Cover Girl: Katy Perry for Rolling Stone Magazine

Posted on July 31, 2014

Katy-Perry-Rolling-Stone-Magazine-UNIF-Dress-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (1)Katy Perry covers the September 2014 issue of Rolling Stone magazine in an UNIF dress photographed by Peggy Sirota.

After coming under fire for alleged cultural insensitivity (largely for having big-bootied mummies dance in her tour and dressing up as a geisha at the American Music Awards), Perry offers a passionate defense of her intentions:

“As far as the mummy thing, I based it on plastic surgery,” she says. “Look at someone like Kim Kardashian or Ice-T’s wife, Coco. Those girls aren’t African-American. But it’s actually a representation of our culture wanting to be plastic, and that’s why there’s bandages and it’s mummies. I thought that would really correlate well together… It came from an honest place. If there was any inkling of anything bad, then it wouldn’t be there, because I’m very sensitive to people.”

She knows the rules are changing, that “cultural appropriation” is increasingly uncool, but she’s not thrilled about it. “I guess I’ll just stick to baseball and hot dogs, and that’s it,” she says. “I know that’s a quote that’s gonna come to fuck me in the ass, but can’t you appreciate a culture? I guess, like, everybody has to stay in their lane? I don’t know.”

Katy-Perry-Rolling-Stone-Magazine-UNIF-Dress-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (2)UNIF Melt Dress

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Photo Credit: Peggy Sirota for Rolling Stone Magazine, unifclothing.com]

    • RussellH88

      If she wanted to piss off Tumblr, I’m sure that quote will do it.

      • http://fibonaccisequins.storenvy.com/ Danielle

        I laughed for like, twenty minutes. Oh, Tumblr.

      • http://msavonelljrose.blogspot.com Avonell

        But Tumblr would love that entire outfit the model is wearing tho.

    • NMMagpie

      More clueless drivel from someone who has completely overstayed their 15 minutes.

      • Thomas

        And where is the talent? She can’t sing (if you’ve ever heard her sing live, she sounds horrible. She yells. Even with autotune she still sounds like she’s yelling sometimes, like on “Firework” for example), she can’t dance, and supposedly she co-writes all of her songs, but she works with the same producers/songwriters that Britney Spears has worked with, so I’m skeptical as to how much she actually writes, and there’s nothing unusual about her voice. Rihanna’s not a great singer either, but at least she doesn’t sound like anyone else because of her tone and accent. Maybe this is being too harsh, but I’m not sure she would be anywhere if it weren’t for her tits.

        • NMMagpie

          I don’t think you are being too harsh; you are keeping it pretty real and I completely empathize.

        • Glam Dixie

          Bonnie McKee writes almost every hit the girl has ever had. Oh excuse me, ‘co-writes’ and Bonnie can’t get a break to save her ass as a singer. I really don’t understand the music business or how it works.

    • Beardslee

      “can’t you appreciate a culture? I guess, like, everybody has to stay in their lane? I don’t know.” I haven’t seen her show or the images from it, but I certainly agree with her sentiment. Globalism and orthodoxy don’t really go together. Maybe she’s not victimizing. Maybe she just likes stuff that’s out there in the world.

      • leahpapa

        I think there’s a difference between “appreciate” and “use the bits that serve the message/meaning I want to create,” especially when the bits that you’re pilfering reference loaded or controversial depictions of a marginalized or non-dominant population.

      • MilaXX

        It’s a fine line between appreciation and appropriation. I’m thinking Ms. Perry doesn’t understand the difference, hence her response.

        • Sobaika

          BINGO.

        • leahpapa

          Like the way white musicians appreciated (i.e., were inspired/turned on by) rock ‘n’ roll and jazz, both of which originated as African-American art forms. No one is saying that they shouldn’t have been allowed to play those types of music. But the fact that so many jazz clubs and rock ‘n’ roll venues remained segregated for so long while white headliners played what originated as African-American music and while the African-American roots of that music got obscured in the popular consciousness – THAT’S appropriation.

