Mad Men: The Quality of Mercy

Posted on June 17, 2013

What a flipping fabulous hour of TV that was, right? Too bad we had to sit through so much Sylvia Rosen in the earlier weeks to get to this point. Season six of Mad Men has been choppier than most, we’d say, with a rather problematic first half to it, but last night’s episode proved that the show hasn’t lost its knack for turning the plot Mad+Men+S6Episode12+2dials up to 11 for the final hours of the season. Practically every storyline  came to a head, some in the most explosive manners possible – and the amazing thing is, nothing has been resolved. All of these storylines are still up in the air. But of course, it’s the Bob Benson story that continues to fascinate the most. We really have to give Weiner & Co. credit for creating a character seemingly out of thin air in the show’s sixth season that managed to captivate the imaginations of the audience as if he’d been there all along. Then again, he feels like he’s been there all along because in a way, he has.

We can see now where we made our mistake in assessing him. It was in assuming that Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce had some sort of credentials review process in place. Really, guys. Somebody needs to bring that up at the next partners’ meeting. Apparently, nothing’s changed in the 14 years since Don Draper glad-handed his way into a job. Because at the end of the day, that’s what the MUCH-discussed Bob Benson turned out to be: Gay Don Draper. Or more accurately, Gay Dick Whitman.  No, he wasn’t the upper-class striver we figured him to be, nor is he the sociopath, government agent or secret illegitimate child some others thought he was. He turned out to be pretty much what we said he was back in the first Mad Style of the season, “another version of a younger Don coming into the story… He resembles him to the point that he could pass for a younger brother and he’s got the same kind of 3-syllable alliterative name. Plus, Don got his first job at SC by essentially berating Roger on an elevator.”  We just didn’t know how literal that assessment was and how the similarities went much deeper. Bob Benson is, in fact, a poor, gay hick who lucked into good looks and has been conning and sleeping his way through a series of jobs away from his embarrassing upbringing, exactly like Dick Whitman (except for the gay part). And it turns out that, like Dick Whitman, his first impulse is to run away when he’s discovered and start over again somewhere else.

We still don’t think he’s any great schemer, though; despite the uncovering of his past. He’s been working at SC for about a year now and all he seems to have ever wanted out of the place was a decenMad+Men+S6Episode12+5t job where he could move up the ladder, just like Dick. Even when Pete made noise about throwing him off the Chevy account, his first impulse was to defer and be obsequious about it, rather than unleashing some master plan. It wasn’t until Pete made it clear that he had every intention to screw with Bob’s future at SC because of his sexuality that he tried that incredibly clumsy attempt to get Manolo and Pete’s mother involved. But that was not the move of a master con man. That was the move of a desperate Dick Whitman with his back against the wall. He’s never really made an effort toward any other goal than just moving ahead in his job  – and trying to score with Pete Campbell, of course. That was his big mistake. If he’d really been the master manipulator people thought he was, he never would have made a move like that. As we outlined extensively in the last Mad Style, being gay in 1968 was not a minor inconvenience; it was something that could be used to quite easily destroy a life. To us, that declaration last week really was an honest one; Bob really was in love with Pete (or thought he was, anyway), he really is someone who lives a gay life outside that office (“Manolo doesn’t like women!”), and that move was exactly as risky as we said it was, because it turned out to be Bob Benson’s downfall.

Or did it? This season has been all about calling back to or echoing previous scenes from earlier in the show’s history, as well as exploring the concept of doppelgangers. Bob is so obvious a double of Don’s (a bit too obvious, right down to the poor rural upbringing) that Pete recognized it right away. But here’s where Pete differs once again from almost eMad+Men+S6Episode12+7veryone else in this story: Pete learns from his mistakes. The last time he had a sleazy schemer by the balls like this, he let him go, choosing not to use the information to his advantage wisely. He went straight to Bert Cooper with the news of Don’s secret identity and Bert defused the whole thing with a “Who cares?” No, Pete’s no fool. Better to have a desperate, lying Golden Boy who feels like he’s forever in your debt for keeping his secret than to have one who never quite trusted you because you didn’t. Pete knows that the Bobs and Dons of the world can charm their way through almost anything and that he’d do well to hitch himself to a rising star (EVERYBODY in Bert’s office defended Bob to Pete) rather than trying to shoot it out of the sky. We have NO IDEA where this whole thing is going, but the odd twist at the last second into a psychosexual master-slave scenario is utterly mind-blowing. Pete may act like he’s repulsed by Bob’s proclivities, but he’s clearly delighted to have his own little gay Don Draper doll to do as he’s told. We were in love with our “Best Little Boy in the World” theory of the character but we have to admit, this twist is infinitely more interesting – and as far away from Sal Romano as the show could possibly get in devising a new gay male character.

In other news, all the women in Don’s life seem to want to slam doors in his face and run away from him. Except Betty, who literally left her door open for him, and Megan who’s so clueless right now that even 1960-Betty would look at her and say “Honey, wake up and smell the shithead.” The latest to declare her disgust is Peggy, who shocked him to the core by calling him a “monster.” It’s not entirely clear if Peggy and Ted are having a full-blown affair or whether they’re still in the flirting stage, but one thing’s for sure: they are the two most irritating people in that entire office right now. Peggy had every right to be upset with him for blowing up her shot at a Clio (in her mind), but Don wasn’t entirely in the wrong here. Ted was stringing Peggy and the client along by not being forthcoming about the budget issues that come with her idea (although we find it hard to believe she’d need that pointed out to her) and they both were acting fairly foolishly throughout the office. It’s one thing when one co-worker comments on your flirting, but when every co-worker does, then you’re clearly not paying attention to your actions and how they’re coming across. Mad+Men+S6Episode12+9

But let’s not pretend Don was doing anyone a favor here. Don was punishing Ted because the returns are diminishing on punishing himself.  But despite Peggy’s attempt to cast Ted as a “better” man than Don, he was being singled out and punished for doing exactly what Don did: allowing his affairs to spill out in the open, for other people to see. That’s the thing that offended Don so much; not the budget concerns, but the way Ted put his arm around Peggy’s waist in the conference room or giggled through the hallways with her or went to the movies in the middle of the day with her. It was the sloppiness that offended him. And the fact that it was Peggy, of course. If Ted was acting that way with, say, Joan, Don might not have batted an eye. But Ted was playing around in Don’s territory (which is how he sees Peggy) and decided to both humiliate him for it and punish Peggy for it. He really is a monster. He seemed pretty deeply affected by the word when Peggy spat it out at him, but since he’s so incapable of real change or introspection (let alone making apologies) we have no idea how the two of them can ever get back the friendly (if contentious), mutually respectful relationship they once had.

And just to prove that she is every inch Don’s daughter, Sally not only had a drink and a smoke this episode, but she too decided to punish someone else for Don’s sins. She used groovy Glen Bishop to beat up his goofy stoner friend by claiming that he’d tried to force himself on her. “You like to be trouble,” said the bitchy Marcia Brady-esque girl from Miss Porter’s, and we’re afraid we haven’t even scratched the surface of that statement. “My father never gave me anything,” she says darkly to Betty as she drags on her first mother-daughter Mad+Men+S6Episode12+11cigarette. We said last week that she was ripe for rebellion, but it looks like it won’t be taking the bell-bottoms, flower-in-your-hair route so many predicted. For now, she’s going to fulfill all her mother’s preppy Main Line dreams for her – on the surface, at least. She’s declaring Betty her “real” parent while she severs ties from Don and tries to make herself into the daughter that Betty always wanted. But this image of the perfect preppy Miss Porter’s girl is belied by what happens in those dorm rooms at night. Sally’s rebellion is going to be decidedly preppy and plaid in nature, but apparently no less full of drugs, sex and alcohol than a lot of people predicted.

Bullets:

  • Witness Don flipping through the channels, going from Corinne, the evil twin played by his wife on To Have and To Hold, and then to the original twin sitcom The Patty Duke Show, in an episode where his doppelganger is revealed.
  • Poor Kenny. Mazel Tov on the baby. A shame about your eye. Now we know why Stan had that Moshe Dayan poster over his bed last week. There’s your ironic foreshadowing
  • How funny is it that the season’s been full of ominous, violent portents and in the end, it amounted to Abe getting stuck with a knife and Kenny getting sort-of shot in the face? Mad Men just doesn’t do literal. This is a show that embodied the British Pop Invasion in the figure of Lane Pryce, after all.
  • How many people yelled out “Those bastards! They killed Kenny!” Everyone?
  • What the hell is going on with Joan? Because no one, least of all her, is acting like she brought in Avon as an account. The suspense is killing us.
  • It’s amazing how much cheating on their respective spouses with each other has improved Don and Betty’s relationship.
  • We miss Stan, Ginsberg and Roger. They’ve all but disappeared from the story except to make very brief appearances here and there.
  • As fantastic as this episode was, we’re sick to death of Don slapping his dick all over Ted Chaough. This show doesn’t really do redemption or give characters their comeuppance, but just once we’d like to see Ted tear Don down and humiliate him.
  • Bob has been infatuated with Pete since the moment they met. “You complimented my tie. It was the greatest day of my life.” Knowing his background now, his infatuation makes even more sense. Of course poor white trash like Bob would be enamored with a fussy blue-blood like Pete.
  • We’re not so sure Peggy’s Rosemary’s Baby ad was as Clio-worthy as Ted said. For one, it was creepy as hell. For another, ads based entirely on current pop culture references aren’t what one would consider a masterpiece of the form. Plop-plop, Fizz-fizz is a masterpiece because it was wholly original and ran for over a decade. Peggy’s St. Joseph’s Aspirin ad would be dated within 6 months. And we question whether any mother would find the ad, with its references to demonic babies, as comforting as it should be. It’s bold, certainly; but it strikes us as the wrong ad for that client.
  • Seriously, Megan. Wake the fuck up.

 

 

[Stills: tomandlorenzo.com]

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    • veriance

      Anyone else want to shriek OMG, they killed Kenny!?!? at the beginning of the show? The hunting outfits were SPOT ON. My inlaws were avid hunters and I have many photos of them dressed just like that during weekends “up north”

      I was also so bummed to see the young Weiner boy make an appearance. He does look just like the actor that plays the husband on Nurse Jackie.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

        I just about had heart palpations when Ken dropped to the ground and people at SD&Company kept getting ominous phone-calls!

        (Although honestly, learning that Harry tries to pay hookers with traveler’s checks wasn’t any less traumatizing…)

        • MartyBellerMask

          “Why did I tell him that” under his breath. LOL

        • ashtangajunkie

          Me too – no more Ken Cosgrove brushes with death! Honestly, with every new disgusting fact about Harry Crane that is thrown at us, I have more of an “of course” reaction. But the traveller’s cheques part was funny as hell.

          • Wellworn

            Maybe it will be Pete now instead of Ken. The good old Chevy boys aren’t going to like him any better.

        • Alana

          I was more like “WHAT IN THE FUCK?!” I thought those calls were brilliant, too; I clutched my chest every time the phone rang. But I was really disappointed while I still thought he was dead…like, another penultimate episode death?

          Poor Kenny.

        • quitasarah

          I kept yelling, “What happened to Kenny?!? Tell me what happened to Kenny!”

        • buddy100

          My question: Harry is in Hollywood and makes casting decisions regarding national campaigns.

          Why the hell does he need hookers? Does he just hire them to break in the casting couch?

      • the_valkyrie

        I thought I was the only one who saw that Glen looks like Dominic Fumusa (Kevin on Nurse Jackie). Glad I’m not the only one. They really do look quite similar.

      • Redlanta

        I was actually pleasantly surprised by the Weiner boy. He has grown up nicely and had an aura of cool. never like Glenn before…
        Poor Kenny. I hope his eye isn’t permanently blinded.

        • fursa_saida

          Same. Shocking to think that Creepy Glenn is the stand-up guy all of a sudden.

        • http://lauriekalmanson.blogspot.com/ laurie kalmanson

          In the land of the blind the one eyed man is king

      • ideated_eyot

    • Jessica Chastain

      I wish Mad men would end with Don & Betty reunited.

      Final scene of S7 – Don enters the house, to see his kids & wife [like in S1]

      Don sits on the couch, with Betty by his side, like in the credits.

      Fade to black.

      End show.

      Alternative is death, and i dont want it.

      • porcupie

        I like that idea, but I don’t know, I think Don is too damaged for all that. How could he be happy with that set up when he can’t ever be happy?

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

          Well, if you believe that Betty can’t ever be happy, they would make a perfectly matched miserable pair. If nothing else, she and Don certainly have the long-simmering and comfortable chemistry they completely lack with their new partners.

          However, I want better for Betty, who I love no matter how crazy she might get. She seems far more content with her life now than she ever did in Ossing. And it’s cute to see her bond with Sally, however bad it might be for Sally’s lungs! That moment in the car where they’re both smoking is amazing — you can see how much of Betty there is in Sally, no matter how much Sally might deny it. And it’s nice to see Betty enjoy being the ‘cool’ parent for once!

          • addie

            I stopped liking Betty when she wrongly fired the woman who help raised her kids. Seriously, Betty is not a good person.

            • Angela_the_Librarian

              For a brief moment at the boarding school I thought Carla might make an appearance. The principal called for someone named Carla to show Sally to her room.

            • dashransome

              oops – sorry, didn’t read the lower comments! Made the same point above. :)

            • lulubella

              I know! I had some fantasy that Sally found out and it was another reason to leave for the school.

            • Alana

              Me too!!!

            • Matthew Vella

              Me too!

            • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

              I don’t even know what happened to Betty’s writing in season 4. She somehow went from a nuanced and interesting, if often difficult and even spiteful, character to being a full-on witch. It’s notable that the writing has walked her character back from the heights of full-on bitchery she delved into that season.

            • UsedtobeEP

              She was miserable. People are hateful when they are unhappy.

            • Chris

              Betty was wrong to fire Carla but it wasn’t for no reason whatsoever. She told Carla specifically Sally was not to see Glenn and Carla not only allowed it, but let him in the house and up in Sally’s room alone together. What if he really was a danger? If it was your child and your home would you feel the same way? Betty often bites off her own nose to spite her face, and other people’s too.

            • dashransome

              Did anyone catch when Sally was dropped off at Miss Porter’s the woman that completed the first interview called for “Carla” to come and show Sally to her room? I shuddered for a moment and half expected the old Carla to show up. I think it was intentional and was meant to show that Miss Porter’s will now become Sally’s home.

            • Spicytomato1

              I also snapped to attention when I heard the name “Carla.” I like your thought about Sally finding a home. It’s just too bad she’ll likely become Queen Mean Girl and perpetuate the hazing. I have no boarding school experience, but I’d guess it’s probably realistic.

            • buddy100

              It was a truly horrible thing to do. But it’s also fairly horrible to damn someone forever for their mistakes. Now that Betty isn’t constantly being gaslighted and abused by everyone’s favorite narcissistic con man, she really has begun to grow up. She shows empathy now and a strong desire to finally bond with her children. Henry has been remarkably good for her. Yes, she has a lot to atone for, but unlike virtually everyone else in the series…she’s changing.

            • Chris

              I agree, I like Betty. Unlike Don she has really tried to help herself. She will never be perfect but like Pete (sometimes) she is capable of learning from her past mistakes.

            • Virginie

              I agree, except in that I thought it was clear that Betty wasn’t concerned for Sally’s safety, but weirdly jealous that Glenn had transferred his attention to Sally (at least that’s what I thought).

        • Little_Olive

          More than being damaged, his self-destruction tendencies are too powerful. If this season has shown anything, it’s that; most times on account of his blindness to really see what goes on around him, other times because he is incapable of acting on his feelings (see, Sally).

          While good writers are able to turn the story in most any way and convincing us it makes sense, I am not on board with the idea of a redeemed Don (not even redeemed on the outside for the sake of a quiet life).

          • porcupie

            Exactly. This season, and the point of the entire series, has been about how Don is lost; he can’t ever be happy, he can’t ever truly love, and now he’s in a time that doesn’t accommodate him anymore, and his facade is slipping. I think it’s highly unlikely that he will get redemption; even if he doesn’t fall off that building literally he’s been falling mentally and emotionally since season 1.

      • P M

        That’s called wishful thinking and not facing reality.

      • R2D2Mama

        I’ve often wondered if Don will commit suicide and jump of the SC&P building and fall to his death like the opening sequence.

        • fursa_saida

          The final shot, of him curled up on the couch, was oriented to match the final position of the falling figure in the credits–loose fetal position, back facing down. And for once he was wearing that exact outfit: pure black and white.

          I’m not sure I think this means he’ll actually end up jumping off a building, but it’s certainly a sign of impending doom of some sort.

        • Chris

          I don’t know that Don will commit suicide, I’ve thought that MW will either decide that he gets some kind of limited redemption or really decides he is beyond help and shows him old and bitter with his 7th wife who only wants his money or something like that. I think it’s fun to speculate about what the last season could be like. Something like the last season of China Beach could be really interesting, where it jumps around in time. Sometimes in the present day, sometimes back in the 60s, 70s etc. showing where people are and how they got there.

    • markopoulos1

      I’m glad you brought up how clueless Megan was this episode! Last night’s episode had so many compelling scenes, but at the end I found myself totally confounded as to how naive Megan actually is…WTH?

      • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

        Is it naive or does she just not have the bandwidth or skill set to deal with him? What to do you want her to do? Commit him? Leave him? She only has so many options and Meighan runs towards things, not away from them. She does love him.

        • bxbourgie

          But the Megan from their newlywed stages would have never kept her mouth shut about this. It’s like she’s a totally different person now. We can’t even say anymore that she’s wrapped up in her own life because she HAS noticed his drinking.

          • Chris

            Exactly, Megan doesn’t even seem like the same person. She would confront Don over a bad mood about the party, and a woman he slept with (when he was supposedly single) before he knew her. She’s so passive now.

            • asympt

              She’s tried too many times. She’s giving up.

            • Spicytomato1

              I think that’s what a bad marriage will do…wear down a person until they’re a shell of their former self. I think Don kinda sucked the life out of her.

            • http://dorothydamage.wordpress.com/ Dorothy Damage

              It’s basically what happened to Betty.

            • Lisa Utter

              I can fully attest to the truth in this statement.

            • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

              Someone tears you down enough, you stop believing you deserve to stand up for yourself.

            • Chris

              I think it’s also that she has a very demanding five days a week job. She is learning scripts everyday and her husband isn’t her boss anymore, she can’t leave early or call in sick like she did after the Zou Bisou party. Don’s not her whole world anymore like he used to be in work and outside work. I’m not criticizing that- she’s still doing a great job and manages to take care of her step kids too.

            • Little_Olive

              My take as well. Megan is becoming the independent woman she was set to be before falling into the Donhole.

            • buddy100

              I think she’s just so utterly distracted with her career that, just like Don, she essentially has put their marriage on the back back back burner. The one that’s broken and about to send the house into a towering blaze at any moment.

            • purkoy28

              I agree, and Megans no victim, she never had a problem freaking out on Don in the past, over small stuff too like not likeing a party ( even though she was told he wouldnt like it) so there is no excuse for her to avoid confronting Don about his attitude, except that she likes to be the victim, last season she revelled in it. In the episode Far Away Places, A little Kiss, and more ep.

          • LondonMarriott

            I think she’s slowly exhausting approaches to making her marriage better and has settled into denial/ignoring problems in the hopes that they’ll go away on their own. I’ve been there – say nothing and avoid rocking the boat. It won’t work but I think she thinks it’s her best option at this point.

            • shopgirl716

              I completely agree. Don has mentally and emotionally checked out of the marriage and there is nothing she can do about it. She can’t do it all herself and she hasn’t figured it out yet.

            • Glammie

              I think it’s not just that. Megan’s an actress. At the beginning of her marriage, she played, to perfection, the wife Don wanted her to be–sexy, provocative, good with his kids, even good at advertising. But then *Megan* changed–in part because being under Don’s thumb 24/7 was emotionally exhausting. She couldn’t keep up with playing the part of Don’s perfect mate and started following her own dreams again of being an actress. Don helped her a little, but also emotionally checked out and into his affair with Sylvia Rosen.

            • purkoy28

              I think Megan wanted to be that person so Don would like her, thats the woman she was when she started seeing Don, she asked to be in advertising, it wasnt Dons idea, he used his pull to fulfill the dreams she told him about, she even told him she wasnt interested in being an actress. She acted that way to attract him and then changed. Im not excusing Don, but Megan is just as bad.

            • 3hares

              I don’t really think she lied to please Don. I think at the time she was with him she had given up acting and was imagining herself being happy doing “what Miss Olson” did. Only it turned out it didn’t fulfill her–much as the marriage didn’t fulfill Don completely once Megan had different goals.

          • fnarf

            That’s what you do. It’s a co-dependent relationship. He’s beating her down as well. It’s all she can do to try and keep him on his feet for another round.

          • Redlanta

            Meghan has become the skittish neurotic chain smoking wife that Betty once was. It’s what Don does to the women dumb enough to love him…

            I have been seeing a lot of Betty in Sally for quite a while now- the young actress even has the facial expressions and mannerisms down pat.

            • http://www.deborahwiles.com/ GoodSally

              Did Megan smoke before she married Don? I don’t think so.

            • Chris

              She may have casually, but not nearly as much as she is now. She is smoking as much as Betty always was shown smoking before. It’s in practically every scene with her now.

            • purkoy28

              She smoked when she was a secretary before she was dons love interest….during season 4

        • lulubella

          I think she is caught up in her career – she’s got something to focus on that is more compelling than looking for work provided to her. Like Don, who hides his dissatisfaction in other activities – work, womanizing, drinking – we know she’s unhappy, and perhaps is channeling that into her blonde twin ;-).

          • ideated_eyot

            I was anticipating a break-up, but now I am not so sure. She is kinda like Don in that she won’t pull the trigger as long as she can maintain her career.

            • http://twitter.com/juvie_cinephile CM Gardner

              I now picture her actually turning into Marie if we are playing the season of history repeats/doppelgangers. But his isolation of her reminds me of Joan warning Peggy about an Abe breakup last season. What was it again? ‘They ignore you until you insist on a declare a declaration of hate.’

              I think it would be too easy for the breakup to be something of Megan’s doing but Don is really not giving her any other choice. He seems too stubborn to initiate it. She has to leave him but in his mind she already left. Yet, I could easily see this going the other way. Like I could see Megan killed off….. on her soap opera and then having return under Don’s thumb once again but not without him embroiled in a million other problems relating to work or even the Don Draper identity. Don needs to get up from the fetal position and own up.

            • purkoy28

              remember when betty asked for a divorce, he didnt want to give it to her and he wanted to go back wtith her for a while after, no because he loved her but because they were a family, thats his and part of what makes his don draper persona what it is. so in other words, don doesnt associate marriage with love and he thinks its important to have so i dont think he would innitiate a divorce. but i could be wrong?

      • bxbourgie

        Exactly! Who is ok with a husband who’s in a drunken stupor 80% of the day and night? I’d have said WAY more to him than “pull back on the throttle”.

        • Heather

          An enabler, that’s who.

          • Kate

            Yes, she is her parents’ daughter.

        • Topaz

          I think she’s still convincing herself that they’re in this together, rather than that he’s leaving her out in the cold while he deals badly with all his emotional problems.

      • Alana

        There’s no freakin’ way Megan is that clueless. I refuse to believe that. At the risk of putting my foot in my mouth in six days, I can’t help but think we’re gonna find out that Meagan’s relationship coping mechanism involves some other dude at work. Could be a reason she hates being called “Mrs. Draper,” too! The trajectory of this season seems to be spiraling toward Don’s inevitable isolation: alienating everyone he loves (despite his efforts this episode to sweep up his mess) and with no one loving him. Meagan cheating on him would not surprise me one bit.

        • CommentsByKatie

          And her wearing red this entire episode; I was surprised there was no thematic explanation for that (Yet?)

        • http://twitter.com/juvie_cinephile CM Gardner

          Considering who her father is, maybe she does know what is going on but realizes her options (yes, she is employed but she has said she is not written in enough episodes to call it a real living, she has shown unwillingness to get a leg up at work, and look at her wardrobe and materialism pre-Don and post-Don marriage) and has been silently accepts his infidelity the way her mother has tried to accept her father with the latest graduate student. I think she has ideas, but just not it being the older wife of the nice heart surgeon they know. I think Megan’s idea of what Don could get is the blonde who came onto him in last year’s finale as opposed to a Catholic woman with a teenaged son.

    • Lorelei_D

      I had to laugh when Kenny lifted his eye patch to dry his tears!

      Bob Benson is interesting in that he functions to depict the evolution of Pete. Hate Pete for his sliminess if you must, but he evolves!

      I much prefer Don hanging out with Joan or having office drama with Peggy than watching him with the women he sleeps with. I’m bored with him and his affairs. Can we at least have him swimming and sharp again?

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

        The cyclops jokes with Kenny were simply hilarious, although I ended up feeling awful for the poor guy. I mean… remember how happy go lucky he was in the early series? “I’m Ken! Cosgrove! Accounts!” And now SDCP and Chevy have reduced him to a weeping one-eyed wreck of a man, unable to leave his hated job because of his growing family.

        Poor guy. I hope he pulls a GRRM and goes off to write an epic fantasy series that makes him famous eventually. He’s one of the most decent fellows on the show and he and CYNTHIA! deserve to be happy.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Made me think about the jokes they made after Guy lost a foot in The Lawnmower Incident.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

            Maybe they’re all working off bad karma. Kenny almost losing an eye might only be the first sign. Next week, perhaps Harry will lose his adulterous dick due to gangrene picked up from a cheap hooker!

            • Heather

              Did he almost lose it? Or did he actually lose it? I wasn’t sure.

            • Glammie

              He said he was fine and he was wiping tears from it, so I’m guessing he has the eye, but I’m not 100 percent either.

            • Chuck Chuckerson

              He was wiping tears under his eyepatch, so I think it’s still there.

        • bxbourgie

          I actually did think he was going to say he was leaving because he wanted to take up his writing again, but that’s not going to pay for a wife and new baby in the manner to which they are accustomed.

          • Glammie

            He’s still writing–it’s just under an assumed name. The Kenny jokes were awesome–and they just left the blood smeared on the side of his face through most of the episode. I mean, we all knew Pete was going to angle for Chevy somehow, but I never figured he’d get it this way. Love it.

            • fnarf

              That wasn’t blood, it was scabs. The pellets tore his flesh in streaks.

            • Glammie

              Ah, thanks. Poor Kenny, he needs to watch that friendship with Dick Cheney.

            • fursa_saida

              I assumed the Ralph Nader reference right before it happened was a little wink to the Cheney thing.

            • MARGARET WYNN

              I just realized there’s yet another Rosemary’s Baby reference in there- in the book & film, her husband gets a big role when he gives the coven his wife for demon baby breeding services- and they make the actor he was standing in for mysteriously go blind!
              Also, as I recall, Guy (Rosemary’s husband) gives them an item belonging to the other actor to work their spell with- and it’s a necktie he borrowed from the man- See: Pete Campbell/Bob Benson/tie.

        • Little_Olive

          Kenny’s happenings are the live depiction of that agency crumbling. Half-blindness speaks volumes.

          • fnarf

            In the kingdom of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.

            Kenny’s not a king, though.

            • Glammie

              He does seem to be more clear-eyed about his priorities than anyone else, though. He doesn’t seem to cheat and he gave up the big client, but not his job, because he has a kid on the way. He’s the equivalent to what Gleason seemed to be–the decent guy who’s good at his job.

            • purkoy28

              why do u think gleason was a great guy? just cause his friend said so after he died?

            • Glammie

              The general response to him, also the couple of scenes where we see him–how he treats Ted, how he talks about his family. I said “decent”, not “greatest.”

            • 20s_Jazz_Baby

              He’s a pirate king.

          • P M

            They turn a blind eye, even.

          • Travelgrrl

            If thine eye offends thee, pluck it out?

          • http://twitter.com/juvie_cinephile CM Gardner

            Also remember the pact he and Peggy once had. She was dragged back in to the agency she thought she left and the purpose for the merger that brought her back is tearing Ken apart- who, of course, was the person who tried to calm Peggy down when it hit her to probably leave the agency after Don threw money at her; the moment which Peggy declared the ‘stupid’ pact over. I think maybe both should reconsider the pact.

        • TeraBat

          Forty years from the show’s end, Ken Cosgrove (under his pen name), as a science fiction author, will be more remembered and beloved than anyone else at that firm.

          • fursa_saida

            The name’s going to end up being Philip K. Dick or something huge like that, isn’t it.

            • TeraBat

              No, the show revealed his old pen name and his new pen name. They’re nothing I remember from when I was a teenager and read all the vintage sf I could find. I still sometimes read some vintage stuff, and talk to people who enjoy the stories written in the 50s, 60s and 70s. During the episode where his sf writings were revealed, I kept thinking about that, and realized that Ken Cosgrove is going to leave a bigger legacy behind than anyone else on the show.

      • Little_Olive

        Yes to the last part of your comments! As I said above, I am not on board with a redeemed Don but gawd, I really want to put him on a cleanse.

        • Spicytomato1

          Seriously. Hair and makeup does an amazing job of finding new ways of making him look like death warmed over. Repeatedly. He’s a virtual PSA for sober living.

      • buddy100

        I think that this season has really made a point of showing how Don is the ONLY one who doesn’t evolve. If anything, he devolves.

        Joan made a move for her career. Peggy has freed herself from Don’s emotional thrall. Pete ended his hollow marriage and has learned from his career mistakes. Roger, sensing his own mortality, attempts to reach out to his children.

        Don, on the other hand, is destroying everything about his own identity and slowly regressing back into Dick Whitman. He’s moving backwards at a point where everyone else is taking a small step towards redemption.

        • fursa_saida

          He’s not just turning into Dick Whitman; he’s turning into the alcoholic hobo he’s always been afraid to be. His father was drunk and sloppy 24/7 too.

    • Tippi123

      Thank you for that recap! Excellent as always. Forgot to breathe during some scenes, e.g. Kenny got shot, the client meeting and Pete and Bob’s conversation in Bob’s office (btw: there’s a picture now! And a map!). It was a blast from the past to see that white spot on Don’s TV when he turned it off.

      • MartyBellerMask

        I’m from Michigan but haven’t lived there in 10 years. The map made me homesick. *snif*

        • Laylalola

          OMG, there was a map of Michigan shown somewhere during the show, wasn’t there? It registered, but just below the surface. That wasn’t in Bob’s office, was it?

          Edited to add: Of course a map of Michigan makes sense, with the Detroit client.

          • MartyBellerMask

            Bob’s office had the big ol’ mitten on the wall.

        • SFree

          James Wolk is a Michigander.

        • Historiana

          I’m originally from Michigan too! But seriously, let’s clear the record that we Michiganders are not insane like the Chevy execs.

          Well, most of us aren’t.

          • not_Bridget

            Hey, the guys we’ve seen could almost be Texans. I’m one–but I’ve never shot a hunting companion in the face! (In fact I’ve never shot a gun at all.)

          • http://aspotofwhimsy.com/ diane {a spot of whimsy}

            Yes, can we please acknowledge that Weiner clearly does not like and/or understand anyone from the Detroit area? Good lord, what is this depiction?! ;)

            • CommentsByKatie

              Every time they show the Chevy guys, I cringe. I think this is how Jaguar must have felt.

            • http://twitter.com/juvie_cinephile CM Gardner

              To be fair, the foreign automakers of Jaguar still look grosser. At least the Chevy execs had dark humor elements including two of the greatest Ken Cosgrove moments: the ‘It’s my job!’ tap and him sticking a tissue underneath his eye-patch.

              I also just find it funny that Hamm and Slattery both have made a considerable amount of side-change taking part in car commercials in both voice-over and physically being in the commercial. I feel like this is an inside joke going on but I also think getting Chevy into the 70s is secretly the worst thing that ever happened to the agency (the decline of the American auto industry, an impending gas crisis, and the death of Fordism) with Ken being a foreshadowing warning sign figuratively.

            • purkoy28

              i dont think its an aim againts detroits, its about car guys in general. they said before about the car industry not being fit for ladies and other things like that, it was the same with jaguar.

          • desertwind

            Those Chevy guys are yahoos alright, but I’ll bet most of them aren’t natives and have just taken to the trappings of a life-style. Dialed up to 11.

            • Spicytomato1

              Yes, I don’t see them as representative of Detroit or Michigan but of the boys’ club known as Corporate America.

            • MartyBellerMask

              One of them definitely sounded like a Yooper. (As in from the Upper Peninsula.)

      • Vanessa

        The sound effects were spot on too–the sound of the remote clicker, the way the phone clunked when Megan hung it up…back to my childhood!

        • Chickadeep

          You forget them until you hear them again — in this episode, I noticed the phone noise when Don picked up the phone when Betty called; there’s something satisfyingly clunky and solid about old school phones, despite being tethered to a cord. Same with certain visuals: the harvest gold wall phone, the boxes of Sugar Smacks and Carnation Instant Breakfast, the heavy glass orange juice bottle…seeing them is like seeing someone you haven’t seen in a long time, but instantly recognize.

          • http://www.lindamerrill.com/ Linda Merrill

            Hanging up on someone just doesn’t have the same satisfaction when it’s the silent touch on a screen. And we’ve lost the fun TV “reaction” to having the phone slammed in our ears.

            • http://twitter.com/mung_beans Mung Beans

              Yeah, but now when I’m angry I can chuck the phone at the wall!

            • CozyCat

              It’s too bad it hasn’t been anachronistically (sp?) preserved like the needle scrapping across an LP noise which now universally means: WTF!

          • nptexas

            The quality of a phone call on a landline on a real phone is incomparable. The earpiece cupped the ear. You could prop the receiver on your shoulder…

            • Sweetpea176

              Remember when those were rented from the phone company? I kept my big clunky phone into the 2000′s, until it finally just didn’t work any more. It was a sad day.

            • nptexas

              I had old phones forever. Even bought a wall phone off eBay about 10 years ago. I think I’ll try to find another one. LOL I hate the cordless phone on my “all-in-one” fax. Princess phones! Only the cool girls had those!

        • disqus_QII5BS5RrJ

          I noticed the authenticity of the remote control clicker too. I was a big Monkees fan, and I remembered hearing that noise throughout their movie “Head.” So what song does the show close with? “Porpoise Song,” from “Head.” I was so excited.

          • Travelgrrl

            Also, the Monkees were a bit of a sham band, like Don Draper and Bob Benson.

            • http://twitter.com/juvie_cinephile CM Gardner

              Hey now! This was when The Monkees had already done an album where they had played their own instruments and were writing/composing their own material. But the movie, which was really their suicide note, flopped hard and only earned its reputation when Bob Rafelson and Jack Nicholson became the godfathers of New American Cinema. The Monkees, thanks to re-runs on MTV, also gained some level of respect though contemporary musicians actually got along with them very well.

              If you have seen the movie Head, (not for everybody as it is very much of its time but it is an interesting watch in the context of how The Monkees were viewed and what the movie was actually saying– they were sick of being labeled a ‘sham’ and a commercial arm as their harshest critics were) the “Porpoise Song” is a bookend to the beginning and end. The beginning of the movie makes absolutely no sense until the ending shows the beginning only the end point, in the band jumping off the bridge. This sometimes reflects of lot of the plot-lines this season on Mad Men, in context making a moment and gesture take on new meaning, and add in the bookend to Don in the exact same position, from womb to tomb as they say, I would say Matthew Weiner made the choice because of what that song meant in the movie Head as much as it was about choosing a pretty great song.

            • Travelgrrl

              EXCELLENT review!

              I did love the Monkees and know they chafed under the “Pre-Fab Four” regime. I even saw “Head” at the theater! (Made no sense to pre-teen me.)

            • Cicero

              I’ve not seen anyone note this, but the visuals accompanying “The Porpoise Song” in ‘Head’ shows Micky Dolenz f a l l i n g a la Don, and then carried away by a pair of mermaids. Worth watching:

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mdd5xI9l7Ns

            • Elena Sophoula

              OH! this just triggered my memory that there was a reference to Vaughn Meader, who was a beloved JFK impersonator — until, of course, the JFK assassination, whereupon he was shunned by fans & his comedy career disintegrated. he changed his name to prevent further backlash, but he only made one more television appearance after JFK’s death. sad & strange story — you can find his record in some record shops — it was a big hit at the time.

              ANOTHER TWIN!

            • Elena Sophoula

              i think it was Ginsburg who said it, when Peggy & Ted were doing those accents/impersonations.

            • Travelgrrl

              THIS is why I love the internet! Off to head down the Vaughn Meader rabbit hole.

            • Alice Teeple

              I have the Vaughn Meader record! I found it at the Goodwill years ago and got it because the cover was so strange. It’s full of topical 1960s humor that I had no understanding of as a 19 year old.

          • Musicologie

            I’m young enough that my only frame of reference for that clicker sound was Head, as well. I don’t think it was an intentional reference, but changing channels was a big part of that movie, so it could have been.

            I highly recommend seeing Head. I rewatched it recently, and it’s held up. It conveys their frustration very well.

