism? S

      • mlle

        I don’t know about other people, but I work in a rather conservative office environment – I sometimes wear my grandmother’s mid/late-60s dresses because they cover enough to be appropriate but infuse an element of fun that’s sorely missing in modern corporate drag.

        • Spicytomato1

          That’s so great that you have her stuff to wear. In this “fast fashion” era, they definitely don’t make things like they used to.

          • mlle

            I’m lucky that I ended up shaped and sized pretty similarly to her and my mother, so I’ve got two wardrobes to pick over.

      • bxbourgie

        Its probably because her SCDP clothes were so terrible that anything would be an improvement/upgrade. She’s not gonna be on the cover of any fashion magazines with those dresses, but at least they’re looking more professional and put together and less like she just threw on whatever and rolled on in to the office.

        • decormaven

          I’m just thankful she’s not still wearing that sad ponytail.

      • filmcricket

        When the first set pictures came out this season & Pegs was in her blue and red suit, my immediate thought was “Margaret Thatcher.” Most of her outfits haven’t been quite so formidable though. However, you’re right that she’s essentially a conservative person, at least as compared to many people her age. Partly her upbringing, partly her personality, partly the fact that she’s gotten so far in her career by rocking the boat without making it seem like she’s doing it.

        • Glammie

          Hmmm, think she’ll be a Reagan Democrat?

          • formerlyAnon

            She’ll come to it hard, but she might. She’s the right age to have gotten the FDR worship handed down to her and experienced the JFK worship. (I say this as a partly Irish Catholic Democrat enough younger than Peggy that I barely remember JFK.)

          • Glammie

            Reagan got a lot of those voters. Certainly, he’d get her mother’s vote. Reagan worked the Irish angle during the election.

            We don’t really know how Peggy feels about things like abortion or what her political philosophy is or if she has one. Peggy doesn’t tend to think in those terms–I expect that’s part of her whole self-made quality. She’s never been to college–I think she was supposed to have been through a secretarial course.

      • Qitkat

        lol. Hilary Clinton and I are nearly the same age. I’ve never paid a lot of attention to her clothes. For the times, Peggy may look conservative compared to the secretaries, but it’s probably necessary in her mind in order to command the respect that might be less if she wore all the current mini-skirt looks. She has worked very hard for her position, and, I suspect, in her mind, feels that she is a little bit more on the same creative level as the men, even though she dare not voice that, and would be shot down, and has been shot down, when she got too full of herself. Look how far she has come. She wants to be taken seriously. Her dress may seem conservative, but she is frequently a powerhouse of interesting, out-of-the-box ideas.

        • Heather

          Yes, there are both gender AND class issues at work here. Remember that Peggy is also a working-class Brooklyn girl and knows all too well how people are judged by what they’re wearing. No way is she going to show up in a mini with go-go boots, OR anything that looks inexpensive.

      • Sadiqeh

        I think you’re absolutely right. Peggy is interesting at work but her personal life suffers. Frankly, I think a lot of this has to do with what her mother said when she learned about the progression of Peggy & Abe’s relationship. Peggy has turned into an old maid before she’s gotten old or given up on men. I definitely think her suits are an improvement and give her more credibility but they’re certainly not complimentary.

      • Spicytomato1

        I like Megan’s style so much more than Peggy’s (although Peggy’s has improved). Remember how much more stylish Megan was when she worked with them? And I loved her red top ensemble from this episode, I’d wear it to the office in this day and age in a heartbeat. Peggy’s stuff, not so much.

    • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

      Calling Don a monster was powerful…but I don’t feel like it’s a power move for her. More than ever, this season, we’ve seen how Peggy’s success is attached to a man–previously Don’s, now Ted’s. I’m hoping by the end of this season, something happens that opens her eyes to how similar Don and Ted really are and how through her relationships with both, she’s not really able to be independent or independently successful.

      • Glammie

        Send Peggy to a consciousness-raising session! That would be pretty funny, actually.

        • Bonjour

          Peggy and Joan: BURN YOUR BRAS.

          Though if Joan did, and let her hair down, there would probably be a riot.

      • ybbed

        I predict spinsterhood for Peggy, unfortunately. I think getting the cat kind of sealed the deal with that.

        • formerlyAnon

          I think that there’s enough “traditional raising” in her that Peggy will give marriage a shot sooner or later. Maybe even much later, in her 50s. If it doesn’t work, *then* she’ll settle into happy single life. I’ve seen a number of women raised to expect a traditional marriage, follow that pattern.

  • rage_on_the_page

    I thought we were going to find a whole new can of worms when Pete asked Bob, “Who hired you?!” But then it was just Bob, being in love with Pete for liking his tie. Not disappointed.

    And now I can’t get the image of Pete in Betty-drag out of my mind.

    • bxbourgie

      And he still didn’t answer the question. Clearly someone had to have called him after the interview and said “Hey we want you!” then showed him around the office, showed him where he’d be sitting. Did no one do that? I’m wondering if he just walked in off the street one day in a suit and tie and no one thought to actually ask who hired him.

      • Sobaika

        He said “You did” or am I misremembering? At any rate, I got the feeling that Pete hired him officially and thus began puppy love.

        • rage_on_the_page

          But Pete didn’t seem to remember, really. Who knows? Maybe he really did just show up one day. But I doubt Joan Harris would have stood for that.

        • Lorraine

          Bob said that Pete walked into the room when Ken was interviewing him, so I’m assuming it was Ken who ended up hiring him.

          • bxbourgie

            When Pete asked Bob who hired him, he said “you did” but then mentioned Pete complimenting his tie. Why would Pete ask who hired him if HE was the one that hired him? Pete’s not that forgetful. I’m not even sure it was Ken. Ken was all “Who are you?” at Bob’s first appearances this season? When he was sitting on that couch by the receptionist on the second floor and certainly when he sent that food over to Roger’s mother’s funeral. Ken wouldn’t hire someone that he didn’t like.

          • Lorraine

            Oh yeah, of course! It’s yet another lie from Bob, much like the way he told Ken his father died and told Pete his father had improved. He’s telling everyone different things. I’m thinking now that he did literally walk in off the street. Notice how his once bare office now has a huge piece of artwork. He’s slowly sinking his claws into the place.

          • Lisa

            And Roger didn’t know who he was either, so I don’t think Roger hired him. One thing that Roger likely can do is remember people’s names and faces.

            Would Lane have been involved in hiring account people?

          • 3hares

            No. Especially not after he was dead!

          • Angela Langdale

            LOL!

          • housefulofboys

            I really can’t remember, did Ken ask who he was? or did he ask why was he up in creative? If Ken hired him for accounts it might explain why he was so vehement about Bob overstepping his bounds by hanging out in creative, and for sending the platter of food.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            No, in fact Ken saw him sitting outside Pete’s office the first time we saw them together and said, “Good morning, Bob.”

          • Lisa

            Perhaps that’s why Ken reprimanded him then: because he felt responsible for his behavior after having hired him?

          • bxbourgie

            Thanks TLo. T? Lo? LOL! Anyway, I wasn’t sure. That actually helps with why Ken was so mad about the food at Roger’s mother’s funeral, it would make Ken look bad because he was the one that hired Bob. That’s also probably why he reprimanded Bob for hanging out on the couch at reception trying to look busy.

          • andrea

            LOL…maybe the big laugh is that NO ONE hired him, and Bob simply showed up one day with coffee and integrated himself into this new dysfunctional world. :P

          • Spicytomato1

            That’s basically what Don did, right? (Minus the coffee.)

          • MilaXX

            That would fit in Bob’s love sick memory of the event. Ken interviewed him, Pete walked in , complimented his tie and likely just agreed with Ken’s recommendation to hire him. A smitten Bob then fanwanks it to Pete hiring him.

          • MartyBellerMask

            THIS.

        • 3hares

          Right, but it was vague and shady. Pete clearly doesn’t remember it and all Bob said was that Pete complimented his tie. It was a shell-game type answer from a natural con.

    • alex

      I also think that Bob’s drawing attention to Pete’s remark about his tie is a matter of “changing the conversation” when Bob senses he is under a threat. He is “making nice” as the tension rises.

  • Jenny

    Has anyone else noticed the high number of “women wearing yellow passing by” that have happened this season? There just seems to always be someone walking by a scene wearing yellow. Anyone else see it or am I imagining it?

    • DeniseSchipani

      I noticed that on my second watching last night — in particular a pair of yellow-clad women outside the conference room. I also noticed some background noise; you could hear people’s footfalls from inside the conf. room.

      • Jenny

        Yes! And it’s not just this episode. It’s been happening a lot. When I do the season re-watch I might pay more attention.

    • decormaven

      Yes, there’s a a woman with a yellow top who walks by just as Roger asks “can we celebrate now?” after Don, Roger, Ted and Jim talk about the Ocean Spray/Sunkist split in Ted’s office.

  • Orlee

    I love the art direction in the dorm room at Miss Porter’s. All those discordant flowers (wallpaper, stickers, wallhangings) make it not so much a garden as a jungle.

    • decormaven

      Reminds me of those old ads for Herbal Essence shampoo.

  • leighanne

    Megan in the blue nightgown at the end makes for a motherly, ghostly figure, so far from Don’s world. They’ve never looked so far apart.
    If she had a power color, it’d be red.

    • desertwind

      It’s in blue and green, too!

      I don’t think she’s having an affair and her reaction to Julie’s question re who she was phoning read to me more as “who is this pushy kid?”

  • Eclectic Mayhem

    The orange colour in Peggy’s bow matches Joan’s hair so exactly it did feel like she was slightly linked to Joan in that scene… As ever – fabulous work fellas!

  • Latin Buddy

    A “What if the Brady girls were rich east coast bitches?” I’m sorry, but they were the best part of the episode LOL

    Also, is the kid that played Rolo the little boy from that Julia Roberts’ movie Stepmom?

    • Chris

      Yes he’s the kid from Lemony Snicket too. Creepiest of all he is 23 years of age to Kiernan’s 13 in real life.

      • Sobaika

        Yeesh. That must have been uncomfortable. She’s one hell of an actress though.

        • Chris

          She is phenomenal. MW said in an interview she has always watched and mimicked Betty and Don even when she was six. Her putting her hand over her face like Don does was from her.

          • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

            Wow! She is always dead on, too, in surprisingly subtle ways. It’s amazing that she picks up on all of that so young.

          • Glammie

            Actually, my daughter’s like that. She developed this ability to consciously mimic at 4. If you think about it, kids mimic all the time, just not usually that consciously. It seems to have something to do with being visually really observant. Kiernan does have a real knack–and she uses it well. It’s not overplayed.

      • alex

        Also, has anyone commented on Sally’s reply to one of the girls’ inquiries about her “divorced parents” in which Sally says that her father is married to someone “Sally’s own age?” Sally jumped right in to the sarcasm (lying of course) but meaning it all the same.

        • SFree

          I noticed. Sally trying to make herself look cool by seeing herself as older than her 13 or 14 year old self, but putting down Megan. Double score!

        • Heather

          Yes. Reminded me of Betty saying of Megan, “She’s 20.”

  • golden_valley

    Excellent work as always guys. You make my Wednesdays. And thank you for the close up of Glenn’s fatigue jacket. I had it stopped on the DVR trying to figure out what all the buttons said.

    • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

      Better closeup added. You can see/read better now : )

      • golden_valley

        Thanks uncles! I’m going to send this to my hippie cousin and see if he still has these in a box somewhere.

    • spamjam

      I call a foul. The orange button above Glen’s upper left pocket is from the November 15, 1969 March on Washington. So unless Glen is (or knows) a time-traveler, he couldn’t have had that button in October 1968.

  • Frank_821

    I find Pete’s alliance to Bob most intrigiuing. It makes wonder about Bob’s abilities as an accounts man. His greatest assets is his charm but he channels it in a very obsequious way. Ken clearly picked up on the fact he’s an ambitious ass-kisser. Does he have any other great skills for the job?

    Bottom line Don has historically been good as the head of creative. He’s not just all charm and charisma.

    As has been mentioned, Pete despite his faults is an excellent accounts man because he’s got superb instincts. He knows where the money is and can sniff out potential clients or new sources of revenue. Something tells me Bob lacking in that area. So the 2 could be quite the formidable team.

