T LOunge for July 2nd 2024

Posted on July 02, 2024

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PinMr Fogg’s Hat Tavern – London, UK

Let’s get all cozy today, darlings. It’s TUESDAY, this week is shot to hell anyway, so why not just hunker down away from all the noise and sunlight? It’s good self-care, really. Settle in.

 

Paul Mescal vs. Pedro Pascal: A First Look at the Epic Gladiator II
In Ridley Scott’s sequel, a new generation of warriors clashes in a savage Rome: “It’s pretty gnarly.”

Paul Mescal turns and looks out the window as he talks about playing a warrior fighting for his life in Ridley Scott’s long-awaited sequel to Gladiator. The light strikes the steep angles of his face, and for a moment it’s easy to picture him as a millennia-old marble bust. “My nose just is kind of Roman,” he says. “So it’s useful in this context. The nose that I absolutely hated when I was in secondary school—and used to get ribbed for—became very, very useful when Ridley needed somebody to be in Gladiator II.”

 

Daniel Brühl To Direct Felix Kammerer As Nazi Era Tennis Star In Bio-Pic ‘Break’, Reuniting ‘All Quiet On The Western Front’ Team
The movie will follow von Cramm’s breathtaking sporting career under the Nazi regime from 1933 to 1945, as he navigates political and personal complexity and a high-stakes love triangle, which meant he went into the 1937 Davis Cup in Wimbledon playing for his life.
The film is adapted by Hossein Amini from Marshall Jon Fisher’s 2009 book ‘A Terrible Splendor: Three Extraordinary Men, a World Poised for War, and the Greatest Tennis Match Ever Played’. The story will be told in German and English.

 

Society is afraid of single, child-free women, and the latest misogyny targeting Taylor Swift is proof
Singlism is rife.

The hideous and sexist Newsweek column on Taylor Swift that’s currently going viral for all the wrong reasons – in which Taylor is castigated for being a bad role model for young girls because she is unmarried, childless and has had over 12 relationships in a few years – has erupted a rollercoaster of emotions in me.
These range from fury, to depression, to actual belly laugh-out-louds-in-disbelief.
But ultimately, it’s left me with the acute realisation of something that I have been banging on about – and experiencing – for years: our society is singlist.

 

The ‘hair tuck’ hack is the easiest way to elevate a simple style, but there’s a catch (literally)
How to lock that sucker down…

By now, we’ve probably all come across the hair tuck hack – a simple case of slipping hair behind the ear to keep it tucked out the way. Most of us will have done it subconsciously to free our faces of flyaway strands, but lots of us will have done it for fashun, too, because slicked back, polished hair is a whole movement. Smoothing those sides down adds sophistication and an extra stylish detail to hair that’s been left loose – just like rolling up a shirt sleeve, or carefully tucking a button-up shirt into jeans (it’s a whole art form).
It’s a trick that’s been used by celebs and influencers for years and – bonus – it can help show off show-stopping earrings, too.

 

Here’s how to practise self-love if the mere thought of trying on ‘summer clothes’ is sending you into a body image spiral
Forget about what your clothes look like – what do you want your summer to look like?

This article references eating disorders.
Trying on clothes can be a body image minefield, and the experience only gets more fraught during the summer: when the swimsuits, shorts, and crop tops come out, so can the insecurities.
Showing a lot of skin is enough to make anyone feel a little vulnerable, and if you struggle with body stuff in general, it can easily trigger a self-loathing spiral.
As someone who has been in summer body image hell before, I want to validate that, as normal as it is, not loving how your clothes fit feels really shitty. Maybe you pull out last year’s shorts and they’re way tighter than you remember, or you order a bunch of cute dresses online only to have your confidence obliterated when they arrive and look nothing like you imagined. Regardless of the particulars, the pain is real. But it doesn’t have to last — or ruin your fun.

 

How Art Mogul Louise Blouin Lost Her Fabled Hamptons Estate
Louise Blouin lost La Dune, the Hamptons estate where she once entertained Prince Andrew and Calvin Klein, but she’s not letting go quietly.

Grab a coffee at the Golden Pear in Southampton, New York, drive due south almost a mile straight down Main Street, take a left onto Gin Lane. It’s just a five-minute drive. As your GPS will tell you, you’ve arrived. The storied street, one of the most exclusive in the Hamptons, runs parallel to the ocean. It’s filled with grand old shingled homes, some built in the late 1880s, hidden from view behind hedgerows of privet, a hardy shrub first brought to the Hamptons by English settlers in the 1600s.
From your turn onto Gin Lane, it’s another 0.7 miles to number 376. Here sits a cedar-shingled house—which you can’t see from the street—built in 1888 on the Rosa rugosa dunes for railroad tycoon Robert Olyphant, the great-great-grandfather of actor Timothy Olyphant.

 

How To Clean Jewellery According To Your Favourite Jewellery Brands
Want to know if it is worth buying a jewellery cleaner? Or how to clean jewellery yourself? We’ve asked fine jewellery designer Monica Vinader and Grove & Vae’s founder Jane Obeng to answer all of our questions.