          • Beardslee

            good point

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          • Judih1

            agree with what you said

        • somebody blonde

          I admit that I also have trouble knowing where the line is. I don’t defend Ms. Perry in particular (because I definitely have seen instances of her crossing the line), but with certain cultures it seems more obvious where the line is than with others. With Native headdresses, it’s pretty damn obvious that people shouldn’t be wearing them when they haven’t earned them. But when white women dress to look like traditional geishas, I’m not sure how much is appreciating the beauty of the style and how much is appropriating someone else’s culture. I’m really not sure how to tell, but it’s certainly made me paranoid about buying very obviously Asian dresses, even though they’re really pretty.

          • barbarienne

            It’s complicated by the history. Native Americans were systematically hunted down and driven out by white people over the course of hundreds of years, and aren’t treated well even now. Their culture was actively destroyed. Appropriating it is beyond ironic.

            Whereas while the history between Japan and the West has not been universal happiness and friendliness, Japan is still Japan, run by Japanese people and retaining Japanese culture. It may or may not be seen as respectful to adopt from the culture, but at least it isn’t on top of centuries of cultural oppression.

            The key thing in such situations is “Who has/had the power in this cultural relationship?”

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Interesting factoid — I recently learned that Japan is basically the only country to have never been colonized/forcefully influenced by Europe, at any point in history.

            • GillianHolroyd

              “Japan is basically the only country to have never been colonized/forcefully influenced by Europe”

              Thailand makes that claim as well. Of course, they were occupied by Japan during WWII.

            • Sophie

              That’s because they saw what was happening in China at the time and decided to forcefully influence themselves with European/American culture to avoid being colonised. And then they colonised/forcefully influenced every Asian country around them.

            • demidaemon

              Yet, post-WWII, they were heavily influenced by America (though their base cultural mores still remained).

        • Qitkat

          I tend to believe it is a dotted line, not a solid line. So much depends on context: which culture the viewer is from and which culture the so-called offender is from; what the specific occasion is, where something is taking place; whether being offended has become automatic without delving into the backstory of a presentation or performance; whether political correctness is getting in the way of thoughtful observance and homage and respect; whether after centuries of oppression have passed away, it is still required of peoples who had nothing to do with the oppression to still have to remain apologists; why beautiful things cannot be appreciated, loved and used in different contexts by those who have no agenda, just appreciation of beauty and design and admiration for creativity from a different culture.

          • Beardslee

            Beautifully put. I wish I had said it as well.

            • Qitkat

              Thank you. It’s such a sensitive topic that is hard enough to discuss in person, let alone with strangers on the internet.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            “after centuries of oppression have passed away” — oh, dear. I don’t think you’re going to want to try to back that up.

            And as is being discussed in this thread, your last point, about why things can’t be appreciated/loved/used “by those who have no agenda” — intent often has nothing to do with whether or not it’s offensive.

            • Qitkat

              My response was only to MilaXX’s first sentence. And I freely admit to generalizing here, and not being specific enough to Katy Perry. Perhaps I should have been, but I chose not to. It’s too bad, I am sincere here, that we can’t sit down over a couple of cocktails and maybe find a way to understand one another’s opinions better.

            • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

              Yes, I regret that too. Sorry if I sounded to be picking a fight!

          • Peeve

            Brava! You’ve said what I have always thought and wondered, and so very much better than I could have expressed it.

            • Qitkat

              Thank you, it’s such a delicate topic, I really appreciate knowing others feel similarly.

      • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

        I know that at least we here at TLo are a lot more undecided about white people dressing in Asian clothes than we are about non-Native Americans dressed in Native American garb, so I’m not going to make a judgment here about her geisha outfit.

