T LOunge for February 24, 2021

Posted on February 24, 2021


 

Mazzini 30 Taverna Bar and Restaurant – Palermo, Italy

 

Darlings, we felt like today’s LOunge needed to be a smaller, cozier, more intimate space. After all, it’s just us, right? A perfect little spot all to ourselves where we can chat and drink and eat all day, with nothing to bother us.

In other words, it’s WEDNESDAY. All day.

We have officially hit the wall on winter and we’re right on schedule. There’s a bit of comfort in that. No matter what else goes on in the world, we’ll always start whining about winter just about the time March comes up on the horizon. There is perhaps a greater sense of urgency watching the seasons change this year because we’re all waiting to get our vaccine and most of us don’t know when that’s going to be, but like a lot of folks, we have this vague, possibly unlikely hope that we’ll be getting that jab before high summer hits. Fingers crossed – for all of us!

Anyway, talk amongst yourselves about this or other, less important topics, dolls. We’ve got some content to push in your faces!

 

Iconic Jane Fonda Photos Through the Years
The actress and activist is set to receive the prestigious Cecil B. DeMille Award at the Golden Globes.

For over six decades, actor and activist Jane Fonda has graced our screens and lent her voice to the Civil Rights Movement, environmental causes, gender equity, and anti-war efforts. Now, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association will bestow Fonda with their highest honor–the prestigious Cecil B. DeMille Award–at the 78th Golden Globes Awards on February 28. To celebrate Fonda’s achievement, we’ve rounded up our favorite images of Fonda throughout the years, ahead.

 

‘The Glorias’ Beauty Team Reimagined Gloria Steinem 4 Different Ways
For the film, the hair and makeup team was tasked with transforming several actresses into the feminist icon at various stages of her life.
When Gloria Steinem finally came to the set of The Glorias, the Amazon movie chronicling her life and directed by Julie Taymor, hair and makeup artist Judy Chin wasn’t sure she’d have the guts to meet her. Chin, along with Miia Kovero and Adrien Morot, had never met the feminist icon but had been studying her face for months. “It felt so strange to have been staring at her images from her entire life, and then suddenly have her there,” says Chin.

 

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Oprah Interview to Air Hours After Queen Elizabeth’s TV Special
The royal family has arranged to air a TV special on Commonwealth Day, in lieu of the Westminster Abbey service they attended annually prior to the pandemic.

Just one day after revealing that they were expecting their second child, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle surprised royal watchers last week with another unexpected announcement: that they would take part in a televised interview with Oprah Winfrey. The special TV event is set to air on CBS on March 7—the same day that Queen Elizabeth and other royal family members will appear in a TV special honoring Commonwealth Day.

 

How Mayo Is Saving Endangered Sea Turtles
Apparently, the condiment can be used to flush out the sea creature’s digestive system.

Mayonnaise can be a surprisingly polarizing condiment (pro tip: add garlic, call it “aioli,” and watch your polarization numbers plummet!), but if you’re on the fence with your feelings about mayo, here’s a story that may push you solidly into the pro-mayonnaise camp: The mix of oil, egg yolk, and acid is saving the lives of endangered turtles.

 

Listen to the Trailer for the New Podcast In Plain Sight: Lady Bird Johnson
The new ABC series, featuring rare audio of the former First Lady, is hosted by historian Julia Sweig.
On March 1, the ABC News podcast In Plain Sight: Lady Bird Johnson will premiere (available on all major podcast platforms), telling the story of Johnson’s life and influence on American politics in large part through audio diaries that have previously been rarely heard.
“I think the discipline of her decision to record a White House diary, her own tapes, represents a major gift to the American public, not just for historians,” says Julia Sweig, the podcast’s host. Sweig is also the author of the anticipated biography Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight, will be released on March 16.

 

The Solace and Stress of a Father-Daughter Quarantine Collaboration
The photographer Mark Mahaney lives with his wife, Jess, and their young daughter, Veda, on the outskirts of Berkeley, in a cozy house cantilevered over a creek. When Veda was a toddler and the family left home, even for a day trip, she’d tell her parents, “I want to go back to our wooden house.” Veda is nine now, but her father has thought often of that early-childhood wish since last March, when their family, like so many others, began spending most of life indoors. Mahaney, who often travelled internationally for commercial clients, has experienced the pandemic as a haze of restlessness and anxiety. During the listless days of last spring, to keep himself and Veda busy, he started shooting a series that would introduce his daughter to the essentials of photography. The photos were originally intended for a commercial pitch. When it didn’t work out, Mahaney decided to continue the project anyway, calling it, in Veda’s honor, “The Wooden House.”

 

American Express Launches a $1 Million Grant for Historic Small Restaurants
Together with the National Trust for Historic Preservation, their aim is to help keep “culturally significant restaurants” afloat.

