The Walking Dead: Live Bait

Posted on November 18, 2013

TWDS4E6+1David Morrissey in AMC’s The Walking Dead

Well, that certainly was 42 minutes of hardcore character rehabilitation, wasn’t it? And there sure were a lot of meaningful scenes of people talking very quietly to each other in dark rooms, right? Also: little blonde white girls are the ultimate image of helplessness in this world, and  when one of them is sad or scared or needs to have a bullet put through her undead brain, the whole world weeps for them.

Seriously, what is the fascination with little blonde white girls on this show? From the opening moments of the series, when Rick had to shoot that little walker in the head, to The Hunt for Dead Sophia, to the Governor’s undead daughter and now his latest, likely-soon-to-be-undead adopted daughter who looks just like the first one. Then there’s that creepy, crazy one back at the prison, who keeps getting crushes on corpses. It’s like the ultimate indicator of how things are going in this story is, “What’s going on with the little blonde white girls? Are they alive? And if they’re alive are they mute with fear or creepy and crazy? Won’t someone think of the little blonde white girls?”

Feh. We were bored and a little annoyed, can you tell? And yet, there was a part of us that kind of enjoyed seeing a side of the apocalypse from another point of view, although it’s getting irritating how often the characters on this show run into new characters who are so stupid, clueless, and without resources that it makes no sense for them to still be alive. This is the third time this season  (Rick and the crazy moss lady in the woods, Rick & Carol and the two dimwitted young people hiding in a bathroom) someone met up with a character or group of characters who seemed to have absolutely no idea of the world around them. It’s almost like the show is saying that survival in this world just comes down to dumb luck, but that negates pretty much everything we’ve seen in the story so far and it renders the struggle of the main characters as a spin of the roulette wheel, with their own actions and decisions serving as nothing more than window dressing for the story.

One of the major failures of this show, as far as we’re concerned, is the lack of world-building; the sense of what’s happening beyond the tiny borders of the main group. You could argue that’s a feature of the show and that it adds to the sense of despair and isolation, not knowing what happened or what’s happening anywhere else. Never knowing the whys or the hows. And that’s a pretty good argument. On the other hand, it’s probably the Number One reason why the show has been so directionless throughout it’s previous three seasons. It’s definitely the main reason why the show has a history of focusing too much on debates and arguments and internal conflict. If you’re committed to not showing the rest of the world, you’re stuck with claustrophobic scenes of characters sniping at each other. The other downside to this lack of world-building is that when the show does try to depict something or someone new, it always winds up being just a little off or nonsensical.

We spent a good 2/3 of the episode thinking he was hallucinating that family because so little of their story made sense. Like those two kids from a couple of weeks ago, it strains disbelief that this group would survive a couple of years in this world without even knowing such basics as how to put down a walker or that all people become walkers when they die. Or that someone with Stage 4 lung cancer would survive several years with no treatment at all. Or that they had somehow stockpiled two years of oxygen tanks for him. And roughly a thousand candles. And three adults and one child could live off a food truck for two years without severe malnutrition. And somehow have enough clean water to do dishes after dinner every night, even though they seem to have done nothing to secure it. Sure, you could work to provide answers for all of these questions, but the fact that there are so many questions – and the story doesn’t seem to want to ask or answer them – that makes it a little annoying. Let’s face it: they wanted a little blonde girl to be his surrogate daughter and a grateful, pretty lady to need his help. They’re simply pieces on the playing board to get the Governor to the front gate of the prison. Redeemed? We’ll see. We doubt very much he’ll manage to keep this new family entirely intact and there’s a part of us that wonders if he’ll wind up murdering them for some reason. But that’s probably us holding onto the hope that the writers aren’t seriously going to try and foist a redemption arc on us. Not with this character. They turned him into a cartoon villain last season and to be perfectly honest, we’d rather see him exit the story permanently, rather than sitting through some weepy series of scenes that cast him as a hero, after we watched him murder, torture and sexually assault an uncountable number of people last season.

It comes down to this, for us: David Morrissey is great in the role, and the Governor was a fascinating character in the books, but the show pretty much damaged him to the point of making him useless. If he comes back as a villain again, we’ll be bored. If he comes back redeemed, we simply won’t be able to accept it. If there’s a third option, we’re willing to listen, but we can’t conceive of a direction  for this character we’d actually like.

