On the Set of “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay” [Spoilerish]

Posted on May 16, 2014

Here you go, Tributes. We figured you’d enjoy the peek. Natalie Dormer’s hair is bad ass. Everyone is less attractive than they were in previous installments. Things must be getting serious.

 

On-Set-Hunger-Games-Mokingjay-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO (1)Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth and Natalie Dormer seen filming on the sets of “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay” in Paris.

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[Photo Credit: Ralph, PacificCoastNews]

    • @Biting Panda

      Shit is getting real y’all.

    • geans

      Wow, I’m really surprised how well Dormer does that look.
      She’s hot in everything all the time, apparently.
      Biiiitch.

      • Rottenwood

        It’s impossible to take my eyes off of her on Game Of Thrones, even with the parade of awesome and/or beautiful on that show. She’s sex on a bloody, ichor-stained stick.

        • lamamu

          She played a great Anne Boleyn in The Tudors too. She has the best, most expressive face.

          • AnaRoW

            Oh, that’s who she is?! I thought she looked familiar.

            That looks like Evan Ross (son of Diana) standing next to her.

            • J. Preposterice

              it is evan ross!

          • Emily Smith

            I loved her in that, the show wasn’t the same after her portion was over. I mean I know it was historically based and we all know what happened to Anne Boleyn but boy the show sure felt like someone stuck a pin in it’s balloon.

            • lamamu

              I know! Don’t get me started on Katherine Howard!

      • kimmeister

        Hunh. I’ve only seen her in Elementary and was not particularly impressed by her appearance.

        • St. Ace

          I thought she made a fantastic Moriarty.

          “As if men had a monopoly on murder.”

    • rigoletta

      Natalie Dormer BAMF.

    • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

      Love the hairspray picture.

      • Danielle

        Peeta needs to get his roots done, though.

        • The Counselor

          Salon services must be hard to come by at this point in the story ;)

      • AudreysMom

        I thought maybe they were spraying over his bald spot the way that can is pointed.

        • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

          That did cross my mind… Grecian 1000 or whatever that stuff was called!

    • Glam Dixie

      Not looking forward to the 3rd installment of the movie too much because the last book was so disappointing to me.

      • Danielle

        Hear hear. I had such a hard time getting through it. Apparently the third installment in the Divergent series is the same way. Natalie Dormer might just redeem this for me, though. Hottie McHotterson.

        • Glam Dixie

          My daughter just read the divergent books and she said the 3rd book ruined the whole series and told her sisters and I not to even bother reading them. That’s pretty bad considering we are rather obsessive readers and love to read pretty much anything.

          • magictodo

            Honestly, just read the first two and skip the third. It’s really ok to end the series that way.

            • Glam Dixie

              I may do that, I’m actually looking for something to read right now. I’m getting ready to reread an old standby if I don’t find something soon.

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              Sometimes when I can’t decide which of the many books I own that I haven’t yet read, I fall back on Jane Austen or another favorite. In my book, there’s never a bad time to reread Jane.

            • Qitkat

              Perhaps it’s not one of her greatest, but last fall I listened to Northanger Abbey in the car on a long drive I had to take every week, and was a bit taken aback with how silly it all was. Didn’t seem to have much depth at all, it seemed to be an easily forgotten plot from week to week. I found it to have a lot of laugh out loud moments, mostly due to the ways females acted in that time, so simpering and idiotic.

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              Northanger Abbey isn’t one of Austen’s best. I think that she wrote it as a bit of a spoof of a particular type of fiction that was popular at the time. It is a silly plot. I much prefer Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility and Persuasion. I have an audio book of Persuasion, read by Juliet Stephenson, that is delightful.

            • demidaemon

              It’s a parody of Gothic fiction–think Jane Eyre. I actually have a very nostalgic love for that novel, as it was my introduction to Jane Austen. I believe that, chronologically, it was her first novel, even though it wasn’t published until after her death.

            • Qitkat

              The idea that it is a spoof, or parody, explains everything, because that is exactly how it felt. I did enjoy listening to it, the reader was excellent at distinguishing the characters. I’ll try Persuasion, as I’ve only read P&P and S&S.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              Persuasion is the only one of hers I really don’t like. But I think that is because it was a required text at school and I couldn’t just enjoy it for its own sake.