        But I will say that while it seems totally harmless and innocent to “like stuff out in the world” — if you have a public persona, it is your job to learn about what you’re doing and whether or not it’s offensive. Even if she had grown up in a bubble and was completely uneducated about the history between Europeans and Native Americans, she would not get a pass on wearing a headdress for a photoshoot. Ignorance isn’t an excuse.

        • Beardslee

          It’s a tricky business. I think we should keep in mind that cultural blending has followed trade routes for millenia, The tiny bit I know about Katy Perry has led me to believe that she is a positive person, who does just like stuff. She doesn’t offend me the way Madonna does, who tosses around cultural icons in a way that I have always found cheap.

        • Leah Elzinga

          I think this is a solid point, in particular the “public persona” bit. This is not some random club kid wearing something they picked up at a flea market… this is a woman with considerable resources and reach, that’s more than capable of doing a little research before making an appearance before millions of people. A lot of time and money goes into those costumes, and especially since she’s gotten flack over it in the past, it makes sense to spend a little time…

      • suzq

        With Katy, I’m not sure there’s enough thought for malice to be present. I tend to give her a pass.

        • MilaXX

          It’s not about intent. I can believe she meant no harm. That doesn’t excuse accepting the correction when it’s pointed out to her.

      • disqus_CbanJPpOR3

        To be honest, there’s nothing ambiguous about dressing women up as mummies and giving them big boobs and big butts, thereby mirroring a history of fetishistic colonial imagery that was prevalent in not only american culture but british culture. if she wanted to channel plastic surgery then that dance set should have been in a clinic, not on a set where katy perry rode in on a sphinx and got carried around by men with ‘pharoh’ belt buckles.

        or, i don’t know, she should have taken a couple of history classes after her first debacle or hired someone to counsel her.

        also, on the geisha performance: people are always forgetting that geisha are highly trained professionals who are sometimes considered as preservers of traditional japanese culture. the fact that highly trained professionals are sexualized is annoying. but the fact is geishas have also been sexualized as part of american post-wwii occupation. american soldiers were one of the primary catalysts for the geisha impersonators in the 20th century–namely, because american soldiers wanted to screw geishas and geishas don’t regularly engage in sex work with their clients. this misplaced fetishization of accomplished professional women who play a major role in preserving traditional japanese culture spawned many geisha impersonators who catered to american soldiers.

        obviously the geisha issue is more nuanced than the mummy issue. but then again, she has said that she would like to skin a japanese person and wear their skin. so you’d think she’d like japan enough to know a little something or other about its history.

    • TrixieConQueso

      Gonna cruise right by those Katy-Quotes and say – Good call on just using the TOP of that HIDDY dress-thing. Colors are dreamy – and fake fur cuff FTW.

      • sugarkane105

        That dress is so 90’s, it wants to be a Lisa Frank binder.

        • TrixieConQueso

          The Lisa Frank Binder – my new Band name for this 90’s cover group I am forming…thanks- lol.

    • MK03

      Wow. Cultural appropriation and stereotyping are considered “appreciating a culture” now? Any respect I might have had for her just evaporated.

      • Anna

        For me that happened when she accepted a “Woman of the Year” award by saying, “I’m not a feminist, but I believe in the strength of women…”

        • MK03

          Ugh, I did not know that. What an idiot.

          • mjude

            me either. ugh indeed

            • smayper

              Me either. I want to strangle women who say they’re not feminists. Really? So you want to be paid less than a man doing the same job? Cuz if you do, OK, I accept that you’re not a feminist.

          • Anna

            To be honest, I don’t even think she’s qualified to discuss baseball and hot dogs.

        • TM

          Oh gosh, that’s a winner. Isn’t she’s also the one with the “because I like men” or was that Gaga? Either way, I can’t even.

          • http://redheadedwolf.wordpress.com/ Laura Renee

            Shailene Woodley said it too — she’s not a feminist because she doesn’t want “beat men down” or some nonsense. (As if the majority couldn’t use a good downtrodding.) Ugh, the perpetuation of such misconceptions.