But lest we sound terribly negative, we did appreciate the opening up of this world and the point of view of new characters, including (YAY!) the show’s first gay character. The acting here was fine, across the board. We were just intrigued enough by the new folks to want to hear more about them, even if everything they told us just opened up more frustrating questions. We were captivated for the whole hour, but we really don’t want much more of this direction in the story. There’s a huge part of us that just wants a ten-second scene of Michonne silently beheading him, and then have everyone move on.

 

 

 

 

 

[Photo Credit: Gene Page/AMC]

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  • SneakyKitty

    I found myself really enjoying this episode, and it wasn’t until it was over that I started noticing the things y’all just pointed out. I did wonder how the family survived without knowing how to kill the walkers, but eh, I’ve learned to overlook glaring plotholes in this show so far. David Morrisey was great, and even though it was a slow episode, I couldn’t stop watching.

    Agree that I’m really tired of little blond white girls, though. Come on now, show.

    I wonder if the Governor is taking the family to the prison so they’ll be safe? With no intention of staying with them, of course. Assuming he gets away before Michonne gets to him.

    • Mismarker

      Total agreement with everything you’ve said. I’ve found my enjoyment of the show increases exponentially when I focus on the good stuff. Otherwise, why waste my time? It’s why Revenge is no longer appointment TV for me.

  • Sobaika

    With due respect to the actor (it isn’t his fault and he tried to make it work) but this episode was the utmost in BORING and I don’t care what happens, he is still the guy with pet heads in a tank.

    • Suzanne Moore

      Agreed. It was so boring I got out my knitting while it was on. The last time I did that was during the never-ending farm episodes. We still don’t know Daryl’s reaction to Carol’s banishment. I think they’re saving that for the mid-season ending, filling in with stuff I don’t care about, like the Governor.

      • marlie

        HA! I was knitting too. My bf looked at me in disbelief when I pulled it out, but hey, I have Christmas gifts to finish.

    • mlurve

      I could get over the pet heads, I could somewhat understand him freaking out at Michonne over killing his zombie daughter, I could even potentially get over his behavior with Glen and Maggie. But murdering a bunch of innocent people in cold blood because you’re annoyed? He can cure the disease and kill every last zombie himself and he still won’t be able to be redeemed.

      • BeccaGo

        I will never forgive him for Milton. Never.

        • NYCGlamourpuss

          Absolutely. The Milton Incident was unforgivable.

        • Karyn

          Agreed. And when that actor shows up on The Good Wife, I jump for joy and go, “MILTON LIVES!”

  • Mismarker

    Re: redemption. He has me at “I’m a pirate”.

  • harlowish

    I agree about not wanting a redemption arc. David Morrissey *is* great in the role, and if this had been a stand-alone episode it might have been a fascinating character study. HOWEVER, I don’t buy it, not from what we’ve seen of the Governor. What was supposed to have caused his breakdown? Gunning down all the people from Woodbury? That might be enough to send another person around the bend, but from everything they showed us about the Governor last season, we know that he has absolutely no problem killing anyone who gets in his way.

    Despite the stupidity of the family living that long, I might have really loved this episode and the character examination, but I just couldn’t because I could not for one second find this character arc and his mental state anything but implausible. You can’t make a character as cartoonishly villainous as they made the Governor and expect the audience to believe that he’s haunted by his actions.

    • Mismarker

      One of my biggest complaints last season was the lack of a backstory for the Governor. Did it serve his character and last season’s story to have his motivations be somewhat ambiguous? I guess. Some of the story last night was lifted from the Road to the Governor novels that act as the character’s origin story. I wish we’d seen some of this last year. Now that he has some layers, I don’t find him nearly so off-putting and I’m interested in seeing where he goes from here… how he will deal with Martinez being in charge.

  • Shannon Long

    Um, you guys, even though I will never, ever forgive the governor for his assault of Maggie and his attempted assault of Michonne…I am extremely attracted to him. Maybe it’s because I saw him as Col. Brandon first, but this feels like season 1 of American Horror Story all over again in terms of wanting-to-boink-a-rapey-asshole.

    • Mismarker

      Yeah. Have you seen “South Riding”? For a second last night, after watching him effortlessly scoop up that man and risk his life for oxygen tanks, I was like “who is this tall drink of water?”