    You made a great point comparing him metaphorically to Betty

    Also with these clashes with Bob and the reveal of his past, it makes me wonder how Pete will feel about Don from now on. We know Pete as always been in awe of Don and wants his validation and be like him. But he’s always known about his fraud. Now here’s Bob. Another version of Don-only gay, servile and even a bigger phony in many respects. I sense a certain contempt coming from Pete for the Dons and Bobs of the world. Those guys have made great strides based on their looks and charisma. I can see him resenting guys like them since Pete, by his own acknowledge, can’t get the same success or adulation just on his hard work.

    I don’t think he hates Don. but there is clearly a disillusionment with the Don Draper mystique. It’s a lot of work, doesn’t work for someone like Pete and there’s plenty of ugly fallout. I felt his final scene was a comment that he’s giving up trying to copy Don and rebuild his life. Better to exploit his little gay-Don doll instead to his advantage

    • DeniseSchipani

      One thing Pete seemed to have learned is that there’s a lot he’s just not good at, and so he’s wise to keep Bob’s secret and make it work for him. Not just because exposing him might not work (as it didn’t with Don), but also because, as he points out to Bob, he’s good at what he does, better than he (Pete) is at “whatever it is I do.”

      Pete’s gotten smart enough to realize he’s not smart enough.

      • 3hares

        Yes, Pete’s always at his most competent when he’s being very aware of his limitations. When he starts to feel too powerful he crashes and burns, but when he’s checking his behavior against someone whose skills he trusts.

      • Donna Luder

        You wowed me there: “Pete’s gotten smart enough to realize he’s not smart enough.” Awesome.
        But…. I would change one word.
        Pete’s gotten smart enough to realize he’s not likeable enough.
        Now he’s realized he can hitch his smarm to Bob’s charm. Why work so hard when Bob can do it all so easily?

        • bxbourgie

          Another one! “…hitch his smarm to Bob’s charm.” Also awesome.

    • MilaXX

      Interesting theory. I just hope Pete doesn’t try to use Bob as his whipping boy because of his jealousy of Don.

    • MartyBellerMask

      Maybe Pete’s just taking mental notes, so he can disappear one day.

  • jozie310

    T&L on Megan: “it would be more normal for her to be dressed down, since she has to get into makeup and costume at some point.”

    You nailed it! This is proof positive that Megan is indeed having an affair. I thought as much, but now I’ve got the smoking gun. She would not want to show up at work not looking her best, because she has someone there who she wants to look her best for!

    • bxbourgie

      Ooooh! Interesting!

    • Joy

      I agree. I said last week that I thought she was having an affair. I wonder if she is found out in the finale? Or she tries to leave him and then he has his heart attack. Overall, I really just hate her acting. Love her clothes, makeup, but I wish they could just mute her and put closed captions on when she is on the screen.

      • Sagecreek

        Hmmm. I find JP so much prettier when she’s without the 60s makeup.

        • Chris

          I agree, back when she was just Don’s secretary that hair and makeup was stunning on her. Likewise when she was first married to Don. This season I don’t think that pale lipstick does her any favors. On some people it works but it can make her look a little sickly, the instances where she is in red or pink she looks so much prettier.

          • vandeventer

            The red is sooo not period appropriate though, and I can’t understand why they always put it on her. Look through any pictures of that time-period, look at ads or celebrities of any age – none of them will be wearing red lipstick. Pinks and peaches were in, but not 1950′s Revlon Cherries in the Snow red. And pale silvery pinks and almost-white pinks were sooo fashionable that it didn’t matter how gross it looked, everyone who was in style wore it.

          • sekushinonyanko

            I think that it just looks so bad on Jessica Pare that they relent. Also lately with the red on the Rosens and the cranberry stuff they have excuses thematically to whip the color out.

      • 1tsplove

        Yeah, I think she is deliberately meant to look like a bad actress.

      • ybbed

        This is my prediction too, Don’s affair isn’t revealed but Megan’s is!! and this causes the “heart attack” or whatever medical condition happens to Don. In the first episode she said, “So you’ll love me even though I am a lying, cheating, whore?” or something like that in reference to her soap opera job. (Can you tell I am rewatching episodes in anticipation of the finale?) Somehow I think it will be revealed that she has strayed, and Don will react.

    • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

      Point in favor.

    • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

      I can’t remember the name of the lady who hit on her at her house, but my money is on her husband.

      • decormaven

        In theory, that sounds right-Mel is the one who criticized the way Megan played the office scene (the one where she was wearing the red crocheted jumpsuit.) But is Megan calculating enough to be with him just to save her job? I didn’t see any chemistry between them when the two couples went to dinner. Megan still seems to have affection toward Don. But it does seem fishy that she dresses so well just to go to makeup for her job. I just chalk up that she’s a clothes fiend.

      • Chris

        If anyone I think it’s the agent she mentioned by name and who took her to the play the night the apartment was robbed (but I can’t remember his name) If its anything I don’t think it’s more than an emotional affair though.

        • sweetlilvoice

          We’ve also never seen him (to my knowledge) which helps the viewers imagine what he might be like.

        • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

          this

      • Fordzo

        Oh, I really want it to be her costar – the woman who hit on her.

        • vandeventer

          Yes! Arlene is the co-star that hit on her. Let it be Arlene!

    • housefulofboys

      It would be typically Mad Men ironic for Megan to get caught cheating instead of Don.

      • Heather

        Yes, and the irony of Don finding that he’s a cuckold.

        • something

          Oooooh! I think I’d like that very much!

          • ybbed

            heart attack coming!

    • urbantravels

      think the assumption that Megan would “normally” go to the studio “dressed down” is not at all period appropriate. In this era, actresses would not show up to the TV studio in sweats or jeans.

      Megan is very conscious of the image she projects in public, and we don’t see her going out looking draggled ever, although she may walk around the house in her underwear, bare feet, jeans, etc. It would be important for her to look good in public, *especially* since she is a successful and recognizable soap actress in New York, where the TV studios aren’t walled off from the public and she’s likely to be approached by fans and autograph seekers when she gets there. We’ve already seen several instances of her being recognized and fawned over by fans in random places, including in the very first moments of the season.

      Her clothes aren’t a smoking gun one way or another about the affair question, but some other clues are potentially more significant – especially her almost dementedly determined cheerfulness and positivity (she has certainly not been that way all the time in the past), and her refusal to take notice of the massive tension in the atmosphere around her and of Don’s extreme distress.

      • jozie310

        Agreed: about her cheerfulness and obliviousness being major clues. That’s what I was going on before reading T&L above.

        • OliviaD

          She is definitely cheerful and seemingly oblivious around Don, but remember last season when Don skipped out with Joan for a ride in the _______ (some car I don’t remember) and then they had drinks after.. Well that was the first time in Don and Megan’s relationship where he was unaccounted for and Megan FLIPPED out. I remember she said something to him like “Why would you make me think that?” because she knew his cheating history with Betty and was well aware of the potential signs that he was cheating. I don’t think there’s any way she’s oblivious to it, the only thing she might be oblivious to is that Don was cheating with Sylvia. I also think she still loves Don and wants to take care of him/make him better but is probably realizing more and more that it is an impossible task. I definitely think she’s “cheating” on Don even if it’s just emotionally, the same way many people believe Peggy and Ted are cheating.

          Also, just sayin’ but remember that hot dress she wore to “the play” with her “agent” the night Grandma Ida broke it. She was super dressed up then, too, similar to the way she was dressed when she “went to work” this episode.

          Finally, this is a side note but did anyone notice how horrible her French accent was on the soap opera as Corinne when Don was watching? THey are obviously trying to show that she’s a horrible actress because Jessica Pare speaks French and could clearly do a better French native speaking English accent. The crappy accent is obviously intentional.

      • SJ

        I wonder if that’s an old defense mechanism from when she was growing up trapped between her parents’ animosity. I’ve known kids like that who overcompensate. When Don first witnessed their fighting I was amazed at how cheerful and blase’ she seemed.

        • Abigail Adams

          Good point. Even if Mme. Calvet isn’t a full-blown alcoholic, Megan still grew up in a household with some dysfunction, and adult who grew up in dysfunctional households tend to have a lot in common with the adult children of alcoholics.

          That might explain a lot about Megan and how she gravitated to Don – her “caretaking”, her current “put on a happy face” tactic….

    • MartyBellerMask

      Maybe she’s going to meetings and auditions too, but it’s easier to say “work”, especially to someone who really doesn’t care anyway.

      • NoveltyRocker

        The hair staying coiffed the same way when she came back home bothered me because I was thinking of the wigs she’s in on the soap opera but she could have easily been at a “work meeting”, not shooting. May not be all that important where she was and if her hair had changed between so few scenes, her sudden bedhead could have become distracting and added fuel to the affair theory.

        • EricaVee

          I kind of thought she was wearing a wig with her normal clothes, too. Can anyone of that era shed some light? If that bumpit hair is natural, how is that look achieved–just a ton of teasing and product? It also looked darker than usual, imo.

          • mixedupfiles

            My mom had a “wiglet” – a pile of curls she put on top. And there was also lots of backcombing.

          • Susan Collier

            My mom had a fall; I think it’s the same thing?

    • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

      This also makes sense why she seems oblivious

  • natasha2marie

    “Besides, we tend to think a combination of sessions with Sally’s old therapist, countless Weight Watchers meetings, and a supportive, attentive husband all combined to remake Betty into someone who knows herself pretty well, making her a better parent and partner.”

    I agree with this, but I also think Betty is better at parenting older kids. Some parents take more naturally to babies and toddlers, while other parents really shine when their kids are older. As all her kids get older and more self-sufficient, I think Betty will continue to improve as a parent.

    The ad scene with Ted and Don crying like a baby and Joan as the Jewish neighbor is the best scene of the entire series.

    • sweetlilvoice

      And she has Henry to help out more too. But I think you are also right that she’s better with older kids. I would probably be the same way.

  • http://piblet.tumblr.com/ Anastasia

    Thanks for pointing out Cara’s awesome costuming, TLO – I got major Captain Hook vibes, but she looks great.

    That Pete is Bob Benson’s Betty equivalent is equally as hilarious as the Pete making Bob his not-exactly-heterosexual bitch comparison.

    Needless to say, I almost fell out of my chair when you guys pointed out the plaid parallels between Sally and Don.

    Excellent as always.

  • ConnieBV

    I used to watch this show and get a kick out of its period snappy comebacks, the clothes and such… But boy has it gone dark. I understand it’s deep and I’m not looking for fluff, but I feel so depressed after I watch it every week. It’s so hopeless. Everyone is so fucked up, and it’s all so cyclical. If this is what Weiner meant to evoke, bravo, but I’m glad to see this season end.

    • missinmass

      Hasn’t been established from the beginning of the season that we are venturing into Hell?

      • SFree

        And Hell with dark humor. I’ll take the dark.

      • ConnieBV

        Again, if it’s what he meant to evoke, he did so for me in spades. I can’t divorce myself from it by telling myself it’s fiction because, being raised by a dad b. 1933, the realism keeps hitting home. Ugh.

    • Laylalola

      OMG, but it’s been dark from the pilot episode, with Pete going over to Peggy’s place and Don having sex left and right and then going home to his beautiful wife, kids, and house.

    • EricaVee

      I kind of agree, it was always cynical and dark but it has all gotten so much more hopeless as of this season and last.

  • Lanus

    So many things…but, I just want to say that I desperately want Megan’s outfit, and if it found its way to me I’d wear it tomorrow, as is, with no updating alterations.

  • Wendi126

    The flower stickers on the mantle were all the rage and could be seen covering walls, notebooks, luggage…you name it. Flower Power began with the suggestion from Allen Ginsberg to change violent protests into peace loving ones by bringing flowers. The iconic pic of the young guy putting carnations into guns was titled “Flower Power”. And of course flower children. Flower images were huge..mostly daisies from what I remember. This show jolts me into my past like no other with its images. I am often reminded of things I haven’t thought about in 40 years.

    • Sagecreek

      Honestly, that Nixon commercial just brought back terrible memories of how angry my father was for the entire year of 1968.

      • decormaven

        That commercial was just the perfect selection for this episode. Talk about creating the culture of fear!

    • formerlyAnon

      ” I am often reminded of things I haven’t thought about in 40 years.”

      Yes. Yes, yes, yes.