            • TM

              Oh Shailene, beautiful clay-eating Shailene. It just irks when her target audience is likely young girls who might not recognize their fav star’s misinformed ideas of feminism.

              Ughh, for the record I really like men too. (And that helps me acknowledge how gender roles are just as harmful to them as it is to us.) Okay, I’m done. I know this isn’t the place. Sorryyyy.

            • smayper

              I love the fact that this is a place where conversation goes in many directions! As far as I’m concerned, keep it up!

            • TM

              You’re right! I like a dose of debate over cultural appropriation vs. globalization and the merits of yellow pumps all in one convenient location. :)

            • FibonacciSequins

              You have 17 upvotes, so don’t feel bad about making that statement. I think it’s a valuable insight.

            • TM

              Aw, I’m so glad that you and the other commentators here are so cool!

          • ashtangajunkie

            I think Beyonce said something to the tune of “I’m feminist but I love my husband” as well. She believes in equality BUT she’s happily married. Annoyed the crap out of me.

            • TM

              Oh, Beyonce is a complicated one…

              I was super impressed by the excerpts on what we teach our girls in Flawless, but then I read about Drunk in Love’s “eat the cake, Anna Mae” reference. I honestly had no idea about Tina Turner’s life and genuinely can’t get over it. If anyone has better insight to those lyrics, I would be really interested in learning more!

              But you know, great to know feminists can be happily married. Look at that! (Ideally, to other feminists but whatever…)

            • ashtangajunkie

              I really enjoy her music, but that lyric in ‘Drunk in Love’ is a bit gross. The “eat the cake” reference is from a scene in ‘What’s Love Got to Do With It,’ which is the movie about Tina and Ike Turner. Angela Bassett plays Tina and she’s excellent in it, but it is (as you can imagine) pretty disturbing. This album is apparently supposed to be the most personal Beyonce has ever done. Far be it from me to judge she and Jay-Z’s sexy time, but I did not love the “Eat the cake, Anna Mae” reference.

        • Sobaika

          L O L – I am in awe of celeb stupidity sometimes.

          EDIT: Is that too harsh? I don’t know, these quotes are all so terrible.

          • Gatto Nero

            Not harsh. On the money.

          • Anna

            No, not harsh at all. She defended her geisha ensemble by saying she was just inspired by love, and how “Geishas are, like, the masters of unconditional love.”

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              That’s… wow. That’s… Nope, I’ve got nothing.

            • Anna

              I looked up where I read it from to refresh my memory and it was in GQ. The writer went on to say that she didn’t have the heart to point out, “in the gamut of human interactions, the courtesan-patron relationship is, um, maybe the most conditional relationship there is.”

              Maybe she should’ve pointed it out.

            • MilaXX

              Which in turn makes her look even dumber. I am far from an expert on Geishas and I know that’s not what being a Geisha is about.

            • Anna

              Indeed. See my reply to @foodycatalicia:disqus below.

            • smayper

              NO SHE DID NOT!!! (by which I mean, holy shit, REALLY?)

            • Anna

              Really.

            • Thomas

              Plus, in the music video for her song “Birthday” she portrayed a terrible stereotype of Jews, AND in the music video for “Dark Horse” she turned a suitor wearing a pendant with “Allah” on it into a pile of ashes, thus infuriating Muslims. The pendant was later digitally removed, but still. I can’t with this girl.

          • MilaXX

            Not harsh at all. They live in such isolated bubbles that many time they are indeed incredibly obtuse. Both Goop & Blake Lively and their “lifestyle” blogs are prime examples.

      • sugarkane105

        I’ve been inclined to defend her choices so far, but I just heard her latest single. In it, she sings lyrics about her clique sitting at a salon “getting their nails did, all Japanese-y.”

        I’ll just let that one sink in.

        • FrigidDiva

          I almost did a face palm reading that.