            • Alice Teeple

              “Head” is such a good movie; I caught it by accident on TNT (I think) when I was in high school, and it stuck with me for years because it was so strange. I think it’s overlooked a lot because it’s so bizarre, but I thought the tie-in with Mad Men was brilliant: particularly how when “The Porpoise Song” plays, we see the motherly mermaids taking care of Mickey after he “commits suicide” at the beginning. It’s a great link to the mother/child references; the secrets bubbling to the surface that threaten façades – and then tying it in with the overall conspiracy feeling of “Rosemary’s Baby.” Holy imagery, Batman!

      • Topaz

        I was punching the air in glee by the end of that Pete/Bob scene. Their working relationship is going to be DELICIOUS. A really interesting sexual tension between those two now as well – not that I think it’ll go anywhere, but like T&L said, I think Pete’s decided he likes having this guy in his power. And this is what I’ve thought all along: no number of crazy plot twists about corporate spying or secret brothers could be anywhere near as interesting as us just getting to know the characters better, and them getting to know each other.

        Oh, and I wasn’t shouting “they killed Kenny” in that opening scene, because my face was too busy going numb in horror. They can’t take my Kenny away from me!

        • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

          Totally agree about Pete and Bob. When the episode was over I thought, ‘I can’t WAIT to see where this goes.’

          • bxbourgie

            Yes! I love that Pete finally wised up and decided to play that long game instead of stomping off to Roger or Bert like he did when he found out Don’s secret. Maybe he’s finally learning that although he’s correct a lot of the time, no one wants to hear him because he’s so damn whiny.

            • not_Bridget

              Perhaps he’s finally gotten tired of being known as That Weasel Pete Campbell….

            • UsedtobeEP

              Grimy little pimp…

            • Glammie

              I loved his speech to Bob–and that the “you people” didn’t refer to Bob being gay, but to his being a charming fake from nowhere like Don.

              Okay, here’s a sick question–if the Lucky Strike guy had pushed Bob Benson for sex, would Bob have said “yes”? I kind of think so. And if he’s really a gay Don Draper he would have found some way to use it to his advantage later.

            • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

              The “you people” thing clearly threw Bob for a loop, because what Pete was saying definitely didn’t jibe with what Bob knew Pete knew. I mean, what are the chances one guy would end up working with two frauds in the same company? It cracked me up.

            • Topaz

              Also an interesting contrast to Don’s “you people” when firing Sal way back when.

            • Glammie

              I know it was really funny watching Bob look just sort of baffled as he tried to figure out what Pete was saying. I think it was one of my favorite Pete Campbell moments ever–at least of those that don’t involve him getting punched falling or doing the Charleston with Trudy.

            • buddy100

              Yeah, definitely. And then Bob would milk that connection for every drop. Gotta admire his sheer opportunism.

            • Glammie

              Which gives us yet another view on Don’s firing of Sal. Gay Don wouldn’t have said “no”–but he’d done a number on the Lucky Strike guy by the end. Don really didn’t get poor Sal’s reaction–i.e. he was gay, but he still wanted to be a faithful husband.

        • buddy100

          I think Bob is Pete’s very own Don replacement. If he can’t humiliate and dominate the real thing, as he’s been obsessed with doing from season one, then he’ll take the whipping boy.

        • fursa_saida

          We know Pete gets off on some kind of power imbalance (in his favor, of course). I agree that nothing will ever happen, but the air is going to be weirdly thick for a while. I think it’s gonna make it hard for poor Bob to get over the crush.

    • Spicytomato1

      I loved every minute of this episode, too. So much to think about but the moment that stuck with me the most as I tried to drift off was Pete’s decision to keep Bob on. I was on pins and needles when Duck made his “I’ve never seen this before,” remark and Pete so ominously said “I have.”

      I completely agree that Peggy’s concept was most definitely not anywhere near a “plop plop fizz fizz” equivalent. I was surprised that Ted was so blinded by his infatuation and reveling in their flirtations when he so recently seemed so determined to keep their relationship all business.

      I’m one of those few who has always liked Glen so seeing the Smooth Teenage Glen appear so cooly in the window made me almost giddy. And that moment when Sally fleetingly smiled as he tackled Rolo to the floor? Priceless.

      • T. Sticks

        I think the fact that Glen was always different and a little awkward in the earlier seasons actually made him pretty realistic as a teen. Now he’s much more self-assured and that’s also believable. As soon as we knew Sally was going to boarding school I had a feeling she’d see Glen!

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1180174329 Elizabeth Phillips

        I thought all the roles in the commercial except the beautiful mother should have been played by one actor in various costumes.

        • Floretta

          Yes – the Alec Guiness thing (Kind Hearts and Coronets?) – one character actor playing them all. Wonder if they could have afforded Jonathan Winters at that point. I’d pay good money to be at that shoot.

        • Adelaidey

          See, now that’s some good thinking that they might have come up with if Don and Joan had mentioned the budget problems outright instead of being passive-aggressive and shifty about it, respectively.

          • Supernumerary

            What? Communication? At this agency? Crazy talk!

            (Which is to say: I agree.)

        • CAMeyer

          I thought the same thing–it should have been obvious to those guys. Maybe the humor of that would have taken the edge off the creepy Rosemary’s Baby reference.

      • MK03

        I have to say, it was kind of awesome to see him beat up his friend for trying to force himself on Sally. I genuinely did not expect that, and it made me happy to see him defend her like that.

        • Travelgrrl

          “I told you, she’s like my sister!”

        • fursa_saida

          Right?! This from the guy we’ve always known as Creepy Glenn? I totally thought he was going to blow it off, so the fact that basically nobody took Rollo’s side was a gift to me. How sad is that, that I was surprised that it was Rollo, and not Sally, who was isolated?

          • Aurumgirl

            It’s sad, but it’s not you. It’s sad because we all know that women are usually blown off when they seek out help because someone’s trying (or tried to, or did) sexually assault them. Sally said “No” more than once, and Rolo didn’t care. He was actually assaulting her in that scene, and she wasn’t having it. Good for Glenn for responding the way he did. And doubly good for Sally to insist, “That’s Bullshit!” when Rolo did the old “who would want to kiss you anyway, when Glenn just got the real good looking girl” nonsense. Wish it would happen this way for women more often.

            • fursa_saida

              Oh, I know it’s not me. :) Honestly, I was so relieved and surprised by the way the turn of events went that it didn’t even occur to me to read anything Sally did as “manipulative” until I started reading recaps (not just this one) and comments. In retrospect, I can see some of the aftermath that way, but in terms of how she handled the situation and how it fell out for her, mostly I saw wish fulfillment. Sigh.

            • Aurumgirl

              Also: Sally was lucky to avoid the sexual assault her father went through, and strong enough to assert herself so it wouldn’t happen (unlike her father, who just couldn’t). It’s another one of their odd parallel experiences.

            • fursa_saida

              Excellent point. I hadn’t remembered the parallel.

      • bellesprit

        I’ve never understood the Glen-hate. When he first appeared in the Betty-Glen storyline, I thought young Wiener was just the right amount of odd. He was a little creepy, a little endearing. For me, he fit perfectly. There’ve been times, in some of his scenes with Sally, when he was a bit stiff; but there were times when January Jones seemed stiff, too. (Something in the directing?) Now, as an older teen (16ish?) he seemed to have loosened up, become more comfortable, and did a very good job. I, too, was happy to see him. There was genuine, brotherly warmth with Sally. I’ve always liked him & like him still.

        • Supernumerary

          I always assumed some of the Glen hate came from all the dislike for Betty/January Jones spilling out young!Weiner’s way, as well as the fact that his old man helms the show — whether or not it’s actually nepotism, people get things stuck in their craw sheerly for the sake of.

      • Glammie

        Yeah, were we meant to think it was a great ad instead of a good one that would date fairly quickly? What I loved about the whole thing is that Don was both right *and* was being a total bastard. I found it perversely satisfying–sort of like the better relationship with Betty. Now that they’ve had their fling, she feels less rejected by him, I think, and can see him more as the eternal fuck-up that he is.

        Did Weiner cast a truly awful actor as Glen’s buddy to make Glen look suave by comparison. I didn’t go to boarding school, but the girls I knew in college who did–well, the show caught it–booze, drugs and sex. And a bunch of them smoked, too.

        • Travelgrrl

          Like when Roger fired Burt Peterson – just because you’re right doesn’t mean you can’t take the opportunity to be a total SOB while you’re at it!

          • Glammie

            Exactly. Don would have been derelict in his managerial duties if he hadn’t done something, but he did it in a way that really stung both Ted and Peggy. Being right isn’t at all the same as being nice.

        • fursa_saida

          Every single horrible move he made this episode was actually also, truly, in the interests of the company. It was a sight to behold.

      • Travelgrrl

        Hate wooden Glenn with every fiber of my being. He looked about 45 last night.

        The Son Also Rises.

      • nptexas

        I always liked Glen, too. And I agree the aspirin commercial was way off the mark.

      • Elena Sophoula

        I wonder what will happen if Betty runs into teenaged Glen….

    • Sally

      I’m a bit baffled by Megan’s cluelessness. She was so aware of Don and who he was when they married. I find it hard to believe that it has not occurred to her that Don was fooling around. But, you see what you want to see. She did call him out on the drinking. And, thanks for saying something about Peggy’s ad, I thought it was creepy. Maybe, it would have been funny to actually see it, but I’m not sure. Something sure seems to have happened between Ted and Peggy, just an episode or two ago, he freaked out because she accidentally touched his hand.. But, they do need to be careful, I have worked in an office where co-workers were having affairs with each other, it’s an annoying thing to work around.

      • markopoulos1

        Exactly! Megan’s cluelessness was baffling, and totally unrealistic, right?

        • OrigamiRose

          I’m not so sure she’s clueless – she immediately latched on Peggy and Ted being at a five p.m. movie expecting it to be empty so as to not get caught together. I feel like Megan has checked out of her marriage, and might be preparing her exit from it.

          • markopoulos1

            Maybe you’re right…My instinct says she is still totally invested in Don and just being really naive, but…who knows?

          • MK03

            It does feel like she’s waiting for the last straw. If she ever finds out about Don and Sylvia, I suspect that will do it.

          • Glammie

            Yeah, she sees as much as she wants to see. Something she learned from *her* childhood with her adulterous parents who, nonetheless, keep their marriage together. Megan puts on a happy face and keeps her head down in the face of trouble. Confronting Don doesn’t really pay anyway.

          • editrixie

            Yeah, that’s exactly the feeling I have. I think she’s given up, she is aware that the marriage is failing and there’s little she can do about it, but she is trying to do something. Learned helplessness. It’s easier to focus on her work, which is taking considerable time for her, and keep going through the motions. I think she still genuinely loves Don, but the scales have long since fallen from her eyes, and she’s just not sure what to do next.

            • desertwind

              Maybe there won’t be any big scene between Megan and Don. She’ll get a better acting gig and it will take her out of New York. That will be the excuse for the end of their marriage. I hope it happens soon for her sake.

            • Nicole R

              Yes, I think Harry will help her get into the Hollywood scene (even though she hates him)

          • nptexas

            Remember her parents’ marriage.

        • Aurumgirl

          Oh I don’t know. There’s that old saying about never underestimating the power of denial.

        • fursa_saida

          I mean, she definitely knows something’s wrong. She told him he was absent and that something needed to change. He’s just so completely unresponsive that I think she’s lost the energy to try to make him pay attention. It’s no coincidence that the clip of her he saw on TV was her yelling at a philandering man to listen to her.

          ETA: I also think that she seems to have adopted the strategy of conciliation–if she’s a nice enough, good enough, kind enough wife, she can keep some kind of hold on him, in her mind. It has the advantage of being much easier day-to-day.

      • Meg0GayGuys6

        “You see what you want to see”… I tend to agree. I think she, on some level, she has to know what’s going on. When she first started at the company, she was pretty perceptive, so I find it hard to believe she could be blind to this.

        • Sally

          Exactly, she does have other stuff going on it seems, but I am puzzled by this. Alas.

          • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

            It’s 1968. The first thought when you husband is spiraling isn’t to run. Especially for a person like Meighan. If she just checked out I would find that out of character.

            • RaptorSafari

              Why can’t you spell Megan’s name? You keep doing this.

            • editrixie

              This totally cracked me up. Every time there’s a post about Gwyneth Paltrow, tons of people keep spelling it Gwen, over and over, so I know it’s not a typo. Since my name is Gwyneth, it annoys me no end — and people constantly spell it that way. It’s right in front of them but they still insist on spelling it wrong. You’d think with all the people writing Megan, and with TLo writing it in their posts, they could figure it out…

        • Topaz

          I feel like there’s an element where one part of her life is going really well – her career is going great and most of her time is spent on that. Maybe if everything in her life was stuttering she’d be asking harder questions about her marriage but as it is perhaps she’s willing to coast, even if it isn’t making her happy, and try to ignore all the bad stuff. When I’m really focussed on work I don’t think “okay, now is a great time to sort out my relationships!” I think “oh God, I just can’t even right now.”

          • Meg0GayGuys6

            I completely agree with the “Oh God, I just can’t”. I think she knows something is up- not necessarily what is up.

          • TeraBat

            In her most recent scenes, Megan is usually on her way to work or some other career- oriented event. I think she’s investing in her career right now because it’s the most satisfying part of her life (and because she may realize that it’s her best shot for getting rid of Don).

            She likely made the same mistake that countless women have made before her and will continue to make: the assumption that marriage will change a man, and that *she* is special enough to be an agent of this change. While Megan is usually quite savvy and observant, she also falls prey to simple human foibles. She doesn’t want to admit that she’s the sort of woman who gets cheated on, so she’ll live in denial until concrete proof is given. Until then, she realizes her marriage is in trouble, but has no idea how to fix it. So she naturally gravitates to spending most of her time and emotional energy on something she’s good at and that she gets admired for.

            • Aurumgirl

              I also think she’s the kind of woman who knows that she’s always going to need to look after herself, no matter what. Husbands and men come and go, but careers are what keep you sustained, in more ways than one. So she’s going to put effort into her career especially when she knows something’s off with the marriage.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

        I think she might have just given up and is only making cursory attempts to reach Don that even she doesn’t believe will actually work. And it would honestly be best for her if she really did just give up on the flaming car wreck that is Don Draper and leave to pursue her own life and passions and a bevy of hot studs who don’t treat her like yesterday’s newspaper.

      • Ally08

        To some extent, I find her mature and realistic. She knows she married a moody, boozy ad exec, so she’s not berating him or trying to change him. Her demands so far have been: stay home when you don’t feel well, eat breakfast, and slow down with the drinking maybe. It’s sad that instead of recognizing this as understanding and support, Don seems to find it repellent (not even sleeping in the same bed anymore). He seems to need a ‘bad Mommy’ at home to push against and cheat on and thereby get inspired creatively — perhaps this is why the last time he got it on with his wife, his mean Mommy-in-law was in the next room.

        I don’t think Megan would be surprised that he cheated, but she would be repulsed by his choice: her friend and neighbour (a woman she confided in) and a comparatively dowdy housewife to boot: much like Betty was horrified by the Bobbie Barrett choice.

        • Historiana

          I didn’t see the separate beds thing as him avoiding Megan as much as him trying to get close to Sally (it was her bed). Sally doesn’t want anything to do with him, so he he’s trying to connect with her in a private way. He has to make excuses to do so, because he can’t tell Megan the story.
          Him in Sally’s room made me very sad.

          • Ally08

            It was also about him preferring to zone out in front of the TV and ignoring Megan’s requests to come to bed later in the episode.

            I will go back to my theory from last week about Don becoming the manipulative/extorting pimp from his childhood in that scenario with Sylvia witnessed by his daughter, so for me him in the child’s bed harkened back to that, too. (Foetal position, being the child again himself, obvs., etc.)

            • J. Parsons

              Don curled up on Sally’s bed reminded me a lot of these scenes from season 4.

          • Glammie

            Yep, sense there, too, of his trying to go back to the childhood he forced Sally to leave behind.

            He’s punishing himself for his sexuality–depriving him and Megan of sex–and, because he’s Don, he’s also punishing Ted and Peggy for it, though on some weird level, he thinks he’s also doing them a favor. It’s a don’t-do-what-I-did thing.

            • MK03

              It reminds me of a Simpsons line: ” ‘Don’t do what Donny Don’t does.’ They could have made this clearer.”

      • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

        I always felt like Megan knew the facts about Dick Whitman past tense without understanding there is still a Dick Whitman present tense. She thought Don Draper was a real person Dick Whitman evolved into, instead of a mask Dick wears because he’s a coward. Megan loves Don Draper, who doesn’t exist, and doesn’t know how to deal with Dick Whitman.

        • Topaz

          A really interesting point – I hadn’t thought about it in that way before. What I think is interesting about him telling Megan about Dick Whitman is that we talked this season about Don pushing the merger to Ted as a way of convincing himself that what Joan had accused him of: that he only cared about his own success, not the company’s, wasn’t true.

          In Megan’s case, he married her immediately after Faye told him it was time to be truthful to himself about being Dick Whitman. He didn’t want to confront that aspect of himself, but he deluded himself into thinking that wasn’t why he ran away from Faye by revealing it instead to someone who lacked the emotional maturity and understanding to really force him to gain some self awareness.

          • http://twitter.com/juvie_cinephile CM Gardner

            He also fell in love with her in the idealized version of California he has, and used Anna’s wedding ring to cap it off.

            Faye would not have lasted either (in that there is no way she would have taken this) and nor should we insist any woman is well-matched with Don Draper. And the confession to Faye did not come from a place of Don taking the initiative to be honest; he was painted into a corner after getting a panic attack because he thought his identity was going to be discovered when he thought he saw G-Men at his apartment.

            • Topaz

              Oops, responded to the wrong post. Ignore this.

        • Travelgrrl

          In some ways, he fell in love with a Megan that didn’t exist. She’s an actress, she’ll be what you want her to be. When she first comforted Sally after her office meltdown, it was kind of random (Megan was closest to her) – but all Don saw was Megan being maternal, not the view we had of her face, which was of her initially being discomfited. One spilled milkshake later, and she’s the 2nd Mrs. Draper.

          Then she was a coquette at his Zoo Bisou party – a total new view of her (and discomfiting to Don, at the time). I’m not sure we really know Megan thoroughly, either.

        • http://twitter.com/juvie_cinephile CM Gardner

          I think she saw and experienced the Dick Whitman present tense in the Howard Johnson incident and never wanted to touch that side of him since. I think even he did not want to show that to her when she actually showed agency, got the hell out by herself and was prepared to go to work after busing all the way back down to the city.

      • Heather

        She called him out on his drinking, yet didn’t seem to notice (or chose to ignore) that he had spiked his morning OJ with booze. She kissed him immediately after he drank from the glass, so I have to believe it’s the latter.

        • Travelgrrl

          Vodka. Pretty unobtrusive in OJ (or Tang).

          • formerlyAnon

            If you know what a person smells/tastes like normally, it’s not hard to smell/taste the spirits, even if it’s just the change in how their sweat smells. However, if Don is almost always either drinking or metabolizing alcohol, Megan *might* be used to it – plus she is almost chain smoking at this point.

        • fursa_saida

          I thought he hadn’t actually sipped from it until after she left. Either way, since he’d been out drinking until late the previous night, she might have thought it was just a holdover (she did tell him to sleep it off).

        • eselle28

          Megan made him stay home because he was hungover. He probably already smelled like a liquor cabinet, and his morning screwdriver just added a bit of orange flavor to it.

          I do think she’s codependent and in denial, to extreme degrees, but in that case I think she believed he was taking her suggestion.

          • Heather

            Good points. Also, I re-watched and he actually drank AFTER they kissed, not before as I’d originally thought. But since he’s an advanced alcoholic he probably smells like booze all the time, as you note.

      • Travelgrrl

        To me, she only saw the facade before they were married. Now she’s seeing it crumble.

    • Democracy Diva

      I don’t know if you’ve read Huffington Post’s recap yet, but they mention you constantly, TLo! HuffPo is basically in love with you and all your Bob Benson wisdom. From their recap:

      “Tom and Lorenzo wrote a tremendously interesting post about Bob last week as part of their weekly Mad Style meditation on the show, and if you haven’t read it, I highly recommend you take a look. I think I was one of many people who couldn’t understand why Bob made a pass at Pete last week, especially after Pete had made derogatory remarks about Manolo and homosexual men in general. I didn’t really get Bob’s mindset or understand his actions, but TLo’s post did what any worthwhile critique does: It made me think differently about a work of art that is worth considering deeply.”

      Mazel tov!

      • BP180

        Hipster tv bloggers: We were right about Bob Benson BEFORE we were right about Bob Benson.

    • Bonjour

      Bob Benson is Holly Golightly — Lula Mae Barnes?

      Is his Spanish a sign of his and Manolo having once been a couple? Friendship doesn’t seem like enough of a motivator for that level of quickness & fluency on the phone — but he keeps his American accent even while shouting in anger (‘Pete Campbell hijoputa!!’ Hilarious) so he’s not Puerto Rican passing for Brahmin. Hmmmm…

      Meanwhile last week’s Mad Style post was so epic (and universally celebrated by TV critics) that I’m just just annoyed/exhausted w MW for not getting on board w TLo.

      • MartyBellerMask

        I LOVED that conversation. James Wolk is awesome. Just awesome.

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

          That conversation freaked me the hell out! Correct me if I’m wrong… but wasn’t Bob telling Manolo to use his influence over Pete’s demented mother for Bob’s benefit? Ugh, as bad as Don is, I don’t think he ever pulled a move that awful early on in his career. (Although he’s been pretty godawful as of late.)

          If Bob is Don 2.0, he has the potential to be even more awful than the original. I’m terrified to think of what he might be up to in another 10 or so years.

          • dashransome

            I agree – I’m still a little unsure about what was being conveyed in that conversation and why. I assumed he was speaking Manolo but wasn’t sure why – requesting help via Pete’s mom makes sense. His affect was a bit unnerving given how upbeat and submissive/subordinate he always is in other conversations.

            • Travelgrrl

              He was tough with Pete immediately prior – when Bob was slightly menacing following the meeting about Chevy.

              I really, really love that character.

          • 3hares

            Yes! Absolutely–that was the moment it was clear Bob was not just Dick Whitman who stumbled into an impulsive lighter switch. I think he’s been involved in some much deeper cons.

            • Sweetbetty

              I’m glad someone has finally mentioned this (deeper cons). The general attitude I got from the recap is that it’s stilled believed that Bob is in love with Pete. I never believed that and his Spanish conversation on the phone seemed to confirm that to me. I can’t remember all the exact words but he was saying Pete was a slimy little creep or something to that effect; hardly words of love. Gay or not, I don’t think Bob is in love with Pete but is using him and his mother to some other end.

            • 3hares

              Oh, I think Bob was definitely truly infatuated with Pete–his words last week just don’t make any sense to me otherwise. It’s the thing that blew up his whole situation.

              But I think once Pete became a threat to him it was easy enough to be furious at him. I think when he called him a snotty bastard or whatever it was it was the flipside of the blueblood aristocrat he’d admired before–like the way Don both was infatuated with Betty’s class and resented her for it.

              To me it seems like the end is that Bob wanted to have Pete dependent on him just as he wants everyone else dependent on him. With Pete there was just also a desire for a personal connection. Joan’s letting slip about Pete’s mom offered Bob the perfect opportunity to infiltrate Pete’s personal life. He recommended his friend Manolo, presenting him as a nurse with whom he’d worked professionally. He probably was pumping Manolo for any information he could get from Dot that could help him further influence Pete. Then he blew it by trying to get Pete to understand falling in love with another man. As a result Pete feels uncomfortable–not only has he lost ground there, he wants him off Chevy. Bob panics. Manolo’s no longer working for Dot but he’s gotten into her head, so Bob can use that to put pressure on Pete.

              I do think there were deeper cons going on here all the time, but Bob pretending to be attracted to Pete wasn’t part of any of them imo. It was the flaw.

            • fursa_saida

              What I learned from this episode is that Bob Benson is a bad bitch, and I am DELIGHTED.

              (Before anybody gets upset, I’m using “bad bitch” in the positive sense of “badass go-getter who takes no shit.”)

        • Lisa_Co

          I agree! The different emotions he went through during that scene- glad handing, subdued, begging, confused- were awesome to watch.
          Oops. Posted in wrong place about different conversation.

      • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

        Don’t you think that Bob is just the kind of person to sit around listening to tapes learning Spanish? In case he needs to uproot and move on? Just another tool on his tool belt right. Like how he got a map of Michigan the minute he got the Chevy account?

        • Bonjour

          Huh, yeah. What a catch w the Mich map.

      • bxbourgie

        Bob’s Spanish was absolutely delicious! It was definitely “American who learned Spanish” Spanish, but still adorable. And I’m pretty sure he was talking to Manolo. I don’t know if those two have ever been a couple, but I do think they’re both working the same angle. Mystery men who create new identities and help each other out when necessary.

        • Topaz

          If I can understand what someone is saying without needing to read the subtitles, you can be pretty sure the Spanish is terrible.

          EDIT: Realised this may be read as me making some crack at Spanish accents. I was just making a not very good joke about my awful Spanish comprehension skills – I’d wondered in the scene why, unusually, I could understand what he was saying and thought it meant my Spanish was getting better. And now that people are saying it’s because his Spanish wasn’t very good, I have my answer. I still suck.

          • not_Bridget

            His Spanish was quite correct. But he was speaking fairly slowly & not using a distinctive regional accent. Yes, he probably listened to Berlitz records to improve his prospects. (Tapes came later.)

          • Travelgrrl

            I knew what you meant. I can read Spanish and *sort of* speak but my accent is terrible and I have a hard time understanding my neighbors who have fluent Spanish.

            I could understand Bob, tho!

          • Bonjour

            I think it’s really charming how polite people are with each other in the TLo board! ^^ great example. Civilized BKs I love it!

            • Topaz

              Don’t know if it’s civilised. I just saw a down vote from someone and panicked!

              Then again someone made a sarcastic remark at me for some factual inaccuracy once, and when I called them out on being rude they actually responded with “yeah, sorry, I don’t know why I did that.” The TLo comments sections are honestly one of the best on the internet for respectful debate, especially in proportion to the number of people who participate.

          • fursa_saida

            I wouldn’t have said terrible, just heavily American-accented. It’s always easier to understand people speaking another language when their vowels, etc. are subtly more what you’re used to. I had a friend who had studied Arabic for years but couldn’t hold a conversation with an actual Arab–but she said she could understand when I, a non-native speaker, was talking.

      • Ms_Flyover

        I replied elsewhere that I see J. Pierrepont Finch – down to the carnegie records (rather than a book.) And I figured his friendship with Monolo was from being in “service” of wealthy clients together.

        • Lisa Huntsman McAda

          I still think there’s something more sinister at play here. I think Bob and Manolo are a con-man team. What do you wanna bet that Momma Campbell “remembers” Manolo in her will, maybe even to Pete’s exclusion?

          • Heather

            I actually love the idea of Bob and Manolo as a grifter couple.

            • editrixie

              I think I’d actually rather watch that show.

            • joything

              Okay, that’s two of us in the audience.

          • Topaz

            Leaving aside the sort of narrative loops you’d have to tie yourself in to explain Bob’s behaviour up to this point in order to fit that theory, I think it’s a shame that people can’t just empathise with Bob’s (and Manolo’s) situation here, rather than reaching around for nefarious purposes. They’re gay men trying to find some success and stability in a world that rejects them. Is that not an interesting and compelling enough grand plan in itself?

            Maybe I’m out of line, and people should totally tell me if I am, but I’m starting to feel like there’s something sinister in people’s determination to portray this as something more sensational. So frequently, evil characters (especially in period dramas) end up being made gay in order to demonstrate just how fucked up they are, to the point that people apparently can’t imagine a mysterious gay character ISN’T up to something evil. But I like to think Matthew Weiner is better than that sort of tired old trope, and I really hope I’m proven right.

            • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

              I don’t think Bob is evil, but there’s a different between being a wide-eyed innocent and being someone who has done some shady things–and who isn’t above doing more of them–to get ahead. You could say similar things about Don/Dick.

              It doesn’t seem like this story line is going the evil gay stereotype route. Even with as little as we know about Bob, he’s very complex, and while obviously dishonest, also very sympathetic and ultimately likable. A lot like Don/Dick at the beginning of the series.

            • Topaz

              Agreed

            • Chris

              I don’t think Bob is evil either. He could be desperate when pushed to the wall like Don told Pete blackmailed men can be. I think he is trying to advance himself through any means possible but people with secrets have to protect them which makes them dangerous.

            • Lisa_Co

              I can’t wait for the S6 DVDs, where Weiner will explain all this in his commentaries

            • Redlanta

              I think Don leaves and becomes Dick Whitman again, at the end of the series. With that in mind, guess who will progress right into his office?!

            • Glammie

              I’ve been thinking something similar that Don ends up in California where “Don Draper” began. Ideally, he apologizes to Sally and tells her he loves her. Not counting on that part.

            • Travelgrrl

              At this point Bob could be revealed as a baby seal slugging, Lindberg Baby stealing, Commie names revealing murderer, and I wouldn’t care. I lurve him.

            • editrixie

              I agree 100 percent. It’s kind of creepy how many people are hanging on to these theories. And your comment also makes me think of Revenge, big time. I couldn’t believe they went there.

            • avidreader02

              I for one agree with you. I may have been too emotionally attached to the tlo hypothesis of the perfect little boy in the world… and I acknowlege that. I wanted a story about a gay man trying to figure out his way in this shark tank world. But instead I get the talented Mr. Ripley redux. A gay man must be a sociopath and a con man.
              And what bothers me more is that the story of a gay man in this time period isn’t perceived as that interesting. And he feels like a plot contrivance now … a way to be a dark mirror of Don and a way to show how Pete has changed.

            • Peeve

              I think you might be a bit premature in thinking that people are giving Bob sinister motives just because he’s gay. We only found out he was gay last week. People have been attributing all kinds of potential nefarious motives to Bob almost since he was introduced. He was a mysterious character who was always around, ever helpful, there must be some ulterior motive. Had nothing to do with him being gay.

            • Topaz

              Yes, perhaps you’re right. I just find it so strange that last week, we got the revelation he was gay and infatuated with Pete Campbell. And some people weren’t happy with that and thought he was still up to something awful. And now into the bargain we find he’s invented his whole past in order to hide his modest/troubled beginnings. Those two things surely adequately explain all of his odd behaviour, but some people now seem even more determined to hang on to some other grand plot twist that must be coming up, as if all this stuff is further evidence of an evil scheme rather than a dismissal of it. And they seem more and more determined not to empathise or relate to Bob on a human level. I’ve started mentally nicknaming them the Bob-birthers.

              You’re right though, I guess it is a leap to think this comes from some deep-seated, subconscious homophobia. But nonetheless, I find this reading hard to understand.

            • Peeve

              I see where you’re coming from, but you know the conspiracy theorists are DYING right now with the reveal of Bob’s past and the Spanish conversation with Manolo!

            • Topaz

              But again I think that’s easily explained by what we know already. He tries to ingratiate himself with people by learning details about them and going out of his way to give them what he thinks they want. He could easily have just learned some Spanish because he thought it would make Manolo happy and that this was a way to cement friendship. That was my immediate assumption and seems so much more likely than any hopped up conspiracy theory.

              Perhaps, if we really want to delve deeper, working in service he’s also been around a lot of Spanish speakers – I work in hospitality, which is a low paid industry with a transient workforce. It means I spend time with people from all over the world. I always have them teach me some of their home language.

            • ybbed

              What do we really know about Bob? Very little has been revealed about him to date. He is intentionally portrayed very ambiguously. He’s a good gay guy is kind of boring. Maybe that is all it will turn out to be, but for sure, he is very phony, and a lot of speculating has been built around less than that on this show. He seems like a con man.

            • Topaz

              See, this is where people lose me, because I think a good gay guy trying to succeed in this place, at this time, is anything but boring. It’s only boring if people have convinced themselves that Bob is solely there as a plot device for some explosive twist.

              But to me, that sort of soap opera conclusion would be the most boring option. Once it’s revealed, it leaves nowhere for Bob to go. He can’t remain in the story. He can’t continue to form relationships with other characters. He can’t continue to navigate the muddy SC&P waters. And anyway, I just don’t think it’s consistent with Mad Men’s narrative style, which allows each character to be their own agent of change, however unwitting, not to be the victim of mysterious outside forces.

              His “phoniness” can be adequately explained by his having come from a poor background that he is trying to hide and being part of a gay subculture whose activities and proclivities are either illegal or treated as symptoms of a mental illness. T&L even went to great lengths in their last Mad Style post to explain how that environment affected, and still affects, some gay men in a way that directly correlates with Bob’s behaviour in the office. His experience in service lends itself even more closely to this reading. Yes, Bob was portrayed as odd and conspicuous during this season, but they’ve spent two episodes now explaining what was going on.

              Meanwhile, what do we really know about Stan? Or Ken? Or that head of Accounts from CGC? Stan’s lost a cousin in Vietnam. Ken has a wife and publishes fiction under a pseudonym. Accounts guy – I got nada. We now know more about Bob’s past than any of those characters but I don’t think anyone’s ever suspected any of them of being con men.

            • fursa_saida

              I agree with you in general, and you make an excellent point when you point out how little we know about so many characters. But I also think that if he did turn out to be some sort of con man, it wouldn’t be the condemnation on this show that it would be on almost any other. Don Draper, the protagonist, is a con man. To some degree, every man in that office except maybe for Stan & Ginsberg are con men. His being a con man–not necessarily in the literal sense of running formal cons a la White Collar or House of Games, but in the identity evasion sense of Don Draper–would be a very understandable response to the circumstances and identity he’s trying to hide. The big difference between his conning and Don’s would be, at least for me, that I’d be infinitely more sympathetic to the motives and imperatives that have led Bob to behave in ways that most people would consider dishonest or shady.

              I definitely think, though, that the obsession with Bob as a McGuffin is weird, and I’m conflicted about how much Bob is going to get to be a character as opposed to a reflection of Don who might get fridged prematurely. Of course, almost every character on this show is meant to be some kind of reflection or contrast to Don, but they have varying degrees of three-dimensionality.

            • Topaz

              Yeah, I feel like too much emphasis on Bob as proto-Don will be a massive lameout (partly because I kinda despise Don), so I’m hoping they don’t work that angle on the show too much. They’ve made their point, now I want to see Bob live out his time on the show in his own right. (EDIT: I also feel like that’s exactly what’s happened to Ginsberg this season. They introduced him as a major new character last year, but really they were just trying to offer a contrast to Don. Now this year they’ve found a new character to say something about Don’s personality and past and sort of left Ginsberg by the wayside. It’s really annoying).

              I think in your point we’re coming down to definitions of “con”. I said in another post that I didn’t agree that Bob was doing anything more shady, for example, when he said to Pete “you should be careful what you say about people” than any number of other people in the office, or clients, have pulled on other characters in the past. But people somehow felt that Bob’s behaviour was particularly creepy. And yes, in the sense that he’s trying to control people’s reaction to get what he wants, you can call that a “con”, and also in that he’s faked his past, this is obviously dishonest. But to push this to some scheme to get mamma Campbell to give up her inheritance (such as it is) – no, I just don’t buy that or any other notion that he’s got some terrible plot up his sleeve that we’re still waiting for him to pull off.

              I don’t know – I do see that James Wolk has a particular presence about him that makes him feel very “Other”, so I get why people thought something was going on, but the suggestions people were pulling out were so out of keeping with how Mad Men operates, and especially now we know what the reasons are, I think we should move on and enjoy how the new dynamic unfolds.

            • 3hares

              I agree–I would have liked Bob just being gay, but the fact that he’s also a poor boy trying to hustle his way into a good life just makes him more fascinating to me. What I glimpsed of his life in this episode was totally believable and also somewhat ordinary. He was born with disadvantages (poor and being gay in a homophobic society) and adapted to succeed. Plus he’s retained a stubborn dignity about it–another way he could probably relate to Pete, actually. Bob isn’t self-loathing about being gay, it doesn’t seem. He’s made connections in a community. He’s done shameful things (lying, getting Manolo to mess with Dot’s head) but being gay and revealing that to Pete isn’t one of them.

              I guess that’s another reason why it was so satisfying to me the way the story pivoted after the phone call with Duck. Pete’s homophobia seemed more just the reflexive opinion of a guy of his time and society. Once he sees what kind of “animal” Bob really is (the kind Don is) Pete has a personal fascination with Bob as a person, lying awake all night imagining his life.

              Bob’s personality is much more interesting to me now than a secret identity he could have.

            • Topaz

              Really great point about “reflexive homophobia”. You’re right, Pete’s never been challenged to really think about it. And even when he said to Bob “you’re sick” there was a strange lack of conviction in his voice. Pete can be a bitter, even resentful man, but he’s not particularly given to hate or contempt. He has far too much self doubt for that.

              I don’t find it shameful that Bob lied about his background though. This is not a world lit up by social mobility or acceptance of difference. As soon as I found out where he came from all I felt was sympathy, just as I would with a mixed race person who might have tried to “pass” as white during segregation. It’s not a nice thing to have to think about, but people want to thrive in the society they’re given, not the society they ought to have. He wanted a different life for himself and didn’t know another way to get it. We have no idea of the family situation he walked out of, but I know that when my family found out my uncle was gay in the late 1960s, they tried to send him for electroshock therapy and he ended up living in a squat in London to escape from them, trying to (very unsuccessfully) rob houses to live. I wouldn’t expect anyone to settle for that. In the end my uncle opted for social activism as a way out, but I couldn’t judge anyone for seeking an easier road. Although Stonewall is on the horizon. Who knows how that will affect Bob.