      • NYCGlamourpuss

        Oh, he’s a hottie, no doubt. Makes me glad that this is just a TV show so I can openly lust over David Morrissey!

        • BayTampaBay

          He was also in Basic Instinct II with CRAZY Bitch Sharon Stone.

    • Saturnine

      The flip side is that now I can’t watch his smoldering looks at Marianne without shuddering and thinking “heads in fish tanks . . . “

    • MilaXX

      Which makes casting another actress who looks similar to Maggie even more insulting.

      • CT14

        I know!

        I think her name is supposed to be Tara, but she looks and sounds way too much like Maggie!

  • rosie5215

    I just couldn’t with this episode. A house defended by two women lets a strange man in? A cop trainee sets her gun down in front of said stranger and takes her attention off of it? And then goes on to disclose that they have lots of food and ammo? The group that finds the governor accepts him back after witnessing him gun down multiple people? I generally expect this show to strain credulity, but this is ridiculous.

    • Mismarker

      All of that was pretty silly. If a guy needs O2 just sitting in a recliner, I’m pretty sure he’s going to need it when he’s sleeping… when even a normal, healthy person’s oxygen saturations tend to drop. They would have run out of O2 tanks *MONTHS* ago.

      Clearly, the producers of this show have settled on a redemption story or, at the very least, an opportunity to give him some dimension. I guess It worked for me on that level. I’m at least interested in him now (surprising, since I never really wanted to see him again after last season) and on board for another Governor-centric next week.

    • tereliz

      LOL, when she revealed she wasn’t really a cop yet I was like, “You don’t say?”

    • NYCGlamourpuss

      RIGHT???

    • CT14

      Don’t forget that while the Gov was stumbling about be-bearded, he ran into the most incompetent walkers. Walkers who fell in fire and didn’t know how to get up again (in THAT dress/nightgown? She should have fallen a millïon times). Walkers who can be avoided be lurching to the side. Walkers that don’t run or follow.

      The Prison gang never runs into the incompetent zombies. They always get the fast ones that bite on an artery.

  • greenwich_matron

    Does anyone know a site where I can kvetch about how much better I would be in a zombie apocalypse than these characters are? I have moved beyond moaning at their stupidity to creating actual zombie annihilation battle plans. Like why don’t they use the zombie’s attraction to fire to trap and incinerate them?

    • Sobaika

      I kind of maybe get why they wouldn’t do that at the prison – there’s a giant forest that they might not want to light afire as well. And it would take a lot of manpower, while we’ve seen that all the former Woodbury residents are terrible at basic survival skills.

      But maybe a MOAT or spending some time triangulating the fences or something, anything.

      • greenwich_matron

        How about some tiger pits and trap doors? Given that zombies can’t read, they can be clearly marked. Also, have they ever explained why they can’t use dogs to sniff out zombies? How do zombies react to electricity? I would think an electric trip wire could be used as an alarm even if an electric fence wouldn’t repel them. They don’t seem to be taking the offensive at all.

        • BeccaGo

          These are excellent questions.

        • Darren Nesbitt

          Um, they don’t have electricity and if they did I don’t think they would waste it on a high powered fence. I don’t know how scary these zombies are but I think most animals run and the first scent of the walking dead. Remember these are regular people (like me). I would love a trap door but I didn’t study medieval war tactics, so I wouldn’t know how to build a human sized trap door in the ground lol.

          • greenwich_matron

            It has been years now. I could set up a windmill with car batteries to get some electricity (I am not an electrician, what I know comes from studying pioneer farming, articles about green electricity, basic knowledge of current, and owning a car with a lousy battery and kids who don’t close the doors). All you need is someone who has seen Soylent Green, a decent textbook, and a little can-do spirit. As for a trap door: dig a hole and cover it with planks that won’t support 100 pounds. Why aren’t there any mills or steam engines? Did the zombies eat all the books?

            If the dogs want to flee when they smell zombies, that means they know when they are coming and can warn the residents. This would pretty much eliminate surprise attacks.

            Why don’t people sleep on platforms, roofs, and second floors given that zombies have trouble climbing stairs? They could take down the stairs and replace them with ladders that they could pull up in the event of an attack.

            I could go on for hours.