American Express and the National Trust for Historic Preservation have announced a new $1 million “Backing Historic Small Restaurants” grant for “historic and culturally significant restaurants in the U.S. to help them navigate the impacts of the pandemic and support their financial recovery.” The grant, which will be award to 25 historic small restaurants, is designed to provide physical and technological aid for things like maintaining historic facades, building outdoor dining spaces, and updating online ordering systems, as well as technical assistance, educational tools, and virtual training from partners at Resy, Main Street America, the National Restaurant Association, and National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation.
To nominate a historic small restaurant in your area, head to SavingPlaces.org.

 

“Art is a Way to Exert Power”: On HBO’s “Black Art: In the Absence of Light”
Curator Taylor Aldridge reviews HBO’s latest documentary Black Art: In the Absence of Light , an accounting of the 500 year history of African American visual artists.

The new HBO documentary ‘Black Art: In the Absence of Light’ highlights the development of art over the past two centuries, using modern Black art scholar David C. Driskell’s landmark 1976 exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art as a point of departure. Executive produced by Henry Louis Gates with consulting by Thelma Golden, the film retroactively examines the history of Black art making that has long been dismissed by the white mainstream. The light in the title can be read as a euphemism for the white gaze, as well as the journey from private art making and disregard to success and visibility.

 

Destiny’s Child’s Girl Group Style Was About More Than Fashion
From the get-go, Destiny’s Child has always been about creative coordination on the fashion front, no matter which members were a part of it. Both onstage and on the red carpet, they’ve set the bar high for girl group style, masterfully matching their ensembles in a way that continues to be replicated by other girl groups today (such as Blackpink or Fifth Harmony). Of course, before Destiny’s Child, there were also the Supremes or the Spice Girls—two groups also known for their coordinated outfits—but with Destiny’s Child, their custom looks had a more personal element to them. Tina Knowles, the mother of Beyoncé, served as their official costume designer, and often made the outfits herself. In creating the signature Destiny’s Child aesthetic, she was inspired by Motown, and icons such as Grace Jones and Queen Latifah.

 

Millions of Americans Qualify for the COVID-19 Vaccine Based on BMI. Why Should We Apologize for It?
BMI-based vaccine eligibility could represent a pivotal moment for the fat-acceptance movement, but it’s also a difficult one for many fat people. After all, most of us are so used to having doctors judge and shame us for our weight that the concept of it entitling me to something beneficial feels entirely unfamiliar. For years, I’ve been delaying annual physicals for fear of weight-related judgment and having my weight brought up in totally inappropriate contexts, as when a gynecologist paused my routine pelvic exam to extoll the virtues of a brisk daily walk. (I take one every day, and I’m still fat, but thanks, Doctor! Can we get back to my cervical health now?)

 

Stunning photos from NASA’s new Mars rover reveal 200-foot cliffs, mysterious rocks, and a perfect touchdown
NASA’s Perseverance rover hasn’t started roaming the red planet just yet, but its cameras have been busy at work.
A suite of ruggedized, off-the-shelf sports cameras captured unprecedented footage of the rover descending to Mars and landing in Jezero Crater on Thursday. Then the rover’s science and navigation cameras began snapping away as soon as it was on the ground. The results are breathtaking.
So far, NASA has published more than 4,700 images from the rover, with many more to come.

 

What to see at the Virtual Online Museum of Art in March
The world’s first online museum collates from the globe’s finest institutions to bring culture directly to you.

Launched last year, in the wake of the devastation wrought upon galleries and museums thanks to Covid-19, VOMA (Virtual Museum of Online Art) is the world’s first wholly online museum. The premise is simple, but marvellous. VOMA curates seminal works from the world’s most prestigious institutions – from the Musée d’Orsay to the Art Institute of Chicago – for you to consume in the comfort of your own home.

 

Hello, Brains! A Life Spent Helping Others Understand A.D.H.D. Online
Jessica McCabe used YouTube to teach herself about A.D.H.D. Her videos taught others. Then she built a business.

Jessica McCabe, creator of the YouTube channel “How to A.D.H.D,” is not a doctor or medical professional. At 38, she’s had a variety of professions including stand-up comedian, actor and restaurant server. Through all those years, she has been learning about attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, which she was diagnosed with at the age of 12. Explaining that information is something she has done on her YouTube channel since 2016.

 

The Black Women Activists behind the Montgomery Bus Boycott
Artist Lava Thomas honors the unsung heroes of the Civil Rights Movement

My project, Mug Shot Portraits: Women of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, illuminates the under-acknowledged legacy of Black women’s activism through a series of portraits based on mug shots of women who were arrested during the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 and ’56, the pivotal event that launched Dr. Martin Luther King’s leadership of the Civil Rights Movement.

 

 

 

 

 

[Photo Credit: mazzini30.it]

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