            • ybbed

              Because they don’t act like Bob.

            • MartyBellerMask

              I think you actually touched on the real reason in your second sentence: He’s infatuated with PETE CAMPBELL. People really hate Pete. Really hate him. So anyone who’s infatuated with him must be insane and probably super horrible too.
              If Bob pledged his love to Ken (who people seem to love) the reaction would be different.

              Personally I’ve always found Ken to be incredibly bland and much prefer the more complex wounded-bird Pete, but that’s just me. :)

          • Glammie

            Mama Campbell has no money left, so not an issue. Plus, she’s clearly not in full possession of her faculties, which would void a change in her will.

            • joything

              I don’t think it has been in the dialogue, but being an adult child caregiver, I find myself hoping that Pete and his brother have gone ahead with “the paperwork” to have Mom declared non compos mentis, so she can’t bequeath Manolo anything.

          • 3hares

            That already happened. The Campbells are broke and Pete probably would have been left out by his father.

          • ybbed

            That’s what I thought too a couple of weeks ago. Bob is a total bullshit artist and when the Manolo story appeared I thought oh boy, those two are some kind of con team going after the old widows money. Little do they know that she doesn’t have any. I still kind of question the gay thing though, I don’t know if that is going to pan out or if that was part of some kind of con. I don’t know, there is just something about Bob…..

            • Lisa_Co

              I also have some doubts whether Bob is gay mainly because primarily he’s a con. I think maybe Bob thinks Pete is gay and that the best way to get close to him (like at Brown,Brothers, Harriman) is to also “be gay”.

            • fursa_saida

              …what.

            • 3hares

              But why on earth would Bob think Pete is gay? These keeps getting thrown out as if it’s reasonable for a guy in 1968 to do something that would get him socially ostracized based on a weak gaydar signal allegedly making its way through all the openly heterosexual behavior and homophobic attitudes. Pete just casually referred to being gay as being degenerate, so why would Bob think it was smart to also “be gay” like Pete in that moment?

            • Topaz

              Also, Bob went with Pete to a brothel and waited outside while Pete was in a room having sex with a woman. How could he possibly think there was a strong likelihood of Pete being gay? Bob was acting on empty hope because he’s a fantasist who likes to invent perfect scenarios. That’s how he got himself into a situation of working at SCDP with a completely falsified life story, and how he managed to convince himself he had a shot with Pete.

              And people should remember, they’re suggesting that Bob is a STRAIGHT MAN assuming that someone else is gay based on, what, a certain “quality” about them? How often would anyone straight in the 1960s assume that, ever, about anyone? Especially given that the prevailing “wisdom” at the time was that homosexuality was a mental illness.

          • Sweetpea176

            I think Bob and Manolo are close friends, lovers or ex-lovers who rely on each other to navigate through a life that depends upon keeping secrets and being evasive. Bob certainly conned his way into getting his job, and he and Manolo may well be very shady in many ways — who knows?

            But if by “con-man team” you mean literal partners in a confidence scheme — it seems like such a stretch. Somehow they found Pete and/or Dot and worked an elaborate scheme that involved one of them getting a legitimate job in an ad agency, making friends with the resident fag hag, getting her to reveal personal information about Dot needing a nurse, which could then be used to ingratiate Manolo to Dot (while performing actual work for her), who will give him — what? a ceramic elephant? (she doesn’t have any money) — in her will, although she appears to be in pretty good health. With a side game that involves pretending to be in love with Pete in order to do what? Be kept by Pete? Blackmail him? If that was Bob’s game, he’d have been better off remaining a manservant.

            Plot coherence aside, that is not only a very long con that leaves a lot to chance, it involves both of them performing actual jobs for a lengthy period of time waiting for a payoff. The whole point of con games is to avoid that very thing.

            • ybbed

              Part of conning people is being able to grab opportunities when they arise. I don’t know if they are professional con men or just liars who manipulate people throughout their lives, but there is something very odd about Bob. The way his voice suddenly changed when he talked to Pete did stand out because we have never seen Bob speak like that. It was really sweet when Pete forced that smile off his face. We’ll see….

      • fursa_saida

        Yeah, no way Bob’s a native speaker (unless they’re just hoping we in the audience won’t notice). Wolk did quite well, though–no odd pauses or “eh”s. I was thinking maybe he’s part of a particular corner of the gay scene that’s composed of a lot of Latinos, and so he’s learned/improved his Spanish from that part of his life? Certainly it seems like where he knows Manolo from.

    • tessasouthworth

      Thanks, gentlemen, for getting this out so early! And yes, I was one of those who mentally shouted, “Oh my God, they killed Kenny!’ after that first scene.

      Talk about foreshadowing, it was interesting to see the episode close out with “The Porpoise Song” from the Monkees’ 1968 movie “Head.” As I recall, it played in a scene when the boys in the band commit suicide at the beginning and end of the film by jumping from a bridge in an attempt to escape from their lives. If it’s not prophetic, it at least calls back to both the series’ opening with the ad man falling, falling, falling and Don’s failed Hawaiian beach ad with the businessman walking into the sea. It was a nice segue from Don curling up in a fetal position, attempting to “escape” to the womb, pre-birth, as it were.

      • Jennifer Ford

        In a movie that was designed to blow up their squeaky-clean image and free them to do other things.

      • 0peramanda

        I thought the exact thing (and maybe squealed a little when the song came on). I also thought with the lines “A face, a voice, an overdub has no choice; image cannot be choice”, it was just on-the-nose perfect coming after Don and Peggy, which had followed Bob and Pete’s scene. You can’t run from yourself, Bob. Look at what that has done to Don.

      • Krafty_L

        Interesting! I didn’t realize that was the Monkees – who were essentially a pre-fab version of the Beatles, in an episode with so many other references to twins.

      • Susan Collier

        The Monkees! I should have known that!
        Interesting note with referencing the Monkees (a band created for a show based on recreating “Help!”) during an episode highlighting an ad team recreating a scene from “Rosemary’s Baby” to sell aspirin.

      • ccinnc

        Thank you for The Porpoise Song! I couldn’t remember what it was, but it gave me good memories and bad vibes simultaneously. Now it makes sense.

      • Travelgrrl

        Also the Monkees were a somewhat bogus band, with studio musicians and Boyce & Hart cutting most of their albums – which hearkens back to Don D and Bob B and even Patty Duke and her “identical cousin”!

      • http://twitter.com/juvie_cinephile CM Gardner

        You folks are killing me with The Monkees as a ‘bogus band’ meme . Listen to the songs Mike Nesmith wrote for the group and come back to me that it is bogus. The movie Head itself is almost an apologetic refutation of what the band was originally created for.

    • otterbird

      Is Megan that naive or is she doing her own thing? Remember how stilted her response was to Sally’s friend when Sally’s friend asked if she was calling her agent? It might have had to do with Sylvia’s son, but I don’t know- it seems like the show has been making it clear she’s got some other things going on, too.

      I know I’m in the minority, but I like Glen. I was happy to see him. Weird kid became a weird teen. And I loved that THAT was why Sally wanted to go visit the school- she knew she’d be near Glen. That girl is an evil genius.

      I like the redemption of Betty’s character this season. She’ll always be self-centered, but marriage to Henry is helping her turn into a real person. I was so creeped out by his character originally, and he turned into one of the moral centers of the show. He seems to genuinely love Betty, not judge her on her appearance or what she makes him look like (he was excited to show Fat Betty off; she was the one who wanted to lose weight). Though I find hilarious that their kink seems to be the threat of cuckolding. Takes all kinds, I guess.

      • Spicytomato1

        I’m with you about Megan having more going on than is immediately apparent. Perhaps it will be revealed next week.

        Agree about Betty, too. I liked the subtle detail of her being disciplined enough to have only of one of Sally’s french fries, compared to her Fat Betty days when she’d polish off a whole bag of chips in front of the TV.

        I’ve always liked Glen, too, and was happily surprised that he seemed less weird/awkward than when he was younger. I thought he had a bit of newfound swagger.

        • otterbird

          And I liked Betty telling Miss Porter’s that this was what she wanted for herself, but didn’t get, and was glad to give Sally the chance. It’s, from what I gathered from earlier seasons, different that what her mother was, and a tiny glimmer of hope that parents don’t have to repeat their own parents’ mistakes.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

            Yes, that was lovely as well! Betty seemed so genuinely proud of Sally as well — and so happy when Sally was actually responding to her and bonding with her. These two are really the most realistic depiction of a stormy but still caring mother-teenage daughter bond I’ve yet seen on tv.

            • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

              What was that line she used on the phone with Don? ‘She has good manners with everyone but me.’ She is proud of her daughter and proud of herself. Betty could have been a lot worse let’s face it. Several years now of Sally favoring her Dad and Betty could have blown the whole thing up and pitted Sally against Don. But clearly, Sally was clueless about her father until this year.

            • avidreader02

              I agree.. i have a soft spot for Betty and I adore the character of Sally. I liked their car rides together. They have a prickly, spiky kind of relationship. And it doesn’t seem fake at all. And as someone who shared cigarettes with his mom… it may seem weird but it is a way of Betty showing Sally that she thinks she is growing up. And maybe a loosening up of their roles.

          • nosniveling

            the only reason Betty wants Sally to go to Miss Porter’s is for the bragging rights.
            And to get her out of her hair.
            Has nothing to do with the”good of the chile”

            • Chris

              I think Betty believes for once Sally likes something that Betty liked and is genuinely excited for her. The idea of Jackie Kennedy’s alma mater is a huge deal even now. Betty has never understood Sally as she got older. Some of their best moments were when Sally is dressed up sitting on Betty’s vanity stool and Betty is putting lipstick on her (to both their delight) or when Betty has a talk with Sally about boys and kissing. This is all in Betty’s wheelhouse and what she understands and knows best. When Sally acted out and cut her hair Betty reacted terribly, but she was dumfounded by Sally. Betty had begged to let her hair grow when she was a child and didn’t understand why Sally was destroying this ‘gift” she had given her. Betty does want what is best for Sally even if she doesn’t always know what it is at times. Betty does the best with the parenting she learned from her mother and I think Henry is a good influence on everyone. She was so excited to give Sally this experience she had wanted, and was even more excited to have that common ground with Sally for once.

            • FloridaLlamaLover

              Nailed it. An acquaintance of mine has a very Betty-Sally relationship with her daughter, in a house dominated by males (5 inc. Dad). Always been a tense situation, Mom telling daughter what to do, daughter grinding her teeth and going along with it. Fast forward to college: daughter joined sorority because Mom had been in the same one, not because she wanted to but because it would be a bridge between the two of them. I agree that this is Betty’s way of bridge-building — but it does get Sally out from underfoot when some teen girls can be VERY difficult to live with.

            • not_Bridget

              With Sally refusing weekends with her Dad, Betty would lose that child-free time. Boarding school is a great solution. Especially a truly prestigious one….

              A more adult Sally can be difficult at times–but she’s not as much “trouble” as when she was younger. Betty’s happier in her life, so she’s doing better as a mother. (She could have left Don earlier–but had to wait until she found Hubbie #2.)

              Of course, it’s nice that Sally is hating Don now, not Betty…

            • fursa_saida

              I don’t understand all these people who are saying Betty’s trying to get rid of Sally. It was Sally’s idea, because she wants to get away from Don.

            • Chris

              Yes and Betty is happy because for once it seems Sally wants something Betty wanted at her age. Betty seems so happy to be able to connect in some way, any way with Sally even if it’s a boarding school and cigarettes.

            • quitasarah

              Sorry, I don’t mean to mock or anything, I just found “the good of the chile” to be a particularly hilarious typo.

          • Ally08

            On a less charitable note, a woman as vain as Betty would not like having her teenage daughter around, making her look comparatively older. However, she did seem to have some straightforward maternal investment in Sally in this episode.

            • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

              I haven’t gotten a sexual competitiveness vibe from the Sally-Betty relationship. There are other problems, to be sure, but I don’t get the feeling that Betty is threatened by Sally in that way. I think she’s happy to have Sally going off to school because it reflects well on her as a mother and will look good for Henry’s campaign.

      • Travelgrrl

        Henry is hot, too. I love that craggy business!

    • Nicholas

      Weiner should take a cue from George R. R. Martin and either kill off some characters or rotate the protagonist roster once in a while. Please, for the love of God, do three episodes next season without Don and Megan altogether.

      Too many female characters on the show are failing the Bechdel test, and it’s not like every single character can’t carry an episode themselves.

      • http://twitter.com/juvie_cinephile CM Gardner

        Mad Men is not Game of Thrones, Game of Thrones is not Mad Men. I have no idea why you think a successful show has to follow pointers of the younger kid on the block especially when the universal of the former is not that complicated at all while the latter’s universe is ever-expanding despite killing more than its share of characters off. But yeah, let’s send the entire creative staff at SC&P to Vietnam to kill them off to make things **interesting** again.

      • fursa_saida

        The lack of substantial development with Peggy this season is criminal. (She’s had a fair amount of screen time, but I’ve never felt like she was…going anywhere with the storylines she had? I don’t know.) The trotting out of the black secretaries and then total loss of interest in them is upsetting. Leaving Joan’s Avon situation hanging is cruel. And this isn’t a female character (though your point about the Bechdel test is spot on), but it’s like they keep giving Ginsberg half a plot point and then dropping it. Why did we see him go on that date? Why did we see him have a breakdown a couple eps ago? I’m really enjoying all the Sally and Bob stuff, but yeah, they could definitely stand to rotate the focus a little more. (Ugh, okay, Ted’s feeling competitive and it’s bad for him/the business. I GET IT.)

        • Chris

          The time spent on Don and Sylvia could easily have been cut in half and conveyed everything that was needed to be said about that relationship. The best partsf of the season for me have been Joan, Peggy, Betty, Sally and the brief glimpses of Stan and Ginsberg. I’ll take a scene with Dawn, Cutler or almost anyone at the office over the endless hookups with Sylvia. I wish the time had been apportioned better.

    • Angela_the_Librarian

      Last night was a great episode. Poor Ken was really put through the ringer by those Chevy guys (also remember the terrible car accident a few weeks back). He actually looks quite distinguished with the eye patch, too bad it’s temporary.

      This was the first episode in a long time where I was actually on Don’s side (at least a bit). True, his motivations in dealing with Ted and Peggy weren’t pure (he obviously didn’t approve of Ted having shenanigans with Peggy), but he was right to stop them from making an ad at the company’s expense and he saved their pitch (I love how uncomfortable and squirmy everyone was until Don made up the lie about Gleason’s final pitch). On the phone with Betty he admitted that he missed Sally, and even slept in her bed. I think Peggy calling Don a monster at the end of the episode was just another nail in his heart after the events of last week with Sally. Now his two daughters–one real and one figurative–are on no-speaking terms with him and all he can do now is curl up in a ball (almost looked like he was going to cry). Unlike other recent episodes, after this one I was left caring about Don and curious about what was going to happen next.

      I was also dubious about the aspirin pitch. I think now-a-days it could be seen as a clever idea for a Super Bowl-type commercial, but I was also left wondering about how mothers wouldn’t want to associate the an anti-Christ baby with their own children. Also, weren’t most people pretty disturbed by Rosemary’s Baby when it first came out? I saw it for the first time a few years ago and didn’t think much of it, but to this day my Dad refuses to watch it, even in an edited form on TV.

      • Orange Girl

        I agree. Don was right throughout the episode – Ted wasn’t thinking with his head, it was wrong to go over budget for the commercial, Sunkist is the better (bigger) client – but of course Don wasn’t concerned about the company. His spite was evident when he called Harry as soon as he got home from the movies after seeing Ted with Peggy. And of course, Peggy called Don out on his bullshit again.

        But, wow, I couldn’t believe that I felt sorry for Don after she left his office. He really looked like a sick and sad little baby.

        Now I’m going to have “The Porpoise Song” in my head all day.

        • Chris

          I didn’t feel one bit sorry for Don he is just a horrible person. If he was on the couch alone like a sick and sad little baby it’s because he deliberately destroyed the relationship with the person who consoled him with his head on her lap on the couch the last time he was this distraught (over Anna)- Peggy.

          • Orange Girl

            Of course you are right. Don doesn’t deserve sympathy at all. I’ve never gotten into the Don Draper/Tony Soprano comparisons, but Don’s actions were pure Tony Soprano. He gets caught doing something awful, vows to change and do something “good,” acts like an asshole to everyone while he’s doing “good” and then is SHOCKED that everyone is pissed at him for it. All I could think as he was laying on that couch was “That poor bastard.”

            • Chris

              Oh I agree he is deeply disturbed and it’s good you still have sympathy for him because he is the protagonist. Like I said before somewhere, I’m personally at the Godfather II stage with Don. He’s Michael Corleone- I could sympathize through Godfather I but he lost me after part II. Since Don didn’t (directly) kill his own brother maybe MW can win my sympathies for him back at some point.

            • K Erickson

              I had a Michael Corleone moment last week too–didn’t the episode end with Don at the end of the hall, looking back at Sally’s closed door, and then closing his own door to face his demons?

            • Chris

              Yes, this season has reminded me of Michael’s arc in the movies where he slowly loses members of his family one by one, friends and allies, his children’s loyalty etc. It seems MW has really been been showing Don’s decline in a way he never has before. Even when Don was first divorced and on his drinking binge he still was Sally’s hero. The past few months have shown Bobby worries about Henry’s (not Don’s) safety and Sally has completely rejected him. Betty now pities him and “that poor girl” instead of being jealous of him and Megan as she was last year. Peggy just called him a monster and Don seems to think others at work are on Ted’s side. He’s getting a lot of doors closed on him. I don’t know if MW is setting him up for a complete decline, or to build him back up and give him some kind of redemption in the last season.

        • bxbourgie

          Don was right, (Ted and Peggy were completely nauseating the entire episode), but the way he went about it was typical Don. All he had to do was pull them both aside and tell them to ease up on the googly eyes and whatever, but instead he embarrassed them, and ruined two more relationships. He’s ridiculous, it’s like he purposely ruins relationships because he hates himself so much.

          • Chris

            I guess I’m in the minority but I didn’t find Peggy and Ted nauseating. I understand they were a bit giddy at work but I can’t think of one male female relationship on Mad Men that didn’t start with sex and exist just for sex, apart from Glenn and Sally or Peggy and Don. What struck me about Ted and Peggy was how darned happy they were just to be in each other’s company. Nobody is ever pleasant in that office very often (apart from Pete’s secretary who seems very nice) and every relationship, business or personal is depicted as fraught with tension and some kind of power play. No one is ever 100% friends or allies (maybe Ted and Frank were) there is always an angle or jealousy etc. I just enjoyed seeing some sheer happiness, friendship and mutual respect (with the attraction mixed in). It was a refreshing change.

            • Ally08

              I guess I’m with you in that minority! I’ve had those flirtations and they’re great. It was one of my favourite parts of theatre — that intense creative collaboration forming a quasi-familial bond.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              I love these two together and even I was embarrassed for them especially when they were doing that berry guy’s voice

            • Glammie

              Don and Joan have never had a sexual relationship. And, in some ways, Don is being very consistent–he kept his adulterous liaisons out of the office. (He wasn’t married when he had his awful one-night-stand with Alison and took up with Faye and Megan.) He certainly twisted the knife in how he handled it–humiliating Ted and undermining Peggy.

              BUT Don was right in that Ted’s judgment was impaired because of his feelings for Peggy. And after he twisted the knife, he actually gave Ted some decent advice. Ted IS married. He SHOULD HAVE paid attention to the budget and the client.

              In some ways, he was giving Ted a taste of what it would be like to be caught the way he was and then pulling back at the last minute. It wasn’t nice, but it also made a point. And in his way, he gave Ted the kind of advice he used to give Peggy in that it was very straight–”We’ve all been there” and then clarified “Not with Peggy.” An interesting aside–he was kind of protecting Peggy’s reputation.

              Keep in mind that we heard Ginsberg venting about how Ted never paid attention to anyone else’s ideas besides Peggy’s. So the love affair, whether consummated or not, interferes with the agency’s creative process and has interfered with clients.

            • Chris

              Everything Don ever does or has done has interfered with work and the creative process at SC. How many clients has he slept with when married? How many secretaries when single? How about sleeping with Faye the consultant and Megan his secretary at the same time. Do you believe Don cared about that aspirin account let alone Ted’s marriage? He threw away Jaguar because Herb dared to challenge him. Don has played fast and loose with that agency in every way possible, used it, ignored it, married from it, promoted a wife into two careers from it. Ted has single handedly kept the creative department afloat since the merger and acted as boss and appeaser in the accounts department with Pete. Don has produced no work since the Chevy merger and upset them at the dinner he attended trying to help his mistress’s son, but he’s now the one who is the arbiter of “poor judgement in the office?”

              I wouldn’t take Ginsberg as fair and impartial either, all he ever does is complain if his ideas aren’t hailed as the best. He was complaining in “The Crash” about it and Ted wasn’t even around.

              This is the only professional misstep we have ever seen from Ted and the only interest in business we have seen in months from Don and it’s just to sabotage someone else’s work. If that is Don “protecting” Peggy God help her from his protection.

            • fnarf

              He didn’t throw away Jaguar because Herb challenged him, he threw away Jaguar because “every time we get a car this place turns into a whorehouse”. Don was the only one there who was even slightly put off by whoring Joan to Herb to get it. (Presumably Ted would have been against that, too, if he’d been there then, but it’s pretty obvious Cutler would have been in favor). Jaguar was a shitty account, and its very existence was always going to be poison, plus Herb was an impossible client who had to be thrown away.

              I don’t know if Don cared about the aspirin account, but he certainly cared that Ted was throwing away $50 grand on it that they weren’t going to get back — because Ted was never in a million years going to save it from his gaffe. He was never even going to bring it up with the guy.

            • Chris

              The comment about the whorehouse wasn’t made until Chevy. Jaguar was never considered a “shitty” account- it was so important SCDP felt it was worth 50K or a 5% partnership just to land it. Pete spent months courting them and Joan made her own sacrifice for it. Don’s dignity suffered dealing with Herb so he jettisoned the account. The only one who couldn’t deal with the account and Herb is Don. Joan’s partnership is worth far more than 50K so Don threw far more than that away when he dumped Jaguar. Don and the aspirin account had nothing to do with money it was an in to get revenge on Ted. Ted made an error in judgement but we will never know how he could have handled it because Don moved in to make sure things went poorly. Don has never concerned himself with costs and only involved himself in the account to do sabotage after he saw Ted and Peggy together. This was not some brilliant business move by Don or him trying to save the account.

            • fursa_saida

              I don’t think it was out of particular concern for the good of the company, but functionally, everything he did in this episode (specifically in this episode, I’m saying) to screw over other people also worked for the good of the company. That’s why he’s brilliant at this kind of office politics; because he uses the logical benefit of the company as a way to make the personal moves he wants to make.

              He’s not altruistic in the sense you seem to be arguing against, but it doesn’t change the fact that (again, in this specific episode), his actions were simultaneously awful and good business. Remember when Pete said to Bob that he’s “I don’t know how you people [i.e. Bob and Don] do it…I’ve learned not to tangle with your kind of animal”? This is the kind of thing he meant.

            • Chris

              I agree- it was his excuse for doing what he did and Ted gave him the opportunity to do it. In the end, yes you can absolutely say the facts are that they got an additional 10K for the commercial.

              Was getting the client in trouble with his boss, Ted in trouble by going behind his back and sandbagging him then using the dead partner as an excuse a better way to handle things than talking to Ted and Peggy? Absolutely not.

              It wasn’t a brilliant business move in that it was the best thing for the company or the best way to handle things, especially relationship and reputation wise with the client, but it was a clever, even brilliantly evil way for Don to punish Ted and Peggy and use the extra money as the excuse for doing so.

            • Travelgrrl

              He never actually flirted or got misty with a co-worker in that way, though.

            • Chris

              No because Don never has a friendship with anyone. We saw him go out with Joan once in a flirty friendly way but it seems like that was the only time those two ever did that in all the years there. They are not friends. Don has sexual relationships or boss- slave ones like he and Peggy but he never has anything as joyous or fun as what Peggy and Ted have. He’s incapable of that kind of relationship with men or women.

            • Glammie

              One client–Rachel Menken–and no one seemed to know about it. Two secretaries–Alison and Megan. He didn’t sleep with Megan and Faye at the same time. Once he slept with Megan he proposed to her and dropped Faye. Not cool, but not two-timing either.

              And I agree with others who say Don threw away Jaguar because it was a tainted account and Herb was the client from hell. Don also gets a pass from me here because he did go to Joan’s apartment and told her she didn’t have to sleep with Herb. The only partner who did that.

              There’s no indication that Don’s produced no work since the Chevy merger. We don’t see everything. It’s clear that his Sunkst pitch worked. It’s clear that his judgment as a creative director is still good–his point about Rosemary’s Baby and children’s aspirin is apt.

              As for Ted, he seems capable, but he doesn’t have Don’s knack–that’s clear in the margarine discussion, where we learn he uses Gilligan’s Island as his organizing principal.

              But you’re kind of missing my point–Don doesn’t have to be good or right to have weird protective impulses and to, amid the desire to screw people over, also keep them from making his mistakes. Don’s a mixed bag. Always will be. You don’t have to like him, but his moral ambiguity is a defining character trait.

            • Chris

              There was no indication that Don did anything “protective” of Peggy. He was mad and jealous and only got involved in any work because he saw Peggy and Ted together. That is observable fact. Before he saw them he told Harry no on the phone and was not doing any work- all he wanted to do was sit and drink.

              We know he is not contributing any creative work because he said flat out he was no longer going to do that. He would only “review” other people’s work and he has not been shown working on any accounts. He had nothing to do with Chevy and told Roger to go to Harry about Sunkist. These are also facts not opinions.

              Also facts: he slept with two business related clients- Bobbie Barrett (in his office during work hours) and Rachel Menken a very important and lucrative account. He also used his secretary/copy writer Peggy to bail him out, hide his mistress etc etc.

              Don slept with Megan before in his office when she mentioned wanting to be a copywriter.
              He then entered into a relationship with the consultant Faye who he emotionally coerced into feeding him client leads and meetings. While he was dating Faye pretty seriously he took his secretary on vacation with him and slept with her again many times. He proposed to her before bothering to call and break it off with Faye. I’d certainly call that two timing if my boyfriend left for a trip with his kids, resumed a sexual relationship with someone else while away and got engaged all while we were a couple. If that isn’t two timing I don’t know what is. These are also facts presented on the show. You may like him but it doesn’t change what he does or what his motivations are.

              Your opinions on the aspirin commercial, the drunken margarine discussion and Ted vs Don are just those- opinions.

              What we do know as fact is that Ted secured approval for the Chevy creative done without Don (presumably by Ted or the team) and he has been bringing in new business and handling all of the creative department while Don has been doing whatever Don has been doing (drinking, smoking hash, running around with Sylvia).

            • Glammie

              Yes my opinions are just opinions. So.are.yours. I, however, grew up around and agency and have a professional writing background. So I have a reasonably informed opinion. These are fictional characters–and you seem to take these differences of opinions regarding them a little too much to heart. In my opinion, of course.

              Anyway, Don never said he’d quit doing all creative. He said he would supervise, but not create on the Chevy campaign. They’ve got a lot of other accounts.

              It’s clear that Don and Ted *together* brought in Chevy. Don, just as clearly, was instrumental in bringing in the large Sunkist account.

              You asked how many clients Don had slept with–Bobbie Barrett was never a client. In fact, Don used his relationship with her to get her husband to apologize to the Utz people.

              Don did not treat Faye well, but, again, it was a spur-of-the-moment switch from Faye to Megan. But it’s not like he hasn’t been a two-timer elsewhere. That was actually kind of an exception.

              I don’t particularly “like” Don–I don’t feel any need to take his side at all times–or side against him. I do find the layers of his character (and several other MM characters) interesting. I like that they stay in character, but what they do isn’t immediately predictable.

              I actually thought the whole Don/Ted thing was funny. Furthermore, I think Matt Weiner and co. thought it was funny. It was certainly timed and written that way.

            • inchoate

              He was involved with Faye, slept with Megan once, went straight home to Faye waiting for him in his apartment, continued with Faye for a while, then invited Megan to watch the kids in Disneyland, hooked up with her again, proposed to her and dumped Faye. It was not an exception at all.

            • Chris

              “Yes my opinions are just opinions. So.are.yours.” Yes, that’s the whole point of opinions. They are different than facts.

              ” I, however, grew up around and agency and have a professional writing background. So I have a reasonably informed opinion.” I’m the one taking things too much to heart?

            • Travelgrrl

              Don never flirted with Megan at the office before she was Mrs Draper. He usually keeps that side of his life separate, as you say. He would NEVER make goo goo eyes at the office with a married co-worker.

              In a way it’s a measure of how innocent Peggy and Ted are: they don’t even know how to have an affair right.

            • Glammie

              Yep, innocent is a good way to describe it. Which is why I think Don gave him almost a weirdly paternal lecture at the end.

            • Chris

              Because they were not having “an affair” per se. That’s why they were acting so innocent. Because there was nothing physical going on they weren’t being furtive. The lecture wasn’t paternal it was to let Ted knew how he felt about Peggy and to cheapen it by discussing it in that way and embarrass Ted.

            • Glammie

              We don’t actually know that. We just know that they hadn’t by the end of the last episode. They’re certainly getting into a relationship where they’re going to cross over if they don’t back off. He’s in love with her, she’s in love with him. She’ll sleep with him the moment he asks and Ted’s already showing that his judgment’s not all that where Peggy’s concerned.

              It’s not a platonic relationship–there’s a lot of touching, physical attraction–it’s an unconsummated one.

              And I actually don’t think Don “cheapened it”–he told Ted that he was in love with Peggy and that “we’ve all been there”. In other words, he recognized that Ted has real feelings for Peggy and that Peggy’s attractive (“beautiful eyes”)–and that he’s not the only one who feels this way–though he also made it clear that he, Don, had not slept with Peggy.

              But Ted is married, he doesn’t know how to be discreet and he showed poor judgment about a client because he wanted to make Peggy happy. Really, the message was Don’s old message to Sal: “Limit your exposure.”

              Too bad someone can’t have a heart-to-heart with Peggy. The only smart thing I’ve seen her do regarding men is to not fall in love with Don.

            • Chris

              We clearly read Don’s actions very differently. Nothing Don said or did was meant or presented kindly. If Don took Ted aside at the beginning I may have believed he had some decent intent no matter how small. Ted came to Don to ask why he sandbagged him and Don very sarcastically spoke of Ted and Peggy. Don spoke about Peggy like she was Ted’s piece on the side and the whole point of the commercial was not because Ted thought it was good but because it was like a payment to Peggy. It was very degrading and embarrassing. I think it’s interesting that so many people feel Peggy and Ted need to be “shamed” and “cut down to size” because they were giggling in the office but I’ve never seen this amount of indignation over any of the many adulterous affairs that Don, Roger, Joan etc have taken part in.

            • Glammie

              I read Don’s actions as ambiguous–I’ve pointed that out in several posts. He was right, but also not nice about it. It’s morally ambiguous like much of Mad Men. And, no, Don didn’t talk about Peggy as Ted’s piece on the side. You’re not in love with your piece on the side. And, again, Ted didn’t argue that the commercial would net St. Joseph’s tons of new sales–his excuse for being over-budget was how excited Peggy was over the commercial.

              Ted’s decision-making *was* impaired. Don didn’t need to humiliate him the way he did. On the other hand, it’s not clear Ted would have picked up a lesser clue. If he weren’t married with two young kids, he and Peggy would be a good match.

              And there’s been plenty of indignation in the office over the years, but just handled differently–giving Don Miss Blankenship as his secretary after he mistreated Alison. Don took it because as he said, “Joan knows what I need.”.

              Is all of this fair? No, of course not. But Don’s many, many sins don’t mean that Ted’s behavior should have gone unchecked.

            • Chris

              It’s a logical deduction that they aren’t yet engaged in a physical affair. If they were they would be far more guarded. They wouldn’t be seen at the movies- they would be sneaking off to a hotel. I can’t prove a negative, but based on what was shown and Ted’s shock at what Don said, he didn’t think he was doing anything wrong and it has been made clear he has a strong sense of right and wrong.

              Don cheapened it by basically telling Ted the only reason why he was promoting the commercial was because Peggy was his chick on the side. It cheapened Peggy, her work and the relationship with Ted.

            • Glammie

              If there’s anything the previous episode should have shown us is that people don’t always do what’s logical or prudent when it comes to affairs. Remember, Ted and Peggy went to the 5 p.m. show because as Megan said, they wouldn’t think they’d be seen there.

              And Don complimented the commercial. Ted told him that he couldn’t say no to Peggy because the commercial clearly meant so much to her (the Clio comment)–even though he, Ted, knew it would be over budget. If Ted had been able to argue that the commercial would open a new market and was worth the expense that would have been one thing, but he didn’t and couldn’t.

              There no indication *anywhere* in the episode that Ted okayed the over-budget for any reason other than his feelings for Peggy–i.e. that the expense would be worth it to the client. If he had another reason, he would have been able to make the argument to the client. He *was* given time to do so.

            • Lisa

              I don’t think that Ted would have touched Peggy’s torso as he did if he were restraining himself from sleeping with her.

            • Chris

              I guess I see it the opposite way, that that little touch was meaningful because that’s the only time he gets to touch her. Plus it was magnified because it was Don’s point of view -just like when he stopped on the stairs watching Peggy touch Ted’s arm in supposed sympathy when Frank Gleason died. I think we will be told definitively next week what happened or didn’t. I believe they didn’t but based on clothing clues and they way things have been going I think next week they will. Time will tell.

            • fursa_saida

              Seriously, where is Joan? Peggy looked out for her a few episodes ago; Joan should have pulled Peggy aside and told her to get herself together ages ago.

            • Chris

              Like when Don was fooling around with his married client Bobbie Barrett in his office during working hours? Or when he was pulling his wife in his office to fool around a bit during the day? Show me your bra or something?

          • Floretta

            They were past paying attention to what anyone said, including (especially?) Don re their relationship. They both seem to have conveniently forgotten Nan. Not necessarily a problem except every soul in the Time Life Building was aware of their feelings for each other and it was NOT good for business. I’m surprised Bert hadn’t said something to one or the other as he did with Joan re Roger,

            • Chris

              Is anyone taking Harry to task for his relationship with Scarlett? It was important enough for him to make a public scene with Joan and call her a whore. Bert was trying to help Joan out, not reprimand her. He knew Joan was in a losing situation with Roger. But on the other hand, if Joan had played her cards like Jane maybe Roger would have married her.

            • Glammie

              Harry’s interest in Scarlett is, actually, ambiguous and has never pissed off a client or affected the creative process in the office. I doubt, too, that it’s ever affected a media schedule.

            • Chris

              Since Harry doesn’t work in creative that is certainly fair to say he hasn’t affected “the creative process in the office.” He did however publicly scream at a partner and undermine her authority. But it was “just Joan” so it doesn’t count. (It’s not like it’s someone important like Don). We don’t know what Harry does for most of his professional life but we do know he uses his travelers checks (probably from the company) to try to pay prostitutes.

            • fnarf

              Harry does TV. TV is the most important thing in the world by now. Sunkist is one of the biggest buyers they’ve ever had.

            • Chris

              Yes I know Harry does TV which is why he has never affected the creative process. He does well in his job and makes a lot of money for SC but doesn’t seem to get a lot of acknowledgement He works mostly on his own without a “team” that we know of and is a peripheral player so we don’t see his business on a day to day situation. We have no idea if he has ever pissed off a client, or affected a media schedule. He has disrupted the entire office and partners meetings though. I don’t remember hearing Sunkist was “one of the biggest buyers they’ve ever had.” And yes, as I said before Harry secured Sunkist, not Don.

            • Glammie

              Yep, it was “just Joan” as opposed to a client. And, yes, she’s not Don, whose departure would be a big loss to the agency even now. He has that knack for knowing what sells and making people want things. (And Joan knows she’s not “important”, which is why she tried to get Avon. She gets Avon and she *will* matter.

              And Harry does media. It’s not as important as creative or bringing in and managing clients, but it matters and Harry is shown to be good at it and good with keeping connections going. He also seems to be good at making connections with potential clients in California. Why shouldn’t he have the secretary he wants? Scarlett lied about her time card, but it was spiteful and micromanaging of Joan to fire her over it. Other than that, Scarlett seems to do her job.

            • Chris

              No one ever said he couldn’t or shouldn’t have a secretary he wanted, the point brought up was disruption. What he had and hadn’t “affected” in the office (that we know of). We know he broke in on partners and disrupted them which should surely count as much as “affecting the creative department” -which is I guess irritating Ginsberg who certainly has shown he can disrupt things himself.