          • Mismarker

            It has been 18 months or so. It may be maddening to see how little they’ve prepared but removing the threat of the zombies destroys the whole premise of the show. If they were to do everything right, where is the drama and what is the danger? I think as they move away from the prison we will possibly meet more groups that seem to have the ZA all figured out. At least Martinez’s new group has a zombie pit.

          • greenwich_matron

            you’re right about the premise, and I am sorry if I am trolling. I have found that my favorite part of this show has become armchair zombie-survival tactics, and I want to share. I will spare you my theories about zombies and lye.

          • Mismarker

            I wouldn’t call it trolling. There are plenty of people on here who like to point out where Rick and the group are going wrong re: preparedness. I just don’t see the point of it, really. This show is never going to be Doomsday Preppers. There will always need to be weakness (so the characters can be shown to be strong) and perceived peril.

          • ransue

            Hydrogen Perioxide! Probably close to your lye theory and easy to make I hear. Pour it on hamburger and watch the fun.

      • MilaXX

        You mean like the ditch Martinez and his crew made?

      • CT14

        Morris seemed to have taken care of Grimes’ hometown all by himself. Traps at the gates that he clears daily. Patrols to double check on defenses. Etc.

    • NYCGlamourpuss

      “Looook, zombies – a marshmallow roast and a sing-a-long around the fire! Come and get it!” It would work, the zombies aren’t that bright!

    • BeccaGo

      I had to catch a train this weekend and there was a 40-minute delay. I spent the entire time planning how I would fortify the outdoor platform and turn the tracks into a moat/fire pit. Pretty sure I’d last longer up there than 75% of the cast at this point.

    • CT14

      I have been known to whine about wanting to watch some smart people in the zombie apocalypse.

      • greenwich_matron

        maybe the zombies eat the people with big brains first!

  • Angela_the_Librarian

    I actually enjoyed the show last night, but had the same complaints about the lack of zombie smarts from this new group. I don’t know why they would have left such a perfect place after apparently not being seriously attacked over the years (if they had been really attacked by zombies they would have all been eaten by now). I think it was just a nice change of pace to get out of the prison setting (though I would really like it if they got out of Georgia and showed what was going on in other parts of the country or world for that matter).

    As for the Governor’s return to the prison, I think that it will come down to one of two reasons: 1) He wants to find a safe place for the girls to go; 2)The girls die (by his hand or by zombies) and he is back to revenge mode, perhaps blaming all his failures on Rick. I don’t believe for a second that the Governor has really changed all that much. Once something sets him off again I’m sure he’ll be back to full-on sociopath mode.

    • Eric Stott

      I’d like to see him drop off the girls at the prison- redeem him just that much – then let him get taken out BAD!.

      • Angela_the_Librarian

        Yes, Michonne should have the honor or course.

        • Eric Stott

          Maybe we get a combination – he gets snatched by the walkers & Michonne has enough pity to kill him….by splitting his screaming head open.

    • NYCGlamourpuss

      True, because the only possible saving grace for this plot is that we don’t know how much time has passed. The girls could all be dead by now by the time he shows up at the prison. He could go into crazy revenge mode, show up at the prison and SLICE! Get his noggin lopped off by Michonne!

    • Isabel

      If the Gov and new family would have stayed, the fans would have hollered. Remember how bored everyone was when the gang was at Hershel’s farm?

  • osu86

    Thank you for articulating all of my thoughts. I was driving my BF crazy last night with all of my quips about how there is NO WAY they would still be alive at this point, blah blah. I’m not saying I can’t suspend disbelief (it is a zombie apocalypse after all), but if there are so many glaring plot holes, it gets in the way of my enjoyment.

    Also, I’m not interested in a Governor redemption, and the writers give no reason for his motivations to be a better person. What changed? Also, the heavy handed symbolism (ahh, he folded the picture over, cutting himself out = he is not the same person and feels like a monster) was really grating. I will say that I do LOVE the Walking Dead soundtrack. They always have great music.

    Now, I just want to watch the showdown when Rick informs Darryl and the rest that he voted off Carol.

    • Sonny

      The “symbolic” moment that killed me was the chess game with the Gov’nah as the king killing off pawns. Because we’ve never seen that analogy before.

    • BeccaGo

      Bear McCreary is a mothaf*ckin’ boss. Walking Dead and Battlestar Galactica rock, literally. :)

  • Audrey L.

    Can we talk Talking Dead last night? Chris Hardwick amazed me with his strength, especially his acknowledgement at the end.

