T LOunge for April 4th, 2022

Posted on April 04, 2022

Bogen Bistro – Bolzano, Italy

 

We need a place cool, comforting and cozy today. A bunker that gets good light. A hideout where we can be seen. A sophisticated space that feels like a hangout. As always, Lorenzo is here to provide. Pull up a seat and get down to the business of doing nothing. We’re off to round up some Grammy attendees and yell at them a little bit. Join us later, won’t you?

 

Ruth Negga Takes Center Stage
Ruth Negga has already conquered Hollywood. Now, making her Broadway debut as theater’s most misunderstood woman, she’s after a different crown.

We assume because something has been done many times that it has been done every possible way,” Ruth Negga says. “I don’t know if that’s necessarily true.”
We’re speaking here of Lady Macbeth. No character has ever earned quite so much bad press. Her name has become synonymous with every insult you could level at a woman near a man in power. And right now, as the world navigates Shakespearean levels of threat, the Macbeths’ story of power, ambition, and regicide has never felt more vital. (Or ubiquitous: In recent months Joel Coen delivered The Tragedy of Macbeth, starring Frances McDormand, and a stage version starring Saoirse Ronan stunned London.)
Before Negga’s move into Glamis Castle—or, more precisely, Broadway’s Longacre Theatre, where she’ll star opposite Daniel Craig as the much-maligned character in director Sam Gold’s production of Macbeth, beginning in late March—she escaped from cold England and went to Los Angeles, and today she’s wrapped in a gray cardigan, almost as if the chill of my London flat were beaming through her computer screen. Over the last few weeks she has been enjoying what she calls “time to gently refill and refuel” before she begins what is sure to be one of the most challenging roles of her career.

 

Elle Fanning and Chloë Sevigny on Social Media, Mental Health, and The Girl from Plainville
The two actresses star in a new Hulu series about the teen texting suicide case that shocked the world.

“I remember seeing Michelle’s face on the TV screen and the media’s perception of her and how she was this kind of manipulative young woman, and Conrad was the victim—and he is the victim,” Fanning tells BAZAAR.com in a recent Zoom interview. “But he was also painted very one-dimensionally [in terms] of not really knowing his backstory or the young man that he was. It’s an interesting case because it’s such a modern one.”
“I think it really shook the nation because it’s about phones and technology and how that’s affecting [our youth], and this false sense of reality that you can create,” she adds. “It was just a modern romance, if you would want to call it a romance, but reading those text messages…they’re very dark and haunting. But then at the same time, they can also be very silly, and they’re very open and truthful in those messages. It was the span of a whole relationship on this phone.”

 

Everything Lady Gaga Has Ever Worn to the Grammys
She’ll be taking the stage again this year.

Mother Monster. Joanne. Tony Bennet’s partner in crime. Metallica’s own metal maestra. Lady Gaga has made the Grammy Awards stage her own personal playground and offered up some of the most outrageous fashion moments, ever, each and every time she arrives on the carpet or performs. Ever since she splashed on the scene back in 2010, when she arrived with yellow hair (which she’s called “piss yellow”) looking like a literal galaxy and that one time she arrived in an egg to be “born” on the stage, each and every time the Recording Academy announces that Gaga will grace us with her presence, fans know that they’ll be getting a bonafide moment. Whether she’s going for old-school glam, championing her pals in the fashion world, or announcing a new era, there’s no telling what she’ll serve when she steps out.

 

President Zelenskyy Gives Moving Speech During Grammys Tribute To Ukraine
The pre-recorded appearance was part of Global Citizen’s “Stand Up For Ukraine” awareness campaign.

This year’s Grammys ceremony included a moving tribute to Ukraine.
Performances and speeches recognized the turmoil the country is currently in due to Russia’s attacks, and a message asked for people to continue sending donations and giving support.
President Volodymyr Zelenskyy delivered a speech via video—which was pre-recorded from a bunker in Kyiv. The message, a part of Global Citizen’s “Stand Up For Ukraine” campaign, called for viewers to raise awareness of the war on social networks and television, and was followed by a performance from John Legend and Ukrainian musicians and a poet.