            • Glammie

              Joan essentially said he couldn’t when she fired Scarlett without talking to him first. Harry, as usual, blew up in the wrong way at the wrong point, but Joan also showed him disrespect by firing Scarlett on the spot over something fairly minor. Joan was being petty–and Joan figured out that she needed to find a different role.

          • Kate

            Nailed it. I really think this is a theme of the show: if you don’t learn/have the chance to learn how to deal with anything (i.e. if you fake your death to escape your origins) you end up having to lie to others and yourself all the time, that makes you sad/angry/crazy (“mad”??) and you never get to have any real human relationships, because everything becomes about protecting/serving your ego and lies. There’s no way out. Not because it’s unsolvable, but because you never got to mature to the point where you are able to see anything from another person’s perspective, except to serve your own ends. Cliffs notes: Don is fucked up, people are starting to figure it out, and he is therefore fucked.

          • fursa_saida

            I still can’t understand why, say, Joan didn’t pull Peggy aside and tell her to pull herself together.

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              this…I can’t either

        • testingwithfire

          >But, wow, I couldn’t believe that I felt sorry for Don after she left
          his office. He really looked like a sick and sad little baby.

          Rosemary’s Baby! I guess we’re at about the eighth circle of Hell where Don is concerned at this point.

          • Glammie

            So is Don damned to eternal hellfire or is he Dante and able to head off toward Purgatory next season?

      • Spicytomato1

        Completely agree with your assessment of the St. Joseph’s concept. I was surprised the client didn’t immediately reject it because the movie was so scary to so many people. I also found it a bit implausible that he’d give in so easily based on Don’s sob story about the deceased AD. I feel like that scene was designed solely to keep us on the edge of our seats — which it did, for me — but that it didn’t resolve itself as well as it was set up.

        • Suzanne S

          I kind of liked seeing Don back on his game when he interrupted all the pre-client meeting giddiness about the ad pitch with (earlier seasons version) Don saying “I’m more concerned (disturbed? I’m paraphrasing) about using Rosemary’s Baby to sell baby aspirin” ~that cracked me up.I rewound that part a few times, the “Bob speaking Spanish” a few times, and the Pete/Bob interaction probably 5 times. I could only bear to watch the suspenseful client meeting twice. (and I’m not one who rewinds scenes over and over like that). Just a fine show last night. Loved how ‘settled’ Bob now looked in his office now as well. I’m sure I’ll catch much more in reading everyone else’s comments as well as when I rewatch this episode. This show has such an amazing cast of actors, it’s unreal.

      • jennmarie19

        I’ve noticed in many interviews with Matthew Weiner that he seems to think the ads in the show are far more genius than they actually would be in the marketplace. For instance, in one interview–I think it was with Terry Gross–he was saying how the Bean Ballet for Heinz was such a great concept. The St. Joseph’s ad seemed really off-putting and tasteless. And speaking of taste–I can TOTALLY remember taking those baby aspirins as a young kid and how awful they tasted!

        • dashransome

          Hah – I loved the taste of baby aspirin! As a child I sat and ate a whole bottle, necessitating a trip to the MDs.

          • housefulofboys

            Haha! I loved baby aspirin too, my mom had to keep it hidden away!

            • Heather

              Me too! That orange-vanilla taste, like Creamsicles. One of my earliest memories is my mom sticking her finger down my throat to make me vomit after I’d eaten a bunch of them. I was probably around 4. (Such glorious early memories have I!)

            • housefulofboys

              I can imagine the discussions around the board room as they wrestled with the conundrum of taste vs safety: “But if we make it taste bad the kids won’t ask their parents to buy it.” “But if we make it taste good the kids are gonna DIE.” And they all shake their heads unable to reach a decision.

            • Alice Teeple

              Oh yeah, I had a book as a kid that was put out by the people behind Mr. Yuk, I think. There were a lot of pictures saying “it might look and taste like candy, but if you eat too much you will have to have your stomach pumped.” I still crave Dimetapp sometimes. I also remember that weird orangey vanilla baby aspirin taste. MMM, snacks!

          • Glammie

            How funny, I did the same thing and had to go to the emergency room. Oh Ipecac. My secret shame shared by a generation.

            • Redlanta

              Reye’s Syndrome people!

            • Anna G

              I know! That was the first thing I thought about during Peggy and Ted’s pitch. Does the little devil baby have a fever? Yes? Then no aspirin, people!

          • editrixie

            That’s why I always prize the orange Sweet-Tarts — they taste like baby aspirin!

          • MartyBellerMask

            For me it was Pepto. I could just chug the stuff.

        • Spicytomato1

          I remember that taste so clearly, too, but I loved it and occasionally invented or exaggerated ailments just to get my mom to give me some. Had they replicated the taste in candy form, I’d have been all over it. Maybe even now!

          • Alice Teeple

            The closest thing I can think of is Smarties, in the cellophane wrapper.

        • MK03

          My dad told me about the time his sister had a friend stay the night. She found the children’s aspirin and ate so much of it they had to take her to the ER to get her stomach pumped. The kicker is, the friend was about 12; WAY old enough to know better!

      • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

        I agree with you about Don’s motives. I thought he was trying to rescue Peggy from embarrassment. He was admittedly misguided in his attempts but I think her calling him a monster – for what he perceived to be a favor – was really hard for him to take. He’s falling apart and trying to redeem himself but he just doesn’t know how.

        • ccinnc

          But he stole credit from her for the idea and gave it to Dead Frank Gleason. Humiliating both of them and, as TLo said, punishing her at the same time. Interestingly, all 3 members of my family – husband and grown kids – thought Don was justified in what he did. I was horrified at how evil it was.

          • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

            That is really interesting. Huh. I only saw it as Don trying to help – trying to redeem himself – and being the only one in the room who came up with a way to assuage the client. Cause that client was pretty mad. It’s so interesting to see how we all bring our own thoughts to table and view some of these characters through our own lens. That’s why I love this site.

            • Chris

              The client was mad because Don deliberately made him mad. He sent over a big budget behind Ted’s back that went to the client’s boss as well. The client had no warning and caught hell for it. Ted wanted to approach the client personally (his long term client and relationship) and sell him on a bigger budget. Don maliciously undermined Ted so the client would be antagonistic when approached about money. Don not only got Peggy’s name taken off the ad, he humiliated Ted in front of the client making him seem sentimental and unprofessional as it was his “sentimentality” over Gleason that supposedly had Ted backing the ad. Not that it was great innovative work. Just invoking Gleason’s name alone was a kind of blow to Ted who is still missing and grieving for him. The whole thing was a planned assault by Don who wanted to smash Ted and Peggy as well as any chance for her to get a Clio award.

            • Angela_the_Librarian

              What Don did was dickish, but Ted should have sent a budget to the company before putting out money to make an ad (or a mock up of the ad?). When Joan told him that Ted hadn’t sent a budget it sounded like something that even Don had never done before (and I’m sure he’s stretched quite far to sell an idea). Don wouldn’t have had an “in” if Ted had done a thorough job with his work, but he was distracted by Peggy. If they had made the commercial and then told the company about the budget after the fact they may have very well lost the company’s contract and would have been out 10K. I’m not saying that Don’s motivations were wonderful in this situation or that he acted in the best manner, but it could have ended a lot more poorly than Peggy potentially not getting a Clio (and I’m still not convinced that the commercial concept is that great).

            • housefulofboys

              Yeah, I really don’t understand all the excuses for Ted’s errors in judgement here. You just don’t spend (lots of!!) company money without talking to the client, you don’t spend company money on an ad campaign that the client hasn’t signed off on. I work in the professional service industry myself and I can’t imagine doing this. Ted wasn’t acting professionally; additionally, he failed to see the problems inherent in using Rosemary’s Baby for a baby aspirin commercial. Think about what Alka-Selzer was a cure for – a hangover, perfectly fine for cutting edge ideas. Baby aspirin??? Not so much.

            • formerlyAnon

              Exactly right about the (lack of) suitability of the ad for the product. Rosemary’s Baby was not considered a “for general audiences” movie. However fascinatingly creepy/campy it reads today, it was a horror movie with a slightly controversial premise.

            • Travelgrrl

              He was thinking only of Peggy, and seeing her shine.

              Yish.

            • Chris

              Ted definitely messed up here, that’s not in question. Whether it would be a hit commercial is open to interpretation. What happened was Don found a weakness and used it to hurt Ted, Peggy and the relationship with the client. Don has thrown away big clients (Jaguar) and wasted tons of money on personal vendetta’s (a whole studio sound stage for a day or two back when the agency was struggling just to trick Ted over Honda), that trip to CA that Roger couldn’t even say was over or under 5K etc etc. the letter about cigarettes that effectively blackballed SCDP from a lot of business etc. They have spent 5k just for work to court a new client. That isn’t make or break money for SC&P. It’s not smart business and I’m not trying to say it is but we don’t know what would have worked out if Don didn’t work his sabotage.

            • Glammie

              Jaguar was flashy, but not a huge client because they were placing their own media–which more than halfs the agency’s revenues from a client. The cigarette letter was a way to get SCDP good PR when they’d just been fired by their biggest client. It wasn’t done without approval from the other partners, same with Honda.

              What you don’t do in an agency is monkey with the client. Don didn’t hurt the relationship with the client–Ted did. I think Weiner’s doing an interesting twist here–Ted is the more honorable, sincere person–but being a better person doesn’t make you the better businessman. Don does have a flair for a certain kind of risk. If Ted could have sold the client on the ad’s merits, Don wouldn’t have been able to say “boo” in that meaning, let along hang Ted out to draw then reel him back him.

            • fnarf

              The Honda thing was a calculated risk to gain a major client. It didn’t work out, but it was worth a shot. What Ted did with St. Joseph was unconscionable — screw over a smaller client that just doesn’t have the potential for that kind of big sale. They’re not going in for $50k because they’re chicken; they’re not doing it because it doesn’t make sense for them.

              The point isn’t that Ted is bad at his job; he isn’t. The point is that he has made a major slipup, and the reason WHY he made that slipup. This was driven home in at least six different scenes. You don’t want to see it, though.

            • Floretta

              The budget WAS bigger than agreed upon, by $35,000 and either the client or the agency is on the hook for the additional $35K ($233K today) it was NOT a small chunk of change and the client had to be forewarned. My only caveat would be having accounts tell them (Roger or Cutler or whoever had the account) rather than Creative – but Creative was the reason it was so high. BTW the client liked sentimentality – it’s what moved him to authorize an additional $10K for the ad. And “Rosemary’s Baby Aspirin” hadn’t the proverbial snowball’s chance of winning a Clio in any event, except in Peggy’s mind. BTW my “best” ad of 1968 was a PSA featuring William Talman (Hamilton Burger of The Perry Mason Show) in an anti-smoking ad shot shortly before his death. See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmjRkpge-jk

            • Glammie

              No, sending the budget over was the warning. Ted was already casting and putting the agency in for $10K without client approval. Getting the news after the fact would have really put the client over the edge.

              And Don didn’t have to make Ted look foolish and sentimental–Ted did that all on his own. Don is no saint and he did humiliate Ted, but Ted and Peggy were also behaving unprofessionally in a way that undermined the agency.

              I think Don was both alpha-dogging Ted AND, simultaneously, trying to keep him from making a serious mistake. Ted *is* married and, from what we can see, not someone who’s been cheating casually. Ted and Peggy are cute together, but in the real world having an affair with your boss who has a wife and two young kids is *not* a good idea.

              Remember, Ted was already floundering with his explanation of the doubled budget before Don did his number on him. Ted knew the client was coming in and, thus, had time to prepare something, but hadn’t.

          • Floretta

            She should be grateful he put it off on a dead man who can’t be held responsible for it – it’s a stinker of an ad and I wonder what the St Joseph’s people even saw in it. Unlike the “plop plop fizz fizz” Alka Sletzer ad that ran for a decade and could be used again today, Rosemary’s Baby Aspirin would have been outdated after a couple of months, if it ever aired.

            • fursa_saida

              No. She wants to be recognized for her work, quality or not. Having men take credit, or give credit to other men, for a woman’s work is a time-honored shitty way of screwing women over, and Peggy has every right to be pissed off by the action, even if this ad wasn’t going to get her a Clio. That it was done so abruptly in front of a client gave her no option to fight it. It’s exactly what Pete was trying to do to Joan over Avon.

              I’m not defending the ad concept itself, just Peggy’s right to be upset over having her work erased.

          • http://www.lindamerrill.com/ Linda Merrill

            I didn’t so much think of it as stealing from Peggy, but just deflecting
            what he believed to be the truth, which was that it wasn’t a really
            great concept but Ted is too besotted with Peggy to see that, so a
            mediocre, and very expensive, idea was being pushed simply because of
            love, or infatuation. Don did what he’s good at: he took the nugget of
            truth – Ted’s emotional support of a mediocre idea – but changed who Ted
            was supporting to the dead guy – his mentor whom he also would
            creditably feel emotional about. It was also a way for Don to play with
            Ted and Peggy’s emotions too. Don is and always has been a Dick.

          • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

            It was a good thing to bring it to Ted and Peggy’s attention how their relationship looks to everyone else and how inappropriate it is for them, but it was a totally wrong, incredibly self-serving way to do it. Classic Don.

            • ccinnc

              I could almost admire how perfectly he executed it. Almost.

            • Glammie

              Yep, which is what made it so great. Now that I think of it–that kind of thing is also what Pete’s speech was about. Pete’s smart and slimey, but he just isn’t capable of Don’s perversity–of being so wrong and so right all at once.

            • fnarf

              This is pretty close to the way I see it. Ted and Peggy need to be brought back to earth. Don had good reason to step in, but, being Don, he served his own control agenda doing it.

          • Glammie

            Oh, I thought it was fairly low down on the Don-Evil scale. He’s done much worse. I had this more in the really twisted category in that it was both good and bad simultaneously. Which I sort of loved.

            I actually thought the nastier thing was the Sunkist switch–but when he decided that Ted was a cheater, he went for it.

            • Chris

              I love how you are ascribing morals to Don now. The Sunkist switch is because Ted is a “cheater”- because Don doesn’t approve of cheating? It’s because Ted dared to mess with Don’s “property” Peggy- and Don went on the warpath. Don couldn’t have cared less if Ted was at the movies in flagrante delicto with Lady Bird Johnson. Don has never had any moral compass when it comes to cheating. Remember him spending the weekend with married Roger and the twins before the heart attack? Or getting Lane a prostitute?

            • Travelgrrl

              You seem so worked up about Don. How can you enjoy the show? (No snark, I mean it.)

              I think some people had that problem with Tony Soprano in later seasons.

            • Chris

              I’m not worked up, I don’t address things to specific people’s names etc like some people have done. I just don’t understand how people are seeing the same information presented on my screen and thinking Don is punishing Ted because he doesn’t approve of cheating? I’m a little boggled by it so I guess some sarcasm is coming across even though I don’t mean it to.

              I am stumped what information has ever been shown that points to the idea that Don disapproves of cheaters? Or that his problem with Ted is because he is a cheater and not because Don resents his relationship with Peggy.

              I also don’t understand how people have to try and spin Don’s motivations to make them better or somehow admirable. Don is being presented as getting worse in pretty much every way but it seems people don’t like those facts. I don’t need Don to be the “hero” but I get the sense a lot of others do.

            • Travelgrrl

              I admire your long and thoughtful posts, but so many are basically “Don is a dick”. I think if you don’t accept that and also enjoy his vulnerability, it would be hard to enjoy the show since he plays such a pivotal role.

            • Chris

              I watch many shows where the main characters are not always good people. I think it’s a very brave choice for MW to have Don sink so low. I can’t decide if he is going to have him earn some redemption or go the Michael Corleone route for him. Either way I enjoy the show. for the varied and interesting people and lives explored. I don’t have to love Don every episode to enjoy it. I did pity him and do to a point but there is a time when the excuses of a bad childhood don’t wash anymore if people don’t do anything to change.

              I also don’t have to (or need to) ascribe honorable motivations to Don that aren’t factually supported on the show or agree with others who do. If they interpret things that way it’s certainly their right and their choice.

            • Chris

              I’m not worked up- I’m genuinely baffled. I don’t understand how, based on the information shown, anyone thinks Don disapproves of cheating and that his reason for going after Ted was because he is a “cheater.”

              When has he ever shown disapproval for a cheater?

              Don only cared because Ted was with Peggy.

              Sometimes I feel like I am watching a different show from other people.

            • Alice Teeple

              RIP TONY :(

            • Travelgrrl

              YES, mourning that character, and the actor.

            • Glammie

              Don has moments of ethical behavior–i.e. Joan and Jaguar. His reversing on Sunkist though wasn’t about being moral–it was more a if you don’t play the rules, I won’t either. More of a gotcha–which is why I described it as a nastier twist than the aspirin meeting. Don basically conceded Sunkist because he thought Ted was a moral person–far more so than himself. When Ted showed himself to be fallible, well,then, to Don he fell off his pedestal, which means no holds barred.

              And remember his falling-out with Roger when Roger dumped his wife? There’s a code here–you get your flings, but you don’t wreck your marriage over them and you don’t let it get in the way of business. In other words, do not get caught, do not do things that let you get caught.

              You may not understand this point-of-view, but it’s a pretty accurate representation of what went on in that time and place. Mad Men is very much an examination and critique of it.

            • Chris

              Because I don’t share your interpretation of it certainly doesn’t mean I don’t “understand this point of view.” It means I don’t think you have any facts presented in the show that support your interpretation.

              If you need to feel Don is a better person than MW is choosing to present him in this instance that’s perfectly fine- that’s your opinion. My opinion differs.

              The whole point of the scene was Peggy with Ted was what made Don angry.

              As TLo pointed out if it were Joan, Don probably wouldn’t have cared at all.

              Regarding Roger’s marriage- that is what opened SC up to be bought by PPL and caused a huge disaster for everyone. It wasn’t a moral issue it was the sale of the entire agency to a huge corporate machine.

            • Glammie

              Well, you dismiss evidence that doesn’t agree with your viewpoint (i.e. the various scenes which showed an array of people reacting to Ted/Peggy wasn’t “everybody” to you, though it was clearly structured to give that impression.) Or that the rift with Roger begins before the company sale, but after Mona confronts Don about Roger leaving her.

              And you don’t seem to understand my POV–or really anyone who doesn’t see Don as Michael Corleone in Godfather II (your comparison). You’ve said you’re “genuinely baffled” by it. But when people give their take, you respond pretty dismissively. (“That’s just your opinion.”)

              It’s not that I think Don is a good guy, it’s that I think he’s a complex one. And you don’t seem to get that–I’ve explained it more than once–and your response is to reduce it to a simplistic I’m defending Don or I think he’s better than Matthew Weiner intended.

              Your take reads as very black-and-white to me. You have your good guys (Ted, Peggy) and your bad guy (Don). I see a lot more grey.

            • Chris

              We disagree on what the “array” is- I find it much more limited than you do. I listed the people and why I found it limited. You disagree- that’s your right.

              You think it was “clearly” structured to give that impression- again your opinion. Mine differs.

              I could go on and on. Saying an opinion is an opinion is not dismissive, however saying things like “You may not understand this point-of-view” among many other comments implying you have a much more sophisticated understanding of Don’s motivations even though nothing in the scene calls back to what you are referencing is.

              You believe Don’s behavior to Ted is somehow tied to a conversation with Mona several seasons ago where she blamed him directly for Roger’s behavior. Again it’s your opinion. I didn’t see anything in Don’s behavior that called back to this or his attitude on adultery when speaking with Ted. That’s my opinion.

              No one is arguing Don isn’t complex but I don’t agree with your interpretation of his motivations. You think Don is making a moral judgement on Ted, I think he got mad. The same way he got mad and punished Roger publicly for hitting on Betty in their kitchen (with the oysters and the elevator). It’s the exact same M.O. then as now, manipulate a situation behind the scenes to embarrass your secret enemy who you are pretending to be chummy with because they messed with your “girl.”

              We clearly are not going to agree on this matter so there is no sense in getting mad and personal over fictional characters on a TV show.

            • Glammie

              No, I said Don’s rift with Roger dates back to Mona coming into his office and predates the sale of SCDP. You wanted evidence for my viewpoint, I gave it to you. Remember, you’ve accused me a couple of times now of not having the evidence to support my opinion.

              Never said Don made a “moral” judgment–I said he figured that once Ted showed up with Peggy at the movie and didn’t seem above the fray then all was fair game. Don doesn’t, in the office, get simply mad. He gets devious.

              I don’t think Don v. Ted is simply about Peggy, by the way. To some extent, Peggy’s a bit of a pawn–there’s a jousting for alpha-male status that’s been going on. They’ll have a rapprochement, then one will score a point and then the other.

              And, yes they’re fictional characters, so I prefer civil, polite disagreement.

            • Denise Alden

              I thought Don conceded Sunkist because he made a deal with Ted so he could look like a hero to Sylvia and appease his guilt about Arnold. Don’s word is worthless: I hope Ted understands that now.

            • Denise Alden

              Chris, I think we are of one mind. I agree with nearly every word of your posts!

            • ccinnc

              And what did Don say to Ted about Peggy, something like, “This happens all the time … (pause) … but not with Peggy.” Was he calling her ugly/not-sexy, questioning Ted’s taste in women?

            • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

              I think he meant that Peggy isn’t the affair type. Obviously she has had one before.

            • Glammie

              I don’t think so. He was making it clear “that we’ve all been there.”–Fallen in love, made mistakes–but that he he hadn’t slept with Peggy. Since he treats Ted’s being in love with Peggy as legitimate–i.e. refers to her “beautiful eyes”–I don’t think it was a dig at Peggy. It was more this weird reassurance that he hadn’t slept with Peggy because the “We’ve all been there,” could be read that way.

              Don’s always had this slightly paternal streak about Peggy–put off her early sexual overture, visited her in the hospital. Now that he’s betrayed his own daughter, I think he convinced himself that his interference with Ted and Peggy was somehow protecting Peggy–which is why Peggy berating him as a monster at the end put him in fetal position no. 2 of the episode.

            • ccinnc

              I guess I’m so disillusioned with Don at this point, I saw his “beautiful eyes” comment as a sneer at Ted, not a compliment to Peggy. And after Don’s “but not with Peggy” line, Ted jumped to her defense, “Don’t say things like that about Peggy,” or something like that. Maybe I need to watch it a third time. :)

            • Glammie

              I don’t remember what Ted’s response was–but I took Don’s rant as much a reflection of Don’s past as anything. Remember, Don’s philandering has just destroyed his relationship with his daughter, so Don’s feeling guilty. Since he’s not introspective, he projects like crazy on other people.

              In some ways, he’s giving Ted the lecture he’s giving himself.

      • Travelgrrl

        Also, with the “Proctor & Gamble are Satanists” rumors that have been around for decades, would Johnson’s Baby Aspirin want to ally themselves with that vibe?

        • Glammie

          The Satanist stuff didn’t happen until the 1980s, so St. Joseph’s has a while to go.

          • Travelgrrl

            I can remember hearing about it as a schoolchild circa 1970 or so.

      • ldancer

        I watched “Rosemary’s Baby” on tv with my mom when I was a teenager, decades after its original release, and thought that part they reference, where the coven all advance towards the bassinet, was hilarious. But I can totally see how the movie was disturbing at the time.

        I also will still joke that something has “a chalky undertaste” sometimes. I’m just not the right audience for that movie, I guess!

      • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

        My issue with Don is his motives/his past behavior

    • LindaLu Allen

      Did you catch the Weiner version of “The B Book” when Pete was on the phone with Duck discussing Bob Benson? Everything started with a B!

    • Scimommy

      Woohoo, an early recap! Yes, I did yell out “OMG, they killed Kenny!” Of course, I also did that the last time the Chevy execs tried to do him in by covering his eyes while he was driving. I hope the writers are not going to keep doing this until they *actually* kill him.

      Ted needs to take Don flying again. That was the only time he had any upper hand. Also, I wonder which would be more painful to Don: if Ted and Peggy consummated the affair, or if they didn’t and Ted actually proved to be the “good man” that Peggy insists that he is.

      • ccinnc

        But “Kenny” never actually dies in SP. :)

        • Scimommy

          Well, fingers crossed they don’t kill him here either.

    • Hermione

      You guys are off-base in commenting that Sally was “claiming” that Rolo tried to force himself on her. There wasn’t anything manipulative or scheming about her reaction to Rolo. He did try to force himself on her and it was good to see her be strong and reject him and satisfying to see her get Glenn to stand up for her

      • http://www.what-the-frock.com Dana WhatTheFrock

        Agreed 100%.

      • Alice Teeple

        I agree, mostly. Rolo was forcing himself on her, but Sally definitely got a rise out of seeing someone stand up for her and manipulated the situation. It was nice to see Glen punch the kid out, though!

        • MartyBellerMask

          Sometimes I think we share a brain.

        • testingwithfire

          Glen is more committed to Sally than Don ever has been.

          I’m getting a little sick of the “mean girls” bit with all of Sally’s friends and female peers, though. Does any female character except Joan have a real female friend any more? I felt that whole thing at Miss Porters with “she keeps talking” was pretty anachronistic. 21st century, maybe, but not back then. I’d love to hear from some folks who went to finishing schools/private schools (particularly girls’ schools) on this subject.

          • Travelgrrl

            Boarding schools are where hazing was born. Pie beds!

          • EveEve

            Yes, there were mean girls, of course there were mean girls. And they could be very mean. I was a four year girl at a boarding school in Connecticut (a rival of Miss Porter’s – but please don’t call it a finishing school – they were, and are, academically quite rigorous!) I don’t recall any outright hazing. Lots of social pressure and pecking order stuff – like exclusive clubs based on social status of one’s family. So maybe it’s a matter of definition. The part that didn’t ring true to me was that the kind of girls depicted in this episode would have been well known by the house mother / faculty for what they were, and would not have been the kind to be put in charge of a prospective new student. Those two girls probably got expelled long before graduation.

        • Chris

          Glenn and Sally and Ted and Peggy are the only male female relationships on the show where the people seem to actually like and care for each other. I am liking that MW made Glenn into a hero.

          • Alice Teeple

            Me too. Glen was a great big bro to Sally when she really needed someone to stick up for her.

            I think Ted and Peggy seem super annoying in contrast to everyone else at SC&P because they actually ARE having fun, in the sense that Creative in other, more functional agencies did. It’s such a change to see Peggy being silly, and seeing someone feed off and encourage her creativity. (To be fair, I’d say Stan and Peggy also have a very healthy friendship, although they have to stop with the sexual mind games.) We also see that side of Ted we haven’t seen since Season 4: the goofy joker. So obviously she brings out something fun in him, too. After years of her being either completely humorless or dry, it’s nice to see Peggy enjoying herself.

            According to Jane Maas’s book, working Creative at Ogilvy was actually a good time – crazy decor, interesting people, a lot of back-and-forth. The fact that Peggy and Ted’s affection for each other is so public seems to really rankle everyone else who’s been furtive about their illicit relationships. I think the constant secrets and lies have made everyone else toxic. Seeing two people actually functioning (even though they’re obnoxious) is jarring to the rest of the office. Joan/Roger, Joan/Paul, Don/Everyone Except Peggy… Maybe Ted and Peggy are being inappropriate, but at least they’re honest about where they’re at personally, and have built a rapport on mutual respect. It’s going to be interesting to see how their personal stuff plays out. That respect could either make them stronger as a team, or make them bitter rivals – it’s hard to say at this point.

            • Angela_the_Librarian

              Peggy and Ted are functioning I suppose, but I think their relationship may also be clouding their professional judgment. They may have lost the account if they went ahead and filmed the commercial over budget (and then the agency would have footed the 10k bill). Their flirtation appears innocent on the surface, but Peggy could very well end up losing everything she has worked so hard to attain. Not to mention that others around her (tainted by jealousy) may perceive that Peggy’s success with the agency is now tied to sleeping with Ted (even if she’s actually not sleeping with him).

            • Alice Teeple

              They all thought Peggy was sleeping with Don for years (including Joan) and that didn’t stop her from barreling through like a freight train. I think the difference is, in that case it was assumed but not open – in this one, it’s very open and they have both pissed off people with power.

              I definitely don’t think their flirtation is innocent; it’s playing with fire. They are opening themselves both up to sabotage from jealousy. Ted is also at risk of losing his marriage through public humiliation, as well – and Peggy also has Don knowing her pregnancy secret over her head. Whether anyone would do anything with that information is anyone’s guess.

              At my first job, I worked in an environment where my married boss heavily flirted with and eventually slept with one of my married co-workers, and it came to light after a neighbor ratted to his wife. It wasn’t a surprise to anyone who worked with them both for months, but it was still a terrible mess when it happened. I could definitely see something like that happening to Peggy and Ted in this environment – perhaps Moira being the catalyst, even. It would be a much more devastating fallout for Peggy. Or maybe those two crackpots will jump ship and start their own agency with Pete, and be competitors with SC&P. Who knows?

            • jdens

              I don’t get the impression that others thought Peggy was sleeping with Don. Especially not Joan.

            • Alice Teeple

              They totally thought Peggy slept her way to a better job; Peggy mentioned it to Don in “The Suitcase,” that it had been a longstanding joke. Joan insinuated that it happened as late as a couple of episodes ago, when Peggy and Joan got into the argument over Avon, and Peggy snarled “I never slept with him.” Stan correctly guessed during “Waldorf Stories” that it had never actually happened.

            • Chris

              I think Peggy and Ted are playing with fire too. The worst case scenario (in my mind anyway) is if Ted’s marriage falls apart over rumors and he thinks “the heck with it I might as well do the crime if I am going to have the reputation” and Peggy goes along with it. It would be such a sad way for their relationship to go. Better that Ted should stay with his wife or decide to end it based on the two of them without Peggy involved. I really would hate to see Peggy be the other woman like she was with Pete.

            • mhleta

              Yeah, Ted and Peggy’s flirtation comprises the sort of willful self-deception that fits the “If you hang around a barber shop long enough, you’re bound to get a haircut” model.

            • Alice Teeple

              I love that phrase!!

            • fnarf

              This. This is why you don’t do that, especially in a situation where the power is so unequal. Does it suck that Peggy is still treated the way she is? Yes. But it is 1968. If anything happens, it’s Peggy who’s going to take the bullet, not Ted.

            • formerlyAnon

              YES.

            • fursa_saida

              As late as the early 80s, my parents specifically requested transfers to different teams within their company so that my dad wouldn’t be my mom’s boss, which would have left them open to all kinds of unpleasantness. (Above and beyond the ridiculous misogyny my mom was dealing with on a daily basis, that is.)

            • fursa_saida

              It would piss me off too if I was sitting in a creative meeting and we couldn’t get anything done because the lovebirds were too busy giggling.

          • mhleta

            Betty saw that compassion in Glenn way back when, too, when she inappropriately confessed to him how vey sad she was when he was only a child.

        • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

          The way she smiled a little over Glen’s reaction was pure Betty.

          • Chris

            Yes- “Can you believe I’ve had three children?”

        • fursa_saida

          I don’t think she manipulated anything. She said no, wasn’t listened to, physically removed herself, was pressured, and sought help from someone she thought would help her. Rollo said she was a teasing bitch, she said it was bullshit, and then Glenn got physical.

          She definitely felt a kind of power and pleasure at watching the fight go down on her account, I’m not disputing that. And afterward, when she agreed she liked trouble, she was certainly spinning what had happened so as to appear cool to this girl, who also clearly likes being “bad.” But I can’t see how she “manipulated” anything leading up to the fight.

      • Chris

        Exactly, she wasn’t wrong about Rolo but she probably got way too much enjoyment out of seeing him get pummeled. But to be fair- I did too.

      • Katerina

        That’s exactly what I came to the comments to say. She obviously didn’t want to fool around with Rolo, and he was being pushy. He wasn’t just some “goofy stoner friend,” and Sally wasn’t JUST troublemaking

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          We’re not arguing that he wasn’t being pushy. But Sally was exaggerating when she said he forced himself on her. She smiled while Glen beat him and the other girl noted how she likes to start trouble. It’s our interpretation that this was all meant to show that Sally was punishing someone for Don’s sins like Don himself was. Add the drinking and the smoking, and you have a pretty perfectly tied up theme of Sally becoming just like Don, even as she says with some irony “My father never gave me anything.”

          • Guest

            She’s a perfect mix-up of Don and Betty.

          • jennmarie19

            ^ Bingo ^

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

            Yeah, I do see this. I think Sally was justified in getting upset about Rollo (who really was a creepy rapey asshole) but she clearly enjoyed manipulating Glen as well. Maybe she’s just happy to have one guy in her life who does come to her rescue, the way her father clearly can’t or won’t.

            • Darren Nesbitt

              “Rapey asshole”. . . I’m not seeing this whole rape thing. or is rape confirmed at the “Why don’t you want to kiss, I thought that’s what we came to do” statement?

            • EricaVee

              He definitely wanted to do more than kiss and was acting like an entitled jerk. “Are you frigid?” ew.

            • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

              If a guy doesn’t take a no for an answer and keeps badgering a girl into giving in, he’s a creepy rapey asshole in my book.

            • Topaz

              It’s not even the badgering, it’s the implication that she had an obligation to do something with him because they agreed to come all the way over at her invitation and then insulting her by calling her frigid. I think she knew when she said “he tried to force me” she was implying physical coercion though. And she didn’t need to say it, since Glen was already pretty mad at that point. She was justified in being upset about this Rolo guy’s behaviour, but she was also stirring the pot. Though I’d also note that I doubt most girls at this time had the vocabulary to articulate what was going on: “he put undue pressure on me and tried to make me feel obliged to do something I didn’t want to do”? She was never going to say that. I don’t think most girls now would even be able to articulate that.

              Scenes like this will always make me a bit uncomfortable because I don’t like anything that reinforces the “cry rape” stereotype, so I found it pretty hard to watch. Are young girls really that manipulative? I went to a girl’s school and girls did all kinds of crap, like any teenagers, but I never saw any girl do anything like that. But I don’t have the jump on all adolescent behaviour. I feel very ambivalent about it.

            • Darren Nesbitt

              ^^ I agree.

            • Glammie

              I don’t think most young girls are that manipulative, but Sally’s got Don and Betty as role models, so she’s a special case.

            • editrixie

              It feels/felt like another one of those male gaze/patriarchal worldview situations to me, which have shown up time and again, especially this season. I am really dismayed by how a show that can have such an acute eye for the horrors of being a woman back in those days can also create such really bad narratives when it comes to these situations.

            • much2learn

              There are definitely people who are able and willing to manipulate during adolescents in this case, but I believe that a situation such as a young girl ending up in a potentially sexual experience, then needing to extricate herself from it is much more complicated than playing games. It is an intimidating experience (physically vs male, previous experience of partner, emotionally, developing a reputation, pregnancy etc), with a lot of emotion, and many young girls feel ready before they are ready. There is an awareness during the whole situation that is being processed, and I believe that it is the actions taken as a result of the cognitive awareness that lead a young girl to go forth, or stop. That would be where the misconstrued ‘playing games’. There is a lot of fear in ‘backing out’. I saw none of that in Sally at all. She was never interested.

            • Darren Nesbitt

              hmm I guess the Y added to rape makes what your saying ok as an adjetive but I still think that is a strong word for this situation. but don’t get me wrong of course he AND Glen planned to come get more. but he is still an asshole.

            • Topaz

              He came to her rescue with absolutely no hard feelings too. Glen’s all grown up.

            • nosniveling

              I think one of Sally’s reasons for raising the alarm on Rollo was to get Glen out of the bedroom with the other firs. She wants him for herself- maybe not physically, but she doesn’t like seeing him with other girls either.

            • Joy

              THIS

          • RaptorSafari

            The poison here is that women are never allowed to nip a situation like this in the bud. She’s “exaggerating” because she stopped what she clearly saw coming instead of letting it happen? Should women just submit to sexual assault so men will believe the danger they sense is real? Would Glen have come out if she’d just said “he’s making me uncomfortable” or “he’s being pushy?” No. She’d be told she was overreacting and be left back with creepy pushy Rolo until something worse happened.

            • Topaz

              I don’t think anyone’s saying she shouldn’t have stopped what was happening – but by the time she said he tried to force her Glen was already mad at Rolo for trying anything at all, so she didn’t need to force Glen to action by saying anything else.

              I don’t think the issue here is the reading of the scene. My concerns are with the creative decisions in constructing the scene in the first place, and whether they were based on an unfair assumption about teenage girls’ tendency to manipulate situations by “crying rape”. And even if Sally, as an individual, may have behaved that way in that specific situation, even if that was consistent with her characterisation, the fact that this behaviour is such a widespread stereotype that people are happy to apply to all girls and women makes me wish Weiner had chosen to portray Sally’s anger against her father in a different way. As a woman I watched the scene and my heart sank because I’ve seen fictional scenes like this about teenage girls a hundred times before. They wear you down.

            • JanieS

              I really agree. Sally was a little strong in her wording, but her actions were pretty much the exact right thing to do in that situation – put space between her and the skeeze and take steps to not be alone in a room with him any more. But the way it was portrayed turned it into YET ANOTHER example of the ‘manipulative hussy’ trope. And plenty of folks (not here, elsewhere on the internets) are going on about how horrible Sally is for “lying”.