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              I think that I was lucky in that I never had to read anything by Jane in high school or college, and therefore I was able to discover them on my own. I had to read “Anna Karenina” for college lit, and that permanently put me off that novel. I tried re-reading it a couple of years ago, and gave up.

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              I have re-read Persuasion, 20 years on, and enjoyed it more, but it still isn’t my favourite. Catch-22 is the only one of my school texts that I loved at the time and can happily re-read.

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              I’ve found some books worth re-reading, and others not so much.

            • gabbilevy

              I’m going down that path — rereading the Outlander books in anticipation of the Starz series! (They’re as good as I remember)

            • Glam Dixie

              I’ve read the first few twice already, I don’t think I’ve got the time to invest in going for round 3, but I did love them.

            • gabbilevy

              Have you read A Fault in Our Stars yet? That’s another one that’s worth every bit of the praise its gotten (and I enjoyed Looking For Alaska, too). Donna Tartt’s novels are also as advertised.

            • Glam Dixie

              I’m on the wait list for it at the library, looking forward to it.

            • DuBey2

              Loved D.Tartt’s : the little friend, and of course, her pulitzer prize winner The Goldfinch

            • Kitten Mittons

              I can’t do that! If I start something, I have to finish it. This is why I’ve read all the twilight books.

            • Qitkat

              Me too! (But not Twilight, I knew I was so not in the demographic, but so many adults recommended Hunger Games, which is why I read them.)
              As for another series, by the end of the trilogy of Stieg Larsson’s “Girl With The …” series, I was seriously slogging my way through them. Talk about an idea that badly needed a good editor and/or critiques with writer’s groups.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Really? Another series that I liked. I didn’t go ga-ga over them like the rest of the universe, but I wouldn’t have said I had to slog through them. In what ways would you have edited the “Girl With The…” series?

              I’m just curious, I feel like I must lose myself in the story and not pay attention to some of these things. The only series I can think of that beat me down were Anne Rice’s vampire and witch books. They just weren’t my taste, and there were too many to continue on.

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              I read “Interview with a Vampire” in one night and thoroughly enjoyed The Vampire Lestat and Queen of the Damned. I still remember that at the end of The Vampire Lestat I truly could not wait til the next book in the series. Rice started to run out of ideas at some point, though. I only made it through the first two of her “Witches of Mayfair” series.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Yes, that’s almost the exact experience I had. The witches were too much.

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              There was something about Rice’s witches that was just too much, too over the top for me.

            • Qitkat

              Trying to recall. I enjoyed the first book, with the strong female protagonist. There had never been anyone quite like Lisbeth Salander, in my reading years anyway. While I always appreciate enough detail to really lose myself in a story and characters, in the second and third volumes, especially the third, I began to grow weary of the extraordinary details, many completely unnecessary to the story arc. I also had difficulty with the Swedish character and location names, keeping everyone straight, needing a map to wrap my head around it all. It seemed excessive, and I don’t mean that as a slam on the Swedish language, even though it sounds like it is. It just became very hard for me as a reader in English with such a monumental story to not get really confused at times. I saw the first Swedish film version before reading any of the books, and thought it was extraordinary. That made me want to read the rest of the series. To me the American film versions paled in comparison to the Swedish versions, and I did like the second and third volumes better than the film realizations. I would probably give the trilogy a solid B that could have been an A with thoughtful editing.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Interesting, I can understand that. I never saw the Swedish films, it sounds like they might be worth a look. Thanks for such a thoughtful reply.

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              I highly recommend the Swedish film versions of the Millenium trilogy. Noomi Rapace is a truly kick-ass Lisbeth Salander. Thankfully the film versions edited the stories so that some of the material in the books that struck me as superflous was not in the films.

            • Kitten Mittons

              They’re on the list then. It is decided.

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              Hope you’ll like them. Mr. B3 and I watched all three films on cable a couple of years ago, and I’d seen them all during their theatrical release.

            • DuBey2

              I second your thoughts, with this difference: The 1st in the …dragon tattoo… series was the hardest for me to slog thru — UNTIL Lisbeth came on the scene. She was extraordinary. But I almost quit in the 1st several chapters with all the details of ____(Daniel Craig character) and his life…
              Also, I never watch the movies until after I read the novels 1st and this greatly increases my enjoyment of the film, since I understand the characters and their thoughts and background so much more.
              Glad for this thread of discussion because now I will skip Divergent #3, and just read & watch the 2nd one, then let that be the finish.