Among items that hold sentimental value, few come close to jewellery. Whether it’s an engagement ring given to you by your partner, a brooch that was once your grandmother’s or a necklace you gifted yourself after a promotion, jewellery made from precious metals and covered in gemstones often act as talismans as we go about our day-to-day life.
So, what do you do when your most cherished gold bracelet or pair of diamond earrings have lost their gleam and sparkle? We spoke to founder, CEO and fine jewellery Monica Vinader and Grove & Vae’s founder Jane Obeng to learn exactly how to clean your jewellery at home.

 

How To Make A Pimm’s Cup
Transport yourself to Wimbledon with this refreshing summer cocktail.

While athletes might be sipping on technicolor electrolyte concoctions, when it comes to fans of some of the sporting world’s biggest events, the “sports drinks” have a much more festive twist. Be it mint juleps at the Kentucky Derby or the Honey Deuce at the U.S. Open, the sports spectator world offers plenty of signature cocktail options. Naturally, Wimbledon—the British Grand Slam tennis tournament—is no exception. In its case, the drink of choice is the Pimm’s Cup: a blend of the gin-based liqueur Pimm’s No. 1, lemonade, and fruit, this low-alcohol refresher has been a staple of Wimbledon-watching for more than four decades. If you’re looking to sip like you’re at the Grand Slam, here’s everything you need to know to make a trophy-worthy Pimm’s Cup as well as answers to all of your burning questions about one of tennis’s most famous drinks.

 

Sarah Ferguson Shared a Heartfelt Message to Princess Diana on Her Birthday
“Rest in peace, my friend.”

On what would have been Princess Diana’s 63rd birthday, Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, shared a touching Instagram post dedicated to her sister-in-law that reflected on both the Princess of Wales’s legacy and the time that they spent together. In the post, which showed the two of them at the Battle of Britain Anniversary Parade in 1990, they can be seen wearing big, wide-brimmed hats and looking up at the sky from the Buckingham Palace balcony.
“Happy birthday to my dear friend, Diana. You were a pillar of light and love. And what a legacy you have left behind. I will forever remember our laughter and the kindred, kind spirit I found in you. I am sure you are watching over us always,” she wrote. “Rest in peace my friend.”

 

Private Letter From Late Queen Elizabeth to Her Former Midwife Up for Auction, Detailing Her Life as a Mom to Charles and Anne
“The children’s grandmother is spoiling her eldest quite openly and will do so with Anne if she got a chance!”

A decades-old letter penned by the late Queen Elizabeth to her former midwife is up for auction, and it details how the former monarch was adjusting to mom life.
The letter, dated Oct. 4, 1950, was penned less than two months after the then-Princess and her late husband, Prince Philip, became the proud parents of two after Princess Anne joined the fold, officially making now-King Charles an older brother.
She wrote the letter to her former midwife, Helen Rowe, who the queen lovingly addressed as “Rowie” in the letter.

 

How Taraji P. Henson Spotlighted Black Designers at the BET Awards
“I always have the best time hosting the BET Awards,” Henson tells Vogue of the honor. “It’s culture’s biggest night, and the energy from the audience and being surrounded by my fellow peers is always such a thrill.”
For Henson, being a part of such a star-studded event is about far more than mixing-and-mingling, however. “The opportunity to celebrate and uplift Black excellence in entertainment is truly an honor,” she says of the ceremony, which honors talent across music, film, sports, and beyond. “It’s a chance to showcase our community’s incredible talent and achievements on a global stage.”

 

All the Chef Cameos in ‘The Bear’ Season 3, In Chronological Order
Did you catch ’em all?

In Season 3 especially, real-life chefs have become a source of inspiration for characters like Carmy and Sydney, demonstrating how it’s possible to create a sustainable, positive career in the restaurant industry while still being a great leader.
And yet, the chef cameos throughout Season 3’s 10 episodes get a little overwhelming at times, especially if you’re not well-versed in the modern hospitality industry’s major players. So whether you’re about to watch Season 3 for the first time and you want to know who to look out for, or you’ve just finished and aren’t sure if you caught them all, here’s your ultimate cheat sheet.

 

Why Toronto Is the Ultimate Destination for Multicultural Cuisine
Follow a local’s guide across neighborhoods and cuisines in the capital of Ontario, Canada

In chef Victor Ugwueke’s kitchen in the Parkdale neighborhood of Toronto, Afrobeat music blares from the speakers, and the smell of jollof wafts through the air. “I like to have the music on loud so when we are cooking, I can be dancing too!” says Ugwueke, who named his restaurant Afrobeat Kitchen after the West African music genre. Having grown up around his mother’s restaurant in Nigeria, Ugwueke is on a mission to make West African food more widely accessible in Toronto.