    • Mismarker

      Haven’t watched it yet but I admire him for even showing up. Sad.

    • Sobaika

      That was majorly depressing. I wasn’t really a fan of the guy but he’s been growing on me, the way he snarked on Marilyn Manson and his grace last night.

    • mjude

      so touching I shed a few tears…..

    • MilaXX

      I had seen on twitter people were sending his condolences and found out about his dad there. I was surprised when he tweeted he was going to do the show the next night.

    • NYCGlamourpuss

      I fell asleep, unfortunately! What happened?

  • Eric Stott

    I did like getting out of the prison setting, and the dead at the old folks home were interesting – can’t exactly call them walkers- but I’m kinda doubtful about the Governor’s part in this. Maybe it’s time to end this show with a nuclear strike.

    • Mismarker

      The senior citizen zombies made my night. Before I became a nurse, I worked as an aide in a nursing home. Rules of zombie physicality (or lack thereof) be damned! Last night, I really wanted to see a zombie whirring around in a Jazzy scooter. Or a walker *using* a walker. While most zombies have a singular need to feed on flesh, I bet senior citizen zombies are still somewhat preoccupied with the timeliness of their bowel movements and the arrival of the mailman.

      • Eric Stott

        and somewhere in their decaying brains a faint thought of “no….one……visits……”. The bunch of silk flowers was a nicely incongruous touch

  • MasterandServant

    I was under the impression that this was a flashback- before Woodbury existed- and is trying to show us the governor’s world and background? The premise of last night’s episode came from the prequel books (Road to Woodbury/Rise of the Governor)…so I just assumed it was not happening in real time, but was a flashback in order to set up his character a little bit better.

    If this was a ‘prequel’ episode, then these women would not have developed the best zombie smarts yet.

    • Mismarker

      But his eye was out. Can’t be a flashback.

      • MasterandServant

        Ah, you are right about the prequel….But as we know, in this show they kind of mish mash the books (look at the character names from last night….they were not Lilly and Megan in the book- those were other characters). I do kind of wonder where it will go (having read all those books)

    • Angela_the_Librarian

      I think the Governor’s reaction to seeing Martinez also shows that it wasn’t a flashback. He was clearly not happy to see him.

      • Isabel

        When I saw the first few minutes, I was growling. “I thought that this was supposed to be a new episode!” I was really confused…

      • DeebaCee

        I clearly missed something at the beginning of the episode. When did the Governor and Martinez split up? I saw Martinez kill the clumsy “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” zombie in the maxi-dress, and next thing I know, the Governor is stumbling around looking like a zombie (with yet another I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” zombie falling next to him). Did Martinez leave the Governor behind, or did the Governor leave Martinez behind?

        • BeccaGo

          The morning after the maxi-dress zombie incident, Governor is shown coming out of his tent and Martinez and Shumpert have split. Very wise decision, IMHO.

          • DeebaCee

            Ahhh, ok. Thanks!

    • MilaXX

      *Points to TLo’s screencap* No because they showed him burning down the ruins of Woodbury. I’m assuming the reason why Michonne’s trail ran cold is because he was laying house with the food truck family.

      • NYCGlamourpuss

        And laying pipe with the food truck mommy! (I’ll show myself out…)

        • MilaXX

          sorry, boo ;-) Don’t worry though, I’m dyslexic and I can’t type. I’ll always have typos.

  • Anna Vasquez

    Honestly, I was just so relieved to not be watching a Rick episode.

  • http://phantomminuet.blogspot.com/ MinAgain

    Well, I liked it. Granted, I found the family’s survival a little implausible, but I suspended disbelief and went along for the ride. The Governor’s little detour into humanity is clearly temporary. Ultimately, I think he will revert to form, and it will be interesting to see what trips that switch.

    • Isabel

      Zombies can’t climb stairs, so some of the episode can believed. The hospital/old folks zombies were locked in because they can’t open doors. The dying dad may also emit odors that are not appetizing to zombies, so that could have saved the rest of the family. I just wonder how they survived the food truck runs.

      • BeccaGo

        Zombies can climb stairs. They made it to the roof when Merle was cuffed up there. I think it’s ladders they can’t climb.