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              As much as I enjoyed the Millenium trilogy, it could have used a good editor-and pruning the number of women who just can’t help falling for Mikal Blomquist would have been a start.

            • Sonnet_PDX

              I’m just like that! Except with the Twilight series: that one beat me. I tried so hard, too! I read the first one just to see why all these people (my age, and not technically in the target demographic) loved it, and I hated it. Then I thought, well, some authors improve in the course of a series as they get better at writing (see: J.K. Rowling), but nope, I got a few chapters in and decided I have WAY to many books in my TBR list to spend my time slogging through this nonsense!

            • Kitten Mittons

              You are my new idol, then. Teach me your ways.

          • latina fey

            that’s hilarious; my daughter was SO mad at the third book. she said she’s refusing to recommend it to anyone because it killed the whole series for her. oh teenagers…

          • ovarB

            I did the same thing with the Divergent series….read the first two and have to read the 3rd and really have no plans to read it. My oldest daughter started reading it but said it is too confusing to read.

          • wiggligirl

            Third book of Divergent series is indeed awful.

          • Toni

            *warning, very vague possibly spoilerish comments ahead*

            My issue with both series was that whenever dramatic tension was needed, the author would have two people be in love (romantic or familial), and then kill one of them off. This happened OVER and OVER with the Divergent series, and became both annoying and predictable. “Everyone ends up sad” does not necessarily equal “great writing.”

            • DuBey2

              wish I could like this x100

          • Sonnet_PDX

            Have you read the Penryn and the End of Days series or the Lunar Chronicles series? Both are pretty stellar entries in the YA catalog.

            • Glam Dixie

              No, I’ll have to see if the library has them. Thanks for the rec

        • anneshirley

          Book 3 of Hunger Games, while pretty bad, is Hemingway compared to Book 3 of Divergent.

        • marlie

          I agree… the third book was the weakest in both series. The 3rd book in Hunger Games had me actively hating Katniss partway through.

          • KC

            Spoilers if you haven’t read book 3 of Divergent!

            I think the 3rd Divergent was just a bit worse than the 3rd Hunger Games. First we have the back and forth between two characters who essentially sound the same. I had a ROUGH time remembering who it was that I was supposed to be following a couple times. It infuriated me. I also think she made Four a bit too soft and easily manipulated. I feel like the guy we got to know in the past 2 books would never react to the news that he was “less” the way he did. Maybe he’d be upset, but I don’t think he would ever allow anyone to tell him who he is. I don’t think finding out he was “Divergent” was the only thing that gave him his mind. I also think the author telegraphed what she was going to do in the end by changing up the narrator. It felt too much like a ploy even though I think that the end makes sense in the context of the character. I was also furious that the ending was such a whimper. I didn’t expect BOOM BOOM or anything, but I think we needed more exploration of the world the author had identified in the third book. Would’ve been really interesting to see more of this broken world and find out what Tris could represent for the future. There was too much hoopla over her DNA, it felt like it was leading somewhere.

            • marlie

              I agree… I sort of wish they’d gone BEYOND where they left off. Like, what actually happened after the ending. Also, with Four, his loss of drive or direction or self-confidence was really annoying. As was Tris’ tendency to break her promise whenever she made one. Even if she has good intentions, I thought that it would be hard to rely on someone in difficult times who never kept their word.

      • Kitten Mittons

        My coworkers said the same thing. I’ve read them, but didn’t feel that strongly. May I ask why it was so disappointing to you?

        • Glam Dixie

          Spoilers, so lets just say it dragged a bit and the ending wasn’t what I had hoped for.

          • sherrietee

            Book 3 was better than Book 2, but not as decent as Book 1. None of them were fantastic, but they were decent reads. Of course, I’m considerably older than the target demographic.

          • Kitten Mittons

            Gotcha, just curious. I guess I was influenced because my coworkers were sooooo disappointed in the ending, so I was expecting something truly awful. Once I read the series, it wasn’t as bad as my expectations, so I came out ahead.