        • suzq

          What does that even MEAN? Are they doing something weird to their nails in Harujuku that I don’t know about?

          • sugarkane105

            The lyrics don’t reference any sort of manicure style, so I’m afraid it’s just making note of how most manicurists tend to be of Asian descent.

            • kimmeister

              And 99.9% of the time, they are Vietnamese, not Japanese.

        • demidaemon

          To be fair to Katy, I’ve actually read Japanese students essays about nails/etc., and, a lot of the time, these girls come off quite shallow. Just my two cents.

        • julnyes

          Isn’t she also wearing her hair in cornrows and eating watermelon … yeah – I’m done with this chick.

      • Ali2044

        I’m surprised anyone has respect for her to start with. I’m pretty sure her first song was I Kissed a Girl and that (along with the film clip) was enough to put me off her for good. She started her career with appropriation and clearly, nothing has changed.

    • lunchcoma

      Sigh. Katy, you have other options. You could pick one of the thousands and thousands of themes that doesn’t have anything to do with a specific culture. Alternately, you could actually learn a bit about some of these cultures you appreciate so much so that you would know if, when, and how it might be permissible to incorporate elements of them into your act.

    • Anna

      “I don’t know.”

      Yup. ‘Nuff said.

    • sugarkane105

      I am more offended by her appropriation of kitty culture. WHEN DOES IT END PEOPLE.

    • dschubba

      Baseball and hotdogs aren’t cultures and people so, yeah, knock yourself out, Katy.

      • MoHub

        I happen to be very particular about my hot dogs, than you very much.

      • Anapestic

        The point she’s making, not especially articulately, is that baseball and hotdogs represent (to many people) American culture, and she doesn’t want to be limited to what’s stereotypically American. I think there’s a reasonable argument to be made about that, and she is perhaps not the best person to make it, but it does sometimes seem that people see a reference to another culture and automatically leap to “cultural appropriation.”

        • demidaemon

          I know exactly what you are saying, but I will just point out that even hot dogs can be offended/made offensive. See Miley Cyrus.

        • dschubba

          I totally get that, but baseball and hotdogs are tied to a national culture as opposed to an ethnic or racial one. Judging by the above excerpts, I don’t get the impression that she’s really thought about that difference.

      • sugarkane105

        “Crab cakes and football, that’s what Maryland does!”

    • Janet B

      Up close photo: perfect use for the dress

    • Gatto Nero

      Because she’s, like, very sensitive to people.

    • deelup

      Judging Kim and Coco because their appearances are too plastic? Need a big old pot and kettle costume in your next tour Katybabe.

    • HM3

      Completely ignoring the quotes: can I just say how REFRESHING it is to have this many celebrities sporting color, both editorially and on the RC? Not too long ago, we saw nothing but nudes, washed-out whites and blacks. My eyeballs are thankful.

      • Kent Roby

        I would find it refreshing on others, but we’ve seen this sort of color from Katy forever. Yeah, I know, her tour title and such.

    • Kent Roby

      She’s got technicolor hair and clothes; how “revolutionary”. It appears that Rolling Stone is gathering moss photographically.

    • Gatto Nero

      Johnny Winter died? Sad.

    • desertsweetpea

      That dress is acid laced sherbet. Me likey.

    • Dino Bonačić

      Bleh.

    • hughman

      Wearing a nightgown made from salad dressing doesn’t add much weight to your argument.

    • Tanya Wade

      I would have preferred the “Fired up and Pissed Off” TP on the cover instead of this overexposed gal.

      • sugarkane105

        Or, put Weird Al in the same funky dress and BOOM there’s a funnier and more relevant cover. Really, we should just work for Rolling Stone.

        • kimmeister

          I heard his new album has done really well!

          • sugarkane105

            Yes! I believe it’s his first number-one album ever. Missed opportunity for Rolling Stone, I think.

