The Daily T LOunge for September 24, 2020

Posted on September 24, 2020

Mo Bar and Lounge – Marina Bay, Singapore

 

Gold and velvet, darlings. The keys to a soothing yet also stimulating T LOunge. Grab a seat or spread out on a couch. The LOunge is never crowded, never too loud to have a conversation, and filled with fascinating people and friendly, gorgeous staff.

Today is THURSDAY. Congratulations.

We are in that weird period of wearing shorts and opening the windows to putting on pants and eyeing the space heaters all in the space of one morning. It’s weird how upper 60 temps feel colder in September than they do in April. Lorenzo’s ready to dive into autumn with gusto, but Tom always holds out hope for a warm early October. Thankfully, the global climate is being very helpful by getting warmer every year, which means Tom usually gets his wish. Sorry about the icebergs and all the bees dying off or whatever!

And with that bit of dark humor out of the way, please feel free to settling and talk amongst yourselves while sampling from today’s Buffet of Distraction:

 

Iman Shares the Stories Behind Four Decades of Glamorous Looks
“Models are much easier [to deal with] than celebrities; we have more fun!” says Iman, and if anyone would know, it’s her. As a supermodel, beauty entrepreneur, and icon, she’s been in the spotlight for four decades and helped change fashion for the better. For most stars, their style story can be told via the red carpet, but Iman’s groundbreaking career means that her influence extends into editorials, covers, runway shows, and more. From the moment she arrived in New York from Nairobi in October of 1975, she was busy making history—even if she didn’t realize it at the time. “I’d never seen a fashion magazine in my life; I’d never worn heels or makeup for that matter,” she shared with Vogue at the Mercer Hotel. “So, I had no idea what I was walking into.”

 

The Story Behind Uzo Aduba’s Inspiring Tribute to Breonna Taylor
For Mrs. America star Uzo Aduba, she was inspired by her on-screen character to use the night to honor Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old Black emergency medical technician who was killed by police in her home on March 13. Aduba played Shirley Chisholm—the first African-American woman to be elected to Congress and run for president—in the miniseries, and found herself thinking about what the pioneering politician would do if given the platform of the Emmy Awards. “It became very important to me and everyone involved to try and carry the spirit of Shirley into the space,” she shared post-show. “Shirley made her life’s work speaking up for and creating space for the people that could not speak for themselves in her community.”

 

Fiber Artists Are Honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg With Lace Collars
RBG made history with her Supreme Court decisions, and honored it with her accessories.
“It is so special and so moving for the lace community to have someone in a prestigious role like Justice Ginsburg still embrace collar wearing and lace collars as a symbol of her power and femininity,” said Elena Kanagy-Loux, a collections specialist at the Metropolitan Museum’s Antonio Ratti Textile Center and founder of the Brooklyn Lace Guild.

 

Princess Beatrice’s Wedding Dress Is Now on Display at Windsor Castle
The princess paid a visit to see her bridal gown ahead of it being available for public viewing.
Royal fans can now get a close-up look at Princess Beatrice’s wedding dress.
The princess’s gown, loaned to her by her grandmother Queen Elizabeth II, is now on display at Windsor Castle. The stunning Sir Norman Hartnell–designed dress was first worn by the queen in the 1960s and was loaned to Beatrice for her July wedding to property developer Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi. The vintage creation, made of ivory peau de soie taffeta, features hand-embroidered detailing adorning the bodice, as well as a skirt trimmed in ivory duchess satin. On the day of, Beatrice paired her gown with the queen’s own wedding day tiara.

 

Here’s Everything Coming to Netflix in October
A new month means a fresh slate of releases on Netflix. This October, Blackpink fans can brace themselves for a new documentary on K-pop’s hottest girl group, titled Blackpink: Light Up the Sky. If you’re looking for something sweet to binge-watch, the first season of Emily in Paris also drops. Film fanatics, you can look forward to the arrival of Her, Carol, and more.

 

The Race to Redesign Sugar
Forget artificial sweeteners. Researchers are now developing new forms of real sugar, to deliver sweetness with fewer calories. But tricking our biology is no easy feat.
In 2015, the World Health Organization recommended that no more than ten per cent—and, ideally, less than five—of an adult’s daily energy intake should come from sugar. In other words, an average adult, with a daily consumption of two thousand calories, ought to consume no more than six teaspoons of sugar a day—the amount found in a generous schmear of Nutella, and quite a bit less than the contents of a can of Coke. The following year, the Obama Administration announced new rules requiring companies to disclose their products’ added-sugar content on the Nutrition Facts label. Some governments have gone further. Many countries, especially in Europe and South America, have begun placing health-warning labels on, and taxing, products containing more than a teaspoon or two of sugar per three ounces—a category that includes many things that people think of as innocuous, such as breakfast cookies, oatmeal muffins, and nutrition bars.

 

Cindy Sherman’s Enigmatic Self-Portraits Take Over the Louis Vuitton Foundation
From a distance, the artist Cindy Sherman could never be mistaken for a recluse, if only for how willing she has been to share her face with us over the years: You’ll find a version of her in almost every European and American contemporary art institution. But when you go looking for her through her idiosyncratically cinematic lens, it’s like tracking down Waldo when he finally decided to ditch the whole striped tee-shirt thing. While Sherman is technically the most sought after self portraitist, her work isn’t really about revealing individual experience or biography, but rather the beautiful and ugly masks we all don throughout our lives.

 

Sophia Loren’s Most Stylish Moments – Both On And Off Screen
At this point, it’s practically redundant to call Sophia Loren a bombshell. From the moment she landed a five-movie contract with Paramount in 1958, the Oscar winner became synonymous with Italian glamour, whether she was dominating the red carpet as a 21-year-old at Cannes or playing a lingerie-draped siren opposite leading men such as Cary Grant and Marlon Brando. Now, she’s returning to the screen for Netflix’s Oscar-tipped film The Life Ahead, which sees her son Edoardo Ponti direct her in the role of a holocaust survivor. Ahead of the film’s streaming release on 13 November, look back at the eternal symbol of la dolce vita’s greatest style moments from the Golden Age of Hollywood – featuring belted Pierre Balmain dresses and custom Dior suits by Marc Bohan.

 

Sin – The first exhibition in the UK exploring sin in art at the National Gallery this autumn.
Sin has permeated life since the earliest days. But until now the story of its relation to art has never been told.
Bringing together works of art that span centuries – from Bruegel and Velázquez to Andy Warhol and Tracey Emin – this exhibition explores the concept of sin in art.
Defined universally as a regrettable fault, offence or omission, sin is something everyone can relate to. In Christianity, it is considered a transgression against divine law and many of the world’s major religions have similar concepts.
This exhibition looks at complex theological ideas and depictions of ‘sinful’ everyday behaviour that blur the boundaries between religious and secular art.
A concept that is universal, but at the same time highly personal, the exhibition asks you to define your own meaning of ‘Sin’.

 

 

 

[Photo Credit: mandarinoriental.com]

Please review our Community Guidelines before posting a comment. Thank you!