            • random_poster

              I actually liked the fact that she went with an unpopular ending. Most times I prefer to have the bow tied at the end, but this felt more real to me.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Yes, I guess I always thought that I would have been more dissatisfied if it had ended in a more expected way.

            • Lori

              I also knew a lot of people who were really disappointed in the ending, but I often found myself wanting to ask if we’d been reading the same books. The things they disliked so much felt to me, if not exactly inevitable, certainly organic to the story Collins was telling. The character fate that people hated didn’t surprise me at all (it was sad, but it wasn’t a surprise) and neither did the choice Katniss makes that so many people didn’t like.

              Maybe I’m just gloomy, but I honestly expected the end to be way more of a bummer than it actually was. (I expected Katniss to choose the person she chose and then for him to die, because girlfriend never figured anything else out until it was too late not to be a disaster for her.)

            • Kitten Mittons

              Yes. That sums up my take pretty well. I was expecting worse based on other people’s reactions.

            • Lori

              Other people’s reactions, and the first two books. Each book is more death and misery than the last—because that’s the story Collins was telling and the character she wrote. The more Katniss cares the more pain she experiences. As the story goes on she cares more, about more people. There was no way that wasn’t going to be a gloom fest. The ending, especially counting in the epilogue was just way less awful than I was braced for.

            • ClioMusing

              I agree, plus I appreciated the PTSD, which I think a lot of people hated about the 3d book, because I find books/series that depict people suffering serious trauma without turning a hair absolutely maddening. Anyone who survived what Katniss had survived would not be in a head space to make consistently good or rational decisions, particularly in the more immediate aftermath, so I found her arc to be realistic as well as organic to Collins’ narrative.

            • Lori

              I haven’t read many interviews with Collins so I don’t know if I’m right, but I assumed from early on that a big part of what she was trying to do with the series was deliberately subvert a lot of the tropes about heroes and walking away without a scratch. Like you, that’s part of what i appreciated about the series.

        • MaggieSays

          I liked it. I don’t come into books with endings I think they should have. I also can’t remember the ending, so it couldn’t have disappointed me that much. Off to wiki.

          • Kitten Mittons

            This cracked me up because it sounds so much like me. “Yeah, I read that. I think I liked it?”

            • MaggieSays

              Obviously wasn’t the most impactful book series I’ve ever read. But I could talk about A Tree Grows in Brooklyn for Hours. Or Chaim Potok’s books. But we read a ton of fluff with snazzy covers meant for teenagers (I have one, so I like to read the stuff she is reading that everyone is reading so I am in the know) and then fawn all over it. Not that all teen books are bad. The Fault in Our Stars was fantastic.

            • Kitten Mittons

              The fluff helps you appreciate the other stuff. Everything in moderation. I’m due for a good cheesy mystery, myself.

            • MaggieSays

              Sure, but I think a lot of people think the fluff is the good stuff.

            • Kitten Mittons

              Well, to each their own, bless their hearts.

            • Tlazolteotl

              Have you read any of the Hamish Macbeth mysteries or Agatha Raisin? They’re both excellent cheesy mystery series – a little funny, quirky characters.

            • Kitten Mittons

              No, thank you! I love a new recommendation.

            • demidaemon

              Have you read any of the Thursday Next series? They are a great spin on murder mysteries, especially for anyone who is a bibliophile.

            • Lori

              I second this rec. That series is basically Fforde giving a nice, long shout out to the book people and it’s really fun.

            • demidaemon

              It is. he also has a series based in the Beatrix Potter universe I believe. I actually read one in the middle of the series long ago, finally got around to getting the entire series, and finished the first one not long ago. I’m pacing myself through them.

            • Lori

              I haven’t read that one. I’ll have to add it to the list. Because there aren’t already about 500 books on the list. (That’s not really an exaggeration. I’m as much of a magpie with books as I am with sequins.)

            • demidaemon

              I am not averse to the shiny, but i am a total magpie when it comes to books. I’m probably up there with you. I don’t know if it’s 500, but I’m sure it is pretty damn close.

            • Sonnet_PDX

              Oh, I love the Nursery Crime series! I am behind on those, but the first two were fantastic. Fforde’s Shades of Grey (not Fifty thereof, heh) is also really good, although the sequel is not due till 2016––which means I will have been waiting five years by then, boo. I think he got a bit sidetracked by his YA series. It seems that is where the publishing money is these days.