    • KES4K

      Are we supposed to be able to itemize every product her makeup artist used on that cover? I guess for better or for worse I’m just used to heavy blur, but wow, someone didn’t smooth that image well at all!

    • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

      How does that eye behind her ear work?

      • sienna elm

        I was wondering the same thing! It doesn’t appear to be attached to the earrings (unless something was photoshopped out by mistake) It made me wonder whether jaw piercings are a thing.

      • Lilyana_F

        Was just staring at it. What the hell is that thing?

      • sugarkane105

        Jesus, thank you. I knew I couldn’t be the only one.

      • mjude

        I didn’t not notice that…good eye? :)

      • http://angrynerdgirl.net/ Jessi03

        Illuminati?

      • MilaXX

        It’s an earring with the eye bit attached to the post of the pearl. Honestly I’m more interested in where she got the safety pin earring. It’s the exact size I’ve been looking for.

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          I’ve mentioned before that I am in AWE of the stuff you know! I am so impressed that you figured that out, I was staring and staring and couldn’t resolve it.

          • MilaXX

            I shop a lot. I came across them when I was on the great earring search last week. :-)

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              I am guessing she/her stylist paid slightly more! Although if it turns out it is labelled “Earrings are stylist’s own” that would be hilarious!

            • MilaXX

              Yeah, for the fad I’d be more inclined to buy the ebay knockoff, but I’m sure she’s wearing the designer original.

      • FrigidDiva

        I more disturbed by how much her neck looks like it was stretched out by Photoshop.

    • FrigidDiva

      Ugh, I just can’t with her, she is SO tiring.

    • Glam Dixie

      I find it’s very popular right now to be offended by everything even if it’s not meant to be at all offensive. Political correctness has it’s place but it’s stepped way over where it’s place should be into a place where it’s just getting silly half the time. Not referring to Katy specifically, just all of the stuff people take offense to in general.

      • http://www.youtube.com/user/TheOctocornNetwork International Model

        I say, if we can clutch pearls over Pharell posing as a Native American in the UK, we should be outraged that Anne Geddes portrays babies as bumble bees and peas in a pod.

      • MissusBee

        I guess the trouble with Katy Perry is she’s all about kitsch. So the moment she gets her hands on anything from another culture it’s like ‘look at this cute thing from another culture!!!’ which is annoying for anyone who would rather someone didn’t cartoonize their culture for cheap entertainment.

        • Glam Dixie

          That’s fair.

        • Candigirl1968

          Yes, she finds these things costumes rather than items that exist within a specific cultural and/or racial framework. Therein lies the thing that makes it itchy.

          On a lighter note, great makeup!

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/TheOctocornNetwork International Model

          It kind of reminds me of Ben Franklin in Paris. He played the role of a Yankee to a hilt to gain France’s support during the war. As a result, there is several older French kitsch items of a fat man in glasses and a coon skin cap. And French allies.

      • disqus_CbanJPpOR3

        Also the part where Katy said she wanted to skin a Japanese person and wear their skin because she finds Japanese people so cute. I don’t know, call me sensitive but that grosses me out.

      • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

        I think there is a difference between taking offence and being aware that something is problematic. I’m not offended by Katy Perry – it’s not my place to speak for the cultures she is appropriating – but I spent way too much time doing semiotic analyses of texts not to look at the connotations and myth building in the costumes she wears.

    • Guest

      recently I was reading a thread about native headdresses being banned from a festival. One person made some comment about how it compared to a non-Scot wearing a kilt, and that no one bitches about that. The follow up to that hit home for me: the gist was that anyone can wear a kilt, that in a lot of regards it’s like jeans, though you might want to be careful regarding the tartan. A headdress holds special social and cultural significance. So for me, that’s where the line is.