    • SportifLateBoomer

      Agreed. I posted about this at length a little bit ago. In 1968 I was 7, with older siblings, so very much picking up the vibes in the news and popular culture. I felt very immersed in the dorm scene. As the Cowsills famously sang the year before… “flowers everywhere…”

  • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

    I thought Don in the dark turtleneck made him sort of like a dark Ted figure, and to me reinforced how in their relationships with and treatment of Peggy, Don and Ted are two sides of the same coin, even if Peggy sees Ted as a hero and Don as a villain.

    • Chris

      Almost everything with Ted and Don this season is a contrast between how they handle the same things in opposite ways: temptation, work, friends, family, spouse etc. In every instance Ted is the good example and Don the bad one.

      • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

        I don’t know. I don’t think Ted’s handling of Peggy has been very “good.” Even if he hasn’t physically acted on it, stringing someone along in an emotional affair isn’t a very nice thing to do.

        • Chris

          Peggy wants to be strung along. She made it very clear she was willing to go for a real affair but he wasn’t. She offered to leave SC and even though he was struggling with himself he didn’t take her up on it. They are both equally involved and enjoying it. Peggy didn’t even seem to consider Abe a fraction as much as Ted did Nan. Peggy’s a grown woman and she has to take her half of the blame.

          • sekushinonyanko

            Peggy wasn’t married to Abe, and she didn’t have children with him. It wasn’t even made clear his name was on the lease. It makes sense that she would not consider him as much of a factor as Ted would consider Nan to be because Nan objectively is more of a factor in Ted’s life. His kids, his name, a wealth of acquaintances, a whole half of his family, his property, all attached to Nan as his wife. Two childless people shacking up that aren’t even seen interacting with one another’s respective friends or one another’s professional lives is not even on the same level. Ted really should be more cautious than Peggy because he has a hell of a lot more to lose, and as someone that has never been married, is surrounded by serial and apparently unrepentant adulterers, and has fooled around with married men before, it’s easy to imagine Peggy doesn’t really get what a big deal them having an affair would be. She doesn’t see lonely ass Pete and Duck sitting in their depressing pads alone. She has a good job, so she never has to worry about being Jane, Trudy or Betty in need of either resting on their parents’ goodwill, a contentious and expensive divorce resulting in a hellova settlement, inheritance, or finding a new husband to make it after getting left by/having to leave your adulterous husband. I think it’s easy to see Ted as not really being conflicted, but just playing that up to string Peggy along without the fallout of a real affair, but it’s possible that he actually has the sense to realize how much it would fuck up his life to have an affair and be struggling with that in ways Peggy can’t begin to understand. All she needed Abe for was to chase out rats.

      • Alice Teeple

        I’ve been calling them “Goofus and Gallant” all season. Hahahaha!

  • Sonia Perez

    I’ve been thinking a lot about Peggy calling Don “a monster”. It seemed
    kind of over-the-top. I did think he brought to attention their
    careless flirting and use of client’s money, but I think he could have
    gone about it in a more tactful way. So, I kind of understand a little
    better why she said monster even though she was in the wrong too. He
    could have handled it better by calling them in privately and saying
    what he saw without embarrassing them in front a room full of people.
    He’s a monster because she knows all about his infidelities and never
    punished him for it. But here he is punishing her for something she has
    not [yet?] acted on. AND he often gets his way with clients when he
    feels justified and here he is not allowing Peggy or Ted to get their
    way with the client.

    • Joan Arkham

      I saw it as a reference to “Rosemary’s Baby” (one of my favorite movies). The baby was born the son of Satan, but it wasn’t really his fault, right? And even Satan’s baby got the love of his mother in the end…unlike poor Don.

      • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

        I keep thinking about that scene where Peggy held Don’s head in her lap after Anna died, and I think to some extent that, with the knowledge of her abdicated motherhood, makes him see her as yet another mother figure to him…and in this situation, another instance where his mother has rejected him.

        • Joan Arkham

          Now I’m starting to think the first half of this season was “whore” and the second half is “mother”.

    • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

      Don wouldn’t care about her infidelities if she weren’t cheating on him. Professionally speaking.

    • Sagecreek

      Nah. He was a monster. That save had nothing to do with the account, and while he might be able to convince Ted that it did? Peggy knows him. She knows exactly why he did it, and that he is, truly, a monster.

      • ldancer

        My read on that was that Peggy was disgusted by Don’s playing with what was a serious situation, where Ted had lost a dear friend and colleague. Don was manipulating very real grief in a work situation. That’s one layer. There was also the obnoxious calling-out of their flirtation, and the fact that he gave her idea to a man. But I think her disgust about the first thing was very genuine. I do wish that she would start explicitly calling out the sexism she’s experiencing. But I don’t know if women did that at that time.

        • SFree

          Not in 1968. That’s why it’s so fun to watch Peggy. She is a trailblazer and often not sure what she should say or can say and get away with it. She’ll do fine in the 70′s, though.

        • Sagecreek

          Yeah, I gasped at the manipulation of the grief before the whole “taking credit away from Peggy” even dawned on me.

          • Alice Teeple

            Yeah, that was a sick and particularly horrible twist; to bring up the dead man as an emotional game in a professional meeting. This would be the equivalent of Peggy bringing up Anna to publicly humiliate Don.

          • Chris

            Great point! I hadn’t even thought of it that way!

    • Chris

      Peggy knew it was all based on personal malice. Don’s motivation wasn’t the agency or the client it was to hurt Ted and Peggy. Not just hurt and embarrass Ted but go in for the kill. The client and the money were the excuses he needed to do so.

    • DeniseSchipani

      I’m struggling with “monster” too. And with her saying, you killed him, you killed the ad, you kill everything (or something like that).

      • siriuslover

        I think it’s because he’s psychologically messing with Ted in a way that is destroying him, according to Peggy. Ted ran from the office…Don won…Ted is no longer in control of his own company…Peggy knows these games, she’s seen them from Don many many times.

        • Chris

          Yes! He sat up that night calculating the most hurtful things he could say or do to Ted. He zeroed in on all his vulnerable points. It’s surprising Don didn’t do better in the war, he really knows how to go in for the kill.

    • tg

      It reminded me of when Bert called Don a monster after Don wrote the anti-tobacco letter and was accused of ruining the firm. I don’t know if it was meant to be call back that scene or not though. In both cases, Don claimed he was trying to help the firm, but he didn’t confer with other partners before taking action. In one case, he gets called out for not using the other partners’ names. In the other, he gets called out for using a (dead) partner’s name. That said, the scenarios are otherwise fairly different.

      • Hyphen

        I coincidentally watched ‘Quality of Mercy’ and ‘Blowing Smoke’ back to back. Don’s back was against the wall and he acted the lone rogue and selfishly in both episodes, yet one sparked with creative genius, the other showed his calculation, desperation and self-loathing. A brave and daring lion, versus a wounded tiger.

        It was also the episode when Don paid for Pete’s share of the extra funding SCDP needed to stay afloat, which was another parallel to this episode – there are rewards in being able to hold some knowledge over someone else.

    • SFree

      Don is a monster. A pretty one, but Peggy sees beyond that. She also has the history of speaking truth to him.

  • AZU403

    Sally’s accusation was more an exaggeration than a lie. I was in a similar situation to Sally’s when I was a little, only it went further, was far more unpleasant, and I never told my parents. It may not have been rape but it was in fact a sexual assault. Sally got out of it before anything actually happened to her, even if the boy didn’t think he meant any harm.

    • asympt

      Yes–especially since Sally is so young, that kind of nasty verbal coercion is more than just nasty. Calling a 13-year-old “frigid” is pushing damn hard on a girl that age’s uncertainty, whether or not Rolo’d admit it.

      • Abigail Adams

        I wonder if Rolo understood how young she was.

        • asympt

          Possibly not, but she was pretty obviously the youngest girl in the room and before she pulled out the major firepower of Glenn was doing everything *politely* possible to deflect him. (And FormerlyAnon’s post below is imgdo a pretty perfect take on the scene.)

          • vandeventer

            Do we know if Sally is younger than the other two girls? I know Kiernan Shipka is 13, but the character of Sally is 14 (or was 14 at the start of the season).

          • sweetlilvoice

            I don’t know if it was spelled out but she looked especially young in those scenes. That Dakota Fanning girl looked a lot of older, of course that was enhanced by her shorter skirt and tying her shirt up to show her stomach.

          • vandeventer

            Yeah, I agree – that one definitely did look/seem older.

          • asympt

            She certainly looks younger. More to the point, the headmistress would have put her in with some Old Girls (junior or probably senior age) for their assessments. It’s a regimented system of privilege at classy boarding schools like that.

            (Google for a Vanity Fair piece on Miss Porter’s School, a few years ago, very in-depth!)

          • vandeventer

            Ah, yes, that makes sense! Also, we know Glen is about 3 years older than her, so maybe the others were all around 17, while Sally is 14 going on 15.

          • asympt

            Yes, no-longer-creepy Glenn was making out with someone age-appropriate (and I’d venture at least as experienced as he is).

      • missinmass

        I got that “frigid” rap a lot.
        Boys…..:(

        • formerlyAnon

          It must have worked sometimes, don’t you think? ‘Cause it sure got worked!

          • asympt

            If the girl is very, very insecure. Which it’s not hard to find.

            Of course it also signals how insecure the boy is, except he’s taking it out on her instead of himself.

        • sekushinonyanko

          I’ve had guys almost equally call me frigid and a slut for not sleeping with them. Generally the former if they think that if I don’t want them I must not want anyone ever, and the latter if they are aware of the fact that I have had sex with other guys, and thus they know the issue is definitely them not me and they’re really butt hurt about it. I usually laugh in their faces now and tell the ones that call me frigid that I actually greatly enjoy sex with men that aren’t losers like they are, and the ones that call me a slut that it’s unfortunate that they’re so underwhelming that even sluts don’t want anything to do with them.

        • Qitkat

          Wow! this brought up a long-suppressed memory from ninth grade, where some boys were saying something similar to me. I remember having no idea how to respond so I think I ignored them.

      • formerlyAnon

        I wouldn’t expect a Rolo to understand how hard he’s pushing on a girl, verbally. He’s not a mature adult, he’s a high school boy and is seeing the situation through that lens. Men a lot older see women as holding the power because they get to say “yes” or “no” and such men are quick to think they’ve been jerked around because a woman has been (in her mind) barely polite but they think she’s been inviting/welcoming advances and then unfairly refuses to back up her “invitation.”

        Acceptable behavior can’t depend on “understanding,” not when Mother Nature wants young people to just make babies, dammit, and communication and empathy are so hard to do.

        That’s why the simplicity and no-interpretation-allowed-or-required of “no means no” is the best we’ve come up with in 40 years to teach our young people how to negotiate learning to act on their sexuality.

        • asympt

          Agreed entirely. Hell, Don’s hardly more mature than snot-nosed Rolo.

    • missinmass

      Sorry that happened to you. I am experiencing some major flashbacks when I watch this show, not all good. Especially the Vietnam stuff..my brother went and home life suffered but he came home… wounded but alive.

    • Qitkat

      As a parent, I would be heart-broken to learn something like this happened to my child, even if learning it years later. I hope you have been able to find a way to deal with it emotionally. So sorry.

    • cpetersky

      Me too – early 70s. It was pretty bad – one boy posted watch, while the other got as far as getting my shirt off. I had to be pretty strong as a 7th grader (they were two years older) to get out of the situation. The story of the attack with lots of embellishments and lies got around my school, and I was humiliated to the *core*. No consequences for the boys that I could see.

      So, if Sally exaggerated to get out of the situation? The power imbalance in this fictional character’s situation, as it was in my personal situation – pretty tipped away from the girl. She got it back into control. Good for her.

  • Elena Sophoula

    i had a feeling that moira’s outfit was a call-back to joan’s outfit from season 1 — that stunning dress with the dark navy on the bottom and the fitted red/blue striped bodice at the top. similar tones on moira, but a completely different shape & delivery. i’m not saying there’s some deep meaning to this, just that i think in the show’s playing with color motifs, you will invariably begin to see certain patterns/schemes played out on different figures/shapes/genders/ages with the progression of time and the development of fashion.

  • MK03

    And just as I predicted last week, Sally’s necklace is gone.

    • Chris

      I couldn’t remember who called it! Congrats! You were totally correct.

  • MilaXX

    I really hope Joan gets that Avon deal. It would go a long way to redeeming the way she got her partnership and I think could set up some interesting dynamics.