 

Heroes: Kyle MacLachlan
“I’m aware it’s a juxtaposition: I’m 65 but I’m still pretty silly and goofy, or I like to think I am,” actor Kyle MacLachlan says of his newly found social media fame. Taking Lorde-inspired selfies on his bedroom floor and posting lip-syncing TikToks have earned him a cornerstone in Gen Z culture, heart eye emojis, and “soooo babygirl” comments to boot.

 

‘The Blair Witch Project’ Turns 25: Robert Eggers, Jane Schoenbrun, and 7 More Horror Directors on Its Terrifying Legacy
Nia DaCosta, “Blair Witch” sequel director Adam Wingard, and other genre filmmakers tell IndieWire about the lasting influence and anxiety of the viral 1999 sensation.

In October 1994, three student filmmakers disappeared in the woods near Burkitsville, Maryland while shooting a documentary. A year later, their footage was found.
That brief but iconic introductory text and the narrative that followed would captivate millions for decades. When “The Blair Witch Project” hit theaters in summer 1999, moviegoers were enthralled by the ill-fated fictional journey of three would-be documentarians — Heather Donahue (Rei Hance), Josh Leonard (Joshua Leonard), and Mike Williams (Michael Williams) — hunting down the truth behind a local Maryland myth. It was shocking; the analog realism of the then-obscure found footage genre instilled in viewers the sense that what they were witnessing was the last record of a real tragedy.

 

Tiktok is full of bad health “tricks”
Beer for a tan? Garlic cloves for sinuses? Don’t fall for the firehose of health BS online.

I’ve been on the consumer health beat for a few months now. That means I stand directly in the path of a lot of strikingly bad “wellness” advice on social media. For example: Take potato juice instead of antibiotics for strep throat (what? no); douse yourself in beer for a better tan (ouch — use sunscreen or stay in the shade); scoop dry protein powder directly into your mouth (bad idea!).
It also means I think a lot about the consequences of the bullshit fire hose. People are getting hurt, and experts, struck with horror at the spectacle, are sinking countless hours and dollars into attempts at a fix<./em>

 

The scintillating histories of the Mitford sisters, as Outrageous begins filming
As a TV series chronicling the Mitford family begins filming, we re-examine the scandalous and scintillating histories of the most famous ‘Bright Young Things’

Move over, Rivals: the upcoming Disney adaptation of Dame Jilly Cooper’s famous novel is no longer the only hotly anticipated television series to have on your radar. Outrageous, a new project that dives into the lives of the Mitford sisters, promises to ‘bring the full, uncensored story’ of the family’s scandalous exploits to life, according to the show description. The series – which will be based on Mary S. Lovell’s biography, The Mitford Girls and air on BritBox in 2025 – will star Bessie Carter (best known for her role as Prudence Featherington in Bridgerton) as the much-loved author, Nancy Mitford; other cast members include Anna Chancellor as the Mitfords’ mother.

 

Andrew Scott Is Always Captivating. Here’s How He Does It.
The star of “Ripley” and “All of Us Strangers” has become one of our most reliably excellent actors.

There are some actors who always, no matter the size of their role or the context of their performance, draw the eye. Andrew Scott, who has most recently appeared as the slippery, scheming protagonist in the Netflix series “Ripley,” is one of them. He is enthralling to watch, his emotional notes meticulously constructed, with playful touches of chaos that always leave space for moments of discovery and surprise.
Here are a few of Scott’s favorite modes of performance, and how his popular roles reflect an actor excelling at his craft.

 

So You Want to Be an Ancient Roman Soldier
For the unprivileged, serving in the ancient Roman army was a path to wealth building, social climbing, and citizenship

Apion was a second-century CE soldier from Egypt, the most well-known Roman province.
Like many who voluntarily enlisted, he wasn’t a Roman citizen. A career in the military offered a better and brighter future: a salary high enough to build wealth, a respectable social standing by retirement age, and, most importantly, citizenship.
He is one of the men whose careers Richard Abdy partially reconstructs—through scholarship and the letters real soldiers left behind—in Legion: Life in the Roman Army, an engaging and long overdue look at the life and career of these soldiers, their families, and the military communities that made up Rome’s might.

 

Inside Olivia Culpo And Christian McCaffrey’s Classic New England Wedding
Olivia always knew she wanted a traditional wedding in her home state, Rhode Island. After deciding to marry on 29 June at Ocean House, an historic resort in Watch Hill, she asked Lisa Vorce to be her wedding planner. Vorce completely understood her vision and allowed her to be present, according to Olivia. “I tried to remind myself that this could very well be one of the last times Christian and I have every single one of our loved ones in one place,” she says of the planning process. “I tried to keep gratitude at the forefront.”
She then asked Dolce & Gabbana to design her wedding dresses. “I had a very clear idea of what I wanted for my ceremony dress,” Olivia explains. “I have worked with Dolce & Gabbana for years, so it was incredibly special to collaborate with Stefano [Gabbana], Domenico [Dolce], and the exceptional design and atelier team.”

[Photo Credit: mr-foggs.com, studiobare.co.uk]

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