      • Ali2044

        You don’t even have to be careful of the tartan. The whole “tartan belonging to a clan” is a marketing gimmick made up in the 19th century. Before that, people just wore the pattern they liked. Anyone can go and get a “family” tartan made up. Kilts are an item of clothing with zero special significance and anyone who tries to tell you this probably isn’t Scottish. Very different to a native headdress which does have significance beyond “head warmer” or “decoration”.

      • Mim McDonald

        I’ve mused a lot on this, being British (English, specifically). I think an English person wearing a kilt in Scotland *could* cause
        offence – again, it’s that power/dominance/history thing – and it would really
        depend on circumstance. At a Scottish wedding where many guests are in
        kilts, and it’s respecting the locality is a world away from simply
        wearing one ‘for a laugh’.

        (And on this subject, for everyone’s information, the phrase ‘British accent! is actually borderline offensive’ It could be a Scottish accent, a Welsh accent or an English accent, but they’re three very different things. It’s deeply annoying when people use ‘British’ as a synonym for ‘English’! *rant over*)

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          I saw the phrase “working class British accent” the other day & my eyes almost fell out, I rolled them so hard. Are they a West Country farmer? A cockney? A shipwright from Aberdeen? Lots of different “working class” accents!

    • Jacob Bowen

      Katy’s hair is very “Katy Perry as Hedda Lettuce”.

    • Emily Roach

      Jessica Brown Findlay realness (second picture, obviously).

    • KT

      Those comments are HILARIOUSLY idiotic. Girl, don’t try to comment on cultural norms… just, don’t. You will inevitably end up saying something about appreciating a culture in the same breath as “fuck me in the ass,” as evidenced here. Just… stop.

    • Noah

      For you, yes. Stay in your lane.

    • Anique Ashraf

      What bothers me is that Katy Perry seems to think that only “hotdogs and baseball” represent white American culture — this is why I think she’s ignorant and not “appreciating cultures” — she simply does not understand dimensions.

      Plus, I’m sorry, wearing a geisha costume to an award show for your bubblegum pop album which is in no way, shape or form influenced by or produced in Japan is not only offensive, it’s stupid. Wearing the clothing of an often “exoticized” group of people who are now increasingly marginalized is beyond stupid.

      • Milka Munn

        Getting offended on behalf of other cultures, I find is just as offensive. “Oh no! the poor and defenseless people of so and so getting their cultures raped, oh myyy’… Umm, no thanks.

        I’m Japanese, and Katy is pretty big here in Japan as well as a lot of her peers. I’ve never once seen or heard any Japanese person getting offended by her costumes or her antics. In fact, I personally find it cute.

        • Thomas

          Japanese culture isn’t the only thing Katy has appropriated though. My ancestry is part Jewish and I found her stereotype of a Jewish man in her video for “Birthday” as insensitive. In her video for “Dark Horse,” she reduced a suitor who was wearing a pendant with “Allah” on it to ashes, and her dancers dressed as mummies with big booties is similar to the depictions of Africans by Europeans and Americans that were highly offensive. Maybe you’re not familiar with Jewish or African American culture because you live in Japan, but these things are all highly offensive and distasteful. Things shouldn’t just be put on as costume. If you’re going to make references to another culture, you should do your homework and make it respectful.

    • gitchygitchymama

      when did rolling stone get all ‘cosmo’ ?

    • saintebeuve

      Oh, the ironic juxtaposition of calling other women plastic inside a magazine when your cover shot is airbrushed so you no longer have pores.

      • FibonacciSequins

        To be fair, the airbrushing is entirely Rolling Stone’s responsibility.

        • saintebeuve

          Of course, but also an entirely predictable outcome of agreeing to be on the cover of a magazine. And it’s not like KP’s schtick is femme naturelle. The whole thing’s kind of a pot/kettle situation.

    • http://fibonaccisequins.storenvy.com/ Danielle

      I’m not even going to comment on the utterly ridiculous soundbites. Bravo for finding a “Katy” dress, Rolling Stone. I loathe the green hair.