    • formerlyAnon

      Plus, with the right creative back up (that is, someone she can work with) she could be really, really good with a client that wants to appeal to a market that is starting to aspire to be a VERY idealized version of Joan: traditional “womanly” woman who’s also staked a place for herself in the marketplace.

    • quitasarah

      Do we know how long it usually takes for someone to “land” an account? And would the partners even let her continue on that path? Seems like the Avon episode was at least 2 months ago in “show time”, I have a feeling that ship has sailed. But I hope I’m wrong!

  • LML

    A lot of people (esp. in the last review) are saying how much Sally is like Betty now, but I agree with TLo… it’s just on the surface (hence the blue/yellow disconnect in their costumes). I think the parallels between Sally and Don are really the key here. After catching Don in the act, Sally has prematurely lost her innocence the same way Don did in the whorehouse. Now she is trying to rebel against Don by molding herself into Betty’s perfect daughter… but she doesn’t realize that she’s taking the same path as Don: transforming herself into a innocent, upper class prep to try and erase a corrupted childhood. The more Sally becomes Betty 2.0, the more she is actually following in Don’s footsteps. Getting into Miss Porter’s gives her the same validation that Don got from marrying Betty.

    Just my personal opinion… anyone with conflicting theories please feel free to share!

    • Chris

      I think your points are all valid but I would say she is like both of them. She loved having that power over Glen like Betty gets a charge out of having men compete for her. She reacts to Don the same way Betty does often. I think it was best summed up when Betty and Don were discussing her at camp and each were convinced she was like the other one.

    • tg

      That seems like a good description. We saw her start openly drinking and smoking this episode, but I wonder if we’ll see her having sexual encounters. Unlike Don, she thankfully knows how to say no. Didn’t her friend in the cab indicate Sally hadn’t done anything with boys yet? Maybe the things she’s seen in the city will make her repress that side of herself. I can see it going either way, and I’m curious about how the show will ultimately play out her storyline.

      • MartyBellerMask

        Saving herself for Glen. He thinks of her as a sister, but she doesn’t think of him as a brother.
        It probably won’t happen before the series ends. She’s mature but still young.

        • sweetlilvoice

          Yes! I made this same comment on Monday. Poor Sally! Will she grow out of the little sis role? I hope she can be with Glen for the first time over some jerk she just met.

        • tg

          Ooh, I hadn’t thought about that. I recently rewatched the episode where Sally says she’s not sure how she feels about Glen, and assumed (despite the effort she put into getting dressed up for him later in the episode) that her uncertainty meant she wasn’t interested in him like that. I was probably projecting onto Sally my own desires not to have much more Glen in the story…

          That said, given how he’s one of the few characters to be there consistently for her and treat her like a person, I do like the idea of her trying to make it happen with him when she’s older. I’m also remembering Betty’s conversation with Sally about the importance of first kisses, and wondering if that’s stuck with her…

          • Bonjour

            Hey, but you know what’s weird? In the ‘Mitchell’ episode, when Sally and her Rye Model UN friend are talking about what they like about Mitchell, in the NYC cab, Sally says “his ass.” (Right?) I remember at the time thinking that was incredibly forward of her. Then we learn from friend that Sally hasn’t kissed a boy yet (i think) and then shortly afterward, S witnesses Dad in the act. Which I think clamps down on her sexual adventuring for some time.

          • Chris

            I got the feeling it was Julie’s idea to do the paper about Mitchell. She was the one who was boy crazy. Sally didn’t seem to have much to say or have a big interest in it so I thought she put “his ass” down to be provocative or for a laugh or to seem more sophisticated to the more experienced Julie.

          • asforteri

            Yes, Sally even says “it’s the only thing I could think of” when Julie is reading the Ass Line and laughing.

  • purkoy28

    funny how when don is watching megan on t.v. and she sais “im talking to u, dont u dare ignore me”, just like she said to him so many times in his real life, then he changes the cahannel right after she sais it…. like he wishes he could do and does in his own way when they are really fighting.

    • Guest

      I have to admit I would sometimes like to change the channel on my husband when we’re fighting, and I’m sure he feels the same way! Too bad Don never learned that the good stuff happens when you dig deeper and find out what is causing the anger. He’s too proud or unfeeling to change his selfish ways.

    • sekushinonyanko

      I did joke earlier that it’s become a running gag for the show to give Don (and us) ways to ignore what Megan says. We had the sirens, her voice literally fading away and now we have changing the channel. I wonder what they’ll think of next?

  • masspatriot

    Two thoughts:
    Clara’s straightening of Pete’s tie and ability to stand so close to him signals, to me, that she and he have been having a good time together out of the office. Gives her job security; gives him a woman to hang out with. She’s smart enough to know that it won’t amount to more than it is.

    Second, despite the many comments on your Monday column, you persist in thinking that when Sally said Rolo was trying to “force” her, that she was crying “rape.” She was saying that he was trying to force her — even to get to first base. It’s not clear that a 13-year-old girl would even really know what rape was, especially back in 1968. And she didn’t say “rape.” Why Glenn decided to teach Rolo a lesson may also stem from other creepy things Rolo’s done in the past.

    This is the one disappointing and incongruous reading you’ve made, and, today, you’ve doubled down on it. You’re looking at this from the social situation of 45 years later, and, frankly, you don’t have a clue how a 13-year-old girl would feel left alone with sleazy Rolo, who wasn’t taking “no” for an answer, and remained nasty even after Glenn arrived, saying she was a tease. Sally was not a tease at all — asking what his favorite music was, moving away from him, doing her best having had some of the first hard liquor she’d ever tasted. Enough said.

    • Lisa

      I don’t know this for sure, but I think that the relationship that many men had with their secretaries was intimate enough that tie-straightening, standing close would not mean that they were sleeping together.

    • 1tsplove

      I’m sorry but in what universe would Sally not know what rape is? In fact, Henry’s mother told her about it in the episode on the Richard Speck murders.

      • Sagecreek

        Yeah, I knew what rape was when I was 5. I know this because I apparently asked my mother to define the word right in the middle of her Methodist Women’s Group meeting.

        Fun times.

        • formerlyAnon

          I remember asking my mom what a prostitute was after reading a newspaper article in, maybe 3rd grade? She sent me to the dictionary (it wasn’t there, gotta wonder what bowdlerized dictionary we had in the house!)

          For the life of me, I don’t remember if I ever got an answer!

    • MilaXX

      Of course a 13 year old in 1968 would know what rape was.

      • Tasha

        I was a year older than Sally and both very smart and extraordinarily naive – I read the TImes every day when I was 12 and there was an article about a rape. I asked my mother what rape was and she told me to look it up in the dictionary, which would have been useful if I knew what “carnal” meant – (I knew what carnelian was, but that wasn’t actually useful!). I was probably on the innocent end of the spectrum, which Sally probably isn’t, but don’t underestimate the effect of no sex education and embarrassed parents on the ignorance of self-conscious girls. By 1968, I was 14 and knew what rape was, but I would probably not have known how to handle Rolo any better than Sally did.

        • SFree

          Honestly, Sally handled him brilliantly.

          • formerlyAnon

            She stood up for herself and what she [didn't] want in a way that girls her age are not always able to do, even today.

    • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

      I don’t “persist in thinking” that at all. I am responding to the many people in our comments section who referred to it as a form or rape or specifically referred to Rolo as a rapist. Not to mention the many comments expressing their disgust at us for supporting rape culture.

      EDIT: Also, this is the one and only time in this comments section this week anyone gets to tell us how “disappointed” or “disgusted” they are with us for making a textually based reading of a TV show and coming up with an interpretation they don’t like. We’re sick of it. Disagree and make your case. We welcome the discussion. Make it about how you feel about us personally and the comment immediately gets deleted. The conversation got completely out of hand on Monday and some people had to be banned after calling us rapists and accusing us of calling Sally a manipulative little bitch.

      • Doris Allen

        Gentlemen, I feel your pain.. You make an effort to provide intelligent and interesting commentary without the offhand slights prevalent in many similar posts (jealous, unemployed writers, all) and completely respecting the TEXT, and unreasonable individuals sling mud. Let them go read elsewhere, say I! Tlo for President!

      • housefulofboys

        I’m glad you said this. As much as I love reading the comments here, I got really upset seeing how the conversation about Monday’s post devolved, and can only imagine how you felt.

        And for the record, I WAS a 14-year-old girl in 1968, and I read the scene exactly as you two did. Also, see FormerlyAnon’s post earlier about social interactions and expectations during this time, which I think was spot on. Not only do too many people try to interpret the show through a lens of modern sensibility, but there’s no excuse for anyone to throw personal attacks into the forum here.

    • Erica

      I agree with TLo’s assessment, but I’ll add one thing. Sally wanted Glen out of that bedroom–not so much that she wants him for herself, but she didn’t like her friend being in there–and wasn’t interested in Rolo. The surefire way to do that was to make the situation sound more dire to Glen than it was. Which is why her new friend was correct–she likes trouble.

      • SFree

        THAT. That is the point. She wanted to be sure Glen came out of that room. And she did it in the most manipulative way possible. It is really not clear that she felt intimidated by Rolo at all, though she may have. But she didn’t like him and he kept moving forward. She needed that to stop and she needed Glen out of that room.

        • Frank_821

          It amused me that evil Marcia didn’t mind how the evening turned out. It seems like she respected Sally more for stirring the pot like she did

          • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

            me too

        • nosniveling

          I felt that way also- she doesn’t necessarily want to be physical with Glen, but doesn’t want anyone else to have him- just like Don and Peggy!

      • SportifLateBoomer

        Agree. I also felt that she “raised” the 2 mean girls, who were ready to kind of haze her, by pulling out her Glen card, a cool boy nearby who would come over w/smokes and booze. I think they respected her badassery and ability to fit in (holy crap who would want to fit in to that crowd?!). But I think she knew she was in a little over her head w/Rolo, she is younger than the others, but because she is Betty Draper’s daughter she extricated herself from the scary situation to her advantage with a little drama by summoning Glen and causing the scuffle between the boys.

        Well played Sally. I think she is fierce and has a good head on her shoulders and will channel the flaws of her parents into a powerful force. Not without a few hiccups along the way. But I’m optimistic for our girl.

      • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

        Interesting assessment, I read this scene as she was sort of pushed into having the guys come over to impress the two girls, wasn’t that into it, and manipulated a way into getting them to leave. I never felt for a second that she wasn’t in control of the way things played out. That way she got bonus points from the girl for having connections and left alone when she wanted it.

    • missinmass

      A 13-year old girl like Sally would be experiencing fear…fight or flight would kick in. The boy was way more sophisticated and she realized she was in over her head.
      Next year she will be like the blonde girl, or like “Girl Interrupted” or both. I would love a spin-off of Miss Porter’s in that era.

    • andrea

      I’m not 100% positive I REALLY understood what rape was when I was 13 (i went to Catholic school. We were rather sheltered). What I DO remember is being incredibly self-conscious and trying to almost make myself invisible when it came to social situations, especially when boys were involved because I was positive I’d do something socially awkward and stupid. :)

      Sally, for many reasons I am sure, simply did not WANT that kind of attention from Rolo. Period. She did a fine job I think of standing her ground (and I was soooo happy to see that she did!) but I got the impression she just wanted it to be over. She did what she needed to get on the girls’ good sides, but when it escalated into uncomfortable territory, she was done. Party over.

      I do think she liked Glen coming to her rescue, even though I got the sense she had the situation firmly in control. I mean look at the times: Women were CONSTANTLY objectified, and she’s just witnessed her own father doing this. Look at how many secretaries have let men do whatever they want with them. I fully expected Sally to cave and at least let him get to “first base” because what has she seen in her life to give her confidence to REFUSE?

      • formerlyAnon

        I thought a lot about what gave her the confidence to draw her line and stick to it. She really DID hold her own line much harder than the typical girl her age could have been expected to do.

        Some holdover perspective from her days with the psychiatrist? Some lesson learned from watching Betty, who hasn’t always been a strong figure but who hasn’t always shrunk from conflict, either? Just being self-protective far beyond the norm because she’s been living in the eye of her parents’ shit storms for so long? Has Henry ever sat her down and given her an empowering talk about handling young men that she’s managed to anchor to?

        Some of those speculations being more likely than others, obviously.