 

From Amal Clooney’s Palazzo to Chrissy Teigen’s Villa, 16 Stunning Celebrity Wedding to Swoon Over
Celebrity weddings come and go, to be ogled at through computer and iPhone screens. But once in a while, a certain ceremony or reception strikes a more memorable chord—this aesthetic, that dress, and that magical setting. You become a little (or a lot) obsessed, dreaming now of one venue and one venue alone. So for those who have fallen prey to the siren song of certain nuptials seen the world over, we have good news for you. Some of the most stunning wedding settings—the palazzo where Amal and George Clooney married, the French chateau where Sophie Turner and Joe Jonas said “I do”—are actually available to rent. Here, we rounded up 16 of the most beautiful celebrity wedding venues for you and your betrothed to consider. Victoria Beckham chose a castle in Ireland. What will you pick?

 

Crown jewels: Bridgerton prompts a spike in sales of tiaras
How to shop the regal hair accessory online – from Gucci to Simone Rocha and Swarorvski

Bridgerton fever has well and truly taken hold again with the release of the second series of the Netflix hit – and while many will be watching the show for its romantic, escapist storylines, there’s no denying that the series holds a definite aesthetic appeal thanks to its fantastical Regency-era costumes and sparkling jewels. In fact, the new season has prompted a spike in interest in one particular statement-making item: the tiara.
As seen on the likes of Phoebe Dynevor’s Daphne and Simone Ashley’s Kate, glittering tiaras are a key part of Bridgerton looks, and are as carefully considered as the rest of the wardrobe. In season one, the principal characters’ tiaras were borrowed from the Swarovski archive, while others were sourced from dealers in New York, Italy and the UK. The show also has its own artisan jewellery designer, Lorenzo Mancianti, who has handmade pieces for the show throughout seasons one and two.

 

Everyone Should Have A Best Friend 30 Years Older Than Them
In life there are anchors that hold you steady, remind you who and where you are after break-ups and bad times. Sometimes they can be places, but often they are people who don’t go anywhere while you race through the good and bad in life, often without comment but only celebration, or concern of a non-judgemental kind.
In a life that got more and more tempestuous through my twenties, one of my sturdiest, unshifting anchors was Everleigh, whom I met in my second year of university, but was different to my other new uni friends for lots of reasons, the main one being that he was in his mid-sixties and was my professor of Renaissance literature. The first time I went to his dusty, book-lined office in the school of English for some feedback on my A Chaste Maid in Cheapside essay, I was there for almost an hour – we accidentally got on super well.

 

The Prettiest Jewellery Trend Right Now Is Fuelled By ’90s & Noughties Nostalgia
Charm jewellery is having a moment; here, Vogue rounds up our favourite places to shop the sentimental trend.

For some people, every personal milestone is just another excuse to add a charm to their jewellery collection: a birthday, a new romance – even the end of a relationship. “We’ve heard amazing stories about friends gifting each other charms of strength to help them through break-ups,” Alighieri founder Rosh Mahtani tells Vogue. “The idea of collecting them, like fragments to mark significant moments in life, is so magical. My most precious charm is one that my dad bought me when I was actually going through a difficult time; it’s a little rose gold drum.”

 

Photographer Ellen Warner Captures an Overlooked Side of Femininity
The photojournalist Ellen Warner has spent her life traveling the world, taking pictures of people whose ways of life and personal stories are relatively unknown to the general public. She’s photographed indigenous cultures from China, Iran, East Africa, India, and Europe—and in the process has explored the visual relationship between customs and styles of dress and the history of the culture itself. But Warner’s work also reveals a more delicate and personal side of her many subjects. With her portrait work, she’s been able to tap into this core ethos—telling the little-known and often marginalized stories of folks she’s met through her travels—while leaving behind the objective eye of a journalist. Her latest project, a book titled The Second Half: 40 Women Reveal Life After 50, speaks deeply to this emotional side of her work.

 

‘Minx’ Stars Jake Johnson and Idara Victor on What’s Behind Their Characters’ Bottom Dollar Partnership
The stars of the HBO Max series talk to The Hollywood Reporter about the past, present and future of their characters Doug and Tina.

If Minx — the fictional feminist porn magazine at the center of Ellen Rapoport’s new HBO Max series — is the brainchild of Ophelia Lovibond’s character Joyce, then Jake Johnson and Idara Victor’s characters are among its brainparents.
Victor, who plays Bottom Dollar secretary Tina, is the equal business partner of Johnson’s Doug, Minx publisher and Bottom Dollar founder, in every way but their title. With the arrival of Joyce, the duo’s mom and dad dynamic sees them bumping heads as much as having each other’s backs while they navigate their family of employees, meddling politicians, inventive advertising partnerships and just generally steering Minx‘s rollout through a constantly (and rapidly) changing storm.