            • Darren Nesbitt

              I’m definitely not standing up for the asshole either but he “forced” her just as much as a sales person asks for your phone/email three times before you check out. I don’t see Sally being restricted by any of his verbal or physical advances.

              She brushed off advance #1 and #2 with light conversation and after that (still an asshole) was confused as to why she wasn’t on the same page as him. Yes she was right in calling Glen but what she told Glen happened is not right. she “cried force”.

            • Travelgrrl

              Calling someone frigid because they do not immediately make out with a stranger is out of bounds, then or now.

            • JanieS

              She was alone in a room with a pushy guy who was significantly older and larger than her. She was drunk. He deserved every punch Glen gave him.

            • Qitkat

              I like the way you have stated this issue in your second paragraph.
              I also think part of what is going on in these discussions is that many people are viewing this through the lens of 2013. Some of you may take objection with what I’m going to say, but in 1968, if a male tried to force himself on a female, especially in the manner which Rolo tried to take advantage of Sally, crying rape was not necessarily an automatic response as it would be now. Educating people about rape has come a very, very long way since then. There is a reason that the sixties were called *swingin*. Although there has always been sex between unmarried people of all ages, it was in the sixties that the stigma went away. Young teenagers such as Rolo looked at the culture around them and thought they were entitled to their portion of free love too. And please don’t take that as a defense of him by me, not in the least.

            • formerlyAnon

              Yes in the sense that mixed messages were so much more mixed. Most people of even teen years in 1968 had been raised by persons with a very pre- female-controlled birth control way of thinking – the virgin/whore dichotomy was stronger, and unconscious/unacknowledged sexism was strong in a way that is hard to imagine by someone born after, say, 1980-something. At the same time, the media and many individuals WERE enthusiastically seizing on the new sexual freedom that reliable, female-controlled birth control seemed to make consequence-free. The education that we have now that teaches men and women to be more thoughtfully responsible about how to exercise that freedom wasn’t available.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              We are analyzing a specific character in a specific scene in a specific story in which the creators have gone out of their way to make a certain point about her (namely, that she is a lot like her father in some ways). We are not offering our thoughts on what “women” are “allowed” to do in a situation like this. That interpretation is entirely on you.

              Just a note here to add that we welcome reasoned disagreement here but we are sick and tired of people telling us week in and week out how disgusted or disappointed they are in us because we did not interpret a TV show exactly the way they wanted us to interpret it. It’s exhausting and it’s an enormous pain in the ass. We have no obligation to host such comments so please reconsider how you’re going to express your disagreement here.

            • Kate

              I think it was also to make the point that part of Don’s legacy will be that Sally is going to be looking out for men who will protect her. And, she’s got one.

              Don almost seems to be slipping away. Everyone who used to depend on him (or, in Sally and Betty’s case, who should have been able to depend on him) is turning out to be fine without him.

            • RaptorSafari

              That’s the most “man confronted with feminism” response you could have possibly given. I want you to have non-horrifying opinions about consent all the time, not just in some designated caring-about-female-agency zone to be determined by you and you alone.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I have no fucking clue what you’re going on about.

            • fursa_saida

              The amazing thing about rape culture is that we’re meant to give every guy a chance because he’s probably a nice guy! and keep our heads down because he didn’t really mean anything by it/hadn’t taken it that far! but the second something happens to us, we were supposed to have known that the guy in question was a rapist and removed ourselves from the situation “before it got to that point.” It’s got you coming and going.

              ETA: seeing TLo’s comment below, I want to make a disclaimer that this comment is about the general issue of the way a lot of people are reacting to the scene and the issues it raises, not particularly about being angry at the recap.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              From the season seven press kit for Mad Men (http://www.amctv.com/shows/mad…, the entry on Sally:

              “She lost what was left of faith in her father when she caught him in the arms of his mistress. She refused to visit him, enrolling in boarding school, where she first took her anger out on an aggressive teenage boy, then was ultimately suspended for drinking alcohol on campus.”

              .

          • Hermione

            Your unqualified “Sally was exaggerating when she said he forced himself on her” is just not accurate. He did physically force himself–his touch, his physicality–on her and he repeated it after she rejected his attempts. He clearly intended to keep trying to get her to let him touch her, and more. She was not exaggerating. IMO, this is a sexist view. Furthermore, when Glenn and the other girl disappeared into the bedroom, Sally would have been sensible to conclude that the boys and the other girl contemplated a party that involved some kind of closed-door-worthy sexual activity. There’s no indication that she understood this at any earlier moment and no indication that she had an interest in it. She didn’t manipulate him into assaulting her; she didn’t entrap him. And this issue is different from the issue of whether she enjoyed the fact that Rolo got in trouble. She got out of a dangerous situation and she was happy to see the jerk get some comeuppance. Maybe others would be simply relieved, but she was also pleased to see him get punished. How does that negate the very real fact of his sexual assault? This is carrying the “Sally is punishing her Dad” metaphor too far.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              We said nothing about her manipulating him into assaulting her or entrapping him.

            • Hermione

              Fair enough, as to that point. I was making an inference from your original post, which stated that Sally decided to punish somebody (Rolo) for Don’s sins–inferring that you didn’t see that Rolo had committed his own sins.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              From the season seven press kit for Mad Men (http://www.amctv.com/shows/mad…, the entry on Sally:

              “She lost what was left of faith in her father when she caught him in the arms of his mistress. She refused to visit him, enrolling in boarding school, where she first took her anger out on an aggressive teenage boy, then was ultimately suspended for drinking alcohol on campus.”

              ..

          • buddy100

            Those other girls better watch their preppy backs. Sally’s smart and, as others have noted, has some powerful manipulators as role models. I think that the fact she can whip up a Tom Collins while her new “gal pals” are clumsily chugging cheap liquor is solid foreshadowing of what’s to come.

          • Alice Teeple

            Exactly. I agree with you on this.

      • Darren Nesbitt

        I don’t think so. Arm around the shoulder was fine and welcomed while they talked. Leaned into kiss and she turned away. Then she stood up. He simply asked a question (like many assholes) what’s the deal?. I don’t see how that was forcing himself. I bet a lot of young boys go to jail for many years for situations like that.

        Update: Everyone keeps talking about rapists getting away. I don’t are to reply to anymore comments on how hard it is out here for rapists, Trust me I’m not team rapist lol. At the end of all that He definitely shouldn’t be approaching a young girl like Sally AT ALL and he is not a rapist or “rapey”.

        • Topaz

          No boys go to jail for many years for situations like that. Sally didn’t go to the police, she just complained to her friend.

          It’s that sort of assumption that made me feel uncomfortable about this scene, in terms of the attitude it reinforces.

        • MissAsh

          She had to reject him more than once. “Arm around the shoulder” is not a code for “do whatever you want”. And no boys are going to jail for trying to kiss girls that don’t want to be kissed. Hell, a significant amount of the time boys aren’t going to jail for forcing sex on girls who don’t want it, so I don’t know how we’d ever prosecute unwanted kissing.

          • Darren Nesbitt

            You say that as if I was suggesting that sally needs to give up the goods. . . so lets not talk about what body language is code for. Yes he should have stopped at the first no. but I’m basically concerned about what forced means.

            • Travelgrrl

              “You’re frigid if you don’t” – How manipulative can you get? He met her like 5 minutes before, and was a stranger to her.

        • http://www.lindamerrill.com/ Linda Merrill

          For one thing, there is a significant age difference between 14 year old Sally and Glen and Rolo who can drive, which puts them at 16 or 17 – a big difference at that age. Sally looked like a very young girl – she didn’t have her skirt hitched up or her midriff showing like the other girl – she wasn’t trying to look alluring in any way. She had no skills to deal with that kind of situation other than to pull away and assume her initial no meant no. That he kept trying when everything in her body and spoken language was clear she wasn’t going there showed him to be a pushy asshole. Even Glen said he’d told the guy to lay off, Sally was like a sister. Glen assumed that was sufficient when he left them alone – that and he wasn’t thinking with his head – ahem. That Rolo started with “you called us to come over” (trying to guilt her) up to “are you frigid” (a dare) shows what kind of guy he was. Would he have gone all the way to rape? No way of knowing. But it’s kind of akin to the psycopath who starts by torturing insects, moves to small animals and end up being a mass murderer. An unwanted arm around the shoulder and a “come on, I just want a little kiss” said to a head that is turned in the opposite direction is never a good sign.

          • Adelaidey

            I agree with the spirit of what you’re saying, and you said it quite well, but I feel like I need to point out what a tricky defense “she didn’t have her skirt hitched up or her midriff showing like the other girl – she wasn’t trying to look alluring in any way”. Even if she had been, her “no” wouldn’t have been less valid, and his continued advances wouldn’t have been more deserved.

            • http://www.lindamerrill.com/ Linda Merrill

              Absolutely. I think one can give a guy a little leeway to investigate his options when the girl has intentionally re-arranged her conventional school girl uniform to show herself off a bit more, but the “no” is sacrosanct regardless.

            • Qitkat

              While “no” is sacrosanct in 2013, it’s valuable to remember that in 1968, that idea was still in its infancy.

            • formerlyAnon

              YES. The idea that a “nice girl” would pretend (or actually be) reluctant, at first, to advance the level of physical intimacy, and that her reputation as a “nice girl” required that she be persuaded/badgered into each advance was FAR more widely held than that “no means no.”

            • Qitkat

              Rueful grin.

            • something

              No is sacrosanct in 2013? That’s funny.

            • ldancer

              I don’t know what it’s like to be a teenage girl now, but based on some of the stories out there, it sounds like consent and male entitlement are still things that need to be talked and taught about. And when I was in high school, in a creative, intelligent peer group, in the late 80′s, I found myself on the receiving end of the type of coercion that I’m sure is common: not physically threatening, though sometimes physically inappropriate (guy clumsily attempting to shove my head into his crotch after I made my intentions NOT to blow him quite clear), but more often just manipulative. That’s how a guy got me to have sex with him for the first time (mine, that is). Because you can be a very smart girl and still not have the tools to extricate yourself from a situation that isn’t exactly bad, but isn’t where you want to be, either. I thought the scene with Sally and Rollo was pretty realistic, that he was an ass and borderline threatening, AND that she overstated the force a little bit…but not much. Yes, she enjoyed the beatdown. I wish I’d had a Glen to beat a few boys down for me, back in the day.

            • Qitkat

              Well, if it isn’t (sacrosanct) in regards to choosing to have sex or not, that is not funny. Not my own experience these days, but yours may be different. Sorry to hear that.

            • something

              No, it’s not funny. I was being sarcastic. And I am fortunate that it has not been my experience either. But surely you are aware that hundreds of thousands of women are raped in the US every year. I think a whole lot of them are screaming “No!” while it’s happening. Except the ones who are unconscious, which apparently means yes, if the Stuebenville boys have anything to say about it. And rape is widely considered to be the most under-reported crime there is.

          • Darren Nesbitt

            One major thing I forgot is that sally is like a pre-teen compared to Glen and Rolo. For some reason I judged Glen as being the same age as Sally a few seasons ago when they used to have phone convos.

          • Bonjour

            I think it’s interesting for MW and crew to show that ‘free love’ is not necessarily going to be good for women and girls…tiny detail but Rollo thinks he’s entitled. And that Sally would be privileged to experience his ‘good hands.’

            There was nothing mutual about that scene. Sally showed none of the crush-y, giggly, boy-crazy butterflies I remember from being a young girl at that age, when (O miracle) the object of my crush showed an interest in me and set the scene for a kiss or a little bit more (age 13, 14)…she knows he’s just getting his and she is deftly pulling the levers of the dorm power play — like Pete with Bob, Don with Ted.

            I also think she is genuinely disgusted w sex right now, post-Dad and Sylvia.

        • quitasarah

          No, no, nope. Not even a little bit. So far off base on this one, you can’t see the base anymore.

        • omg_dora

          Right. Because it is SO easy for a girl to get her rapist tried and convicted, ESPECIALLY in a so-called date rape situation. The police automatically believe you, the judge respects you, your family, friends and community support you, and nobody vilifies you. It’s like having a superpower: you can send a guy to jail with a snap of your fingers! It’s no wonder that so many women get drunk on the power of it and wrongly accuse innocent guys who have just annoyed us in some way. You know, it’s funny, I can’t think why NONE of my half-a-dozen friends who have been assaulted in recent years have gotten their rapists arrested or even tried going to the police in the first place! They’re missing out on all the fun.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        From the season seven press kit for Mad Men (http://www.amctv.com/shows/mad…, the entry on Sally:

        “She lost what was left of faith in her father when she caught him in the arms of his mistress. She refused to visit him, enrolling in boarding school, where she first took her anger out on an aggressive teenage boy, then was ultimately suspended for drinking alcohol on campus.”

    • Vanessa

      BTW: on the West Virginia thing–I meant no disrespect for West Virginia but I assumed that Bob was intended to be a Native (not school taught) speaker of Spanish, since he used so many idiomatic expressions. According to the U.S. Census of Population, in 1980, 95.6% of the population of West Virginia was White Non-Hispanic, 3.3% were Black, and 0.7% were of Hispanic origin. (the data estimated from a sample for 1970 show 0.4% Hispanic). Even as of 2010 only 1.2% of West Virginia reported that they were Hispanic. That is compared to 37.6% of the population in California in 2010.

      • wayout46

        Bob Benson’s Spanish had a very thick American accent, was warbled, and almost unintelligible. He is no “native” speaker.

        • Wellworn

          I understood him very well. Spanish is my second language, and I am pretty fluent. He spoke with the American accent, as you say, but there was a slight lisp which is prominent in Spanish from Spain, which is what Manolo speaks. He isn’t a native speaker, but he does speak well, and the idiomatic expressions he used are pretty common in conversation. Especially the profanities.

          • Travelgrrl

            Castilian Spanish from Berlitz albums?

          • wayout46

            Well, Spanish is my first language and I can guarantee you that his accent was thick with phonetic accents placed in the wrong syllables, making what he said lack the rhythm and inflection necessary for natural flow. He spliced “hi-jo-de-pu-ta” with the unnatural staccato of someone who is not familiar with the Ianguage and exaggerated the j’s and c’s to the point of caricature. Castillians would have a laugh because the emphasis was so magnified. I love James Wolk, but he sounded like he learned those lines in his dressing room right before shooting – and I’m not questioning your ability to understand what he said (are you sure the subtitles didn’t help?) … just that it was THAT off. To illustrate, imagine somebody saying “you son OF A bitch, I am gonNA get you FOR that, no matter how long IT takes! “

        • fursa_saida

          I didn’t think it was “almost unintelligible,” but yeah, no way he’s a native speaker.

      • Chickadeep

        I think Bob’s idiomatic Spanish is probably more due to picking it up from native Spanish speakers like Manolo in a social or work setting rather than in a classroom.

        • not_Bridget

          Perhaps he learned the language from Berlitz records–and then got some advanced idiomatic vocabulary from Manolo & other companions.

        • fursa_saida

          Yeah, I’m a Spanish-as-second-language speaker and I know expressions like “hijo de puta” and so on. It’s not hard to pick up if you’re paying attention at all outside the classroom.

          • Anna G

            Yep, my co-worker, a native-Mienh speaker from Laos, just called me a “cabrona” when she found out I am going on vacation. Spanish slang is pretty easy (and fun) to pick up.

    • Laylalola

      Pete learns, but I can see this biting him (as so many of his choices do), Bert Cooper (who laid down the law that Who Cares? is the rule Pete should follow), and ultimately Don Draper (it seems that should the whole Bob Bensen thing unravel, Bert even for one moment act astounded that Pete wouldn’t have said anything, Don Draper’s secret would be ripe for reveal before the new partners and/or Duck and/or authorities etc). At the same time, in the meantime, it’s fascinating to think of Pete having a second chance at controlling the dynamics.

    • Chris

      I thought the whole point was that Peggy and Ted weren’t having any kind of physical affair which is why they were so oblivious to everyone else’s reactions at the office. If they were having a full blown affair they would have been much more paranoid and circumspect. In their minds they were acting, at least objectively “innocent.” Why go to the movies if you are having an affair- wouldn’t you go to a hotel? The only time they are around each other is at work and the movie was an excuse to be at “work” together outside the office. That’s why every little touch etc. was so meaningful because that was all they had. In their minds they were following the letter of the law, if not the spirit of it. That was why Ted was so thunderstruck when Don said all those things to him about Peggy. People engaging in a “real” affair would be far more suspicious and aware of people’s attitudes.

      • NightOwl

        It was totally an emotional affair though. They are sometimes more uncomfortable to witness than a physical one because like you said, the parties involved don’t try to hide it and don’t see how inappropriate it is.

        • Chris

          I also think there was a large dose of schadenfreude in people’s reactions. Everyone they showed reacting had some sort of stake- Moira is very territorial with Ted and Ginsberg is very competitive about his ideas being listened to. I’m sure Joan didn’t love seeing how Ted was with Peggy’s work when she had a run in with him about her own. The other guy in creative didn’t seem too perturbed by Ted and Peggy and we didn’t see anyone else reacting to it.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

            That’s a good point. Not that Peggy and Ted weren’t obnoxious… but those most affected by them clearly had an emotional stake beforehand.

            (And I rather think that Joan was amused to see Peggy fall so hard for a new mentor… after Peggy threw the fact that she hadn’t slept with Don into Joan’s face before!)

          • fnarf

            This just isn’t true. Everyone we saw had a reaction to it. On the evidence presented, I think it’s safe to say that everyone in the entire office, except maybe oblivious Roger, knew about it.

            • Chris

              Who is everyone? We saw Moira, Ginsberg and Joan (plus Don) who had negative reactions.

            • Travelgrrl

              Everyone in that St Joseph’s meeting (sans client) knew what Don meant.

            • Chris

              We have no evidence that Cutler knew what the heck was going on- he seemed genuinely puzzled in the meeting. As the closest person to Ted,, if he felt Ted was acting strangely or affecting client relationships he surely would have said something to him. We know he isn’t shy. The other people are the same people listed above- Don, Joan etc.

            • Chris

              Cutler didn’t- he is Ted’s friend and his job is dealing with clients. He looked completely stumped at what was going on. If he thought Ted was acting strangely or endangering an account he isn’t shy, he would talk to Ted. There was no information shown that Cutler thought anything apart from the obvious money issue was amiss. The only people there besides him were Joan and Don.

    • http://www.what-the-frock.com Dana WhatTheFrock

      I was embarrassed for Ted and Peggy and the way they were behaving. Someone needs to turn the hose on those two. While Don’s actions towards them were totally dickish, they weren’t 100% unjustified.

      • Spicytomato1

        And yet it was such a realistic depiction of an office flirtation. Who hasn’t witnessed one? At least they didn’t have an office pool about whether or not they were sleeping together, which happened in my husband’s office more than once.

        • MartyBellerMask

          Don’t be so sure. In season 1, there was an office bet about the color of Allison’s panties.
          Oh, the good old days. Most of the boys haven’t really changed.

      • Inspector_Gidget

        Talk about handing Don the perfect opportunity. I’ll bet he even believed his own BS that he was doing it only for the company, too! Until Peggy unloaded on him.

    • Vanessa

      It just killed me that Don yet again took the credit away from Peggy. Though I think the episode was laying it on a little thick with the Ted/Peggy interactions, I think that Don reacted just as much out of envy of Ted and Peggy’s happiness as he did for domination.

      • Angela_the_Librarian

        I don’t entirely see how Don took credit away from Peggy (well, I guess saying that it was Frank Gleason’s final idea?). Ted and Peggy weren’t doing a great job of justifying the extra expense for the commercial and it probably wouldn’t have been made at all without Don’s intervention. You’re right that Don’s motivation for interfering was more about jealousy than anything else, but Ted and Peggy should have also worked harder on their pitch.

        • Chris

          Don made sure the commercial when made, is credited to Frank Gleason so Peggy has no chance of getting the award for it. Just like he took her idea for the commercial he won the Clio for, he made sure she won’t have a chance of getting one again.

          • Frank_821

            Yup. I mention this last night. Don was punishing her “for her own good”. She called him on it that ultimately he’s using the ad as an excuse to stick to Ted. There was many more respectful and discrete ways he could have fixed this without publicly humiliating them. Not to mention how Don reneged on Sunkist

          • bawoman

            Peggy would still get the award.Frank is dead, they have to give the award to someone. And the only people who wouldnt know it was Peggys idea are the clients. She would still get the credit.

            • Chris

              The most important people are the clients. They can’t just put it in Peggy’s name after Don sold it as Frank Gleason’s dying idea.

            • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

              I don’t see why now. Will the clients really care if they’re told a simple cover story, like Peggy being the one to take Frank’s idea and polish it up? She could get her credit, one way or another.

          • Floretta

            First, that ad, if made, would never win a Clio. I can’t even see St Joseph’s approving it in the first place, but this is TV fiction, so meh. Second, IF Peggy is all that talented she will have all sorts of chances at winning one or more Clios and other awards for her work, with SC&P or another agency or on her own.

            • Chris

              The client from St. Joseph’s loved it he said so at the meeting- that’s why he immediately approved the idea before. The meeting was over money. Peggy’s idea already won a Clio before- for Don.

            • Alice Teeple

              Also, it’s possible that Peggy and Ted’s infectious enthusiasm were part and parcel for the client’s initial acceptance. The SC&P staff might be sick of their lovey act at the office, but Peggy and Ted were clearly quite giddy at the idea and acted it out with glee, which probably sold the idea. This would be a clear callback to the delight Cool Whip’s reps felt for the “just taste it” banter between Megan and Don. (Even funnier: in their skit, Peggy and Ted cast themselves as meddling old people instead of a sickeningly cute husband and wife.)

        • Alice Teeple

          Don has a long history of doing the “right” thing for the wrong reason – case in point: Mitchell, for instance.

          Don did take credit away from Peggy by attributing the idea to Frank Gleason – an especially cruel thing to do on two levels: first, it exploits Ted’s genuine friendship and grief, by turning it into a cheap display of sentiment to sell aspirin. Secondly, it harkens back to Peggy’s big hangup: not receiving due credit. He hit them both in their Achilles heels. That’s not even addressing their romantic relationship yet, although that seems to be the icing on the cake and Don’s excuse for hitting them that low below the belt.

          I’m not saying Ted and Peggy are blameless – they were acting like idiots – but Don was especially malicious.

      • MartyBellerMask

        That’s EXACTLY what I took away from it. Even if Peggy got her Clio, it wouldn’t be *hers* because suddenly this was Frank’s baby. It kind of pissed me off that this wasn’t what Peggy ranted about. Instead she defended Ted. WTH Pegs, worry about yourself.
        Although, yeah, budget is a concern, but Don has never been a rule follower, nor is money that important to him. And the ad was all wrong. Why didn’t anyone bring that up?

        • Floretta

          Don did – and Joan. They both thought WTF when the idea was presented by the Ted and Pegs show but they were plowing it on through, even if badly underfunded by the equivalent of almost $250K in today’s money – which the agency would have to eat.

          • Chris

            When did Don or Joan say that to Peggy or Ted? I thought Don complimented the commercial when they did it for him.

            • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

              Don asked them about the cost and Ted brushed it off. I think that’s also when Ted explained that he’d spring it on the client after they’d already finished casting. Pretty sure Joan didn’t say anything out loud to Ted and Peggy, though.

            • Chris

              Yes but no one criticized the idea like Floretta said above. I think Ted wanted to use the casting as a way to show how great the commercial would be and why it needed a bigger budget.

            • MartyBellerMask

              EXACTLY.

          • jen_wang

            I feel like, if they’d kept it hushed up and then sprung the idea in all its glory on the client post-casting, that they might have had a chance of working out. It would’ve been a big gamble, and one that doesn’t seem in character for Ted when he’s not blinded by his love for Peggy, but I could see it possibly working. It’s hard to imagine that both Don and Ted, with their combined experience and charisma, couldn’t have finessed it if they’d committed to doing that. But (of course) we’ll never know.

        • fursa_saida

          Also, I was super annoyed that she left the room when Ted asked her to. The whole incident concerned her too. She had every right to be there for the fallout.

          • Alice Teeple

            I wasn’t annoyed – it made sense to me and was in keeping with Ted’s personality. I think it was another example of Ted Chivalry, for better or worse. He knew what was coming from Don and didn’t want Peggy in the middle of it, and wanted to spare her humiliation. Peggy went right on down and had her own confrontation. Don beat Ted, but Peggy beat Don. Ted would have felt emasculated if he had witnessed Peggy’s total evisceration of Don by defending him. Another wonderful parallel to the situation with Glen and Sally, I think. That’s right…Peggy was Creepy Glen!

      • testingwithfire

        Don’s actions, as Peggy says, were utterly monstrous. If he had truly been concerned about the cost of the ad and the consequences to the client, the right thing to do would have been to take Ted aside and tell him to cool it or he’d have to take the matter to the other partners. Instead, the agency could well have lost the client thanks to Don’s concern trolling. “Great Caesar’s Ghost,” indeed: Don slipped the knife in but good.

        The Frank Gleason thing gave Peggy a slap too – I was paying a lot of T&L-inspired attention when Peggy, dressed in peach, was holding out her hand to Don as his “mother” when they were play-acting the ad. By now we should all know where that would head. But the primary target here was Ted.

        Don is now completely incapable of even a simple office flirtation, much less the good friendship he once enjoyed with Anna Draper. So he pulled a Jeannie Bueller; if I can’t have it, then no one can.

        • Floretta

          Ted is the last person to listen to Don about anything. And Don saved the ad for the agency (and got them an additional $10K).

          • Chris

            Don’s the one who put the ad in danger by submitting that budget report on the sly and getting the client in trouble. He went behind Ted’s back with Ted’s client to sabotage him. Then he found a way to embarrass Ted and rob Peggy. Don doesn’t care about a small aspirin account. He willfully threw away their car account because Herb had the nerve to question him on creative. Don couldn’t care less about saving an account.

            • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

              Ted would have been in trouble with the client if he’d sprung it on them after already casting, and SC&P would have had to eat the $10K they wasted on casting for an idea the client wasn’t behind and didn’t have budget for. I’m not saying the way Don went about this was in any way right, but Ted’s judgment was way off here. If it hadn’t been for his thing with Peggy, he would never have done something like that. Don at least had a plan to save the idea. Ted would have gotten in trouble with the client regardless, and the commercial would never have been made.

            • Chris

              Don’s whole plan centered around denying Peggy the credit and smashing Ted and Peggy. Don’s plan wasn’t to “save’ the idea it was to endanger it then use his “plan” to look like he was helping.

            • fnarf

              When was Ted going to come clean to the client, exactly? After he spent the money? Bzzt.

              Don had already made up his mind to throw away Jaguar before Herb challenged him. In fact, he agreed with Herb, and fed him enough rope to hang himself, because he wanted to get rid of Herb. Herb was the worst client in the history of the industry.

            • Chris

              No Conrad Hilton was, they spent countless hours and amounts of money trying to please him because it was the white whale account and Don wanted a father figure. Instead he got tied to a company like a serf and no Hilton account (along with a verbal kick in the pants from Connie at the end). Herb was a loud mouthed jerk and he didn’t “hang himself” Don dumped him because he just couldn’t swallow his pride to work with someone he saw as besting him before.

            • Travelgrrl

              2nd worse after the Lucky Strikes guy.

            • jen_wang

              I LOLed when Roger said Lee Garner Jr. had made him hold his balls. Oh Good God.

            • Sweetpea176

              The irony being that Sal was fired for NOT holding Lee Garner Jr.’s balls and Roger probably doesn’t know that.

            • Travelgrrl

              He cares about SC & P eating the difference between an approved $15K budget and a $35K one, should the client not go for it. Then at the meeting, the budget had ballooned to $50K!

              That alone was reason to act. To do it in the most dickish way possible is pure Don.

            • Chris

              Don has never gotten involved in any financial matters before relating to a client’s budget. Don only became interested in any clients after he saw Peggy and Ted together.

              The money was Don’s excuse to interfere not his motivation. That is all I am saying.

    • Vanessa

      The shot of Sally saying “My father never gave me anything,” was perfect–I could see her at age 50, with a raspy voice and a cough, saying just the same thing and holding her head and cigarette the same way.

      • HelenNPN

        I liked that line because while Betty sees her father paying Sally’s way through ritzy prep school that she could never have had, Sally knows she wouldn’t have even gotten in the door there if she didn’t know how to play her cards right with those girls, and she did that completely on her own.

        • SFree

          I think Betty understands Sally’s meaning more than anyone. Betty never got what she really wanted from Don. Yes, she got the material things, but she knows they were not enough (though she did settle for them in the end – the conversation with Don about Jackie Kennedy Onassis was clever). So, paying for the expensive private school is also a consolation prize.

          • Kate

            It’s also a way of getting Sally out of the picture so he doesn’t have to deal with explaining to Megan why Sally isn’t coming around anymore. Megan always takes care of Don’s kids on his weekends. He couldn’t leave Sally and Megan alone with her for fear she’d tell. It would also suck for Sally to run into whatsherface in the building. This is a way of paying her off for her silence. It’s also mercy on Sally’s part because it was her idea.

            • jen_wang

              I read it more as him throwing money at the problem (as always). He knows Sally wanting to go away is because of her disappointment in him, and he’ll try to make amends by paying for anything she wants.

          • MartyBellerMask

            And I think now Betty realizes that it wasn’t a fight with Julie, or being robbed that made Sally stop wanting to see Don. Betty now understands that it was Don himself who screwed up somehow and drove her away.

      • Musicologie

        My favorite part about that line was Betty’s reaction. Her face showed a complicated mix of emotions (that should silence people claiming that January Jones can’t act). You can see that Betty’s happy that she’s “won,” but realizes that in order for Sally to say something like that, something terrible must have happened, and Betty doesn’t know what it is. And, given what she knows about Don, she realizes that that “something” could be extremely bad. So, Betty’s satisfaction gets strangled out by a grimace of motherly concern.

        • jen_wang

          I think it’s almost relief, too, that the tension in Sally’s life isn’t between them anymore. Despite all her shortcomings, it has to suck to be the parent that deals with the daily grind while her ex got to be the fun, cool parent. It’s great to see that, despite that, she seems concerned about Don and Sally’s relationship; she doesn’t hate him like she used to. One of my favorite things so far this season has been seeing her get over that anger–I feel like it’s defined her since her weird hand tremors in S1.

    • HelenNPN

      Here’s the thing about Bob:

      He’s not a hick from West Virginia. That was an old lie that helped him into an old job as a boy valet. I believe Bob has normal career goals as T&L say and a shady past because he’s simply had to make up his past from whole cloth. Why? He is an illegal alien. His gigolo friend who he was on the phone with is HIS doppleganger – the latin love toy/romancer who can be anything to the target of their focus or desires.

      Bob refined his broken English in the South where he first landed as an illegal immigrant, possibly South American, and refined it subsequently as he clawed his way into more well bred WASP circles and traveled on the Queen Mary to Europe. Hence he came to be well spoken enough to decide to go for the big money by passing as an Ivy Leaguer.

      The most unbelievable aspect of his storyline to date for me is that he would risk exposure EVER by yelling angrily in fluent Spanish on the phone!

      And Peggy. I don’t love me any Peggy at all, and haven’t for soooo long. She is incredibly sour, humorless and just about as piggish and self oriented as any of the men in her office. She really thought she’d charm her way into having the firm spend tens of thousands of dollars on her so she could get a prize? I’ve worked in creative fields in corporate offices, and even long long after the 60′s when the boss acted like a real SOB, you didn’t go in and confront and call him on it EVERY SINGLE TIME. It is too much. Bosses often act like SOBs – get over it a couple of times okay? Yeah, ideas are stolen, usually all of them, usually right out from under you, no extra credit is given, you are there to make the upper management look good and find you indispensable, until it is your turn. Because you are tenacious and diplomatic. You smile, you do the work, you learn, you accrue power and you move on and hopefully up. There are a lot of people who have a lot of charm and talent trying to get into those positions all the time. What you don’t do is constantly call out your boss on everything he does that you don’t like, and call him names, yell at him, take your inappropriate crush’s side openly, be resentful all the time, complain constantly, and give the stink eye or the ignore mode to any man that isn’t actively courting you!

      Peggy is really overrated, and I believe MW has overestimated the kind of patience that would be shown to someone who acts like her in any office, and how much tolerance the audience has for her daily offering of sour grape soda. Hopefully she treats her cat Morris much better than she treats us.

      • Alice Teeple

        With that accent? No way. He speaks Spanish with a worse accent than I do. Hahahaha!

        • HelenNPN

          Its a theory I had to float, basically because I knew a family of upper crust Mexican boys that did live out that storyline. Substitute California for the south, restaurants (moving from the back to the front of the house) for the man-servant thing, and Antiques for Advertising. Illegal for decades, but people liked them around because they were tall and good looking, and focused.

        • Ally08

          The accent is no defense against this good theory. There are giggling fits at my house every time Marie is expected to pass as a native francophone while butchering French words in that thick accent.

          • Alice Teeple

            You do have a point. Maybe in the Mad Men world, native speakers all sound like foreigners.

            • fursa_saida

              I am really, really hoping they’re not just trying to pass Bob off as a native speaker. I could never buy it. It would distract me endlessly.

        • not_Bridget

          Bob definitely spoke Gringo Spanish. With a slightly advanced vocabulary….

        • http://robot-heart.tumblr.com heartbot

          Agreed. Although it’s possible he’s not actually from West Virginia. Who knows where he’s really from.

          • Alice Teeple

            I loved that little detail! Straight out of “All About Eve.” It made me laugh.

      • Wellworn

        Re-watching Bob’s Spanish a couple of times, and he really does speak with an American accent, although the grammar is fine. There is a slight lisp, which makes me think he learned Spanish from Manolo – Spaniards often have that lisp, as do Guatemalans and some South Americans. I highly doubt that he is a native speaker.

      • housefulofboys

        Totally agree with you on the corporate gamesmanship at play in creative fields. It can be one land mine after another and the best and most successful possess not only creativity, but a very soft touch when it comes to office politics.

        Can’t agree with you about Bob, though. :-)

      • Glammie

        Don’t buy the illegal alien Bob story–I think he learned Spanish from Manolo and other former co-workers.

        I am with you on Peggy’s behavior–you don’t go in and yell at the boss repeatedly. Workplaces aren’t fair that way.

    • MartyBellerMask

      Best line? Roger: “Lee Garner, Jr. made me cup his balls.” Bahahahahahahahahhaaaaa!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • Orange Girl

        Seriously. I think that is the funniest line ever on Mad Men.

      • NightOwl

        I also vote for “What, did you find a hooker who will take a travelers check?” and he mutters “I should never have told you about that.” heeeheeeheee

        • Danielle

          That one was much funnier (though harder to appreciate on the first watch, because we didn’t know whether or not Ken was dead yet).

      • mommyca

        it was actually “made me hold his balls”

        • MartyBellerMask

          Yeah, I’m probably confusing it with Cutler’s line. Still, funny as hell.

      • SFree

        That entire series was hilarious. As if all of their little examples even came near to being shot in the face!

      • housefulofboys

        Not to mention the ever-so-slight pause after he said that before anyone spoke again.

    • rantress

      Nobody else saw Kenny as a Cheney reference? Also, that Nixon ad was chilling.

      • Wellworn

        I only noticed what Don was watching on TV during my rewatch of the episode. After Ken was shot, I was too distracted in the first viewing. Those small details are always important in MM, especially the socio/political ones. And then I will need a third viewing after Mad Style to catch all the clothing and design in the episode. I wish I spent as much time cleaning the house each week as I do watching this show. Oh well, just one more week anyway, and then my house will be much cleaner.

      • MK03

        I did! That was all I could think about after I saw it. I tweeted “Cheney used to be a Chevy exec. Who knew?”

        • filmcricket

          Cheney actually got his start in national politics working for Nixon, so there you go. That juxtaposition was completely deliberate.

          • fursa_saida

            I thought it was also funny that they referred to Ralph Nader, the demon of the right, right before it happened.

    • NightOwl

      Apparently when Glen toasts “Here’s looking up your old addresses” he was using a form of Cockney rhyming slang (last word rhymes with the actual intended word – here, probably dresses). My fiance caught this and I thought it was an intriguing bit of writing – has Glen been travelling in the UK? When did he become so damn adult?

      • Spicytomato1

        I can’t imagine that he’s been traveling but if he’s at boarding school he’s probably picked up a lot from more worldly classmates.

      • Mismarker

        Love it. Good catch. Glen was far less annoying than he has been in previous appearances.

        • HelenNPN

          And he’s outgrown his baby fat.

        • Ally08

          I don’t know. When the guy climbing in the window said Sally’s name before we saw him, I was all, “No, not Glen!” He’s the male juvenile Sylvia: a deadly-dull time waster in too-brief episodes.

          • Mismarker

            Don’t get me wrong, I totally turned to my husband and said, “Oh, shit. It’s fucking Glen.”…. but I don’t think anything about that scene could be considered boring or a waste of precious air-time. His appearance here was in true service to the story. It helps that his acting seems to have improved from “stiff as a board, stone-cold dumdumb” to “could, possibly, maybe act himself out of a paper bag”.

            • Travelgrrl

              He’s unfortunately still in the “only got the job because my last name is Weiner” category.