  • erikagwen

    I think part of the disjointedness of this episode, for me anyway, is that in the books, this whole thing takes place BEFORE he becomes “the governor,” so that yes they do still have candles and it is possible for someone with cancer to still be alive. Society hasn’t been shut down for very long. Some of the things that happen then in this story line are what make him the horrible person he becomes. But sticking it in now….. it only makes me think they’re going to write/ramp him back up to be even worse than before.

    • MilaXX

      But that means nothing to anyone who hasn’t read the comics and it’s also a contradiction to the claims that the show is intended to diverge from the comics.

      • NYCGlamourpuss

        Exactly. I haven’t read the comics, yet we’ve been assured that they’re going to be two very different things, and that if you haven’t read the comics, you’ll still get the show – which for the most part I have. But the show should hold together, plot-wise, without the comics. A perfect example is Michonne – I haven’t read the comics. But from what I understand, the reason she’s after him, the reason she’s out for revenge, is that apparently he does some absolutely unspeakable things to her in the comics. And that anger and revenge has translated over into the show – but why? The show doesn’t give us any reason that she has for wanting this guy dead to the point where she’s hunting him all over the state of Georgia (the show). But apparently she has plenty good reason (the comics). And they writers aren’t tying those two together. My boyfriend tried to say, “Easy, it’s revenge for Andrea.” But Michonne was hot to off the Gov. way before Andrea had been killed. It’s just not coming together with his storyline.

        • Mismarker

          The Governor did send Merle and a couple other goons out kill Michonne after he agreed to let her leave Woodbury. It’s not as bad as the stuff he does to her in the books but, on top of what happened with Andrea, it’s not nothing.

          • NYCGlamourpuss

            Yeah, I mean I get that. But even sending out his goons doesn’t seem to quite equal hunting this guy to the ends of the earth. The stuff I heard alluded to in the books – if my imagination is as bad as what he actually does to her, then I get it.

          • Mismarker

            Agreed. I probably would have given up months ago. But I’m sort of lazy and can be easily distracted!

          • leonps

            That’s why it’s best not to try to kill someone and kill their best friend.

      • erikagwen

        Oh I agree that it’s a contradiction, but only to a point – it’s not in the comics either. It’s in a prequel book book that was written a few years later. Regardless, putting this in the story line now, makes it seem odd.

      • CT14

        If they had any sense they’d stop trying to force Rick on everyone and realize Daryll is their breakout star and let him run things. Except he’s too smart and they need stupidity to keep the zombie invasions happening.

        TV works better with an ensemble anyway.

        • MilaXX

          I wish I could like this a thousand times more.

    • bellafigura1

      Wait, really? Last night’s episode happens pre-Woodbury?

      • BeccaGo

        No. See: eyepatch.

        • bellafigura1

          Exactly!!!!

      • Mismarker

        It’s a bit confusing, right? : ) Last night’s episode occurred in the 2-3 months following the end of season 3. The main story of the episode is lifted (with changes) from the Rise of the Governor book, a pre-Woodbury account of the man who would become The Governor.

    • ransue

      I think you hit the nail on the head. The cute little blond girl gets it and the new and improved Governor goes berserk.

  • tereliz

    The thing that worries me the most about this episode is that it takes place right when the Woodburyites were getting settled in at the prison. Several months still need to pass before the scene with him standing outside the fence watching Rick and Carl split a pea pod. How long was he out there watching? Is Penny-Redux still alive? What about her mom and aunt? What happened to Martinez?

    And—most importantly—how many Governor episodes are they going to make me suffer through before Rick tells Darryl what he did to Carol?

    • Mismarker

      I think he said he’d been alone and wandering for 2 months? So that means we’ve got another 4-5 months of Gov story to cover before meeting up with the end of last week’s episode. All of your questions (hell, they’re my questions, too) should be answered in next week’s episode. They should be back to the prison story for episode 8, the mid-season finale.

  • marlie

    I also wondered about the massive amount of candles and the clean water. This episode was the most drawn-out, painfully boring one I’ve seen thus far (I only started watching this season), and I kept asking myself “when are they going to get to the point of all this?”

    Also, I think the “new family as a way to redemption” storyline is lame and a little bit lazy.

  • Rachel

    Last night it was decided in my house that the Governor was really Civil War Vet Snake Plissken. Also, the first 3 minutes of this episode felt like a music video–complete with standing in front of a burning building while staring soulfully into the distance.