            • demidaemon

              IT’s true. He does seem to be pretty prolific, which I respect and admire.

            • Kitten Mittons

              No, but I will check them out. Thank you!

            • demidaemon

              No problem! I hope you enjoy them!

            • http://foodycat.blogspot.co.uk/ Alicia

              I did not know Hamish Macbeth were books! I loved that TV series!

            • marlie

              I read most of the stuff that my nephews read (because I’m the cool aunt like that, and my sister and her hubby aren’t “readers”), and my 14yo nephew just finished The Fault in Our Stars (he really liked it). I haven’t had a chance to read it yet but I’m actually worried that it’ll be too sad for me!

            • Kitten Mittons

              Such a good auntie!

            • marlie

              I try. :)

            • random_poster

              I read a lot of my daughter’s books for that very reason. For sure some are better than others.

            • Qitkat

              :-) A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
              I read that so many many years ago, and have forgotten all the details, and yet, I know it resonated with me at the time, and is still one of my favorites books, though, lol, I couldn’t possibly discuss it now, without re-reading it. Same with so many other books.

            • MaggieSays

              I want to reread it this summer.

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              I don’t know if it’s in print, but Ursula LeGuin’s Wizard of Earthsea trilogy was quite entertaining. LeGuin’s a genuinely good writer.

            • formerlyAnon

              Still popular!

            • bitchybitchybitchy

              Oh, that’s good to know. I have fond memories of those books.

            • LadyLuck777

              Agreed. I read those several times as a teenager. Tehanu was terrible though.

        • Jennifer L.

          Also trying to avoid spoilers – it’s like Collins forgot that huge plot developments needed to have underlying motivations. I wouldn’t be surprised if she had figured out Hunger Games was going to be a movie and was writing to-the-film, as it were – ‘Well let’s have them do this thing for no apparent reason because it’ll look so awesome when they’re filming with giant crossbows in Paris!’

          • Kitten Mittons

            Interesting. I can see that.

            Maybe I just didn’t have that high a bar for them. I probably grouped them with the Twilight books, and when they were better than those, I gave them a pass on any of the plot issues.

        • Sarah

          It had the feeling of “lets hurry up and finish this trilogy and strike while the iron is hot.” As in: I think if that book had been shopped around to writer’s groups and critiqued, it never would’ve ended up like that.

          • Kitten Mittons

            Ah, I see. I’m sure she felt that pressure quite a bit.

        • anneshirley

          Not a spoiler, but the format also changes in Book 3 to dual narrators, which is not done well. Also the ending was terrible.

          • Kitten Mittons

            I do remember the narrator thing, which is pretty silly.

          • BuffaloBarbara

            Not in Mockingjay — that’s strictly Katniss. It was the Divergent series that switched narration styles, which annoys me (I am still trying to force myself through “Allegiant.” Ugh.)

        • Claire

          Right when it came out, my friends who were really disappointed were the ones who had been reading the series all along and were mad they had waited a year for a book that’s a non-stop bummer, which I can get. But I think if you read all three in one go, it flows better. I didn’t love the last book, but I thought it was interesting.

          • Kitten Mittons

            I think that’s definitely the camp I’m in, too.

          • Guest

            That could be. It struck me as the right ending — the war that turned everything on its head, almost ending up with the new boss same as (or worse than) the old boss… with only Katniss standing in the way of the cycle repeating itself again. Then again, I read them back to back in three days, and didn’t spend time speculating between books.

      • ovarB

        Exactly!!! The 3rd book lacked the fire of the previous two…no fire pun intended. :P

      • jonnyf8

        My issue with the 3rd book was that it felt rushed to satisfy the reader demand for the final installment. Since its being split into 2 movies I’m expecting it to correct some of the books shortcomings. I’m going to be optimistic for now. And, I think these pictures look great!

        • Sarah

          Ha, I just wrote that. I should’ve scrolled. It was a very hurried denouement.

        • melisaurus

          I think short rushed books could possibly translate well to screen though?

      • TigerLaverada

        Me, too. Talk about a fizzle instead of a bang. It read like the author started the series with a really good notion but had absolutely no idea how to finish the story.

      • fursa_saida

        I actually like the third book in almost every respect.