        • NoveltyRocker

          I think she was angry. She used the same kind of fist shake and growly, indoor shout we’ve seen in other scenes where the direction was “Sally is mad”, and this character has been shown to lash out in rage when she’s reached her limit. This review draws a parallel between Don’s punishing instinct and Sally’s and I think it’s the strongest tie-in between the two story lines.

          • formerlyAnon

            Oh that’s interesting – and an example of how one’s own blinders limit one’s perspective. I didn’t see real anger – more a semi-panicky/petulant lashing out – because, I’m sure, I don’t myself go to flat-out clean anger easily. But when you bring it up it seems it could be in character for Sally.

          • NoveltyRocker

            She did seem panicky, then petulant but I guess I just see petulance as a specific flavor of its root emotion, anger. From what I’ve read, rage is a common reaction to loss of control for children who’ve felt abandoned emotionally or physically. Some people internalize and beat themselves up and some lash out at the outside world. Or some combo of the two like we’ve seen with Don, whose story this season is pretty wrapped up in that original wound, parental abandonment.

    • TheAmericaness

      Considering what Sally caught her Papa doing, I think she was quite well aware of what sex was and whether she was being forced to do something or not. It was her first experience (as far as we know on the other end of the camera) and the little jackass she was with was an ass and she was confused and upset and instead of saying he was a jackass she made it sound more than it was. She knew it too. She’s smart. She’s her daddy and her momma all wrapped into one. Maybe not completely doing this all on the surface, but her gut reaction was to manipulate the situation to save face as her momma’s little lady, as much as she hates that version of herself. She might as well buy a road map and a good car and ask her daddy for directions to a fucked up life just like his because as of this episode, that’s where she’s headed. God, it’s like the Sopranos.

      • ybbed

        When she knocked on the door to call out Glenn I saw that more as wanting a friend, someone she could count on at that moment. It just kind of escalated but I don’t think it was so calculating on Sally’s behalf. Once she saw a pounding going on I think she just felt justice was being served.

  • 1carmelita

    I thought Peggy’s colorless dress in the scene with Ted and Don almost looked like the color of flesh. When Ted touched her waist it gave that gesture an even more intimate feeling.

    • Chris

      Janie Bryant used to refer to Megan’s beige sparkly interview dress as her “nude” dress. I think you are right it was a way to add a very subtle hint of sexiness to an outfit that is not overtly sexy.

    • Wellworn

      Good insight there. I also thought it had a pinkish hue, like all the nightgowns for that earlier episode where Don was molested by the hooker.

  • housefulofboys

    I love Megan’s cranberry red outfit, I didn’t realize until I saw the screenshot that it was actually a suit. Beautiful color on her.

    • MilaXX

      I saw it more as another version of the Sunkist Ocean spray conflict rather than another whore red for Don.

  • Mary Nease

    Ah, what a contrast to the days of Sally sneaking a cig in the bathroom and Betty blowing a gasket over it.

    • Carrie

      Right!? That scene always stood out in my mind because Betty’s concern about Sally’s smoking (at age, what?, eight?) wasn’t that she’d ruin her health, it was that she’d burn down the house.

  • Judy_J

    The girls room at Miss Porter’s is spot on. Those flower stickers were everywhere in 1968. I loved seeing the stuffed animals on the mantle. I had one exactly like that dog with the keg under his neck….where in the world did they find that? The attention to set design and costuming is outstanding, and a big part of why I love this show.

    • decormaven

      I covet that inflatable pillow with the yellow polka dots on the bed. Very of the moment for that time.

      • Judy_J

        I just noticed that awesome psychedelic Dylan poster. Had one of those, too.

        • decormaven

          Yes. That Milton Glaser poster was an insert in the Dylan’s Greatest Hits album.

    • formerlyAnon

      Those damn flower stickers were forever, too. Well into the 1980s you would see them in bedrooms because they were so hard to remove without damaging the surface to which they’d been affixed.

      • Judy_J

        It was popular at the time to stick those flowers on your car, especially if that car was a VW bug. My high school annual has a photo of students proudly posing next to their flower-power cars.

        • formerlyAnon

          My clarinet case was adorned.

          • housefulofboys

            OK, formerlyAnon, this is getting a little weird. Are we twins separated at birth?

          • formerlyAnon

            Ha. I think we were legion.

        • Cheryl

          Yes, I put them on my little white 1967 Datsun.

    • VictoriaDiNardo

      And you can just bet that giraffe picture was outlined in black cord with little colored stones glued into the spaces!
      If you ever go to a vintage/collectable toy show, it’s like walking through your childhood. With the added stab of – “why did I throw that out – it’s selling for a hundred bucks!” or more. My husband used to collect lunch boxes and it was shocking what you could get for a Charlie’s Angels box. Superman – forget it! More regrets…..more hoarding…

      And I too want another inflatable pillow!

  • housefulofboys

    About the St. Joseph’s client meeting. I’m not convinced that Don walked into that meeting with the intent of punishing Ted and Peggy. After all, Ted asked him to attend, and Ted told him that he was fully confident that he could persuade the client to agree to a bigger budget for the ad. Don said nothing while Ted tried to convince the client, but Mr. St. Joseph was having none of it, and even (as I recollect) pushed himself back from the table a little, which I would interpret as a negative response. It was only then that Don – who is nothing if not quick on his feet – proposed the Frank Gleason interpretation, and took the opportunity to twist the knife a little in the process, cause it felt good. If Ted’s arguments had succeeded, there would have been nothing for Don to say about it.

    • MilaXX

      I think Don was itching for a fight the minute he saw them Ted & Peggy at the movies. Everything he did following that from calling Stan about Sunkist to sabotaging the St.Joseph’s meeting was aimed at punishing Ted and Peggy.

      • Chris

        Yes he was absolutely stunned an angry at seeing them. From the minute he got home and to a phone it was war. Never mind Ted may have saved Sylvia’s son Mitchell’s life pulling in a huge favor for him, not to mention everything Peggy has done for him, he decided they must be destroyed. The fact they were at the movies must have been particularly galling for him.

        • Robyn Garrett

          Actually, a more interesting question might be whether or not Don realizes why he’s doing it. I know someone with a similar lack of introspection/inability to change and, while it seems painfully obvious to the outside, the person has almost no idea of what motivates the bad behavior. It’s very “this is what you made me do” instead of “I felt bad, so I acted horribly.”

          • formerlyAnon

            Yup. I know one of those. It’s interesting to watch someone who’s never before hit one of his issues/landmine baggage topics slowly realize that this intelligent, articulate and persuasive man has lost contact with objective reality in his take on a situation, though he STILL *sounds* intelligent, articulate and persuasive because he still sincerely believes he’s operating in reality. He almost immediately forgets anything that doesn’t fit in with his deep-in-denial perspective, even if that forgetting causes him much repetitive inconvenience, grief, annoyance and trouble. Being in the situation with him is disorienting, watching someone else navigate it is even more disorienting.

          • Robyn Garrett

            Maybe that’s what Rosemary’s baby grew up to be!

          • Chris

            I don’t think he does. Look at how many seasons it took him to make any kind of connection about sex and the “motherly” prostitute. I think he knows he was mad at Ted and Peggy but probably couldn’t articulate why if asked. Once he found an excuse to undermine them at work he told himself that was the reason, but Peggy sees the real him and Don just willfully lies to himself.

          • jen_wang

            It reminded me a lot of when Betty manipulated her stable friends into having an affair, and then refusing to take responsibility or empathize with her friend at all afterwards. She took a lot of pleasure in being able to judge someone else when she was feeling conflicted about things herself, and it seems like Don does the same thing here.

        • siriuslover

          Well, don’t you know it was Ted’s fault that Don’s relationship with Sally is screwed up? If he hadn’t saved Mitchell, he wouldn’t have called Sylvia, and if he hadn’t called Sylvia, she wouldn’t have turned him on, and then they wouldn’t have been having sex when Sally walked in the door. Yeah, it’s Ted’s fault and he deserved to be punished…
          Please note, this is not my interpretation. It’s snark with a little bit of what Don probably thinks in his own twisted way.

        • DoloresH

          What struck me is that he seems willing to throw Mitchell on a landmine just because he’s pissed at Ted. It isn’t clear to us whether Mitchell’s thing is a done deal or not, but there goes Don blowing up his agreement with Ted like it’s nothing. Seemed particularly evil of Don.

          • jen_wang

            I suspect Mitchell’s safe; Don’s a terrible person, but it doesn’t seem like Ted would do that to a kid, you know?

      • Vanessa

        Yes, that is why Don, who never arrives on time for meetings, was there early, at the head of the table, waiting for everyone else to show up.

    • Robyn Garrett

      Don knew exactly what he was doing. He’s the one who got the client all worked up in the first place, setting it up so that Ted’s arguments couldn’t persuade the him.

      I wonder what Joan thought of all that. It’s almost a move that she might have played herself in seasons 1 or 2 (probably not in front of a client, but certainly in front of coworkers).

      • Cheryl

        He didn’t get the client worked up; he sent them the inflated budget. They had the right to know that they were going to be billed at $50,000 before the casting had started. If he hadn’t, they might have refused to pay (since they hadn’t approved anything over $15,000.) Then SC&P would have been responsible, and they might have lost the account all together.

    • DoloresH

      Please forgive me if this has been posted before, but I know the Mad Style folks will know the answer. Would Frank Gleason have even seen the movie Rosemary’s Baby? He was sick for a while and died a few episodes back, so it seems odd that he would have been able to catch that movie. I know the book was out, but the commercial seems to be a visual idea that is directly taken from the movie (been a while since I’ve seen it though.)

      Seems like if Peggy does get that Clio for “Frank Gleason’s last idea” people might start putting that together.

      • housefulofboys

        This episode takes place at the very end of October. IMDB says that Rosemary’s Baby was released in June of 1968, so it’s not inconceivable that Frank might have seen the movie. He was shown in the office earlier this year and was well enough that Ted didn’t know he was sick until Frank told him.

        • Cheryl

          I think he was shown in the episode of RFK’s shooting, which was June 4, when Ted visited him in the hospital. Don was cutting it close, but I’m not sure anyone will be able to put the facts together — who would really wonder enough about it to notice exactly when he entered the hospital?

  • Fordzo

    I’ve just gotta say, Marten is growing into a very handsome young man.

    • SJ

      I know the kneejerk is to yell “Ahh Creepy Glen!” when he appears, but I thought his acting was much more natural this episode.

      • SFree

        Not much more. Let’s go with a smidge.

    • sekushinonyanko

      Him growing into his looks helps his creepiness even out a lot.

  • Laylalola

    Sally’s side ponytail — I suspect that’s right on point for the era. In the early-1970s my proper grandmother did this to my kindergarten hair once. It was the only time in my life I wore it that way, it looked so odd to me but she insisted it was what all the girls at the high school she taught at used to do.

    • Chris

      I think she picked it up from troublemaker Julie. Now Sally is doing some troublemaking of her own.

      • teensmom99

        They actually got it from Cissy on Family Affair. At least that’s why I always wanted to wear my hair that way.

  • J. L. A.

    I think Betty becoming a politician’s wife has given her more happiness than the weight-loss. She has something to do now and a reason to keep herself in “fighting shape” as Joan’s mother put it. Betty’s always been the classic bored housewife, happiest when given attention from her husband and a sense of purpose. With Don, it was hosting and accompanying him to client dinners. But Don kept a lot hidden from her, even his strategy going into the dinners. He just expected her to play her part and look pretty. But it is different with Henry because Henry respects her enough to fill her in on his game and what she needs to do in the social situations. But yes, she still greatly enjoys being admired and sought after as well.

    • Candigirl1968

      Betty is definitely at her best when she is “task oriented.” She doesn’t have much of an inner life or hobbies and friends to keep her occupied, and we’ve seen that when she is left completely to her own devices, she becomes adrift.

      • SFree

        Poor Betty. She is the stereotypical 50′s housewife and not a good mother. She would have truly benefited from having a job, but she was born at the wrong time.

      • J. L. A.

        Much better put than I managed! This role is what she was raised to do; a hostess with the added complexity of politics perfectly suits her.

    • Chris

      Yes, and we know Betty has all the tools to succeed. She is well educated, beautiful, clever, has a good pedigree and excellent social skills (when she wants to). Henry has given her not only prestige but something to focus her time, talents and energy on.

      • SylviaFowler

        Talents?

        • Chris

          Absolutely, having good social skills, knowing how to deal with the crowds and people involved in politics and fundraising are talents. I believe Betty is entirely capable of planning and hosting events for Henry. She dabbled in all those women groups in Ossining because she was bored with making butterscotch pudding and wanted to do something she felt mattered.