    • MilaXX

      They certainly used the left over SFX makeup.

    • Badriya Al-Badi’a

      I am HATING the use of actual songs in the show this season–it sucks all the meaning right out of the scene for me, just because of that music video effect. We the audience get what’s going on, we don’t need musical hand-holding. Especially not when you’ve got a great cast of actors perfectly capable of conveying all the emotion/conflict/pathos/drama/etc that you could want them to convey. Plus, the world of recorded music is gone in the world of TWD, it feels I suppose anachronistic in a way.

      (I did like Beth singing I Don’t Want to Grow Up, but having characters singing songs is an entirely different thing. Though how a religious rural sheltered farmer’s pre-teen daughter became a Tom Waits/Joey Ramone fan is another question.)

  • MilaXX

    Color me annoyed. It was painfully obvious that the sole purpose of this stuff ep. Was an attempt to redeem and humanize this character and introduce new characters. The redemption is a fail. In fact it’s a bit insulting to try and tell us he’s even worth redemption when you just spent the previous episodes trying to convince us that banning Carol was the right thing to do because of her actions.
    Everything about this episode was just clunky and heavy handed. I’m annoyed that next week appears to be more of the same. They may have liked Dave Moressey as an actor, but they should have let this character go.

    • SassieCassy

      cosign

    • NYCGlamourpuss

      Hopefully they will let him go before the season is up. They can’t honestly believe that somewhere in this guy’s brain, a switch was flipped for him to all of a sudden be a good, contrite person after all the things he did in Woodbury. I know it’s not *impossible*, but for this show, it’s a really far stretch. I have a far easier time believing that Carol could go from abused doormat to competent bad-ass to cold blooded Corleone than for THIS guy to suddenly go in the *other* direction – a vicious murdering near-rapist to a quiet, contrite humbled man. Nope, not buying it. He needs to be offed, there’s nothing else they can DO with his character.

      • MilaXX

        EXACTLY!

      • lynde1038

        I’m hoping this is just another way to explore the “can we come back from the things we’ve done?” theme they’ve got going this year. And that, in this case, the ultimate answer will be “no.” This particular guy cannot come back. He doesn’t get to. Some folks can. Rick, Carol, Carl. But when you’ve done the kinds of things the Governor has, you just can’t.

        • NYCGlamourpuss

          That’s true.

        • BeccaGo

          Well put.

        • Mismarker

          This is spot on. He’s here only to further the overarching theme of the season. Utilizing him beyond that would be a misstep, imo. I’m intrigued he’s back and anxious to see what lies ahead for him, but he needs to be gone (i.e. DEAD) before season’s end.

  • NYCGlamourpuss

    Jesus Christ, I’ve never seen anyone get more tail than this guy after a zombie apocalypse!

    • Angela_the_Librarian

      and in the back of truck with two other people (including a child) present. I know desperate times call for desperate measures..but they could have least gone outside.

      • NYCGlamourpuss

        But it must be LOOOOOOVE!!! (*Gag!*)

        • Isabel

          The Love Truck

      • Mismarker

        If the food truck’s a rockin’…..

        • NYCGlamourpuss

          Haaaa!

  • DonnaL

    So, is the younger sister supposed to be gay? The two sisters looked so much alike (not to mention that the older one looked like Maggie) that I wasn’t even sure which one the Governor made it with in the truck. But I guess police academy and gruff, aggressive manner are supposed to signify being a lesbian?

    • Sonny

      When they are walking down the street, the sister’s talking about going camping with a crush and then finding out that the friend has a boyfriend.

      • DonnaL

        Ah, OK. I must have been dozing off at that point!

      • Daktari100

        But couldn’t that mean she had a crush on a boy, only to find out later that the boy has a boyfriend?

        • BeccaGo

          No. She said “she.”

  • Daktari100

    How did I miss the show’s first gay character? Who was it?

    • bellafigura1

      The sister who said she was a cop, who was obsessed with “pounding it out”.

  • YoungSally

    When the Governor showed up stumbling down the street, I was wondering if this was yet another alternate ending for Breaking Bad.