          • Alice Teeple

            I loved his cameo! Glen was great in this episode, and he was a much needed breath of fresh air.

      • Jennifer Ford

        There was *a lot* of British influence during that time — in music, fashion, culture, etc. The movie “To Sir, With Love” (1967) has a scene where rhyming slang is explained in it. This stuff was out there, talked about in teen magazines, and as trendy as the clothes they picked up from the Beatles’ dalliances with Eastern spiritualism.

      • catherines

        That toast isn’t Cockney rhyming slang, which uses a very different word to the intended one, to confuse outsiders – addresses and dresses would never be used as rhymes for each other, as it’s far too easy to guess what’s being meant (for instance, “plates of meat” are “feet”, “apples and pears” are “stairs”). It’s just a silly pun: to look up someone means to get in touch, but “looking up your old addresses” sounds like, obviously, “looking up your old dresses.”

        It is the sort of joke that English music hall comedians used, though, and would have been considered vaguely risque. Those weak jokes were very popular on saucy postcards in Britain in the 1950s, drawn by Donald McGill (a typical joke is something like this: “excuse me, Miss, do you keep stationary?” “Oh no, I wriggle about a bit”) or the Carry On films of the 1950s and 1960s.

        • NightOwl

          Thanks for the info!

        • Topaz

          Oops, didn’t see this post and just replicated your point. Liked your music hall examples though.

          • fursa_saida

            Lulz, I just did it too.

      • Topaz

        Speaking as a cockney born and bred, that’s not cockney rhyming slang, though it might be a funny play on words. Cockney rhyming slang is usually more oblique than that. For example “draw” (as in weed) would be two-by-four. Or “butcher’s” meaning “look” because look rhymes with butcher’s hook. As in “have a butcher’s at that.” “Dress” and “address” sound too similar to be rhyming slang. It’s also not about rhyming the last word of a sentence. Any word, usually a noun or adjective, can be changed over. Though granted if your fiance is also from East London, we may find ourselves at a bit of an impasse on this one…

        Also, East London in the 60s was a mire of poverty (have a look at David Bailey’s photography for some examples) and gangsterism, so I’m not sure many preppy New York kids would visit it. Swinging London was focussed in the West End. And besides, by the 1960s rhyming slang was seen as a lame thing that old people did. Its popularity only picked up again in the 1970s in the UK because it started getting featured on TV.

        If he was attempting rhyming slang, he’d be more likely to have picked it up from British films that played to the novelty of it, so I wouldn’t say it would be a result of him going to the UK.

        • NightOwl

          Thanks for the clarification! I feel lucky to have access to the informed perspective of the commentariat here. It makes sense that the geography and timing is too off for it to be rhyming slang, and that it was more likely a generic pun.

        • fnarf

          Exactly. Cockney rhyming slang doesn’t substitute the rhyming word, but the one paired with it. If I was going to make up a (terrible) rhyming slang for “dress” from “address”, I’d use, I dunno, “former”, as in “former address”, or “street” as in “street address” (I said they’d be terrible). So I’d say “here’s looking up your old streets” or “here’s looking up your old formers”.

          What Glen was saying was more akin to Groucho Marx or some Catskills comedian — “looking up your old addresses” being a pun on two senses of “looking up”. I’ve heard it before, too — google it.

        • Travelgrrl

          My favorite is “berk”, for … well, you know.

          • Topaz

            You know, I’ve said that for years, and my Dad has called me that whenever I do something dumb since I was a little kid, and I never knew it was rhyming slang until I looked it up just now. Yikes. In fact, I’ve been looking up rhyming slang all day and realised that half the things I say are rhyming slang and I didn’t even know it. I’m more cockney than I realised.

      • Travelgrrl

        That’s an old WWII era expression. Glenn could have heard it from any adult man.

      • fursa_saida

        Is that an actual example of Cockney rhyming slang? I’m asking because it seems unusually straightforward :) (as opposed to, say, “raspberry tarts = farts” –> “raspberry” to mean fart.) I tried looking it up and could only find “slits in a dress = mess,” which is probably not relevant.

    • markopoulos1

      Does anyone think that Peggy and Don’s relationship will be somehow repaired next season? It would be so depressing to know that they never got past all of this ugliness….

      • veriance

        If she can repair her relationship with Pete, I suppose anything is possible.

        • Chris

          Peggy is written as a very forgiving and generally gentle kind of person. Her scene with Pete when she tells him about their baby she gave away really sums up her character. She could have played it so many ways. At that point Pete fancied himself in love with her so she could have said “Yes you chose wrong, you could have had me now suffer.” or she could have told him about the baby in a way that blamed him “You abandoned me and I had to give our child away.” Instead, she took the “blame” on herself saying it was her choice to have a different life and disillusioned him in as gentle a way as possible, saving his marriage (or postponing its demise). Same with Joan- she could have had revenge for all the times Joan mocked her for her career aspirations or hindered her (xerox machine in her office) but in the end she helped Joan when she could. Peggy is capable of forgiveness if Don does anything to show he is asking for it or even slightly deserving.

      • Chris

        After everything that has happened I don’t think I want to see Peggy repair that relationship. When I look back, the only positive thing Don has done for her that was truly altruistic was back in the break between season 1 and season 2 when he went to her in the hospital after having the baby. It’s probably the best thing Don has ever done in his life. Since then he has belittled her, treated her as a poorly treated child, thrown money at her, verbally abused her, used her ideas and finally deliberately sabotaged her personally and professionally. When you look back at how Peggy has helped, protected and supported Don I am not sure what she would get from a relationship with him. He is really a toxic person.

        • markopoulos1

          I completely agree. But I do hope that he redeems himself in some way to her somehow. Maybe he can never make it up to her, and maybe they’ll never get back to a place of mutual care and admiration…but I would love to see Don humble himself somehow so they can have some future moments of tenderness and peace with one another.

          • Chris

            I was hoping for this too- all season. Now I just am so over Don because I just cannot find one person he is not a negative influence on. Maybe MW will write something brilliant for him and change my mind.

        • Ally08

          Well, he did promote her from secretary to copywriter, helping to launch her down her career path. No small thing, getting lifted out of the secretarial ‘pool’!

          • Chris

            It was Freddy Rumson who discovered her and promoted her ideas (which Don used for a very successful pitch to Belle Jolie in his name of course). Peggy got promoted to copywriter as a way for Don to smack down Pete. Peggy was always treated worse by Don than any of the male copywriters. It was Roger who gave her the good office when she asked. If Don promoted Peggy it was because she was 500% better than the men she was working with and probably paid 50% less for it. Anything that he did to help Peggy really helped him first.

            • Ally08

              Very true. Actually, a point worth discussing is how much of Don’s success was built on mooching others’ and especially Peggy’s ideas. Has she been his best catalyst and ghost writer all along and so he’s uninspired and resenting her giving her ideas to someone else now?

              Btw, really liking your comments today.

            • Chris

              Right back at you!

            • Chris

              I think he resents Peggy admiring Ted. She respected Don’s talent and feared him in a way but never thought he was a good person. I think it’s interesting that Don, Pete and Ted appreciate the same thing in Peggy- that she “really knows them” or can see the “real them.” Pete has mentioned it to her twice, once during the CMC and once at the Ocean Spray dinner, she told Don she really knew who he was when Anna died and Ted was so grateful when she saw him as “strong” (how he sees himself) not “nice” like everyone else does.

            • Sweetpea176

              Don doesn’t “mooch” others’ ideas — he pays them for them. And I think we can assume that he came up through the ranks at SC before becoming Creative Director, so I don’t think we are to believe that his success has been unearned. He even hired Danny after unwittingly pitching one of his ideas, so that it wouldn’t be mooching. (At Peggy’s insistence, but still, point remains that providing (often uncredited) ideas is what a copywriter’s job is.)

            • Ally08

              You’ll note, in the last episode, he even mooched Stan’s California idea. Stan even feared for his sandwich… that was a good line.

        • testingwithfire

          Peggy’s interactions with Don since the merger have all been very cold. When she gets angry at him, she is very controlled – she doesn’t flip out at all nor does she allow him to derail her. She doesn’t interact with him other than to let him know when he’s being an ass. She might contact her old pal Freddy Rumsen on Don’s behalf if Don winds up in Bellevue (which is where I think he’s headed, or someplace similar) but I doubt she herself will be the hand-holder ever again.

          • Chris

            I’d love to see Freddy Rumson again. His relationship with Peggy is so sweet and avuncular. It’s the relationship Peggy would have wanted with Don in so many ways. He really is Peggy’s mentor and benefactor. I was watching some old episodes and their relationship from season 1 on is just charming.

      • Miss Disco

        Possible things to happen:

        1) I think Peggy may be about to make use of Duck’s services and find a new agency.

        2) Cutler is going to split off into a new agency with various people going with it again.

        3) Don will be the one pushed out of the company (it was his initial that was taken out!)… which might lead into

        4) Bob Benson is going to push things too far and Pete will expose him, and Don in the process, for what they are. Which in Bob’s case may coincide with Stonewall, but in Don’s coincides with Vietnam.

        • Travelgrrl

          Korea?

    • Orange Girl

      I couldn’t tell if Peggy’s ad was good or not, and I agree with TLO’s assessment. However, I think the entire point of that ad was for Don and Peggy to act out a scene with Don as the baby and Peggy as the “angelic mother.” Throw in Ted’s hand on Peggy’s waist and you have a full-blown “mother-whore” scenario, as viewed by Don. Remember, Don doesn’t have a mother and Peggy gave up her baby boy.

      • Angelfood

        Good point. Especially with the opening and closing shots of don in the fetal position.

      • Chris

        Yes about the commercial. At the end, Don is a mess on his couch like he was in “The Suitcase” only this time he is not sleeping with his head on Peggy’s lap. That “maternal” figure is gone now.

        • Qitkat

          I have been thinking a lot about that episode, one of my favorites ever, and it truly makes me sad that we may never see that kind of intimate interaction between Peggy and Don again, or anyone else for that matter. That was such a phenomenal episode that concentrated so specifically upon those two and Don’s dealing with the loss of what we now know was the only woman ever in his life to be a straight shooter with him, who knew most of the whole truth about him and still remained a true friend, and did not have a sexual component to their relationship. After seeing young Don time after time with his step-mother in the whore house, we can’t even say that there was not a sexual component to their relationship, not in the carnal sense of course, but in the situation and place she put him in, with no choice on his part. Neither Peggy nor Joan ever had all those attributes that Anna did, as neither one knows his complete story, or even very much of it. Anna was outside of it all, outside of his job, outside of flirtation, and while I doubt if even she knew all the terrible details of his upbringing, she brought objectivity, and compassion to their relationship that no one else ever has.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

        Great insight. And the funny thing is that part of the reason why Don got so upset over Peggy’s rejection is that he also is using her as a stand in for the (forever?) absent Sally.

        Poor Pegs. Having to be both Don’s mother AND his daughter is no small task!

    • Edwina3

      Even though the Best Little Boy in the World theory didn’t completely hold up here, I appreciated learning about that phenomenon. Like other marginalized people, we know so little about gay history and the struggles and coping strategies that were necessary for survival. Because of your post, we got a closer understanding of the difficulties that gay people have endured in the shadows and I thank you for that.

    • BobStPaul

      Apparently my hearing is going. I would have sworn Peggy said impostor rather than monster and that that was why Don looked so shocked. But then I also frequently mis-hear song lyrics…

      • Mismarker

        Bingo Jed had a light on. : )

        Imposter totally works, too, but she most definitely called him a monster!

    • Vanessa

      Pete’s story is coming back around to the notion that the 1960s took apart some of the entitlement of the upper classes. His attitude always was that he deserved success as he came from the right family with the right pedigree (like Roger), and has been confronted once again with the reality that the strivers and no-names are getting ahead.

      • Ally08

        Now that you mention it, the family history Bob invented for himself is very much like Pete’s actual history. Bob may have a Draper-esque name, but in his fantasies, he’s a blue-blood Campbell. Tom Ripley-esque, indeed, as other commenters have mentioned. Put away all the blunt objects, Pete!

        Oh no, I hope he doesn’t get clubbed with the ceramic dog in his office…
        http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Mad+Men+S6E11+2.jpg

      • 3hares

        I think MW’s often said, though, that it’s a little more complicated. He’s probably got an automatic idea that there are proper ways of doing things, but he also wants to break out of the system that produced people like his father. Pete doesn’t respect him or see him as worthy of respect just because of his breeding.

        But Don and Bob are something different. They’re not just strivers, they’re liars–which Pete has come to respect.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

      Does this mean that Bob will eventually be the Don to Pete’s Roger? Only with a long-simmering and never-to-be-requited passion stirred into the mix? Because if it is — hot-damn, I’ve got a spin-off that I need badly.

      • OrigamiRose

        As unlikely as it was, during their confrontation in Bob’s office, I was yearning for Bob to give Pete a big long smooch (Tom Selleck-on-Kevin Kline style from In and Out).

        • MartyBellerMask

          There’s always next season…

          • Mismarker

            So true. Who knows where Pete Campbell lies on the Kinsey scale? Plus, he’s finally found someone who may be willing to be his submissive. Oh, the possibilities.

            • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

              I’m not even joking about how sexy I find these two together! Pete’s infinite neediness and desire to be loved, Bob’s sinister servility…

              I feel like I should take this to tumblr already.

            • lisbeth borden

              No kidding! Love this storyline for Pete (& Kartheiser to show off).

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

          If nothing else, the hate-sex between them would end up being *epic.*

          (Yeah, I know, it’s never going to happen. But let me have my dreams!)

          • OrigamiRose

            I share your dreams!

          • lisbeth borden

            Man, Pete Campbell has been so lonely, I was just WAITING for him to give in last week during the knee-touching. Holy hell those two are a sexy pair…. Pete’s self-disgust would make it even hotter!

            • bxbourgie

              I almost want this. Almost. I think many people would consider it a “jumping the shark” moment, but honestly, gay relationships happen all the time like this.. a person who’d never before considered having feeling for another man (or woman) becoming warm to the idea based on their interactions with that person, even if they’ve never indicated that they would be open to it in the past. Pete is so disgusted with Bob, but at the same time, maybe that just masks his own desires in a “thou doth protest too much” kinda way? I know I’m totally dreaming here, but I mean it could happen. I’d be ok with it.

            • lisbeth borden

              I think it’s perfectly realistic when we reflect on the demise of Pete’s marriage & relationship (or attempt) with ANY woman, from the mentally ill one, to the kid, to Trudy, to Joan…..SO LONELY. I would love to see Pete & Bob happen, not necessarily forever and not just because it’s sexy. It’d be an awesome storyline.

          • MartyBellerMask

            Not to mention, it’s a little too “HBO” for Mad Men. AMC can only take it so far.

    • mommyca
    • P M

      Why are people saying that Sally was being Betty? The idiot Rolo WAS trying to force himself on her. Yes, she was Betty in her words, but her actions and motivations were genuine, and not blowing the situation out of proportoin

      • Mismarker

        I agree. Her actions were genuine but I think Glen’s reaction was both shocking and exhilarating to her. The kind of thing that may color her actions from now on? God, I hope not. Maybe little Gene will escape this hellhole unscathed since he seems to have had very little interaction with Don.

      • Wellworn

        Ya, it really bothers me that people will say she’s being frigid like Betty just because she doesn’t want to make out with some guy she just met. And isn’t she 13 or something? I really don’t think Betty is that frigid either. Icy yes, but not frigid.

        • not_Bridget

          In those days, “frigid” did not mean icy. It was only applied to a non-orgasmic woman. But it would have been in the vocabulary of a boy who thought he was sophisticated. Next, he would have explained how male arousal can cause health problems. (Sally was too young to just say “so jerk off, already.”)

          Really, those girls were far too young to go “all the way.” Glen’s “girl” might have let him get to second base–if he was lucky. Sally was right to resist Rolo, but saying he tried to “force” her made the situation sound just a bit more dire than it was. However, it impressed her new friend….

          • Wellworn

            Yes, I agree. Maybe I didn’t write well enough to get my point across, but I know what frigid meant then, and was commenting on how the term was used by some commentors to describe Sally just because she turned down Rolo. And also in their making the frigid connection with Betty, who I don’t think is frigid either, just icy. Icy in her demeanor, but not frigid sexually.

          • inchoate

            Glenn and the girl were both a bit dishevelled when they came out of her room. I think second base had already happened.

          • Sweetpea176

            I think you’re on to something with Sally’s remark impressing the other girl. She said that Rolo tried to force her to the other girl in response to her asking what was going on. I think on some level she may have realized the possibility that the other girl will look at the situation the way Rolo did — are you some kind of uncool naive child? — so she turned up the volume a little bit to save face in front of the mean girl. Not to incite Glen, necessarily. He was already defending her.

        • formerlyAnon

          To be fair, “frigid” in the vocabulary of a boy in that situation meant nothing more or less than ‘not cooperating in my desire to have sex (or a steamy hand job).”

          • fnarf

            When I was a lad in this very time period (10 in ’68) “frigid” was perfectly appropriate for “doesn’t want to make out”. Rolo’s not trying to have intercourse, though he’d certainly carry through if it came to that; he’s just trying to get to “first base” to start with, then second, etc. It’s what teenage boys do. She’s inappropriately young, but again, this is ’68. It might have gotten rapey, later on, but I doubt it; at that point it was just a kiss she was rejecting.

            • Bonjour

              Re evidence of his intentions, he said ‘I have very good hands’ (or sth close to that) — for a 14-yr-old girl who just witnessed the Primal Scene, w only one of her parents, staged as sweaty/disgusting/gross, I can see why Sally is not keen just yet on furthering her sexual education. Also it was a cas hookup, not an ‘I’ve admired you so long you are so pretty whatever’ adolescent scene of courtship/infatuation. Sally deserves better!

            • formerlyAnon

              I wasn’t advocating for “rapey” being technically the right descriptor, sorry if I wasn’t clear. Just that in my similar time-frame experience (I’m a year or two older than you), a guy operating at the sophistication level to pull out “frigid” was gunning for something more than first base. (Even if he was used to settling for it.) It’s something that probably varied depending on the social group.

            • Virginie

              I really wish we could retire the term ‘rapey’

        • Chris

          Oh Betty isn’t frigid at all in the sexual sense. She really enjoyed her love life with Don and she and Henry have been shown to have an active love life. She has a cool persona in general and Sally has adopted this as well. The comparison with Betty was in liking the power she holds over boys. Betty liked Henry being jealous of the guy flirting with her and Sally liked Glen beating Rolo up over her. They both got a thrill from the reactions.

    • FloridaLlamaLover

      Lots of thoughts, but here’s one no one mentioned: Sally wasn’t wearing the necklace that Don gave her.

      • mommyca

        i noticed the same thing!

      • Scimommy

        “My father never gave me anything.” The necklace doesn’t exist any more.

        • formerlyAnon

          She’s denying its existence, but I’d bet money it’s shoved in the back of a drawer or jewelry box.

          • Scimommy

            Sure. I didn’t mean it literally doesn’t exist, just in her dramatic teenage mind.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

      Also, is anyone getting some severe Talented Mr. Ripley vibes with Bob? That way he changed on a dime from hissing threats to Pete to cheerily laughing with Clara was *chilling.*

      All I’m saying is… Pete better not be going on any boat-rides with his protege if he knows what’s good for him!

      • Topaz

        I think he changed tack because he was in a precarious situation and knew that being charming Mr nice guy with Pete wasn’t going to play, but I don’t think it was any more nefarious than that. It was damage control. People pull crap like that in this office all the time – witness all of Don and Ted’s mind games. And clients always make shady little comments when they’re not happy with the work they’re seeing from SCDP, without coming outright and saying it. I did really enjoy seeing him trying to exert some control over the situation though. Good to see he’s got some balls, even if he’s using them a little clumsily right now. God that sounded wrong.

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

          Hey, so long as Pete doesn’t hold them.

          (Though to be honest, that scenario sounds hot as hell… Damn. I think I’ve got the start of a fanfic to write to occupy the hiatus!)

          • Topaz

            Hahaha. There’s gonna be so. Much. Fanfiction.

            The moment when Pete told Bob he wanted him to stop smiling. Dude.

            Suddenly remembering my Vincent Kartheiser crush from back in his Angel days in a way I never have since he transformed into slimy Pete. I’ve never really gone in for shipping with fictional characters, particularly when there’s no real likelihood they’ll get together. I like stories and characters to take their own course and trust in the writers to make the most compelling choices. But this one is starting to reel me in, I gotta say. Must. Resist.

    • http://www.jaimieteekell.com/ Jaimie

      I don’t think Bob Benson saying “It was the greatest day of my life” pertained to Pete complimenting his tie but the sentence before it, about how he was hired: being hired at SCDP was the greatest day of his life. And he’s exaggerating slightly, trying to get across that he likes his job and Pete should go easy on him. (Not to mention bringing up the love-angle in that moment would not have worked in his favor. Pete made it clear that disgusted him.)

      • HelenNPN

        I think he was certainly pleased about the tie compliment. He had gotten the image down right and passed. Great day for him.

    • Cakewalk Yarns

      I’m guessing Bob Benson was “manservant” to our old friend from Lee Garner from Lucky Strike. Bob made a remark about Don’s reputation in one of the 1st eps of the season which stuck with me – where he would have picked up that information? And then Roger mentioned Lee Garner, Jr. out of the blue last night. Bob’s from West Virginia – tobacco country – bingo.

      Also: Yellow = Pissed On. Whenever somebody gets pissed on by somebody else (usually Don) we see them in yellow – or in the case of characters like Pete who would never WEAR yellow – we see giant blocks of piss yellow in the background.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=572633200 Tanzina Ahmed

        I think Duck was clearly insinuating that Bob traded on his sexual favors to get his way in the past. My only question… was Duck right or was it malicious rumor?

        And as a corollary… is Bob really attracted to Pete or was he hoping to blackmail Pete after an assignation?

      • 3hares

        It was the VP of the financial firm he was at.

    • Ally08

      It’s a testament to how cynical and perverted the culture in that advertising agency is, that everyone wanted to puncture the most innocent romance that office has ever seen.

      That said, though grounded in respect and admiration between two peers, Ted does like to pull rank on Peggy: “it’s Monday!”, backing up Pete asking her to leave the room, now him asking her to leave the room… Many a crush would not survive that kind of repeated, um, knocking her down a Peg, but then as I mentioned before, she’s comfortable with the patriarchy.

      • Miss Disco

        well, innocent except that he’s married.

        I read his asking her to leave on those occasions more as a ‘i’ll deal with this/don’t get dragged into it’ situation.

        • Ally08

          I doubt that every other person there who has had an extramarital affair is shocked by that aspect.

          I think it’s Peggy and Ted’s transparent joy and (relative) peer relationship that’s galling. If he was ritually humiliating her in the office while sleeping with her in hotels, everyone would be fine with it.

          • Chris

            Yes, I think you are 100% correct. As I say somewhere- there is a mix of jealousy and resentment in the reactions of every person who commented on it negatively at the office. They all have their own axes to grind. Ted and Peggy’s mistake was acting too happy around each other.

          • Miss Disco

            yes, that’s true. It’s not so much ‘:O you’re in love!’ as ‘:O you’re acting like you’re in love.’

            Don and Megan had the decency, the DECENCY!, to frequently fight and put everyone on edge. What’s all this schmoozey happy, making jokes and working together about! One of you should be crying in the elevator. Dawn’s probably watching like ‘I’m so TEAM CHOLSON right now.’

            • fnarf

              Don and Megan’s relationship was also extremely divisive in the office. Any relationship would be. Ted + Peggy are interfering with the work. Chris doesn’t want to acknowledge this, but it was readily apparent in every scene in the office this episode.

            • Chris

              I can see my opinion -which differs from yours really bothers you to the point you have to complain about it using my name “Chris won’t acknowledge my opinion is the right one.”

              Here are the facts- and you can accept them or reject them.

              Joan, Ginsberg and Moira (plus Don who looked into it after seeing them at the movies) noticed Peggy and Ted’s behavior and were irked/annoyed in some way by it. Those are the only people and departments that were shown. The other creative person (I forget his name) didn’t really seem to care.

              It’s up to the viewer to decide if this is “readily apparent” and divisive all over the office with everyone as you keep posting.

            • jen_wang

              I did get the impression it was readily apparent, because of what goes on in those scenes with the annoyed people. With Ginsberg, I think the takeaway was that Ted was so into Peggy that he was ignoring the others. And I think Don is particularly jarred when Moira not only notices what’s up, but feels like it’s obvious enough to be comfortable commenting on it to him. (Can you imagine what would’ve happened if he’d heard Dawn talking like that about himself?)

            • Chris

              Well I think the point is that Dawn wouldn’t because she is more professional and doesn’t fancy herself having that kind of relationship with Don. Moira is a whole different person and personality. She sat in the first meeting staring at Pete (a partner) before reluctantly offering him her seat. Dawn is portrayed as so efficient she would have immediately gotten another chair because she sees herself as there to facilitate everything as much as possible. Moira wasn’t going anywhere, she wanted to be sitting there next to Ted. The show has very specifically chosen to include scenes where Moira is territorial about not only Ted’s business but Ted himself, with Peggy and to be on his heels so much the very polite Ted shuts the door in her face. Moira is not the disinterested but professional secretary Clara or Dawn are. She has been shown as VERY interested in Ted’s business and Don used that. Dawn would never be in that position because no matter what Don did, whether it be breaking things, being drunk, she would never discuss it with anyone else.

            • jen_wang

              Totally agree with all of that. But I do think that Moira (even as possessive and comparatively unprofessional as she is) wouldn’t be gossiping with a partner unless she thought he could see it anyway. She’s irritated when she says it, but it doesn’t quite seem like she’s lost her temper or self-control.

            • Glammie

              Ummm, yeah, several departments, several people, several scenes–it’s readily apparent. That’s how an hour of television works. That was the point of including those scenes. You were meant to know that it wasn’t just Don reacting and j what happened accordingly.

            • Chris

              What other departments? Not Cutler who handles accounts. Joan, Ginsberg and Ted’s secretary who watches his every move. That’s all. No one from “several departments.” And the other person in creative didn’t seem to care.

              How it would work (in an hour of television) if they wanted to show this was the agency wide calamity you are building it up to be, would be to show other departments or people outside this small interested group reacting to it. They purposely did not show that.

            • Glammie

              Don, Joan, Ginsberg, Moira–four different people ranks as “several”. You can add Pete for accounts, who’s not bothered by it, but told Peggy flat out that he could see they were in love with one another, so he noticed. So finance, administrative, accounts and creative have noticed–”several” departments. No one from media, but Harry’s in California during this episode.

              Never said it was a “calamity”–but certainly not a case of nobody notices or cares but Don, who only cares because he’s pure evil and insanely jealous.

            • Chris

              Don’s not “pure” evil but his motivation towards Peggy and Ted was malicious, not good intentioned. That is my opinion.

              Pete noticed because he and Peggy were both drunk at a pretty intimate dinner for three. (Ted also noticed Peggy and Pete had some kind of connection which is not something I ever thought was general knowledge either.) Pete not only wasn’t bothered by it, he didn’t seem to think it was a relationship that was “interfering with the work” as stated above so I don’t think accounts fits into the theory that their relationship is so “divisive.” Likewise the other creative person who didn’t seem to care.

              I’ve never said “nobody notices” Peggy and Ted, I’ve listed who has noticed (several times) and been in some way annoyed by it. Those people all have a personal interest or previous resentment. They are not impartial or necessarily representative of the entire office.

              Joan also thought Peggy was Don’s mistress and let him “carry her to the deep end of the pool” when she wasn’t.

            • Glammie

              Ginsberg doesn’t have a personal interest in Ted and Peggy. He just wants his work out there. He was resentful–that was pretty much the purpose of his one scene. We never see the entire office, so it’s kind of ridiculous to demand that there be–what–a large group meeting where people complain about it? What we saw was a reasonably realistic show of how these kind of things affect office morale.

              Don’s motives are always mixed–why? Because he’s extremely good at rationalizing his behavior to himself. He gives himself excuses–and in this case–Ted gave him one when he okayed the budget without clearing it with the client.

              The only character I think may qualify as majorly evil is Cutler with the voyeurism,the drug doping and overt desire to mess with SCDP’s accounts. He’s kind of charming, but we haven’t been shown any redeeming qualities as of yet.

              Don’s weak as much as anything.

            • Chris

              Ginsberg is always resentful when it’s not his ideas being listened to or used, like in “The Crash” Even when it was mostly gibberish between Stan and Ed and his idea was “Dad I could be dying in Vietnam don’t you want me to have a car?” he was mad his idea didn’t get the proper attention “What I’ve got nothing interesting to say because I’m not on drugs?” He also demanded to have Peggy’s pen so he could be the one to write things down. Ginsberg is always complaining about something. Of course Peggy’s idea getting the attention would bother him whether it was the best idea in the world or the worst. That was my point about Ginsberg.

              Again it’s my opinion but I don’t think Moira, Ginsberg and Joan represent the office morale of all of SC. It’s a very small sample of people who have their own agendas or previous resentments against Ted or Peggy or both. Joan’s morale didn’t seem to be taking a beating, she seemed to alternate between being bored with them and cynically amused.

            • Glammie

              Ginsberg a loose cannon, but the point of having the scene at all in the episode was to have him say what other people would be too diplomatic to say. There’s no other reason for the scene to exist, but to show the Peggy/Ted dynamic in the office.

              SC doesn’t exist. This is all fiction, so the question is why are those scenes there? If this is just about Don’s reaction to Peggy and Ted then why have the other reactions in there at all? Why show Ted brush everybody off, but Peggy in a meeting. Why have Moira, who’s been standoffish, make any kind of connection with Don?

              I think it’s because we again see Don picking things up and using them to do the right/wrong thing simultaneously. Here I’m going to quote from Seth Stevenson at Slate:

              “This seemed like Don of yore: drunk, manipulative, sometimes cruel, but mostly right on the merits. Sunkist *is* a bigger client, even if it does mean that Ted . . . has to beg for mercy from Ocean Spray. Ted *did* spend too much on that aspirin casting, and then Don fixed it. Most delicate of all, Ted *isn’t* thinking with his head, and Don’s correct that others can see it. Joan, Ginsberg . . .people are tired of Ted’s goo-goo eyes.”

              Stevenson goes on to say that Don’s motives are mixed, jealousy being a factor, etc.

              So this is just my opinion, and the Slate writer’s opinion and several other people’s here. I think it’s worth considering that if we’re all out to lunch that there are a lot of people at the restaurant.

              I also don’t think he’s changed that much–he’s just gotten older, less pretty and so his misdeeds are less glamorous and harder to take. He was a drinker and a womanizer from the first episode.

              For me, the question has long been whether redemption will be possible for Don. For a long time, his one redeeming quality was his kindness (when present) as a father, but he’s betrayed Sally now, so he’s pretty much isolated from genuine connections. Certainly, not the season–Matt Weiner’s having Don pay the piper. I think it’s quite possible we’ll see some Cutler sabotage next week. If he’s not a stand-in for the Devil, he’s certainly a snake in the grass.

            • Chris

              If we’re pulling out quotes -MW the person who actually writes the show said( and I’m paraphrasing because I can’t be bothered to transcribe the video) that Don is doing this “for the company” ostensibly but it’s not. Don is doing it as punishment against them because seeing Ted and Peggy “broke his heart.” You can see his exact words on the inside the episode video at AMC if you haven’t seem it yet.

              Moira has never been standoffish with Don, just Peggy and Joan. She and Don had a little dialogue on the stairs before during the crash but mostly they aren’t in each others orbit. Don noticed her because she was standing up and just staring into the conference room at Peggy and Ted.

              I agree scenes are there for a reason and I agree of course there is a Peggy and Ted dynamic no one is denying that. There is also a reason Moira has been shown all season incredibly attached to Ted and resentful of anyone encroaching. She is a very, very minor character yet almost every time she is shown that idea is reinforced somehow. It’s pretty much all we know of her. That’s why I’m saying she isn’t the last word on the office’s mood. She is incredibly attuned to Ted’s every move and mood.

              I’m also not saying Ginsberg is an idiot, just that he is always seeing himself being “slighted” so that again is someone with a bias. If you look at what he offers at the Ocean Spray brainstorming meeting it’s all complaints and sarcasm. Cran prune is diarrhea in a cup etc etc. He’s not offering pearls of wisdom.

              Regarding Slate, there are a million opinions out there I’ve seen everything written about from both sides. Even TLo debate what MW actually says. Rolling Stone still thinks Peggy’s sister adopted her baby. Everyone has an opinion including the hundreds of people who post here and everyone is entitled to them.

              FYI I don’t remember ever saying anyone was “out to lunch” nor did I say Peggy and Ted weren’t a thing. My opinion is it was predominantly interested parties that were paying attention or put out by Peggy and Ted and it wasn’t an office wide catastrophe and threat to the agency.

              You feel differently. That’s fine. We can keep going back and forth but is anyone going to change their mind in this as a result? Probably not.

            • Glammie

              If you’re going to pull a quote–then pull a quote. Claiming that MW said that Ted and Peggy broke Don’s heart doesn’t mean a whole lot–though I’d say it argues against Don being pure manipulative evil. It’s a nebulous comment–like most of Weiner’s, who likes to keep his cards close to his chest, though, once again, Weiner, not surprisingly, shows a certain empathy for his creation.

              Yes, every character has their own set of motivations, but taken in aggregate it’s clear that they’re meant to stand in for the office as a whole.

              Yes, there are a lot of opinions out there–I’m using one of the people who’s paid to express his, not someone in the Slate comments section. You, not me, are the one who said you were “baffled” by people who didn’t share your view of Don.

              And as MadStyle’s tomorrow, I’m done here.

      • Chris

        Well I saw the Monday comment as him trying to distance himself from temptation. He was very awkward and a bit brusque but I saw it as complete self preservation (or denial). Ted knew he couldn’t hear that from Peggy and be alone with her. I agree with Miss Disco that the other occasions were him trying to keep her out of the situation not neccessarily knocking her down but he did pull rank. I agree the office is very cynical and I think all the persons who reacted to Ted and Peggy definitely had their own axes to grind. They weren’t completely disinterested parties like say Pete’s secretary or someone like that would be.

    • eb1966

      Pete’s speech to Bob reminds me of Trudy’s to Pete in “The Collaborators” – Where she started with “this is how this is going to work” and laid out all the rules. He’s learned from the best, and in this relationship, he gets a chance to be the one in charge.

      • Topaz

        Nice parallel! God, I miss Trudy so much.

        • bxbourgie

          I do too..

      • Chris

        And Bob’s little threat to him in the hall called to mind Don telling Pete years ago that information powerful enought to make a man do what you want is also powerful enough to make him do other things. Pete, unlike Don has learned from his mistakes over the years.

      • CatherineRhodes

        Good point.

    • http://www.facebook.com/dglassman1 Doug Glassman

      I’m not so sure Bob isn’t a sociopath. When he was raving on the phone in Spanish and a few other times, he had a gleam in his eye like a gay 60s-era Patrick Bateman. On a different show, he’d go on a stabbing rampage.

      Also, I think Ted’s enthusiasm over the ad and its “Clio-worthiness” was about 20% based on its creativity and 80% based on the fact that Peggy wrote it. I’d say she’s his Yoko, but Peggy actually does have some talent. I don’t think they’ve slept together… but we’ve seen what Peggy does in movie theaters.

      • Topaz

        But notice that he has real friends that he can ask for help when he needs to. That’s doesn’t strike me as sociopathic. He sounded like someone panicking to me, and therefore arguing against a voice of reason on the other end of the phone saying “this will almost definitely make things worse”. Asking someone to talk to Pete’s mother also doesn’t exactly scream “evil scheme”. This seems like someone who is forced to live a secret life but has made connections and allies where he can, with people who understand what he’s dealing with. And he’s got a certain amount of grit in dealing with dangerous situations because he has to.

        • fnarf

          There’s definitely some scheming there. What we don’t know is whether they’re plotting some kind of grand scam, or just plotting to keep their jobs. They definitely appear to be working Pete for whatever reason — from more than one direction.

          • Topaz

            Think we’ll have to agree to disagree here. I don’t think they’re working Pete at all, beyond how any junior staff member might “work” a senior staff member in order to advance. I think Bob genuinely was infatuated with him, even if the scales are falling from his eyes now. He clearly tends towards fantasising, which is how he’s found himself inventing an entire life history for himself and acting it out in real life, which explains how he managed to convince himself that Pete could fall in love with him (and also in that context it’s heartbreaking that Bob escorted Pete to a brothel and actually OFFERED TO PAY). He also desperately wants to advance in his career and be admired by his co-workers. He has a past he’s not happy about that also doesn’t look good in a resumé for an accounts job, which he’s tried to cover up very unsuccessfully, indicating he did it out of fear rather than any grand ruse. That’s the sum total of what I think he’s up to here.

      • SFree

        Yes, we do know what Peggy does in theaters, and it has never been innocent. I thought the very same thing when I saw them. I didn’t think the guilt on their faces was related to playing hooky. They are executives and can sneak out of work any time they want … they all know that. Except clueless Megan, who looked truly surprised and like she and Don had been caught skipping school.

        • Chris

          “Yes, we do know what Peggy does in theaters, and it has never been innocent.”