          • Bonjour

            And she’s a crack shot — good with a gun.

  • VermillionSky

    I’m pretty sure Megan is having an affair. I think she has decided that Don isn’t going to change and will always be a little distant (and probably a cheater) so she needs to do what her mother did to keep her marriage together (her father was a cheater and a bit disconnected from her mother, too) and find the companionship she wants outside the marriage. She’s just repeating the pattern they set up for her (one of the big themes of the show).

    • SJ

      Maybe that’s who she was calling when Julie was over last ep. “Are you calling your agent?”

    • Sagecreek

      It’s a pretty common theory, but I hope she is not. I wouldn’t want anything to mitigate against Don’s horribleness.

      • SJ

        I like the idea that Megan could be more complex that she seems. Betty was victimized by Don, but she was also slapping Helen Bishop and sleeping with a bar rando. Megan seems so one-note/sad marriage now (I don’t think that’s Jessica Pare’s fault). There’s just not enough time to show everything.

  • Florrie Brafman

    Re Sally’s short skirt on her Miss Porter’s interview — I remember wearing a way shorter, powder blue, pleated skirt for my interview at Barnard in 1972. MY MOTHER hemmed it for me.

    • barbarasingleterry

      Those short skirts were what every teenager wore in 1968. My mom and grandmother made most of my clothes, the hem lengths would not have passed the required 2 inches above the knee when kneeling dress code at my school. Both of them were very style conscious and since I wore colored tights with all my dresses they were hemmed at about 4 inches above the knee sometimes shorter. I had a great leather skirt that my mom found on a trip with my dad, it hit way above mid thigh, I loved it and wore it until I grew too tall. Cali style of course, not that preppy. Later, my mom hemmed my uniform skirts to a shorter length because they looked better on me….

      • Sagecreek

        Damn, I hated girls like you. I was forced to dress like I was Amish :)

        I still remember getting my first pantsuit. BWAHAHAHA.

        • barbarasingleterry

          Pants weren’t allowed at my schools except for 1 Friday a month and that didn’t start until I was in 10th grade. Only pantsuits were permitted, I borrowed one of my mother’s and felt very sophisticated…

          • Sagecreek

            7th grade here, but it had to be a PANTSUIT, out of matching material. Mine was green polyester.

          • Elissa Malcohn

            I’m closer to Bobby’s age than Sally’s. Until seventh grade, the girls in my public school couldn’t wear pants unless the temperature dropped below 20 degrees F. My eighth grade class picture (1972) shows me in a polyester pantsuit about the same pink shade as Joan’s dress. I didn’t have the right body shape for short skirts; I went for longer skirts and bodysuits whose snaps frequently gave way.

            I still have my button collection from those days a la Glen’s jacket. My favorite: “Take Brooklyn Out Of The War,” black on yellow with a nice graphic of the bridge.

          • Doris Allen

            So true. I started college in the east in 1965 and you had to have written permission to wear slacks. By 1969, when I graduated, EVERYTHING had changed! Just that short corridor.

          • Wellworn

            I grew up in a Los Angeles suburb, so you would think we’d be a little more progressive, but the girls all wore slightly short skirts or dresses in the late 60s, and weren’t allowed to wear pants until 1969, I think. This was the LAUSD dress code for girls. And of course you had to wear knee socks with those skirts.

          • ybbed

            I was in L.A. too and I remember when I was in 10th grade in 1968 about half way through the year they changed the policy so girls could wear pants. I remember it because it was my first year in high school, so now that I think about it, maybe it was early in 1969.

        • formerlyAnon

          Oh yeah. To her credit, my mom grew up poor with literally 2 dresses most years – 1 school, 1 church – and made damn sure I always had a version of what was in style. But modest. So modest that yes, I envied those whose parents had apparently (as I thought) managed to travel out of the 19th century, unlike my own.

          • housefulofboys

            That reminded me that growing up I had 2 pairs of shoes, 1 school and 1 church. A far cry from the closet I now need for my shoes! Is this foreshadowing?

      • VictoriaDiNardo

        I was Sally’s age in 1968 and I remember my sister making me a dress with long sleeves which she had to double-check on me – once it was on the hanger she saw that the sleeves and the hem were in line. Now, my arms are a bit on the long side, but it was really that the skirt was THAT short. I don’t think I was allowed to wear it to school; it was a party dress! ( Ohio was NOT California, no matter how much Beach Boys music we played! )

    • housefulofboys

      Lucky! My mom was very conservative and my skirts were hemmed longer than most. So, after I left the house for school (I was 14 in 1968) I would fold the waistband over a couple of times to reach the proper level of coolness.

      • SFree

        In jr high (a little earlier, maybe 1965-66) if we rolled our skirts and we got caught at school, they had us get on our knees. The hem had to touch the floor. Looking back, how humiliating was that for a teenager?

        • desertwind

          My gawd. Seventh grade 1968-69 Pennsylvania.

          That kneeling-on-the-floor Hem-length check thing! I had no idea others suffered this. The smarmy vice ( ! ) principal. The grimy school hall.

          That jerk would also grab guys, pull them into his office and cut their hair!

    • b.read

      Curious about Sally’s skirt: why does the pattern change right at the bottom?

  • 1tsplove

    One more point about the Rosemary’s Baby parallels w/ Don–Matthew Weiner has said part of this season is about opening with the imagery of hell and Don deciding if he is going to pass through or take up permanent residence there. And all of his bad decisions–continuing the affair with Sylvia, being selfish with company decisions, refusing to cooperate w/ Ted, scarring Sally permanently, etc. have led him to his state of utter misery and self-loathing (i.e. hell) that we see in the final image of this episode.

    • golden_valley

      Brilliant on your part for recognizing it and Weiner for writing it.

    • SJ

      I’ve been spending all season trying to figure out who his Virgil is, and if he has one. At first I wondered if it was going to be Dr. Rosen with all of his “stop smoking” etc, but he’s kind of fallen apart. I thought of Ted flying him through a storm and above the clouds, or is it Dick Whitman? Maybe he won’t make it and take up residence as you say.

    • Chris

      And that episode was full of mother child references. All the talk of babies including Ken’s wife Cynthia, Don in the fetal position at the beginning and end, Peggy playing the radiant young mother in the ad run through, Rosemary’s Baby. Megan was even boiling eggs!

    • Elizabetta1022

      Just wrote about this, too–sorry, didn’t scroll down far enough to see your comment! I agree about the Dante/Hell imagery. Also, interesting that Peggy called him a “monster” and that he stood in for Rosemary’s baby in the St. Joseph’s commercial when Peggy and Ted reenacted it.

  • Therese Bohn

    The first thing I thought of when I saw Clara in her red jumper and half-back hair was Marlo Thomas in That Girl — Now I want to look up all of Clara’s fashions since she first arrived!
    And Megan’s matching coat was magnificent.

    • Chris

      It reminded me of the Partridge Family’s performance outfits.

      • Therese Bohn

        Ah, very true! Then Clara is ahead of the curve because The Partridges didn’t come out until 1970!

        • desertwind

          How about a Paul Revere & the Raiders look! (Mark Lindsay lives in your building, said Julie)

          In 1966, age 14, my husband’s first band The Cellophane Flower ( hee hee ha ha !!!!) wore matching Paul Revere style outfits.

          Every time he mentions the outfits, he complains about the sweaty polyester and the cheap scratchy lace!

          • decormaven

            That ruffled blouse is very evocative of the dandy looks coming over from Great Britain. I’m impressed Clara is working this. Off to see if anyone has started a Tumblr of Clara’s looks.

  • formerlyAnon

    Thank-you for this season’s “AHA, how could I have missed that!?” moment when you point out that Pete is Bob’s Betty – the ticket punch into the class to which he aspires. There was a palpable *click* as that slotted into place.

    I am also mostly with you guys on your take on the Glen/Rolo/Sally scene. And I was a girl about her age, less privileged but not so much as makes any difference, at the same time. Rolo was a LOT less aggressive than a number of guys I went through similar scenes with – all of which ended with me safely out of the one-on-one situation either because they were guys who – like Rolo – didn’t cross the line into physical force or because – as here – the situation was engineered to have a safety net – other friends readily to hand, some kind of accessible chaperonage, etc.

    Teen “dating” had stronger elements of ritual theater to it than it does now, partially a holdover from the days that reliable birth control wasn’t in the control of the woman. The guy was supposed to be the physical initiator, the girl, if she wanted a reputation as a “nice girl” was supposed to be trying to slow things down and/or needed to be talked into it. Yes it was largely total bullshit and real behavior deviated from this supposed norm – but it was a template that confused things mightily.

    The exaggerated concern for reputation makes little sense now, but think about the character Rizzo in the movie Grease – she’s supposed to be ‘fast’ and is treated disdainfully as a girl with a reputation – though as far as we see she confines her physical relationship to one guy. Her sin is apparently that people *know* about it and there’s the strong idea that people know that she’s **enjoyed** [gasp. horror.] being physical with guys.

    Sally mostly handled herself well, and she did factually exaggerate in how she phrased it to Glen – I’m not gonna blame her, she’s had a traumatic few weeks, emotionally there may not have been any conscious exaggeration. So I’m not sure she set out to disproportionately “punish” Rolo. I think it’s fair to call her on it, though because she seemed happy that Glen’s response got out of hand and it’s no more right that Rolo gets beat up than that Sally gets called names. Rolo deserved to be called out and receive a little peer pressure from Glen (“Man, don’t be an asshole. If she’s not into it, let it go”), but not the response he got.

    Not that it’s unrealistic that teen boys who’ve been drinking might have ended up in a physical fight. Especially if Glen has a bit of a loyalty thing for Sally. It would have been a
    lot MORE unrealistic if Glen and/or Rolo had any apparent understanding of “no means no” as it’s used today. A more likely outcome, if Glen weren’t apparently so loyal to Sally, would have been the classic “I’m on your side, man, but we gotta calm down the chicks” reaction where Glen would say something more like “Ah, forget about it. If she’s gonna be a prick tease, don’t waste your time on her.”

    • housefulofboys

      It’s difficult for people now to separate themselves from current cultural expectations to put themselves into the 60′s era emotionally. I was also Sally’s age and everything you say here about the boy-girl “mating dance” rings completely true to my experience, and makes the dorm room scene ring true as well.

    • DeniseSchipani

      very well said, thank you.

    • SFree

      I also dismissed some of the physical fight with Glen. First, they are friends, and teenage boys. They probably punch each other or wrestle regularly. And notice that Glen just grabs his coat and goes after him for the ride home. This wasn’t a big deal for these boys.

      • Chris

        Yes, I said the exact same thing under the regular Mad Men post. I have two brothers who would fight worse than that over something silly. I think Glen hit him twice and had no worries he wouldn’t give him a ride home.

  • Laura Renee

    Oh, but you didn’t mention Megan’s (quite atypical, yes?) blue nightgown of marital unhappiness when she tried to call Don to bed!

    • leighanne

      A very ghostly figure, to me. The look on his face along with the distance between them- she may as well not have been there at all.

      • Wellworn

        I agree. That scene seemed to be shot as if she were a ghostly apparition. She has already appeared as such when Don went loopy in CA. I wonder what it all means.

    • Chris

      I was trying to see if it was part green at all or just blue. Blue/green could tie into the adultery theories for Megan below.

    • sweetlilvoice

      Isn’t she kind of out of focus too? Like we are seeing her from the corner of his eye?

    • peterpapa

      This seemed to be calling back to her styling as Snow White in the commercial from the last episode of season 5. In addition to her styling, she’s blurry and in the distance.

    • Roz

      And it adds to the seemingly ENDLESS number of nightgowns/sleep ensembles Megan owns–representative of all the endless ways she is trying to win back Don–?

  • ashtangajunkie

    I love seeing Betty with her mojo back. I can’t say it enough – I missed fabulous Betty! I don’t know what to think about Peggy and Ted, but I certainly think about it a lot. I agree with the others who don’t think they’ve gotten physical yet, but yowza, that’s some chemistry. There’s so much to talk about in each episode, but once TLo pointed out Sally’s plaid dress mimicking Don’s bathrobe, my head pretty much exploded.

  • CristinaSalazar

    That moment when Sally’s darkness terrified her mother. That is why I love this show.