 

The Rewriting of Emily St. John Mandel
She became famous for a pandemic novel. But the crisis she’s interested in is change itself.

In “Sea of Tranquility,” the new novel by Emily St. John Mandel, an author named Olive Llewellyn goes on book tour, where she is subjected to terrible questions. Journalists lob inquiries about whether she prefers sex with or without handcuffs. Event attendees ask why her narrative strands don’t cohere. Strangers she meets on the road, in Ubers and fancy receptions, wonder why she’s racking up Marriott points instead of taking care of her daughter. Olive’s blockbuster novel, “Marienbad,” about a “scientifically implausible flu,” will soon be adapted into a film. Hence the tour, which Mandel narrates in dry, clipped fragments—the lingua franca of autofiction, and a flashing clue about what she’s up to.

 

My partner and I live in a 230-square-foot school bus with an L-shaped layout. Here’s what it’s like.
My husband, Charlie, and I bought an old school bus for just $3,500 in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic and converted it into our dream tiny home.
We had been living in Chicago, Illinois, and even though we knew we didn’t want to be in the middle of a city any longer, we couldn’t decide where to plant roots.
So we compromised by moving into something mobile, as that would help us determine where we wanted to eventually settle down.
The build took nine months, and we’ve been living in the 230-square-foot space ever since. Here’s what the experience has been like, so far.

 

America finally gets an Amazon union
Amazon wanted to make former employee Chris Smalls the face of labor activism. He just handed Amazon its first US union.

In one of the biggest worker victories in modern US labor history, a majority of employees at an Amazon warehouse in Staten Island, New York, have voted to unionize with a worker-led union that didn’t even exist a year ago. The election results mark the first time a majority of workers at an Amazon facility in the US have voted to join a union.
Workers at the warehouse in Staten Island, known as JFK8, voted in favor of being represented by Amazon Labor Union, or ALU. The union captured 2,654 votes, while 2,131 voted against. Another 67 ballots were contested by either Amazon or the union, but the margin of victory was greater than the number of challenged ballots so the results are final. Amazon has five business days to file any objections, and said in a statement that it is considering doing just that.

 

Remembrance of Bookstores Past
New Yorkers still tell stories of browsing at Harlem’s Liberation Bookstore or spending the afternoon at Scribner’s.

New York City is home to wonderful bookstores, but there used to be so many more of them to choose from — from Coliseum Books, just south of Columbus Circle; to Ivy’s Curiosities and Murder Ink on the Upper West Side; to the dearly departed St. Mark’s Bookshop in the East Village. By one count, there were 386 booksellers in Manhattan in 1950, including almost 40 on a six-block stretch of Fourth Avenue. (By comparison, there are fewer than 100 in the city now.) Here’s a look back at a few old favorites.

 

Japanese florist Azuma Makoto creates botanical sculptures for Dior Parfums
Azuma Makoto, the floral artist who started Tokyo’s ‘flower butchery’ and sent a bonsai tree into space, debuts his new collaboration with Dior Parfums

Japanese florist Azuma Makoto thinks flowers are like prayers. ‘From birth to anniversaries, birthdays, weddings, sympathy, encouragement, and even death, we entrust our various emotions to flowers and live with them,’ he says.
‘When I work with flowers every day, I notice that flowers are never arranged with one hand, but always with the other hand. It looks as if I am praying, and I feel that this is in line with prayer, because I actually bind the flowers as if I am entrusting my feelings to them.’

 

The 14 Most Beautiful Jungle Hotels Around the World
These hotels in the jungle will surround you in stunning nature and wildlife.

Calling all eco adventurers: If your dream vacation involves braving a private suspension bridge into your Costa Rican canopy villa, scanning the treetops for brilliantly plumed birds as you go, or trekking through wild Rwandan terrain in hopes of spotting an elusive mountain gorilla, then we have hotel ideas for your next big adventure.
These unique lodges and eco-resorts around the world offer complete seclusion and total immersion in their jungly, wildlife-filled paradise surroundings.

 

 

 

 

 

[Photo Credit: Alex Filz, www.noa.network, bogen.bz]

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