          It’s never been innocent? What other times has Peggy ever done anything in a theater besides with the guy in the striped pants?

          • Frank_821

            She gave a guy a handjob in the theater last season. she was having a bad with the Heinz beans guy

            • Chris

              Yes, that’s the one time. I was reacting to “it’s never been innocent” implying she is always up to nefarious things in theaters.

            • SFree

              It only takes one to be a callback in MM. I’m sure there are innocent moments for Peggy at the movies, but I can’t remember them in MM. She loves to sit in the dark, anonymously and invisible. It is a place where she plays out her naughty side.

            • Chris

              I thought she went, like Don did to get creative ideas from the movies. The only other time we saw her at the movies, she was just watching and ran into Don. The day with the striped pants guy she spent the entire day acting just like Don would, first with the client, then going to the movies and then hooking up with a random person. Peggy found out Don’s way doesn’t work for her. That was the only naughty movie time we have seen Peggy engage in.

            • jen_wang

              Yeah, I don’t think they were up to anything sexy in the theater. It seemed to me to read more like a betrayal because movie theaters are Don’s special thing to do when he wants to escape, and we used to only see Peggy at the movies when she was doing something like Don (escaping for the day from that Heinz blowup; going to clear her head–and bumping into Don–after going to CGC).

          • SFree

            She smoked pot before it was acceptable.

            • bxbourgie

              “I’m Peggy Olson… and I’d like to smoke some marijuana.”

        • 3hares

          Megan wasn’t clueless. She wanted to dish about Peggy and Ted having an affair.

      • ccinnc

        Yes, that rage was startling, after weeks of nothing but smiles and politeness.

    • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

      Betty is feeling more benevolent towards Don for one reason and one reason only; she is no longer the only one who knows that Don is an ass. Before, everyone always loved Don. As you said, he is so charming that he can get away with anything. She looked like a woman with a failed marriage to a handsome, successful guy. Now, with Meighan and Sally clearly on the outs with him, she can sleep well at night knowing that the end of the marriage wasn’t (entirely) her fault. She was married to a very flawed man and she is no longer the only one who knows it. She was a good enough mother not to tell her adolescent daughter that her father was an ass who cheated on her. And now she doesn’t have too. She wins.

      • Mani @ Iz and Oz

        Love this analysis. Sally found out all on her own, and I’m glad that she did. Don’s charm has been seriously wearing off in this season, for ONCE, it is chipped, and I honestly think he deserves hell for half the shit he’s done. How does it feel to be knocked off the pedestal for once, Draper.

      • Darren Nesbitt

        When Sally says he hasn’t given me anything. I thought my glance at Betty would reveal her smirk but I guess that’s too diabolical. What do you think the face she made to that statement meant? Was she surprised?

        • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

          That was the face of someone who knows that SOMEthing happened, but can’t figure out what. And her prodding of Sally to tell her isn’t getting her anywhere. I’d say it was eating her up inside to know the truth but I don’t think it is. Just having ‘won’ the battle of Sally – and feeling the superior parent to Don – seems to be enough to keep Ole’ Betty happy. Kids are turning into hippies all around her and her daughter wants to go to Miss Porters. She’s on the top of the world.

        • Chris

          Betty isn’t stupid and knows Don better than anyone at this point. She knows Sally won’t go back to his apartment, wants to go to boarding school and has just rejected Don’s influence on her entire life. Betty will put two and two together and come up with something. There is a reason she called Megan “that poor girl.”

    • bxbourgie

      “… Don slapping his dick all over Ted Chaough.” I know I wasn’t supposed to read that literally, but my mind immediately conjured up that image and now it’s all I can think about. Good grief.

      • Miss Disco

        all aboard the new ship!

        • EricaVee

          the HMS DonTed Abbey

          • Travelgrrl

            Why has this not gotten 10,000 upvotes?

    • Tafadhali

      I think there was definitely an element of Sally punishing someone vicariously for Don’s sins in the Miss Porter’s scene, but I also felt that she was enjoying having someone in her corner — she has to turn outside of her family to find someone who will be actually protective of her, who will listen to her and will try and shield her from the sexual experiences she isn’t ready for yet. It’s pretty sad that it’s creepy big-brother figure Glenn and not her dad filling that role.

      (Not that I think teenage girls need to have their virtue preserved by a patriarchal figure. Just that Sally clearly wants SOMEONE to look out for her, since her parents obviously aren’t going to.)

      • Tafadhali

        (on my phone, sorry for typos, but it won’t let me edit.) (….except now I’m not on my phone anymore so I totally edited the typos.)

      • quitasarah

        Yes, I didn’t get the vicarious punishment thing, but I definitely think the grin was all about having someone she can count on, someone in her corner.

    • Ms_Flyover

      Am I the only one mentally making a “Bob Benson” = “J. Pierrepont Finch” connection? think it’s the carnegie records that are doing it…

      • Chickadeep

        And speaking of J. Pierrepont Finch, one of my favorite subtle acting moments in this episode was the expression on Robert Morse’s face in reaction to Roger Sterling’s line about having to hold Lee Garner, Jr.’s balls. Doubly funny when you remember Bert Cooper doesn’t have a pair of those anymore!

    • Vanessa

      “We’re not so sure Peggy’s Rosemary’s Baby ad was as Clio-worthy as Ted said”
      I think his level of enthusiasm was supposed to reflect Ted’s infatuation with Peggy. Ginsburg also said “I wanted to see if he would react to an idea that wasn’t hers.”

      • fnarf

        Because when Peggy’s in the room Ted doesn’t even know the rest of them are there too.

      • quitasarah

        Cosigned.

    • Tippi123

      Moira was slightly peeved when she saw Pegs and Ted having a laugh in that glass box, no? I also think she was quite happy to tell Peggy Ted had left when Peggy wanted to speak to him…

      • Chris

        Absolutely she was. She has resented Peggy for quite a while. Whether it’s a power struggle over Ted, his attention or something deeper we don’t know.

        • Darren Nesbitt

          Also Don said “Ask your secretary!”. It seems that their secretaries are supposed to be their mistresses or spirit beings or something lol

          • Chris

            Well remember Joan told Peggy her first day at SC that what the men wanted in a secretary was a cross between a waitress and a mother right? They are supposed to take of everything in their private and public lives.

            • fnarf

              My father, who was a big-time exec during this time period, had his secretary do all kinds of personal jobs for him — gas up his car, buy my mother and us kids our birthday presents, get the dry cleaning, maintain his calendar, everything.

              We’ve also seen numerous secretaries being held responsible for tie-straightening, coat-brushing and other grooming duties, and being chastised for failing to do it. Her job is among other things making sure he doesn’t look like an idiot. This is difficult for Moira right now because the guy making Ted look like an idiot is Ted.

            • Chris

              Moira has been presented as a busybody and forward for a secretary – using Ted’s name and authority with Joan over the list Joan had written up (then being subtly told to back off by Ted when he says “Moira” reprovingly), being the only secretary in the partner’s meeting. She also visibly didn’t like it when Peggy went in Ted’s office without letting her announce her, and once Ted (who is usually extremely chivalrous) shut his office door right in her face when she was marching in after him. Whether she is just territorial or harbors any other feelings or resentments we don’t know. We do know Clara, Dawn etc don’t act this way towards Pete and Don. When Don gets drunk, smashes things or in anyway acts up Dawn reacts to it but is not out making faces or complaining in front of anyone else. Clara does not at Pete’s antics either. Moira seems far more emotionally invested than the other secretaries.

            • forward_slash_PRS

              I disagree somewhat. I’ve said before on this blog that I think Moira has so far been presented as an excellent, dedicated executive assistant (aka secretary). This is what I do, and I recognize her pain at her boss looking idiotic and her earlier discomfort with the merged agency not treating Ted (and by extension, her) w/ “proper” respect. She’s in a strong position and can state the obvious to another partner if she wants to.

              fnarf, I loved your related post — in my career from the 1990s until today, I have gassed up cars and taken them to the carwash. I have picked up & dropped off dry cleaning. I have purchased gifts and planned travel for family members. I would never let my executive appear in public ungroomed in any way. It’s a bit like “The Devil Wears Prada” without Meryl Streep throwing coats at me . . .

            • Sweetpea176

              I have a different take on Moira, having been an assistant to corporate executives myself some years ago. Her job is gatekeeper for Ted and much as anything else, and there’s a pecking order among secretaries. The bigger the boss’s status, the bigger the secretary’s status. The biggest boss’s secretaries are the Queen Bees of the office. I think we’re meant to think of Moira as being Ted’s Joan — in charge of everything, in on everything, commanding the most respect — not as being a busybody or too forward for a secretary. I would expect her to be territorial over Ted because making sure his day runs smoothly is largely her job. If he loses status, she loses status. If he loses trust in her ability to be gatekeeper, or in her ability to get people to do things in his name, she could lose her job or be demoted, regardless of whatever other skills she may have. There may be more to it, and many secretaries and bosses become very friendly over time — platonically and romantically — but I wouldn’t necessarily assume that there is.

            • Alice Teeple

              That is a fantastic assessment, and calls back to that speech Pete gave to Clara about her job being linked to his. And it would perfectly explain her attitude: perhaps she is looking out for herself, and not for Ted after all. Joan has already made her feel somewhat self-conscious. She demanded a place at the boardroom table – people have been insinuating it was because of Ted, but maybe she was attempting to establish herself as a presence. If she’s running around with Cutler like some are saying, that would also tie into the Joan parallel.

            • Sweetpea176

              I was an “executive assistant” as recently as about a dozen years ago, and it’s still like this at a certain level. Maybe not tie-straightening, but if my boss’s tie was out of whack before a meeting, I would have considered it my job to let him know.

          • formerlyAnon

            For all the jokes and ridicule about women not wanting to fetch coffee – that originated in the idea that women really were expected to be office mommies/wives. If you had your own secretary, many men never had to remember a birthday or anniversary ever again – it was the secretary’s job to prompt them, and often to order the flowers, pick up the present ( a perk of shopping for the boss was a longer lunch hour, where I first worked), make the dinner reservations, etc. Not *instead of* the office work, *in addition to.*

            • fnarf

              Exactly. My dad wouldn’t even know what the present was, he’s just give her a budget — “go pick out something for ten bucks”. Oh, Doris, I remember you well.

    • Mary Featherstone

      My 2 favorite scenes from the episode: Sally smoking the cigarette (she’s a mini Betty Draper) and the death stare from Peggy in the conference room when Don was humiliating her and Ted.

      • Chickadeep

        Speaking of Mini Betty Draper: look at Sally’s expression in response to Prep School Marcia Brady’s “You like to start trouble” comment. Kudos to Kiernan Shipka for her precise re-creation of January Jones’ slightly smug “wouldn’t you like to know?” sly Mean Girl face with the sideways glance. Miss Porter’s isn’t going to know what hit ‘em.

    • siriuslover

      Great analysis, guys! I agree with you about Ted and Peggy, and as I said last night, I’m still not sure they’re having a full-blown affair. I certainly yelled out in my hotel room, “Oh my god, they killed Kenny!” I was very happy to see him with the eye patch, but irritated at Roger’s Rogerness about the patch…though his Lee Garner, Jr. comment was pretty funny. Don is regressing, not showing any growth whatsoever. I felt the baby imagery was meant to evoke that Don doesn’t grow from his mistakes. Someone a few episodes ago said that Wolk (don’t remember his first name) has been signed to his own show next year. Does that mean that we will see the end of Bob Benson next week? I hope not.

      • EricaVee

        Allison Brie (Trudy Campbell) did Mad Men for years while also playing a main character on Community, so it’s not out of the question that he could do both.

    • Tippi123

      Pete’s mother’s getup doesn’t look as polished anymore as it was last week I thought. She clearly needs a bit of MANOLO in her life!

      • DaveUWSNYC

        I noticed that too – from pretty in pink to refrumped.

      • snarkykitten

        Shit, *I* need a bit of Manolo in my life

      • joything

        And her nurse, Josephine, is fantasizing about a murder spree. God I loved that actress’ face. Who needs dialogue?

    • HelenNPN

      I’d like to add a thought about the ongoing theme of death – anyone’s death – on the show.

      Advertising notoriously plays into “the death wish” and it is only fitting that
      this impulse informs so much of Mad Men. In fact, think about it –
      would you rather see the show finally end with Draper just a failed,
      washed up old drunk. Bloated, rejected by his ex-wives and forgotten by
      his kids, telling stories to some skid row cronies about how it
      was….? Or would you rather he just make an exit, and go with some of
      his superficial diginity and glamour still intact, off the side of a
      building or down the old elevator shaft, or William Holden style into a
      pool…?

      I’d venture that given what we’ve been shown about DD’s
      actual life, the majority of viewers share a sort of subconscious mass death wish for
      him.

    • Darren Nesbitt

      Bob Benson is crazy, and not in a sad Don like way but in a vicious I’m afraid of him way. I’m sort of happy Pete pulled in the reigns on this. I think he has a new gay pitbull to walk around the office and command at will.. . . Why do I like Pete a little more lol

      • lisbeth borden

        I think Kartheiser deserves a supporting Emmy nom this year. First, he made me feel sorry for friggin’ Pete Campbell, now these great interactions w/ Bob Benson?! His best work of the series, the best character this year imo.

        • ryenerman

          Yes at the end of the episode I commented to my husband for at least the fourth time that it’s inexcusable that Kartheiser has been overlooked for an Emmy for years now.

          • Mani @ Iz and Oz

            I honestly think it’s because his character’s so swarmy, which is an extremely unfair and unfortunate bias. Kind of like how Bryce Dallas Howard was overlooked too for her role as Hilly in The Help – she played a completely thankless character. But the fact that we hated her (and Vincent too) was undeniably proven acting ability.

        • EricaVee

          And this whole season he’s just held his entire face differently, in that smarmy, unhappy scowl. Amazing.

    • Frank_821

      Yes they Killed Kenny came in load and clear

      That breakdown of Ken’s was both sad and hilarious. Plenty of black humor. Actually it occurred to me that conversation was the first sign Pete’s life was comign back under control when he openly admitted he and Trudy were no longer together

      Don is such a fool. and so unaware that’s beyond pathetic.

      That last scene with Pete and Bob was excellent. But Pete is right. based on on past experience, it’s better to keep Bob around and at a safe distance. I am also glad they showed pete being self-aware enough that the Bob Bensons and Don Drapers of this world have a powerful tool in their charm and personality. Somethign that allows them to accomplish great things with. something Pete himself is less gifted in.

      It was amusing that Pete openly declared himself offlimits and how for the first time we saw an honest conversation involving Bob. In a weird way with the cards on the table between them, I can see sort of a friendship develop between them eventually. There already is a lot more honesty going on between them than other people with those last comments about Pete’s mother and Manolo happening with the office door open and Bob actually yelling back at Pete

      • HelenNPN

        I’ll agree and go a little further and say – I think Pete’s complex response and commanding way was a bit of a turn on for Bob. He probably only admires him more now that he is explicitly “forbidden fruit”. ; )

      • Adrianna Grężak

        I agree that we might see a friendship. Pete’s an asshole, but he’s a complex asshole. The same person who raped a German nanny also passionately defended the civil rights movement.

    • Tippi123

      Harry saying, “I’m on the coast.” HAHAHAAAA! What’s that? 60s lingo? NY lingo? Do people still say that?

      • Denise Alden

        It reminds me of Sydney Pollack (in Tootsie) telling Dustin Hoffman “Michael, I’m talking to the coast,” and Hoffman spits out, “This is a coast, too. New York has a coast . . .” and Pollacks sighs and hangs up.

    • Ally08

      If we can get back to our regularly-scheduled paranoid plot forecasting, my hopeful theory for next week is that Cutler splits the agency & takes all the best clients, and that after what happened this week, Ted does nothing but encourage him. (Maybe even Pete will be ready to ditch his former partners with Chevy and Bob, since the old SCDP set doesn’t have much love for him and almost left him behind during the last split.)

      Don has doubly reneged on his ‘end the war’ handshake with Ted last week: by bringing in the other (bigger) juice account and humiliating Ted in front of a client and Peggy. Going back on a handshake deal is a gross violation of trust; it would be today, let alone back then, between two men and business partners to boot. (Also, Ted may now get his friend to ignore Sylvia’s kid’s National Guard pilot application, leading to more meltdowns on the home front.)

      To go back to Pete’s great line in the season opener — “And now you’re going to go to your office and take a nap.” — I would like to point out that this is just about all Don has done this year. He has not had a single creative success. The Ted-Peggy thing bugged him because of their creative energy, mutual affection, and the fact that these two bright people, who used to be obsessed with his ‘genius’, have moved forward without him.

      • Laylalola

        I love this analysis and at the same time disagree with almost of it! :) As for Don — Sunkist this episode alone was a major creative success of his (winning almost 3 times the advertising by pitching the rise in color television to play up the orange). And I guess I see his reaction to Ted-Peggy differently than many people here — more than anything he likes to passive-aggressively (aggressively?) sabotage the women in his life, making this not about her but about his triumph over her. I’ve seen it in the real world: Some people have a real compulsion to thwart the success of others — they don’t want them to succeed, then they’re no longer interested when they fail.

        • Chris

          Harry was responsible for Sunkist- when Roger asked Don about work he told him to give it to Harry to work up a media strategy. We haven’t seen Don produce one piece of work since Chevy. If there was creative attached the chances that Don did it are slim to none.He doesn’t create creative anymore, he just “reviews” it.

          • Cheryl

            Harry definitely does not get the respect he deserves. He’s out there in La-La-Land (New York joke) on his own making deals and bringing in clients and cash and he’s still the butt of all the jokes. I’d like to see him eventually get his revenge but alas, I don’t see that happening.

            • Chris

              He may yet- he has been shown in CA a lot this season. He may get an offer from another firm.

      • Chris

        I agree that Don’s whole motivation was to destroy Peggy and Ted in any way possible. A lot of people have posted that Don was concerned and was “saving” the agency when he interfered with the aspirin account. Don hasn’t cared about one account or client since landing Chevy and dumping all the responsibility on Ted. Don single handedly jettisoned Jaguar simply because he didn’t like the way Herb challenged him. Ted was a perceived threat to Don and what is “his.” He didn’t care one whit about the agency it was pure malice.

        • http://classversussass.com Class Versus Sass

          I agree with this

          • Denise Alden

            Me, too. As Pete said, “You’re just Tarzan, swinging from vine to vine!”

      • nosniveling

        Don changed his mind on Sunkist the minute he saw Ted & Peggy at the movies- he knew he had leverage with Ted, and could go back on their agreement.
        It is nothing but dick slapping, disguised as concern for the company.

        • Bonjour

          Remember in S1(or way back then) when Don and Roger went out for a 100-martini lunch and a whole bunch of oysters, and before they left the office Don ‘broke’ the elevator, so they’d have to climb a ton of stairs? Nasty result, right in front of the client.

          Don does this, preemptive attacks own high level ‘colleagues’ in front of client, to make sure he stays dangerous and on top around the office.

          • Virginie

            Wow, I’d never realised Don actually broke the elevator himself.

            • Bonjour

              He didn’t actually break it, but put the ‘out of service’ sign up and sort of winked at the elevator operator, as I remember.

            • http://twitter.com/mung_beans Mung Beans

              he bribed the elevator operator IIRC

          • Chris

            Yes it was retaliation for Roger flirting and coming on to Betty at dinner at the Draper’s house. That was his punishment from Don- public humiliation. It was the same punishment for Ted being with Don’s other girl Peggy- public humiliation, this time in front of the client.

            • Bonjour

              Ohhh, thanks. I never knew what that stunt was _for_.

      • sweetlilvoice

        Exactly. Don has been creatively dead for weeks now. And why didn’t Ted have a prepared response to the client’s concerns? He had time to prep! Don’t leave your fate to Don Draper Ted!

        • Chris

          I thought it showed Ted genuinely believed it was an amazing commercial and that the client would realize it and want to put the money towards it. I also thought Ted wanted to be further along in the commercial to have something to show the client and really “Wow” him but Don got to him first.

          • Alice Teeple

            I was wondering if the commercial was actually just borne out of them getting caught in the movie theatre, and their enthusiasm was doubled down to save face – like Peggy’s “date,” and they actually came up with something they thought was funny. It’s almost as if they were like, “oh shit, now what do we do? We’d better actually make this Rosemary’s Baby aspirin commercial…”

            • Chris

              I don’t think so- they had been working on it for a while. They were already up to casting the next day at work. Joan knew all about the commercial- it had been underway for a while. Ted really thought it was genius. Almost the cruelest thing Don did was make Ted doubt himself professionally.

    • katiessh

      ha! i knew there was something weirder about bob benson than the fact that he was gay; nobody in mad men is that nice, of course he’s made up his entire career. Also, just saying, we haven’t seen the finale left- plenty of time for more violence.

    • decormaven

      Pete’s going to have free toilet paper delivery for life, with the leverage he now has over Bob Benson. Like TLo says, this plot development has gotten decidely more interesting.

      • Adrianna Grężak

        My boyfriend, who’s only watched a few Season 6 episodes, was confused by what happened. But it made perfect sense, especially after I explained the “Who cares” scene in season 1.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1180174329 Elizabeth Phillips

      Bob could still be Don/Dick’s son. They were in Pennsylvania when Dick was raped by Aimee. Pennsylvania shares a long border with West Virginia. Aimee could have gone over the border to WV and had Bob, then found out that Dick was now Don and sent Bob to meet him.

      • Adrianna Grężak

        That would be one hell of a twist, but I think dozens of critics would say that Mad Men jumped the shark. It would kind of explain why Bob hangs around Creative, but I don’t think he really interacts with Don often.

        • Laylalola

          It would be too much — in fact, it was risky for the writers to go with a second character having a completely falsified identity, it so easily could have been a jump-the-shark moment in itself.

      • quitasarah

        The strongest argument against this kind of twist is that MM is not that kind of show.

    • tresfabuleux

      “We can see now where we made our mistake in assessing him. It was in assuming that Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce had some sort of credentials review process in place. Really, guys. Somebody needs to bring that up at the next partners’ meeting. Apparently, nothing’s changed in the 14 years since Don Draper glad-handed his way into a job.”

      As an HR person watching the show, I couldn’t help but wonder how they hired Bob without so much as calling his references or verifying his most recent education. It was something that Duck was able to easily do with quick phone calls. Looks like they need a better (or an actual) Personnel Department at SC&P.

      I would say that the one difference between Bob and Don is that Don assumed the identity of someone who actually had the educational credentials, whereas Bob seemed to just completely doctor his resume. Neither is right, but at least Don’s is technically right…the best kind of right.

      Finally–the scene between Pete and Bob with the “I surrender” bit which was dripping with crazy sexual subtext first left me scratching my head, but then I thought more about how in this case Pete has more power (which that little shit always craves) holding a secret (which this show trades in) than revealing it, which has already backfired on him once. Plus I think Pete realized that people like Bob, and to a lesser extent, Don, have nothing to lose if they are outed. They can pick up the pieces, run away, and start all over as a new person in a new town.

      • OrigamiRose

        In theory I agree, but even as recently as 2001, Notre Dame hired George O’Leary to be their football coach, a man whose CV included a degree from a non-existent institution (among other fabrications).

        Plus, I think back to what Dawn told her friend early in the season, how totally screwed up the agency was; I can see there being poor protocols in vetting candidates during the hiring process. Especially if someone gives an order to a new hire to be made.

        • tresfabuleux

          We can even look more recently to the last CEO of Yahoo (Scott Thompson, before Marissa Mayer) who had inaccuracies on his CV to know that people still do this today. It still happens, but especially now it’s much easier to sniff out. Even with less technology though, one would hope that there would at least be a call made to each of the candidate’s references.

          I can imagine the hiring process at SC&P is a mess, just like everything else around there seems to be.

          • OrigamiRose

            Agreed :)

        • Alice Teeple

          Hell, the dean of my college went to Bob Jones University for her undergrad.

          • formerlyAnon

            To be fair, Bob Jones U. actually exists.

            • Alice Teeple

              Not in the world of accreditation…hahahha!

            • formerlyAnon

              Thank god for small favors.

      • Chris

        I thought it was also said somewhere that Don(Dick) went to night school? I thought he educated himself sometime after moving to NY from CA. I would think it was necessary in his field to have that base of knowledge.

        • Peridot

          Yes, he attended City College of New York which, especially pre-1970s was known as the Free Academy and the “Harvard of the Poor”. So Don/Dick’s education is authentic.

          • Cheryl

            Yes, he could have gotten a college education, but they’ve never really shown how Don became so “polished” and sophisticated. Was it Betty’s upper-crust influence? Or something he picked up from Roger or Bert? He was a hillbilly Army private and became a smooth Mad Adman a decade later, but we never really saw the transition.

            • Chris

              I guess we are to assume it was a combination of aspiration, self education, his college education and life experience. He was always trying to better his position and self. First selling cars in CA then moving to NY, selling furs, creating ads, the job at SC. I did notice when re-watching some first season episodes lately that Don (or Jon Hamm) had an accent that popped up now and then in his speech he doesn’t have now. His diction is better than it used to be but I don’t know if this is deliberate or just experience on the actor’s part.

            • eselle28

              My guess would be that it’s something that evolved slowly over the years. He probably picked up the initial skills while he was in cars and sales, was passable as middle class by the time he met Betty, and slowly picked up additional refinement over the years of living with her, interacting with Roger, and meeting clients from a variety of backgrounds.

              I think Bob is an example of how this can happen. He has excellent instincts and nice manners, but he occasionally makes some mistakes that come across to people as strange or tacky – having the vegetable tray sent to the funeral (which would be regarded as a thoughtful gesture among my modern-day, middle-class, rural peers and probably seemed appropriate to Bob) and trying so hard to be friendly that some people find him off-putting. He’s mostly there, but there are a few nuances to pick up still. I’m guessing Don might have been like that at the same stage, though probably in a less cordial way.

        • Alice Teeple

          Yeah, I think he went to City College of New York.

      • SFree

        The HR of today is so much different than it was then. Plus, these guys see themselves as being beyond the rules. They broke off on their own and they merged the two companies virtually overnight. Rules do not apply to them or, apparently, to their corporate structure. It’s a wonder they haven’t gotten into more trouble financially.

        • tresfabuleux

          I know that HR of today is totally a foreign concept back in the 60s–in fact, if a company had anything similar to HR it was called the Personnel Department and it was mainly a place for filing forms and compliance-based work.

          These people definitely have an “above the law” approach to their company, and I too, wonder how they manage to stay afloat financially. I guess Joan manages to somehow keep it all together. At least that’s how it goes down in my head.

          • Miss Disco

            its amazing that Lane was the only person who ever embezzled from the company really.

            • Chris

              Well Lane had to forge Don’s name to do it. Two signatures are needed so two signers have to be in cahoots to pull it off and the signers are probably only partners.

            • Miss Disco

              yeah, but that was only discovered because bert brought it up with don after checking some numbers. Who knows if Joan or Dawn go asking the partners about all those little expenses going astray. This sort of thing happens in the corporate world all the time, probably not even exposed until someone gets carried away with a month in bermuda or something.

      • Edwina3

        Plus, back then people didn’t neccessarily have to have prestigious degrees to rise the corporate ladder. My Dad was circulation director for the New Yorker in the mid- sixties with no college degree whatsoever.

        • tresfabuleux

          Truth! And even today quite often I get into discussions with my hiring managers on whether a degree is truly “required” to perform certain jobs.

        • Wellworn

          My dad started working at the loading dock of an aerospace company in CA in the 1950s and worked his way up from poverty and just an associate’s degree to managing a think tank of scientists and engineers many years later. He even worked in the “Skunk Works”. Makes me realize what an incredible feat that was.

      • editrixie

        Agencies often don’t have a full HR department; they might have a person who does HR stuff as part of their job. And back then, it wasn’t as common for an independent agency to have hiring staff (a lot of times, in some of the agencies I worked for as an intern or part-time help, even in the late ’70s and ’80s, it was the accounting people who did your paperwork, and you interviewed with the creatives or whatever department you were going to). And I worked for a small firm once where we found out our director had fabricated most of his resume. Funnily enough, the lawyer who lobbied for our trade group ended up taking his position, and then he and a woman in the company started embezzling funds, which my boss and I stumbled upon and had to bring to the board’s attention. You’d be amazed at what can happen in small companies like that.

        • tresfabuleux

          Oh I’m not surprised at all. I’ve been in really small companies where I’ve been the entire HR department and have seen places where there is none at all.

      • fnarf

        Except that Dick Whitman didn’t make up an identity; he stole one. There really was a Don Draper before him. as far as I can tell, Bob Benson really is Bob Benson, he just lied about his resume. Maybe that’ll turn out to be wrong too.

        • tresfabuleux

          Right, I think we are saying the same thing

    • Darren Nesbitt

      Can we please have no more scenes outside of the office! I love seeing drama unfold during client meetings and the partners running from office to office “closing the door” to talk shit! Every time I see the Draper apartment or Betty’s Kitchen I get bored.

      • Qitkat

        While the office drama is the crux of the show, I’ve always felt that just as none of us leaves everything at home when we show up at our offices, neither do these characters. It enriches the experience for me greatly in understanding what has contributed to a character’s emotions through the personal life scenes. To me, it would not have the depth the show obviously has, if all we ever saw were business scenes. That is the failing of many procedurals, the characters come across as one-dimensional due to lack of home or social settings and interactions with other people in their lives.

    • Wellworn

      I saw the Don Draper similarities with Bob Benson also, weeks ago. I am a bit surprised that they would reveal his background so soon though, although they revealed Don’s past early in the show, I don’t remember when Pete learned of it. I wonder if there are still more secrets to reveal. After being up too late last night, and up too early this morning, I have a little more perspective. I do see how he has moved his way up already, in the same fashion that Don probably did. I do hope that his character will continue through the series. I like Bob. He has been resourceful and a go getter beyond belief. I want him to succeed. I wonder how Pete will be involved in this, I feel he will somehow. I don’t see blue blood Pete meshing in any better with Chevy than Ken did. Bob will smooth this process because he is the expert at meshing well with others. And who wouldn’t love to see a little of that Chevy violence that was directed at Ken, now aimed at Pete? What part of Pete’s body will need patching?

      • SFree

        Bob is the brighter side of Don. And he drinks coffee, rather than booze, at the office.

    • Donna Tabor

      As usual, thanks for the analysis.

      And just wanted to thank you, Tom and Lorenzo, for last week’s very long essay on gay history. It was fascinating and enlightening, and I’ve been watching The Boys in the Band ever since. This past weekend I was with an older gay couple who would have gone through all this same stuff, including one of them having been married “to a very nice woman” for awhile.

      • fnarf

        My uncle was the same — older, in fact — gay in 1940s Idaho (which cannot have been easy), then NYC theater scene in the 50s, and yes, married to a “nice gal” (also gay).

        • Donna Tabor

          You know, it was hard enough being female in those days. I can’t imagine being gay, which was illegal almost everywhere. How sad, that we try so hard to change and control one another, instead of just allowing us to be ourselves. What a waste of energy.

    • Emily

      I was so confused by the Miss Porter’s scene. First they were being nasty to her, and then ten minutes later they were besties. Did I miss something? Was it assumed that when Sally called the boys over that was how she earned their respect?

      • Darren Nesbitt

        Seems like mean girls initiation 101. I know nothing about young girls but from what I see on tv I think they were feeling her out as a cool mean bad girl or a goody two shoes.

        • Alice Teeple

          Trust me, that scene was accurate. Young girls are the worst, and Sally’s ability to play them was fantastic. They’re a piece of cake after her old man…

          • sweetlilvoice

            She is totally her parents child!

        • Qitkat

          A little piece of me always wondered what it would have been like to go to boarding school, but clearly I would not have handled it well. Sally’s dysfunctional upbringing has prepared her much better to sail these waters.

      • SFree

        Sally brought the boys, who brought the pot. They didn’t want or need money. She delivered what they wanted. And now they see her as trouble, which put her on top of the pile. When she gets there as a student, her spot is secured. Hopefully, it will be more interesting.

      • Chris

        Sally not only showed she was cool in the way she reacted to their hazing, within a short time she provided two older guys (but still age appropriate) with a car, booze, pot, cigarettes etc. She showed she was sophisticated, connected and from the right sort of background (and not a squealer). She also showed a taste for trouble. She passed with flying colors.

      • Mike R

        It was a set up for a spin-off series: The Facts of Life ’69.

        • Chris

          Oh they wouldn’t have gotten away with any of that with Mrs. Garrett.

    • Wellworn

      Have to admit I was a little bored with the Sally boarding school segments. Maybe I’m too old to care about teen drama. I like Sally and was interested in how she would react regarding the shocking events of the previous episode, but it almost seemed like a spin-off show. Like “A Different World” spun off from the Cosby show. Except they were all nice in ADW.

      • SFree

        I totally agree. It seemed so predictable. The rich mean girls, sneaking in boys, drinking and smoking, going to another room to make out. I really expected more.

    • Susan Collier

      Agreed, that St Joseph ad had a totally dated premise and if dug up in present day would be cringe-worthy with the accents and stereotypes.

      • Wellworn

        Agree with that too. I don’t think it was a great idea either. Although I loved Joan’s “Jewish mother”. I swooned a little bit. I’m Jewish and I wouldn’t have minded having a mother like that.

        • sweetlilvoice

          I think everyone would love a mother like that! And we got to see Don cry like a baby too. I hope there is a gif of that.

      • Chris

        We think of the late 60′s as modern but so many of the attitudes were still so bad. Have you ever seen “Thoroughly Modern Millie” and the Asian- I hate to even call them stereotypes! It’s just so bad. It’s too bad because it’s a very silly but kind of fun musical.

    • NMMagpie

      Pete Campbell is a genius. He completely embraced the “keep your enemies closer” way of thinking. He is the snake in the grass, for sure.

      And I LOVED it.

    • Wellworn

      I think Bob saying it was the best day in his life was regarding being hired, rather than Pete giving him a compliment on his tie. Bob’s biggest interest here is working at the agency, and I think his alleged (lol I’m not sure about anything anymore) infatuation with Pete is secondary to that. Bob spends much of his time being obsequious at the firm, helping everyone he can, not just Pete. He listens to those motivational records on succeeding in business all the time. I also am trying to remember in that first episode, wasn’t Ken angry with him for not staying upstairs? Have to rewatch.

      • OrigamiRose

        Ken dressed down Bob for appearing to have no work to do (in addition to not staying in his department).

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          And for hanging around outside Pete’s office.

          • Chris

            It always seemed out of character for Ken (to me anyway) to be so aggressive over something like that. Was it because Bob seemed suspicious to him? I took it to mean Ken was becoming more ‘establishment” and resenting the up and comers but now I think it was to show Ken’s instincts about people are better than Pete’s.

            • Eric Stott

              Ken is getting a lot more nervous & snippy lately. I think he’s been getting fed up with the job for quite a while.

            • Cheryl

              Well, he *is* pregnant now, after all.

            • fnarf

              All the accounts men in this company are paranoid about having business stolen from them — especially Pete and Ken.

      • Darren Nesbitt

        THIS! for some reason I think that Bob confessing his “love” for Pete was really just related to his ladder climb.
        - Possibly he thought Pete was gay and tried to pull it out. Maybe that face he made when he left his office that day was “Damn that didn’t work”.
        - He can’t be that in love with Pete because he told Manolo to mess with his mom. You’re right Tlo he is no Master planner but he definitely has a few plans.

        • Doris Allen

          He asked Manolo to have the Mom pressure Pete to leave him be. I think he likes Pete just fine and he sensed Pete’s loneliness and happiness and offered him love. Pete needs love, just as Joan needed a friend without a sex agenda. Sex was implied in the offer, but it wasn’t the point. Pete had signalled that he was going to hurt Bob’s position at the firm and Bob was reacting to that.

      • eselle28

        I don’t think those two concepts are entirely separated in Bob’s mind. He got a job better than any he’d had before. A wealthy, WASPy man a few years his senior noticed him in a positive way and treated him as an equal. Bob’s been treated like the help for most of his life, is now terrified of slipping up and standing out in a bad way. He listens to all those self-help records, but I’m sure he doubts sometimes that they’re telling him the truth. I think he’s a little desperate for affirmation that he really is just as good as someone like Pete, and he got a ton of it all in one package.

    • Mani @ Iz and Oz

      WHAT an episode. Welp, looks like I got my fill of Ted & Peggy flirting, though the ending was unsavory. No surprises there. I wonder if Weiner is going to nail this one in the coffin or stretch it out until the end. And Peggy continues to drift away from Don and as much as he had a point – he went about it in the worst possible way. Smooth, asshole. Don you really DO have a talent for driving a wedge between you and (almost) every decent person in the world, huh? What a sad man, you are.

      I think with many of the characters in this episode I’d have to blanket it with the statement of “give it some time.” Bob may not have been as manipulative as suspected, but he’s still rather young (early 30s I’d say at the least) and hasn’t ripened with experience. He’s been so used to pleasing behind closed doors that he never had the opportunity to flex his muscle. His bright and cheery demeanor rivaled Dick’s in our flashbacks of him kissing Roger’s ass, all smiles and enthusiasm. He’ll get wilier once he’s in a position of more power and maybe pull a full Don and get cocky about it too. Either way, I’m really interested in how the character will flesh out, Bob is quickly becoming one of my favorites. I think T&L pretty much nailed it when it came to Sally – she’s not going full on rebellious – she’s following right in the footsteps of her mother. Cold, conniving, manipulative, and just like Rollo spat – frigid (fuck that asshole though, good riddance. Keep your grubby disgusting hands to yourself.) With drugs and alcohol and self discovery added to the pot, of course.