  • jozie310

    Why does blue/green symbolize adultery?

    • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

      It’s been a persistent and consistent motif all season. We invite you to read back through the Mad Style recaps to see examples.

      • Vanessa

        And now Sally and Betty wearing Blue and Green in the last scene in the car is just confusing me…..

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ foodycatAlicia

          Sally knows about Don’s adultery, Betty is committing adultery. I would suggest it is connecting them.

  • decormaven

    Just had an epiphany. Remember the dog statue we saw in the corner of Pete’s office last episode? That’s a callback to when Pete saw Duck’s dog, Chauncey, in S2′s “Maidenform.” Remember Pete suggested that maybe they should get a dog for the office to make them appear more friendly, easy-going toward clients? Even though Duck shot down that idea, Pete got a dog facsimile.

    • housefulofboys

      He just got another one – Bob Benson and his puppy-dog eyes.

      • decormaven

        Good call! He definitely has those sad eyes.

      • meowing

        And a puppy’s eager-to-please persona!

  • Elizabetta1022

    At the beginning of the season, TLo and a few others noted that Don was reading Dante’s Inferno on the beach. As the season progressed, each week we’ve found ourselves in a different “circle of hell.” (This past week being “fraud.”) I’ve been wondering where Don would end up in all of that, and I think Peggy’s exclamation makes it clear–Don is the Lucifer of this particular Madison Avenue hell. (I think the Dante allusion is why we’ve also had so many metaphors of the afterlife and mentions of death or near-death experiences–the door man, Roger’s mother’s funeral, the ad Don created of the man walking into the ocean, Abe’s stabbing, Frank Gleason’s death, Ken’s shooting, Rosemary’s Baby, and on and on.)

    This is also interesting to note (from Wikipedia) : “In Dante’s Inferno, Satan is portrayed as a giant beast, frozen mid-breast in ice at the center of Hell. Satan has three faces and affixed under each chin are a pair of batlike wings. As Satan beats his wings, he creates a cold wind which continues to freeze the ice surrounding him, and the other sinners in the Ninth Circle. The winds he creates are felt throughout the other circles of Hell….Scholars consider Satan to be ‘a once splendid being (indeed the most perfect of God’s creatures) from whom all personality has now drained away.’”

    Don has been losing his mojo all season–going through the motions (it seems to me) and almost imitating the Don who he thinks he once was. Also, I believe at some point the split identity of Dick/Don will be resolved, in one way or another, whether by a literal or figurative death.

  • bayusc

    Ohhh! Call back I didn’t think of before… In the episode with the intruder “granda Ida” – Sally was reading a copy of Rosemary’s Baby….

    • sweetlilvoice

      Great catch!

    • Roz

      Probably Megan’s!

  • decormaven

    Love that blue/gold dress Betty wears when she’s having the first conversation with Don in the kitchen. That’s a Talbots dress- I’d bet a nickel. They made some version of that outfit almost up until their latest evolution some 3 years ago.

  • http://hotmesshousewife.blogspot.com/ Hot Mess Housewife

    I appreciate that you two still took the time to write such a thorough Mad Style during Tom’s birthday – happy belated birthday Tom! Fabulous work as always. The fun of reading these is now trying to catch what TLo might comment on later in the week when I watch the episode! I was so proud of myself for noticing Megan’s cranberry top after Don poured the OJ during Sunday’s viewing!

    Anyone else feeling extremely frustrated by AMC not selling the SCDP/SC&P mugs they’ve been featuring this season? I would buy one in every style, I think they’re so cool and I would LOVE to have a little “Mad Men” mixed into my morning!

    • decormaven

      Another belated birthday shout-out to Tom. Thanks for working on your birthday to spin these little confections for us.
      Not to worry; if AMC doesn’t rush these mugs into production, someone else will (at least until the cease and desist is issued.)

      • MilaXX

        wouldn’t be surprised if Cafepress doesn’t have an entire Mad Men collection

  • Lattis

    Peggy, who is an almost totally neutral figure, with the only visual interest being a buzzing mass of tumult right over her heart.

    Just to say I love that observation and beautiful phrase.

    • peterpapa

      And that buzzing mass seems to be calling back to the black and red striped pattern on Moira in the scene just prior, which also happens to be over Moira’s heart in an otherwise solid, neutral outfit

  • MartyBellerMask

    Just WHAT is going on with Moira? There has got to be a story. Maybe she feels guilt not over discussing the flirting, but just knowing it is happening. I don’t think she dislikes Peggy as much as she dislikes her relationship with Ted.
    Perhaps she has a personal connection with Ted and Nan. Wouldn’t that be an interesting reveal, if Moira turns out to be Nan’s niece or something. But I really shouldn’t speculate because I’m never right. LOL
    I can’t wait for next week! Or for next season. Dammit MAD MEN, why did you waste so much time the first half of this season??

    • meowing

      Isn’t next week the finale (already??)?

      • bxbourgie

        Already. :(

    • Wellworn

      I think, having been his secretary for so many years, she has seen what a good guy he is, not a philanderer like many others. Plus she has those years of loyalty. I think she’s just protective because she doesn’t want to see her golden boy boss tarnished.

    • Bonjour

      Moira, with her Shalimar, holds a candle for her chivalrous boss. Now that she’s spurned by him, she’s willing to disloyally dish with Don about his (T’s) misbehavior and poor taste around the office. She put out vibes that both Don (her red lipsticked mouth — when he was high?) and Cutler both noticed. But she wasn’t chosen. So she’s pouting.

  • melanie0866

    I can’t stop wanting Megan’s outfit. Love that dark cranberry red. I would wear it to work tomorrow. (Well, maybe I’d have to wait until Fall, because it’s hot here in Texas. Still, I covet it.)

    • Judy_J

      I’d wear it, too. I’m also in Texas (Austin), but the AC is turned down so low in our building that I could be comfortable, at least indoors.

  • mizzelle

    Was I the only one reminded of Partridge Family looking at Clara’s frilly blouse?

    • vandeventer

      Yep, Laurie Partridge all the way.

      • formerlyAnon

        Good lord. How I wanted to BE Laurie Partridge.

        • Frank_821

          I don’t blame you. I always thought Laurie was way cool, smart and appealing. Way more so than Marcia Brady. But then again Laurie was in a rock band. I imagined all the girls kissed up to because of it. That and to try to get a chance with Keith :p

        • DeniseSchipani

          Connection! Laurie Partridge = Susan Dey, who played opposite Harry Hamlin in L.A. Law. Which means exactly nothing, but still. I’m glad Laurie was brought up, though, because Clara was reminding me of SOMEONE and it was her, I just couldn’t put my finger on it.

          • housefulofboys

            Six Degrees of Separation…

    • fnarf

      I agree with you totally, but it’s a bit prochronistic. Partridge Family was September 1970 to March 74. I watched every episode live and a couple of times since!

      I think Mad Men has been just a teensy bit ahead of where they should be at time. This one is probably OK, but “Jimi Hendrix” wasn’t in the mainstream consciousness — middle-class America was not wearing the fashions of rock stars for another few years. But it is New York….

    • chylde

      Clara’s in a Chevy commercial. Her name is Alexandra Ella. Funny name! Cute girl.

  • teensmom99

    One tiny quibble which seems so mean spirited of me given your brilliant elucidation of all things Mad Men–I don’t think Sally’s plaid dress is too short. Girls wore really short dresses then. She would have been seen as more of a girl than a teen. I was only 6 in 1968 (ahem) so I was/am much younger than Sally but I had versions of that dress and they were super-short–shorter than hers. At her age, I think that shortness would have been okay. And with that, it’s time for my cran-prune.

    • housefulofboys

      That made me laugh out loud!

    • AViewer44

      I am about 3 years younger than Sally but I was wearing incredibly short skirts in 1969, barely covering my bottom. However, the principal at my private school took me aside for a talk. ….. But I agree, I don’t think Sally’s skirt was all that short.

      • Cheryl

        What about wearing white socks? I was 19 at this point but I thought it’s more likely she’d be wearing knee socks (especially since we know it’s October) or tights than little white socks.

        • formerlyAnon

          I’d agree, but we weren’t as preppy as the Drapers. So maybe that makes a difference?

    • misscellaneous

      TOTALLY Agree. I have Easter pictures with my sisters of that time and our dresses were SO short if we dropped something we didn’t dare bend over and pick it up. Not in front of church anyway…

  • Chryslin

    Just had to weigh in for the first time. The big thing that stuck out for me was that Sally was wearing the same hair style as her bitchy but fashionable friend from the previous week (can’t remember her name). But it wasn’t quite done well – she had a strand straggling down the opposite side. It seemed to reinforce the idea that Sally is still a little girl playing at being more sophisticated and adult.

  • http://piblet.tumblr.com/ Anastasia

    After someone mentioned Pete and Bob = Mr. Burns and Smithers from the Simpsons, I google image-ed “Smithers and Burns” and there was a picture of them getting attacked by squirrels! (“CARA!! MY GUN!! … Excellent”)

    I can’t help but think Matt Weiner’s been kicking himself in hysterics for the last 6 seasons because no one caught on until now.

  • dickylarue

    An episode without Manolo felt like an eternity. That is all.

    • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

      We miss that charming, ascot-wearing Spaniard.

      • 3hares

        “That Spanish fly…”

      • Damien W

        It’s like Mad Men suddenly became The Drowsy Chaperone, complete with its very own Adolpho.

        Another stellar essay. Thanks.

      • Elizabetta1022

        He is fabulous! PS And Happy birthday, Tom. Hope you and Lorenzo are living it up!

  • SnazzyO

    You write the best reviews. Hands down.

    Every line is a treasure.

  • Paula Pertile

    Thanks. Delicious, as always.

    Personal note about Rosemary’s Baby: I saw it as a kid, sitting between my parents. My Mom spent most of the movie covering my eyes with her hand, and was mad at my Dad for letting me see it because he’d read the book, and knew what it was about. I didn’t get to see it properly until years later, and now never miss it when it comes on.

  • Sarah Zibanejadrad

    I know I am a bit late to the party on this, but I just now came across this blog and it’s everything I could ever want. Now, to address one minor note to add: Bob has been seen without his jacket once before when he was escorting Joan to the beach. Who wears short shorts? Bob wears short shorts.

  • Wellworn

    My sister and I had those groovy orange and yellow flower decals in our groovy orange and yellow 60s bedroom.

  • SportifLateBoomer

    Brilliant analysis, as evah. Big Gratitude. Learned so much more about the characters and the era. So many callbacks/memory triggers for me in this episode:

    –I used to shoplift those same flower stickers, on the mantle in the girls’ dorm, from the psychedelic store at the mall. I remember keeping some and disposing of some of the evidence by a fence, where a neighbor found them and I thought I’d be caught out.

    –I totally had that suitcase of Sally’s — I think w/green and blue flowers (adultery theme! way back then, a foreshadowing!).

    –My older sisters and I had Rolo’s “buffalo” sandals, I think that’s what they were called. Very groovy. Made your feet black with the dye wearoff.

    – That daisy crewelwork wall thingie also appeared somewhere in my childhood. And I had a much-adored Snoopy, which my father still has for some reason.

    Re: the Peggy/Ted office romance…early in my PR agency career I had a big flirtation with a somewhat older, slightly more senior colleague. We acted exactly like that — the in-jokes, the touching, the egging each other on, I was kind of his protege and I adored him. It felt so familiar. Funny, he also blew hot and cold, I made a move at one point and he was ambivalent and it never went anywhere. Although he wasn’t married there was much guilt.

    What does it say about me that I still love Don and have hope and compassion for him? Other than I like me some sexy, smart, handsome bad boy/man?

    I would kill, kill I say, for Megan’s tapestry coat/skirt ensemble. I would wear the hell out of it this fall.

    • housefulofboys

      yes, all of the above, except the shoplifting :-)

    • charlotte

      Not that I don’t like that ensemble in clothes-form, but I’d love to have it as a carpet.

  • Virginie

    This is just to say how much I love all of your Mad Men commentary. You guys never cease to amaze me with your insights.

  • Adibug

    I have a burning desire for that umbrella stand outside Pete’s office.

  • Chris

    At Miss Porter’s in the dorm room scene are those Avon perfume dolls on the yellow shelf behind the blonde girl with the tied up shirt? An Avon shout out maybe? Or are they bells?