  • bellafigura1

    I was happy to leave prison, I have to admit. But I was confused, was the Gov stealing that Brian identity? Or was he Brian pre-apocalypse? And why did he burn up his family photo? And agreeing with the poster and TLo, all the little blonde girls and all the brunette women are starting to blend together…

    • Sobaika

      They covered this in the Talking Dead, it’s a fake name. It’s supposed to be some great symbolic thing (Brian is a name among the graffiti messages he comes across in the opening montage) but I think it was a pretty insignificant tidbit when it comes down to it.

  • BeccaGo

    The Governor should not be getting more ass than Daryl. That is just so wrong, Walking Dead.

  • xmixiex

    this show. i’m done. i just don’t care. have at ‘em, zombies. eat em all.

  • Raven

    i remembered walking dead was on this sunday and was looking forward to it, then remembered it was a governor-centric episode and lost all interest.

    you nailed it, he’s toony. i’m just bored to death and completely turned off by this character. hearing that he’s supposed to be misunderstood now is so…yawn…if i want to watch man pain fueled by women dying i’ll just pop in an action flick.

    not to mention i can’t feel any sort of sympathy for someone who resorts to sexual harassment, uuuhmmm, DEF not the zombie apocolypse’s fault. he was always like that you just don’t become that way because you’re real cool and misunderstood and ‘need to get the job done’. so it actually makes me feel uncomfortable for his dead wife too. and kid.

    see you can have a character like that, you can have the hugest dillhole ever but the moment you skew the writing to try and make him seem like i should care for him…..you lost me. i think that’s one of TWDs biggest flaws. rick comes off as selfish to me, i read him as this coward. if he can’t deal with it it needs to go. and he’s getting worse as it continues…but i’m supposed to see him as a do goody farmer or something. (which is actually very much so hershel, to me.)

    i don’t mind spoilers, since i’m never reading the comics. what’s the governor like in the comics? i’ve read how carol is treated in the comics and decided i’d never touch em with a 50 foot pole. although i don’t see a way to hide spoilers on here so feel free to not answer this one…or answer vaguely.

    but hey! this recap saved me from watching. they didn’t even have daryl confront rick, which is the only reason i’d watch…

    • Mismarker

      There is a Walking Dead wiki online. Everything you ever wanted to know about the comic, Road to the Governor books, TV show, webisodes, and video games.

      • Raven

        road to the governor shall be wiki’d indeed. thanks for titles. there’s so many issues of TWD, haha.

        • Mismarker

          “Rise of the Governor” and “Road to Woodbury”. Excuse me! : )

  • Lyra Byrnes

    Because I haven’t been paying superclose attention, I thought last week the handsome dude who was healthy and wanted to stay in the cell with a sick fellow was half of a gay couple, and thought, “Finally!” Well, I was wrong. But now–finally!

  • Trickytrisha

    I’m not gonna buy into the whole redemption bit. The Gov is one vicious motherf**cker. My take is that the whole “let’s play happy families” thing was simply to have access to a new daughter to replace the dead one, and if she comes with a cute and willing mom, even better for him. In other words, one big act to get him what he wanted. I do NOT think this leopard has changed his spots, but we’ll see.

    • Eric Stott

      He might have – that is, he may THINK he’s changed. He’s gone through a shock that has knocked him off course, and he could go along being a decent figure, but if he gets thrown back into a leadership position I think the old self will come back.

  • Chevalle

    I was convinced he was going to kill them every time he looked at them. And then when him and that lady shared the “look” in the back of the truck and he put his hand on her throat when he kissed her I thought he was strangling her. The governor will never be redeemed for me. I’ll always view him as a very evil man.

  • BP180

    “The acting here was fine, across the board.”

    That is pretty generous. I thought both of the new women were pretty bad.

  • RoseJB

    La-Bibbida-Bibba-Dum

    • Big Bear

      Cluck! Went the chicken.

  • Big Bear

    What I don’t understand is why everyone keeps driving/walking in circles. How else to explain why they constantly fall over each other ALL THE TIME.

  • Truth

    The characters that you are seeing in this episode and the one before are based on characters that were discussed in the two Walking Dead novels “The Rise of the Governor” and “The Road to Woodbury”. *Mild spoiler, but nothing major ahead* The family hiding in the apartment that doesn’t make sense are all based on characters in the first book, and that story takes place approximately a month after the zombie outbreak. With the writers attempting to write these characters into the story this late into the apocalypse, it makes a lot less sense. It seems like the television writers are trying to take side material that was written as a prequel to the comic and jam it into the storyline so that they can stretch their material.