        [SPOILERS] A big part of what I got out of the series was the straightforward look at all these characters with all kinds of PTSD being asked to keep functioning and being, basically, unable to. I was dealing with untreated mental illness at the time and remember reading that scene where she hides in a closet just to avoid yet another round of “the Mockingjay needs to do xyz” and relating real hard. The third book is the one that’s heaviest on the psychological toll, and I’m here for all of that. There are some plot choices I might change, but I was never really in it for the plot.

        • Kitten Mittons

          That’s a very thoughtful take on it.

      • Jangle57

        Agree! I was so put off the endless killing in this book, especially with the fate of one young character in particular, I can’t even imagine how they could make a movie of it and make it palatable. I will be avoiding it like the plague.

      • KC

        I actually think the 3rd and 4th installments could be really good. I’m hoping that there are some changes and since we are going to be able to get more viewpoints than just Katniss’s we’ll see a bit more action, etc…I think it’ll help that there will be 2 movies. While the first part was slow there could be some good scenes and we could sit back and see how things play out just. The last movie will probably be craziness, but I think it’ll help that they’ll get to focus on each part of the book as individual things. I always thought (even before they announced they were splitting the book) that it would be so much better if there were 4 instead of 3 books. Especially with what happens at the end. They may get more time to dwell and embellish that, which will be nice. I personally think that all of the events, the order of events are not bad, its just how their written out. I feel like seeing it all visually will really help, as well.

      • annla

        I didn’t like the 3rd book much either. I have hopes that they will actually make it into a better movie than book. I was totally Team Gael. When the oppressors are killing your people, you gotta fight back!

      • BuffaloBarbara

        I actually liked “Mockingjay” a lot, maybe because I read the three books back to back in a handful of days. (I’d read the first one ages before, and was a little meh, but then I re-read that, tore through Catching Fire, and went straight into MJ). I thought it was exactly the right ending, with the war turning out to be meet the new boss, same as or worse than the old boss, and Katniss having to figure that out and ending up as the only one standing in the way of the dystopia repeating itself.

    • GrumpyKitty34

      How come Jennifer Lawrence looks the same as everyone else? She’s supposed to have a special suit designed by Cinna that makes her look special from everyone else. She is the symbol of the resistance after all.

      • Danielle

        Don’t say his name, my eyes leak every time. D:

      • dorothyeverytimesmurf

        i haven’t read the third book in a year-ish, but i don’t think this is one of the parts where she’s being a symbol of the resistance (note peeta)

        • Lori

          Yeah. I’m guessing they were shooting the final battle in the Capital. Katniss is dressed like everyone else then. The special, symbolic outfits are just for the little filmed bits that they broadcast to everyone. When she fights she’s just a soldier.

      • BuffaloBarbara

        This could be after they invade the Capitol, when she’s not wearing the Mockingjay suit anymore (even though they brought it along).

    • tallgirl1204

      Jennifer Lawrence is a chameleon. I think this quality (chameleon-ness) is what is going to turn her into one of the ‘greats.’ I think of other actresses who always seem so natural in their roles, as if “oh, this is who she really is.” Because, this sure looks like who Jennifer Lawrence really is. And yet, in other roles I think the same thing.

    • MilaXX

      It’s war!

    • SugarSnap108

      A real man never goes to war without hairspray.

      • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

        what the fuck is that about? is that what those cannisters lying about are?

    • Sissy

      all my baes

    • julnyes

      I have enjoyed Natalie Dormer in everything I have seen her in. That evil smirk she has makes me think she is up to something deliciously devious at all times. I would like to be her henchwoman.

      • http://frankbettecenter.org/ sleah_in_norcal

        i’ll never forget her as ann boleyn. the scene of her execution was one of television’s finest. her face at that moment…exquisite.

    • MightyMarshal

      I wish they wouldn’t with Pita’s hair. That shade of yellow is just not good.

    • TM

      Oh yay–they were able to keep J Law’s hair the same. Too bad they still haven’t figured out what to do with poor Josh’s hair though. (He is just not a blond.)

    • crash1212

      Love the hair spray shot!

      • sun

        Peeta is so nonfunctional!

    • Jessy_N

      oh, pita bread…

    • Haley Buchanan

      Natalie Dormer’s everything is badass. Always.

    • BuffaloBarbara

      Who the heck is Natalie Dormer supposed to be playing again?