    • fnarf

      I think they’re Dreampets. My sister had a million of them. Cartoonish animal shapes in a velvet-like flocked fabric, filled with sawdust, which they had a tendency to leak (a tendency exacerbated by the rough handling of an asshole big brother, i.e., me).

      • Chris

        I think that’s on the mantel right? They do such a great job of getting just the right touches for every room. And shame on you about the Dreampets! Lol.

      • decormaven

        I think a lot of them are Dreampets as well. The eyes are more cartoon-like on a lot of them, similar to other Dreampets. Where are the troll dolls?

        • formerlyAnon

          I would have thought these girls were a little too old for troll dolls. I remember them fading out before middle school – we still *had* them, but they were stashed away somewhere, with the favorite Barbie stuff we were also too old to want to admit to keeping.

          • decormaven

            Probably so, but since some of the items look a bit juvenile, I figured a troll doll would have hung around as well. Didn’t they release a line that was dressed in hippie garb? Seems like I remember those.

    • sisterb67

      They *ARE* Avon perfume dolls! They were from Avon’s Cotillion cologne, my friend’s older sister had them on her dresser (they were all empty, but we loved the bottles – the one on the left has a purple and green plaid skirt!)

      • Chris

        Great eyes! Hopefully this is a good omen for Joan!

  • Angelfood

    Great review as always, the highlight of my week. So sad that the season is almost over… Went by so quickly. And no more mad style for a while. Does anyone know if there will be a long lag between seasons?

    • Cheryl

      They usually start filming in late August or early September. Hopefully they’ll start releasing some “teaser” photos at the end of the summer.

  • WhitleyGilbert

    Love the post, as usual, though I have to disagree about the girls’ room at Miss Porter’s, where I think Dan Bishop took some serious creative license. It’s a dorm room at a boarding school, not their home bedroom, and the furniture and decor would be much plainer and more institutional than this. Posters, sure, but wallpaper seems like a huge stretch. I would also expect more utilitarian, beat-up dorm furniture–bunk beds, dressers, etc.

    • charlotte

      The girl said that her room was supposed to be the living room, so maybe the other girl’s room is more dorm-like. Given that it is a high-end boarding school that provides living rooms, this kind of furniture seems realistic. The parents are paying loads of money after all.

      • Bonjour

        It’s not juvie, it’s Miss Porter’s. I agree. Parents will expect to see Yankee thrift but not institutional crap. I’ve seen wallpaper and iron bedsteads in boarding schools like this one.

        I do agree with the commenter who thought the Mean Girls was anachronistic, and an example of bad/lazy/young/uninformed MM writing. Same for the commenter about Bob Benson not being as fleshed out a gay character as we would wish, same for Ginsberg, same for Dawn. Really this show is brilliant but not flawless. And better at telling the story of the mainstream than of period subcultures.

        Anyway thinking on Talented Mr Ripley, Hemingway stories and Salinger stories, the upper American class could be very welcoming and social in that period, it seems to me, even to outsiders (and Sally isn’t an outsider) — they would just freeze you out or talk behind your back, if they didnt like you, rather than actively haze you. Whit Stillman’s Metropolitan fits the profile too. Another example is the movie Quiz Show, when Rob Morrow’s character (Goodwin, Jewish, 1st in his class at Harvard, Doris Kearns Goodwin’s husband) gets invited over to Ralph Fiennes’ character’s family farm/country house, and reports back to his wife “you should see how these people LIVE!” (It’s east coast WASP paradise with sailing, cultured dinner table conversation, father and son Columbia professors) and everyone is super kind and welcoming towards him. Obvs they are adults…but I still think period-wise the boarding school girls would be sniffing out Sally’s class status in subtle ways, to ‘place’ her while still maintaining sheen of good manners; it’s an art they’ll get better at with age. Obviously not the writers’ agenda tho

    • Laylalola

      The dorms are actually houses — think, Sorority Houses — and house between 20 and 40 girls. Jacki O went there; Vanity Fair has written about the school. It’s not your typical utilitarian beat-up dorm.

  • alex

    What I wouldn’t give, down the road after Season 7, to know what Matthew Weiner makes of these insights, comments, projections, sublimations, analyses, connections, allusions, theories, afterthoughts—put forth by the diversity of maddicts. As we are compelled to offer our brilliant—and occasionally “feeble” remarks— (who cares?), we take the risk because we connect in such a vital moment in history.

  • Karly Beaumont

    I love these Mad Styles and I’ll miss them when the season is over. May I suggest that you guys do a podcast for season 7. Thanks!

  • Sweetvegan

    Thank you, TLo!

  • ItsDicey

    Wow, thank you T & Lo for this. You blow my mind with your attention to detail. Bravo, guys!

  • oat327

    Is it just me, or do half of Glen’s buttons seem to be pro-war (“To Hell with Hanoi” and “Win in Vietnam”) and half of them seem to be anti-war?

    • fnarf

      I noticed that. I think that’s about right, actually; I had badges (and stickers), and I would wear one regardless of what it said just because they were cool — and the really cool thing was having a lot of them, so whatever it says, the more the merrier. There’s no ideology there either way; just a kid trying to be hip.

      • not_Bridget

        TLo pointed out that, due to the boys’ backgrounds, Vietnam wasn’t a real threat to them. They would be safely in school for as long as possible. If necessary, they probably hade the connections to get a cushy National Guard posting–or some such.

        If he had to consider the War seriously, Glen might have had a consistent set of buttons….

  • TritoneTelephone

    Your mistake wasn’t assuming SC&P would screen applicants. It was assuming Weiner & Co. knew enough about gay people to write the character you described last week. They write a good Don Draper, so they just made another one and added “gay.” I’m very disappointed, I loved your “best little boy in the world” analysis!

  • ybbed

    Another nice touch, thanks to the set designers, in the preppy room there are all those wool crewel embroidery pieces hanging on the walls. I think I counted at least three of them and that was such a popular craft back then! I remember doing these, my mom made them, there were kits and books everywhere, which eventually developed into all the hippie embroidered jeans and other clothing items. Being a fiber artist these just screamed out at me and brought back so many memories.

    • misscellaneous

      Can macrame be far behind?

      • formerlyAnon

        No, it is not!

  • HM3

    Anyone else notice the orange-and-white striped similarities in Peggy’s scarf, Dorothy’s scarf, and the suit for the lady from Miss Porter’s? It seemed really distinct amongst the three ladies. The only other woman on the show with an equally bold stripe was Moira, though her black, red, and grey stripe fanning out into her suit jacket collar signaled increasing trepidation. Wonder what to make of these stripes…

    Also what of the red-and-black motif? We are being bludgeoned by it: Megan and Don, Moira and Don, Joan and Don, Clara and Pete. It has to mean more than a signal for a female who possesses some sort of deeper connection or understanding of the situation. But what? These similarities are SO striking and prevalent…

    • splade24

      Was about to comment about Dorothy’s scarf being similar to Peggy’s…… whatever it was. Somebody being loved / providing love?

    • EricaVee

      And isn’t red and black the color motif for the Rosen family? I wonder if there’s a running connection or the red and black was its own short-term motif for this episode.

      • not_Bridget

        Hmmm. What if the various families (or companies) in Mad Men had sigils? Like the factions in that other Sunday Night Favorite–Game of Thrones?

  • And Finally…

    Oh dear, it’s starting to hit me. Next week are the last posts! And TLo aren’t following any other shows right now… Grrr.

  • maggiemaggie

    Glen and Rollo were SPOT ON! And I speak as someone with experience with exactly these sorts of boys. Glen’s exit – swoon!

    Rollo will no doubt grow up to be an investment banker, but Glen will grow up to be a television writer, DUH!

    On the other hand, the ‘mean girls’, just didn’t ring true for me. I know there’s a Vanity Fair article about mean girls at MIss Porter’s School, but my experience with preppie girls of that era was actually that they were pretty mellow – although they did smoke a lot of pot, drink like fishes and would have sex with practically any thing that moved. Still they seemed to have a weird calm that comes from never having any unmet needs and not a doubt in your head that you ever will have any unmet needs. In fact mostly they were just like Kiernan Shipka/Sally Draper with her preternatural poise.

    The mean girl thing is too much of a cliche. I’m sure they existed, but they certainly weren’t unavoidable.

    It’s late to the party but I’ve been stewing about this for a while and just want to add my two cents.

    • misscellaneous

      maggie – wow you nailed it. Preternatural poise of a rich girl. I think the girls weren’t THAT bad and I hope they drop the cliche HEATHERS bit and keep with the entitled secret slut stuff.

  • http://marshmallowjane.com/ marshmallowjane

    The school administrator is wearing a CIRCLE PIN! These were very popular. I had one in high school. What year is the show in now?

    Mini skirts became very popular in the sixties. I think that Megan’s short skirts have shown her youthful age and fashion sense; she is also an “artistic” type. Betty is older with children. Her fashion sense is something different all together. Betty’s life calls for her to be more conservative with more of an “old money” look.

    I see Sally as rebellious, period. She has more self-confidence than either of her parents. There was much pressure on her to give in to this boy, and she stood her ground after these girls left her stranded. She is “cool” enough to smoke and drink but she drew her own boundaries.

    During this particular time period, giving up virginity was more of a right of passage than it is now. Girls Sally’s age didn’t give BJs to boys as casually as they do now. Having a “reputation” did not enhance popularity in public school. Sally’s mother wants her in this private school so that Sally will have structure that Betty cannot easily provide without a lot of effort. These spoiled girls at the private school are looking for adventure. They don’t have to fight for an education.

    • misscellaneous

      Agreed. Sexual adventures were definitely within boundaries. Sally’s no idiot. She wants in that damn school and she’ll rule. I had that plaid dress too. Circle pins were 50s I thought, which is perfect for the administrator. I think her kind of hip pleats show she’s trying to keep up with the girls. It’s not like anyone came pounding on the door when the boys were fighting or smoking. Maybe it’s more like Candace Bergen’s boarding school where she learned nothing but how to smoke.

  • HelenBackAgain

    “From her blue plaid to her smoking and drinking to the need to punish someone else, Sally’s story this episode was about how she’s more like Don than she ever wants to be.”

    I think Sally’s becoming very Betty. My only quibble here.

    But, as always, loved this! Full of things I caught but didn’t understand the significance of while watching. NICE job!

  • taj

    I love you guys. No doubt this is fun for you to watch/analyze/write, and it’s FUN to read it. Thanks, cheers, and please keep it up!

  • librarygrrl64

    “Betty only functions well when she’s got some self-confidence. When she loses it, she loses everything in her personality.”

    Excellent observation. Yes.

    “We kinda thought this dress was a bit too short for Sally. Perfect for the time, but we would have thought Betty would insist on a slightly longer hem than that for this trip. Even so, she’s the height of the good little preppy girl.”

    I could swear that I owned and wore the exact 4-year-old’s version of that dress in 1964. To the photo albums!!!

    You guys rock and so does Janie Bryant. I love these posts. :-)

    • orangechickenorange

      You’re on here too? Hello! :)

      • librarygrrl64

        For years, yes. T&L are my jam. Glad to see you here, too! Philly, represent! ;-)

  • Leah Elzinga

    You guys had noted a couple of episodes back that Dawn was the only one that wore hoop earrings, so it kind of stood out for me that Megan was wearing them this episode. A sign of her “otherness” as well?

  • desertwind

    You guys are such an influence on my thought processes… last night I re-watched Metropolitan and jumped at a character’s bathrobe — He’s wearing Don’s bathrobe! What does it mean?

    PS Metropolitan is a loving and seemingly honest view of what happens to some of these kids a year or two out of prep school: that social class and what some kids think will happen to each succeeding generation, intellectual but young and pretentious conversation, gossip, fancy Christmas balls, hideous dresses (talk about Princess Puffysleeves!)

    Several of the girls went to Miss Porter’s, which they refer to as “Farmington,” the town the school is located in.

  • misscellaneous

    Great thing about Sally is she’s Betty on top and Don underneath. She is my favorite character. Putting her in boarding school was brilliant. Hell, I’d watch a whole show about that alone!

  • madmaniac

    The toe sandals, probably buffalo hide, were very popular in the late 60′s…

  • Iveta

    Not sure if this was posted since I read the first 500 or so messages on Wednesday…
    As soon as Rolo appeared on scene my bf said he looks like exact copy of Bob Dylan pictured on his first released album in 1961 – jacket, hat, even the actor resembles young Dylan.