    • Milka Munn

      How many of you people offended here are actually Japanese?

      I am Japanese, and I see nothing wrong with it. Neither does the rest of Japan’s population.

      Stop being taking offense on behalf of others,

      • SugarSnap108

        Yet you feel free to speak for “the rest of Japan’s population.”

        People are giving their personal opinions about Katy’s whole schtick and interview quotes (and not just the Geisha costume). I don’t see them claiming to represent Japan’s feelings. You’re doing that.

      • demidaemon

        I just wanted to say that your point is completely fair. However, as SugarSnap states, be careful of over-generalization.

    • frannyprof

      Whut…

    • Man Dala

      That vomit hair continues to be hideous.

    • lamh

      But ya know what, Katy Perry and Miley Cyrus are doing now, Gwen Stefani did it better and still does.

      Remember What Your Waiting For, Luxurious and Sweet Esacape?

      • demidaemon

        True. I think it helped that Gwen embraced the culture (I’m thinking, in particular, Harajuku) before applying it.

    • demidaemon

      I’m kind of digging her complete non-apolegeticness. You go, Katy!

    • cocohall

      Does she not have a publicist???? I am not surprised by her comments. I would not think of turning to Ms. Perry for nuance and insight on any topic. But honestly, her team (which did a rather good job of protecting her super clean image in her “documentary”) really should have seen this coming and done a better job of coaching her. One, to manage her brand. And two, and more importantly, because Katy DOES have so much influence over pop culture and even if she couldn’t articulate her appreciation of other cultures, she could have at least been more on message about not intending to offend, and being sorry if she had. I don’t think “fuck me in the ass” conveys much sense of contrition.

    • mila_8

      The Melt dress is tripping me out. If I saw this on the street I couldn’t help but stare until it faded into the distance.

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    • yllas

      Huh? Deep words!…(eyeroll) I like the pretty colors in this magazine cover photo. I wonder what she looks like in real life.

      • texin

        She’s really very pretty.

    • Kathy

      You know nothing, Katy Perry.

    • Fred

      This is what “cultural appreciation” in America looks like: Welcome! No point being pissed off at her for not being sensitive enough. Why not ask yourself why someone who is making so much money and wields so much power in her industry knows SO LITTLE about things that aren’t baseball or hotdogs?

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    • texin

      Have any of the critics here been to a concert on Katy Perry’s current tour? I took my 13-year-old for his birthday and sat front row. Girl puts on a heck of a show. She may not have the pipes of Whitney Houston, but she’s an amazing performer. Katy’s show was a lot of fun for this mom who grew up on going to everything from major stadium shows to underground punk clubs. The costumes alone were almost worth the VIP admission.

      The mummies were a very small part of one song in her “Egyptian-themed” set. BTW I don’t see any Egyptians complaining… Anyway they came out and pranced around for a few moments and were gone.

      My takeaway was that they were meant to be a tongue-in-cheek reference to Miley Cyrus’ show, which I believe features some real people with unusually sized body parts.

      I noticed other jabs, too. A couple of times a backup dancer would bend over as if to start twerking, then stand up straight and roll her eyes or shake her head “no”. The message: “no, we don’t go there.”

      “getting our nails did all Japanese-y” refers to Japanese nail art (it’s a thing).

    • http://armchairauthor.wordpress.com/ LesYeuxHiboux

      One of my closest friends (she’s my Jock Twin and I’m her Geek Twin) has a wonderful story about middle-school aged Katy Perry outing her as a non-Christian to their entire mega-church. With a microphone. At the time they were buddies learning to skateboard. I have an awesome screenprint said friend did, hanging in my living room, of Perry in her whipped-cream bra atop the question “Destined for greatness?’ Long-story short: the idea of Katy Perry being sensitive to other people and their cares made me laugh out loud.

    • http://msavonelljrose.blogspot.com Avonell

      Can I have everything the model’s wearing please?