      And dearest Peggy, I love ya girl, but PULL IT TOGETHER DAMMIT. It’s too much, sweetie, too damn much. Stop leaning on men for guidance and approval and learn your lesson already – you are a talented woman who has a lot going for herself if you’d just pull your self esteem out of the gutter. Defending Ted (poor Ted btw, give him a break writers, please. Don is not an anti-hero anymore, he IS a monster) and pouring your allegiance into him is putting your palm over the flame. TRUST NO ONE. Go start your own agency and take Stan, Dawn, Phyllis, Gins & Joan with you please.

      Lastly, they had BETTER address Joan’s Avon account in the finale. That is all.

      • Tippi123

        Duck said Bob was 28.

        • Mani @ Iz and Oz

          If I recall correctly, I think he still was uncertain about his age by saying “If he’s even that.” or something along the lines.

      • Eric Stott

        If Peggy isn’t really careful, she’ll be pregnant.

        • Mani @ Iz and Oz

          Again. Eghad girl, bitch slap yourself out of it!

        • not_Bridget

          I think Peggy figured out how to take The Pill. Betty seems to like spontaneous sex with her husband, so she’s obviously moved on from the diaphragm. And I hope the miscarriage convinced Megan to get with the program…

    • Donna Luder

      That aerial view of Don curled up on the sofa in the fetal position looked like he was in cardiac arrest: hand clutching chest.

      • Darren Nesbitt

        Sidenote: I’m glad the agencies I’ve worked in have clear glass walls. I would be pissed seeing the Account and Creative Directors laying on couches EVERYDAY!

      • Laylalola

        The show started with him curled up in the fetal position in … Sally’s bed I think.

    • Rachel Goldberg

      I think Don is offended by the sloppy romance, but he’s also deeply irked because it is what his never are — genuinue. Yeah, its stupid and going to end badly, but Peggy has genuine affection and admiration for Ted, and he for her. Peggy wanted to learn from Don, but they both knew she knew he was a pig.

    • Heather

      Don is definitely closing in on rock bottom. Sally is one of the few people Don -really- cares about and losing her trust and love is killing him. Sneaking vodka in his OJ (from a flask in his suit coat) after sleeping in Sally’s bed? Not that I feel sorry for him at all. You reap what you sow, dude.

      • SFree

        Sneaking the booze was a real indicator of his downfall. Old Don would not have been sneaky.

      • fnarf

        Note that he’s not even a vodka drinker – but vodka doesn’t smell. Keeping little bottles of vodka around in all sorts of odd places is a pretty classic sign. I wonder if there’s one in the toilet tank.

        • SFree

          It is a sign that even he knows the booze has become a problem. He also told Betty he was using cold medicine, but she knew better.

        • Heather

          although Megan was totally on to him when she kissed him goodbye–she could smell the alcohol on his breath and made a little face

          • Cheryl

            She also suggested that maybe he “pull back a little bit” (paraphrasing here) but he’s really disregarding everything she says. She has no influence on him at all (but Betty still does).

      • Virginie

        I kept hoping that the moment when Sally saw him in flagrante with Sylvia would be Don’s personal watershed. The moment when he saw himself in daylight, hit bottom, and then changed for the better. I’m still hoping for that, like a sad romantic fool ;)

    • Kwei-lin Lum

      Kiernan Shipka continues to be a fabulous actress. You could see her take her first steps from relative innocent to seriously jaded prep school teen. She’s only 13?? I don’t know how old Sally Draper is supposed to be, I would assume barely older at best, but she’s hanging out in this episode with girls who seem at least 2 years older. What a sick situation for the headmistresses to put her in. Well, maybe not. They want to make sure she survives if accepted; they couldn’t be that blind to the shenanigans in the school.

      • Alice Teeple

        Oh my god, those scenes with her and Betty in the car gave me chills, they were so good. You’d think they really were mother and daughter. Their rapport with each other was so spot-on. Amazing acting from both of them – one of January Jones’s best moments on the show, easily.

        • Angela_the_Librarian

          I’m sure it won’t happen, but I think Kiernan deserves an Emmy nod for best supporting actress this season. She’s done remarkable work.

      • Munchkn

        I think Sally and I are the same age so she would have been 13 going on 14 or maybe she’d even have turned 14 already.

    • MilaXX

      Don is so predictable in his jealousies I knew immediately he would go after Peggy and Ted. I cannot wait to see what happens with Pete & Bob.

    • prettybigkitty

      As much as I love Mad Men, I have found myself losing interest this season. In seasons past, I couldn’t wait for Sunday nights to watch and enjoy the latest episode. As everyone here can attest, everything about the show is brilliant. The writing, acting, of course the costumes. And the story and characters were always very compelling and authentic. I think the fact that Don has not shown any redeeming qualities, or given us any reason to like him, much less feel sorry for him is growing tiresome for me. I don’t find myself rooting for any of the main characters, aside from Peggy. Megan is too clueless and helpless, Betty too needy, and Pete, well too Pete. I still rank the show among my favorites, but wish there was at least a little glimmer of hope for redemption or light at the end of the tunnel. Just my 2 cents.

    • dickylarue

      I actually thought Don handled the Ted/Peggy situation with the right kind of sledgehammer. Ted needed to be held out the window by his ankles to truly realize what he was doing. It wasn’t just the way they were acting in the office, but it was affecting dealings with a client. As for Peggy, her constant telling Don how good Ted is just makes us all realize that Ted is a man with a family having an emotional almost physical affair with a co-worker. There’s nothing commendable about him and Peggy telling Don he’s the monster shows her judgment is clouded. I actually feel like Don’s in the right in that triangle although I do know he’s enjoying “causing trouble” just like Sally. Although I think as you age, you start to lose that enjoyment of causing trouble and start to wonder why do you default to that in these kind of situations.

      I like Sally running away to boarding school and giving us a taste of Catcher in the Rye in the process. Weiner’s going to love that setting going forward.

      The Bob Benson is a Don Draper thing has me confused though. Was it this common back in those days for people to make up identities? I guess if in any time period, that was the time to do that without the internet to help check references.

      I was honestly a little let down when it was revealed he’s a gay Don Draper if I’m being honest.

      I am curious about next season splitting the office in two and Don heading to Los Angeles with Roger and Harry to open the LA branch. Not sure it will go there, but that could breathe some life into a new season.

      And yes, we spent far too much time on Sylvia which tells me the reveal of their affair to Megan is coming. I almost wonder if Sally’s boarding school pal’s comment about her being a troublemaker is to set up Sally revealing what she saw to Megan. Someone who likes to cause trouble certainly would enjoy doing that even in a passive agressive anonymous letter/call kind of way.

      • lisbeth borden

        Shades of Betty revealing Anna SO slyly for the family tree project. Sally took her father’s side over Betty THEN, but Sally has also learned from the best exactly how it’s done, to use now….. Betty AND Don as examples!

      • Eric Stott

        It was a lot easier to make up a false personality back then – you could open a bank account under any name you chose and unless someone asked you to present physical proof of your background you could get away with bluffing. To confirm a statement you actually had to write letters or make phone calls to someone who had to go to paper files. Some institutions had information on IBM punch cards but they were rare, limited, and slow.

    • maninsync

      For Bob Benson having sex with men was a means to an end, and apparently something he wasn’t above doing. He’s gay when it is expedient for him, and his outrageous misjudgement of Pete is what led to his downfall. Now, like it or not, he’s under Pete’s thumb, very smart move by Campbell.

      • SFree

        I think he’s gay. He may also use sex to get what he wants. It sounds like you don’t think he’s really gay, that he may also women in the same way. There is no evidence of that.

        • Darren Nesbitt

          I think he turns the gay up when he needs to though. Possibly at this point he may not really care about men or women that much. Manolo even seems like a pawn in his ladder climbing game.

          • Qitkat

            I posted a thought last night in the TLounge that Bob may have met Manolo while in Europe traveling with the people he worked for. He and Manolo may have hooked up, sexually, or through a desire to both change their lives. So they joined forces as *con men*. It calls into question as to whether Manolo is actually a nurse, in my mind.

            • DogintheParthenon

              Great observation. Mrs. Campbell certainly has the conspicuous trappings of wealth, and Manolo has more than ingratiated himself with her. She may not have much left in the bank, thanks to Pete’s father frittering it away, but she still has her jewels. He is in a perfect position to take what he wants from her.
              He and Bob may be working in collusion.

            • Cheryl

              I think Manolo is more of a companion than a “nurse.” And they both probably do whatever it takes to move Bob up the ladder.

          • SFree

            There is no good reason for amping up the gay in 1968. I disagree on Manolo, too. I think they are friends. Who did he call when he needed a good rant?

        • DeniseSchipani

          In that way (and I agree with you!) he is very much the Talented Mr. Ripley. He’s gay, but he’s not looking for a nice relationship or even a hookup.He’s looking to get ahead, and hide his tracks on the way.

      • fnarf

        This doesn’t make any sense. There were no possibilities of any occasions when it was expedient to have sex with men in 1968. To suggest that Bob would make a pass at Pete, who, like virtually every straight male in America in 1968 regarded homosexuals with utter disgust and contempt, is completely illogical. It’s like suggesting that a person would be willing to advance his career by molesting a child. That could never happen. But that’s how homosexuals were regarded back then.

        • Inspector_Gidget

          Total agreement. If flirting with Pete was part of his master plan then he’s the worst schemer ever. Hitting on your boss right after he has declared his disgust for gay behavior only makes sense as a blind, emotional reaction.

      • formerlyAnon

        Don’t often down vote, but I did here because I think that’s a total misreading of the risk he was taking in declaring himself, however obliquely, to Pete. It really was such a crazy thing to do, given his ambition, that it had to come out of sincere feeling. (Not that that keeps him from being bi, but there’s nothing I’ve seen in the show to indicate that he is. If his time with Joan is to be interpreted as courtship, it has to be the most chaste, asexual courtship I’ve ever seen on Mad Men.)

        • maninsync

          That might be true if we hadn’t overheard Benson’s phone conversation in Spanish with English subtitles, presumably with Manolo, where Benson tells him what a prick Campbell is and how he’s going to ruin his career, and that Manolo needs to lose Mrs. Campbell, I guess so they can both leave town.

          • formerlyAnon

            Well, we’ll have to disagree. I don’t think a schemer who’s panicking and casting about for a way out of a hole he’s dug for himself by acting on an impulse can’t have dug that hole out of sincere feelings that are against his best interests. (ETA: if Pete had been shown flirting with Bob or in any way giving him reason to think he (Pete) would welcome an advance, I’d be able to see it your way , maybe. But I didn’t read that in what we were shown.)

    • masspatriot

      The timing of this segment: Jackie Kennedy married Aristotle Onassis at the end of October, 1968. Hence Don’s sarcastic comment about her name. The Nixon/Humphrey presidential election will take place a week or so after this episode.
      Roger Ailes, infamous now for being head of Fox news, was the brains behind Nixon’s advertising in the 1968 election. Odd that the ad men aren’t more involved, or at least commenting on, the seismic shift that happened with political advertising that year. Joe McGinniss’s seminal book, The Selling of the President, 1968, would document this development.
      The leaves on the trees as Betty and Sally drive to Connecticut also signal the end of fall — lots of New England color.
      T+L — orange, yellow and brown. Some green. But, alas, no blue! Make of this what you will. Sally wouldn’t be transferring to boarding school until after Christmas, and even that mid-year transition would be unusual. She’ll still be around until January.
      Although 1968 was one of the most pivotal years of the twentieth century, the drama of that era has been mostly off-stage or implied. So, I’d predict that the last episode will skip the presidential election, and wind up somewhere in December, when the U.S. sent astronauts on a trip around the moon at Christmastime. It was a proud and hopeful event capping a year of great upheaval.
      Query: will Peter move to Detroit? Does he want to? He certainly relishes the possibility of shooting a squirrel or two out there with the Chevy yahoos. Or will this signal Bob’s being sent off to Michigan (he has a map of Michigan on the wall of his office!), and, thus, despite his fascinating role this season, we’ll see him rarely again.

      • fnarf

        “The Making of the President 1968″ was by Theodore H. White — McGinniss’s book was “The Selling of the President 1968″. Both were influential, though White’s in retrospect was rather dry and bland. The best book on the 1968 election, in my view, is the much more recent “Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America” by Rick Perlstein, which, along with his riveting, insane “Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus” are essential reading to understand what really happened in American politics in the 60s.

        I really love your typo of “Don’t” for “Don’s” — it should serve as a warning to everyone who comes in contact with the man — just don’t!

        • masspatriot

          Oops. I’ve corrected both mistakes. Thank you for pointing them out. Teddy White’s book on the 1960 presidential election made the covering of a campaign an important event, but, by 1968, he was too big a celebrity and mostly phoned in that year’s The Making of the President.
          I’ll look for Rick Perlstein’s book.

        • Doris Allen

          Thanks for the book rec. Always looking for good non fiction!

    • sweetlilvoice

      Did Kenny really lose an eye? I couldn’t tell. I was so relieved he didn’t die, I couldn’t focus for a minute. Those jerks are Chevy are totally asses.

      • Darren Nesbitt

        No I think the material that blasts from a shot gun went into his eye. I think that’s why he has the projectile scars on his right side. There is a word for all those little pieces of debris but I forget what they are called.

        • Susan Collier

          Peppered with birdshot?

        • Eric Stott

          He could have been hit by the blast of propellant gas, or the paper and cardboard of the shell, or the wadding put in to keep the shot in place. In any respect, pretty lucky.

      • Eric Stott

        Their reaction was just “oh shit”

      • Adrianna Grężak

        I don’t think he did, otherwise he’d say that he lost an eye. He also winced when he touched it to wipe a tear, so I think it’s just (severely) hurt

    • Jordan Wester

      Does anyone else find Kenny’s hotness upped considerably by the eye patch? Cause I do.

      • Danielle

        Not that it needed upping, but it did look pretty badass.

      • Eric Stott

        Back then they’d have made remarks about the Hathaway Shirt Man – but that ad series is too old for a current audience to recall

        • judybrowni

          Yes!

        • SFCaramia

          Not me! I remember The Hathaway shirt man well…very cool. In fact, now that you mention it, I’m surprised none of the characters did make a reference to him.

    • Quinky

      Remember at the beginning of season 4, when that reporter linked Don with Dorian Gray? I’ve been thinking about that all season, as Don has been shot in increasingly unflattering lights. He looks boozy and puffy and swollen. How much further can he fall? At what point does that fall cease to be interesting? I think we’re already there. I still feel a great deal of compassion for someone as damaged as Don Draper, but witnessing this sort of slow-motion suicide is never easy or fun.

      Did anyone else notice that the blonde twin character in the soap was confronting a man for cheating?

      • Adrianna Grężak

        I totally noticed that with the soap

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QFW22QV426LUOEPGASPZJWJMDE MishaFoomin

      For no reason whatsoever, “plop plop fizz fizz” was going through my head LAST WEEK. I declare myself psychic. Partially. I just can’t figure out those lotto numbers.

      With so many characters on one show, it’s hard to give them all good airtime. Maybe another season will utilize them more.

      • fnarf

        I have an LP of that song, by Sammy Davis, Jr., with the “big band” version on one side and the “rock” version on the other. Vintage hilarity.

      • Chris

        I think Juliana Margulies Dad is the one who wrote “Plop Plop Fizz Fizz.”

    • masspatriot

      Matthew Weiner has certainly set up a trust fund for his son “Glenn.” He may have to cut back on casting, as did St. Joseph’s as-per-ine, but the residuals for Marten Weiner will guarantee him a steady income for years to come.

    • Edwina3

      NY Mag linked to a Vanity Fair article about Miss Porter’s school, it’s a lengthy piece bit that dishes on the mean girl tradition there. For googling purposes it’s called The Code of Miss Porter’s School.

      • testingwithfire

        thanks for the heads-up – I was wondering about how authentic this was.

        • mhleta

          See my post buried somewhere in here about my friend’s experience with a Peggy at Miss Porters in the 1970s. Also, one of the teachers just got called out for sexual assault recently.

          • testingwithfire

            mhleta – wow.

            FWIW the Vanity Fair article is a really good read.

            • mhleta

              I’ll keep an eye out. Is it the issue currently on news stands?

            • roble ridge

              It’s an old article. You can Google “Vanity Fair Miss Porter’s” and there will be a link to the piece.

    • fnarf

      Does anybody else think that Sally’s going to get herself expelled from that school by 1970 at the latest? Although, with her parentage, she’s on schedule to become the greatest manipulator of all time.

      • urbantravels

        I think it’s been established that Sally’s not going to that school, based on what Betty said in the car.

        • fnarf

          That’s sure not what I got from that conversation. Betty was being coy, because that information was the only hold she has over Sally at this point, but she eventually came out and said that the school would be glad to have her, and that while many other schools would too, they hoped she would choose them. They both smiled. Everyone at the school gave an excellent report of her.

          • not_Bridget

            Sally was admitted to the school. I doubt she’ll leave before she’s ready. She’ll continue to be polite to the grownups–and just wild enough to get respect from the wilder girls.

    • Frank_821

      One thing I forgot to mention was the sad parallels of parenting shown between Don and Betty. We got Betty having positive moments with the child she has the most difficulty understanding. Despite the circumstances, it was wonderful to see Betty trying to create a worthwhile moment with her firstborn.

      And Don not only screwed up with his daughter at home he messed up with his office daughter. If he really cared about the company and how everyone is perceiving her, he should have manned up and used himself as a cautionary tale and acknowledged how his relationship with Megan at work impaired his judgement and messed things up. That was part of the reason their relationship spiraled the way it did last season. That’s why Peggy was forced to quit. That would have made Peggy listen and helped Don get some of her respect back. Instead he’s still treating her, to paraphrase Freddie, as “that secretary from Brooklyn who’s just dying to help out”

      • Qitkat

        While I liked your comment, it’s clear by the character exposition of Don over the seasons, we’re engaging in wishful thinking. If Don had ever done all the things he “should have,” we wouldn’t be watching this story.

    • shopgirl716

      I was naively horrified that no one thought it was a big deal that poor Kenny had been shot in the face. They all just blew it off and said it was part of the job. Getting shot is part of the job, who needs to go to Viet Nam? I would have resigned the account too. It reminded me of the incident when Dick Cheney shot someone in the face.

      • SFree

        I think it was meant to show how callous they are. It’s okay for Kenny, but I don’t think Roger would have been so cavalier had it been him. Otherwise, don’t you think they would have pulled Kenny out after the car accident? It’s like domestic violence that just keeps escalating. Get thee to the shelter, Kenny!

      • Laylalola

        I shouldn’t be laughing, but I am. TLo noted last week the ways the show can be darkly hilarious.

      • makeityourself

        For better or for worse, he shot his friend in the ass, not the face.

        • DogintheParthenon

          Dick Cheney? Shot his “pal” in the face: http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/02/12/cheney/

        • masspatriot

          It was in the face. And the man he shot, a big Texas Republican, never got an apology, or any word at all, from Cheney.

          • dalgirl

            Curious how you know that!

            • editrixie

              It’s public knowledge. Google it, and you’ll find articles about it.

            • dalgirl

              Ok, thanks-must’ve missed that!

        • urbantravels

          Wrong.

    • masspatriot

      The secret to Betty’s weight loss: Carnation Instant Breakfast, on the counter as she phones Don. Is this a new form of product placement? At least for the Carnation company. I don’t think they make Instant Breakfast anymore.
      Interesting that Megan is too distracted to make breakfast for Don, and Betty’s gone instant. Two ladies becoming less domestic.

      • Alice Teeple

        No, they make it! It’s no longer in a brown box, it’s in a yellow one. Good catch and observation on both accounts…it’s a nice, subtle transition from the old school housewife to the working/modern mother.

      • KatDuck

        Good eye! Though I can confirm they still make it.

      • SoulMo

        It makes her so desperate for that fry make all the more sense.

      • chrissybee

        They still make it, but it’s not called Instant Breakfast. it’s Breakfast Essentials or some such nonsense. I wish I didn’t love that stuff, but I do.

      • MartyBellerMask

        I’m sure it was just some swag the company sent over. Arnold gets a free camera, Betty gets Instant Breakfast.

    • Sarah Chilcote

      The song at the end credits was “Porpoise Song” by the Monkees. It was the theme song for their 1968 movie, Head. I am a huge Monkees fan so I flipped out when I heard it because it’s really obscure.

      I am not a theorist, but wanted to point out that in the movie, Head, the song is used both at the beginning and the end credits. In both places, either one or all of the Monkees are running to escape from their fans and end up jumping off a bridge into a body of water. The main portion of the song is film of them seeming to be drowning. At the beginning credits, Micky Dolenz is saved by mermaids (it’s a weird movie) and at the end credits, all four Monkees find themselves trapped in a large fish tank, to symbolize their entrapment in the creative control of the television show.

      Speculate away!

      • Ashley Stacey

        Interesting! Thanks for sharing! The theme of drowning/suicide has been rampant this season and that just fits in too perfectly, so it clearly shouldn’t be ignored! Bravo!

      • Mike R

        Not sure it’s that obscure a song. Not a fan of the movie here.

        • judybrowni

          It’s been verified by some of the best recap authors.

          • Mike R

            Sorry? I wasn’t disputing that that was the song used. It certainly was. Just saying I don’t think “The Porpoise Song” is all that obscure. I mean, if you know the Monkees’ canon (as it were), it’s in the top 15.

          • urbantravels

            The closed captions identify the song, before you even quite start hearing it.

            “‘Porpoise Song, (Theme from Head) playing.”

      • mhleta

        Yeah, that’s really interesting. Don was curled up in a fetal position at the beginning and end of the ep, first in the kids bed and then on the sofa in a similar bookending fashion. He’s also had several figurative baptisms, on his first trip to Cali and his near drowning on the last trip, so this adds more fodder to the speculation mill.

    • Darva Sutra

      Fantastic write-up, yet again, guys, thanks! Also, Evil-Roger’s “a client cut my wife’s breast” (seriously WTF?) and Roger’s “I held Lee Garner Jr.’s balls”… hahahaha LOVE IT, Roger has such a twisted sense of humor he thought nothing of throwing that bomb out there!

      • SFree

        I think it was “cupped” my wife’s breast.

      • Lisa Huntsman McAda

        CUPPED, not cut….still creepy but BIG difference.

        • Laylalola

          Ha! I thought he was saying “copped” a feel.

        • Darva Sutra

          Ah! thanks, okay that makes more sense!

        • Tafadhali

          Oh my god, I definitely heard “cut” also. Cupped is way less traumatising.

      • Chris

        I heard cut too-it seriously freaked me out. Glad to know I was wrong (and not the only one).

      • sweetlilvoice

        Which wife? I want to know that one! Both are fine ladies.

    • Joy

      I just have to confess that I really love Betty this season and dare I say that I relate to her a bit!! Oy. I recently lost all my baby weight and have so much more confidence now that it is summer and I’m semi-skinny again!! With so much emphasis on your kids and husband, it is nice to get your old self back, even if it is your extremely vain side :)

      • testingwithfire

        I love Betty even when she’s not very lovable. Like Vincent Kartheiser, January Jones gets to play all the really unattractive qualities that a lot of people hate to see on screen… petty, petulant, childish, etc. … not easy stuff. Glad to see she’s getting a shot at playing the character more like a grownup and is doing it with aplomb.

    • A Shiny O’Connor

      From Don’s messing with Ted and Peggy, I got 50% being a shit, and 50% trying to stop them doing to Ted’s kids what he’d just done to Sally. Also the office ppl are ‘the kids’ who could see what was going on with P&T, giving Don another reminder of what Sally had seen him do. So he put a stop to it so the office could return to being an escape from his steaming heap of a personal life.

      • Alice Teeple

        Maybe. I don’t think Don’s that thoughtful unless there’s an angle. I think it was more like 50% being a shit, 45% power play over Ted and Peggy, 5% “these two are so annoying.”

      • Chris

        I don’t think Ted’s kids even exist in Don’s mind. He has never done anything decent for his own kids I don’t think he cares about Ted’s.

        • A Shiny O’Connor

          I don’t think it was ‘a plan’, but he feels guilty as hell, and he knows Ted has a family. Perhaps there’s a teeny tiny element of trying to save others from his mistakes.

        • andrea

          It’s a metaphor: Don effed up in front of his kid by exposing his seedy, cheating side to Sally. A Shiny O’Connor is saying that Don watched Ted & Peggy’s behavior and saw it through other eyes, like his daughter did, and metaphorically, T & P are “messing around in front of the kids” (workers). Of course he doesn’t care two figs about Ted’s real-life kids. But Don is, if nothing else, a ginormous hypocrite.

          • Chris

            I understand what she is saying I just didn’t see anything on the screen or in the performance that would make me think Don is thinking of anyone’s kids. I agree he should think of them, and a better person would, but he should do a lot of things and never does.

    • A Shiny O’Connor

      Obvs for Mad Style, but I loved the blue and green towel around the freshly showered and shaved Don – he was trying to wash off the adultery.

      • fnarf

        And the booze seeping out of his every pore.

      • SFree

        That one was kind of in your face, wasn’t it!

    • susan6

      Wow, Don and Bob’s parallel lives (poor white trash, getting their foot in the door by faking their background) remind me of the Reba Mcentire song “Fancy”. “I charmed a king, a congressman, and an occasional aristocrat; and then I got me a Georgia mansion, and an elegant New York townhouse flat”.

      Pete’s got himself a slave now, pretty much. Smart to hold Bob’s secrets over his head. I thought it might be more of a contest, since Bob has spent his time trying to learn where all the bodies are buried at the company, but he didn’t work fast enough.

    • bayusc

      Am I the only one that thinks Peggy is a bit of an entitled pain in the ass? Yes, Don’t delivery was bad, but the essence of what he did was save the idea in general. Any time any of Peggy’s ideas get passed over she whines and always wants full credit. A copy-writer (even senior one) can NEVER speak to a Creative Director like that. When push comes to shove, she has risen in the ranks very quickly– remember she was merely a secretary 8 years ago…but she tends to think of herself as top-dog. I’m not saying I’d like to have Don as a boss, but she has to remember that’s what he is…

      • NoParasitesNo

        I hate her and always have. She’s whiny and thinks she’s better than everyone else.

        • SFree

          She is blazing a trail, and she is not always good at it. Do you see any other women in that office, other than Joan, who has made any move out of secretarial pool? Nope.

      • fnarf

        No, I just think Peggy’s a little naive. She’ll always be a little naive for that office; I mean, LOOK at those people. Peggy’s basically decent, but she’s infatuated with her boss, and she’s not able to control that infatuation when he’s putting so much effort into returning it. She’s out of control.

        But she IS Top Dog — she’s Chief Copy Editor. Not on a par with Don and Ted, but a cow-orker of solid standing.

      • SFree

        She has always spoken the truth to Don. That is key to their relationship.

      • Frank_821

        To a certain extent that is true. Don rightly called her out on it in the Suitcase. However the last couple of years Don has used her as a emotional punching bag. It was that dynamic that she was bristling under for some time. He’s only acted in an appreciate or respectful manner when he’s in danger of losing her. Leaving the company was the best thing for both of them. She became a lot less whiny and he actually treated her more respectfully

    • soniabe

      the shot of sally smoking was classic. first she looked surprised, like a child, I thought she would cough from it but she didn’t, and then the way in wich her hands held the cigarrette and how she said “my father never gave me anything”. That’s what made Betty’s face so good to see.

      • mhleta

        My 17 year-old’s head exploded when Betty suggested her daughter take up smoking. My mom did the same with smoking and drinking. “I know you’re going to do it anyway, so you may as well do it here.” I’m the Zero Tolerance mom because of the bad results from these parenting practices.

        • snarkykitten

          My mother in law did that with her kids. Well actually she pulled a King of the Hill and forced them all to smoke an entire pack in a day…somehow, my husband was the only one who walked away without a habit

          • mhleta

            Why on earth? Did she own stock in Lorillard?

      • SFree

        It was clearly not the first time Sally had smoked, just the first time she had been offered one by Betty. Betty’s way of saying you are a young lady now. Ugh.

    • mhleta

      I am so jazzed to see the “Dysfunctional Boarding School” trope rear its head. If the show were to carry through the 70s, this would be the thing to sustain it. You could add the “Dysfunctional Riding Stable” to the mix, a subject on which I could expand for hours. For now, here’s my Miss Porter’s saga that is not an Urban Myth but happened to one of my dearest friends who, in the mid 1970s, transferred to MP starting our sophomore year. Long story short, her roommate pulled a Peggy, but kept it secret. As far as my friend knew, her roommate just never came back after Xmas break, which was fine until a horrible, horrible odor started creeping out of her closet. Further investigation revealed the a foot locker inside of which was the decomposing corpse of her former roommate’s former baby. For the rest of the year, townies would drive by the school hollering the song “Havin’ My Baby” at the top of their lungs. I tell this story not so much to be salacious, but to drive the point home for skeptics who may doubt that many of these very expensive and exclusive boarding schools were actually places where messed up rich people fobbed off their messed up children to the messed up staff for a really fucked up experience that had little to do with intellectual growth.

      • Edwina3

        This tragic story is referenced in the vanity fair article about Ms. Porters that I mentioned down thread.

        • mhleta

          No kidding? Now I have to find it. Thanks.

        • mhleta

          I just read it. I remembered some of the details incorrectly, but it’s interesting they mentioned it. God, that poor girl. Her father was her doctor and signed off on her to go to the school? If you made this up no one would believe it.

          • mhleta

            Also, worth noting: “As for Jackie herself, the perfect Miss Porter’s student in every way, she managed to achieve what she had vowed on her yearbook page: ‘Never to be a housewife.’” Ironic, because she was, after all, the ultimate house wife. The Uber Housewife. I was watching the early episode where the women are all smitten with Jackie’s televised tour of the white house. Her manner was so studied and unnatural, the monotone and overly enunciated language, the way she barely moved her head and neck–By today’s standards, rather creepy.

      • masspatriot

        As I recall, real insiders, students and alumnae, call it “Farmington,” for the town in CT in which it’s located.
        “Miss Porter’s” is for outsiders.

      • formerlyAnon

        A friend of mine, a talented actress and musician, spent a couple of years at boarding (high) school at Interlochen during the early ’70s. Her stories (though not as dramatic as the baby story) convinced me that teens, at least girls, trend waaay too far into Lord of the Flies territory if living communally. There is no amount of supervision that can prevent it. Especially if, as often happens, it’s the kids whose path is a little bumpy at home who tend to want to go/are shipped off to boarding school.

        • mhleta

          Great point. I’ll add that In those days it seems the teachers trended a little too far into Madison Avenue territory, which kind of fed into the whole Lord of the Flies behavior. My sister attended a small private middle school where the principal kept a bottle in her desk and more than one of the teachers got high with the kids. My private school principal was known for his boozing and womanizing and was actually shot by the Haitian French teacher for being a racist and not renewing his contract. There was other shenanigans, some of it violent and some of it hitting the front pages. (The Menendez brothers came from my school. Big surprise there.) I remember serving at one of the parent banquets and the drunkeness, (“You girlsh are sho priddeee!”) was far beyond anything I see from fellow parents today (at school functions, anyway. They tend to let their hair down elsewhere, from what I hear.) I sincerely hope we’re doing a better job than our parents did. They weren’t all drunken cheaters, but there were plenty of them out there.

      • http://www.modcapecod.com paige @ MCC
    • joancarol

      Who got their pound of flesh?

      Pete is virtually blackmailing Bob, Sally has found a way to hurt her father, and Don cut both Peggy and Ted.

      Kenny physically lost flesh to keep Chevy.

      • Laylalola

        And of course, who is Shylock? Who’s refusal to show mercy is his undoing?

        • urbantravels

          There are plenty of people who are holding Shylock-like grudges at this point – Sally against Don, Pete against Don (a very old and deep grudge – he’s working it off by proxy on Bob) – but I think in the end the biggest Shylock is Don.

          He’s just lost his daughter (could that be too on-the-nose to be deliberate?) and then cruelly punishes Ted and Peggy for their, admittedly, stupidly open googly-eyes behavior. There’s no reason he had to be that mean about it; he’s just projecting his own deep humiliation and regret for getting caught himself, turning his self-loathing on to them. When Peggy calls him on it, he tries to justify himself, ending with “It’s for the good of the company.” That’s when Peggy responds “You’re a monster.” Shylock justifies his vengefulness by claiming he only wants justice to be upheld; Don’s masking his by saying he’s just doing the responsible, professional thing. Don Draper, the poster boy for professional, responsible behavior.

          • Denise Alden

            Thanks for this! I’ve been scratching my head about ‘the quality of mercy’ and I really like how you’ve deciphered some of it here. Totally missed ‘monster’ for ‘Shylock.’

      • Vanessa

        i think that the mercy being referred to in the title is primarily Pete’s so-called mercy to Bob, and the quality of his mercy is quite strained.

    • Inspector_Gidget

      This season has picked up quite a bit after dragging its way through the first half. I’m glad they seem to have gotten the literal out of their system after last season’s flag-waving. (“Hey guys, Lane is going to commit suicide!”)

    • judybrowni

      As for the credentials check, I worked in publishing in the early-70s — including at a Madison Ave big deal slick magazine conglomerate — and nobody checked nothing, as I recall.

      You had an interview (or at most, two) with HR person, or editor, told ‘em what you’d done, and that was that. Either they liked your face, or didn’t.

      Or, since I’d been fired from my first two itty-bitty local newspapers (I was bored there, basically) I doubt I would have been hired.

      In the mid-80s, was hired as an Editor, and it became apparent that the Editor-in-Chief actually mis-remembered my biggest credit as from another magazine entirely.

      Got hired from an interview with her alone, and never even handed over a resume. No credit checks, either. And nobody seemed to care/notice that I’d never gathered my college credits into an official BA.

      • DeniseSchipani

        Very true! (I was in magazine publishing in the 80s-2000s, now freelance). No one ever checked anything, including my college degree’s veracity. These days, when my husband’s interviewed for jobs, he has to *bring in* his undergrad and grad degrees.

      • mhleta

        I really wish I’d known this as I was living in NYC in the 80s and could have used the info to good advantage. I noticed stark contrasts in hiring practices in retail between then and now. The many retail and nightclub jobs I had at the time I got by walking in off the street or knowing someone. A few years back I went to work for J. Crew. On my intake interview I had to leave the office immediately when they discovered I didn’t have my passport on me. I had to go home and get it for the interview to proceed. Seriously.

      • urbantravels

        OTOH, today you’ll often have more trouble getting a reference from a former employer, at least if that former employer is corporate. Last corporate job I had, we were strictly instructed not to give ANY kind of reference for former underlings if called for one, and to refer the caller to HR, who would verify ONLY whether the individual had been employed there, and between what dates. (Nobody was supposed to give a character or work performance reference – even a GOOD one – because even a good one, apparently, can get twisted into a reason to sue the company.) And you would not be told why the individual left, even if it was getting fired for having a fake resume.

        • SFree

          Yes. HR today is much different. It is a vehicle for avoiding all lawsuits. I work for a university and it the same as you describe.

        • sweetlilvoice

          My old retail job had the same policy. However, a lot can be emphasized from how you say ‘Yes, the person worked here.’ Once, a former co-worker put me down as a reference and I did not appreciate that. Especially when she quit and left our schedules a mess for weeks. She still got hired though.

      • OrigamiRose

        I worked in advertising until a few years ago and our company had *the* most useless HR department I’ve ever encountered. The only assistance they would provide during the hiring process was to place the job postings on relevant sites. That was it. Apparently, spending day after day writing memos and rewriting the employee handbook was busy work enough.

        The manager doing the hiring would get slammed with the applications and the responsibility for screening, interviewing, checking references/education information. All internal applicants had to be interviewed per company policy, no matter how over/under/un-qualified for the job posting at hand.

        A separate risk management division handled security screenings and drug tests – by which I mean, we sent the candidate information to RM, who sent the information to a third party who did all the work. It was truly the theater of the absurd in motion.

    • Judy_J

      I haven’t read all the comments, but did anyone else notice that Don’s orange juice was Tropicana, not Sunkist?

      • judybrowni

        Now that you mention it! I was busy marveling at the period perfect glass bottle.

      • meowing

        Yes! But then I got to wondering: did Sunkist bottle their own juice back then or just grow the oranges for other bottlers? I remember that heavy bottle, too. Where on earth do the props folks get all that stuff: that bottle, the McDonald’s bag, that metal Saltine cracker box (Mom had one) on everybody’s kitchen counters, ad infinitum…

        • decormaven

          Paper products can be mocked up fairly easily, and that includes labels for canned goods. You’re right on about the other items, though. It’s a game of mine to spot the items used in set decoration. These folks are the best- there have been very, very few miscues.

        • deathandthestrawberry

          I have one of those metal Saltine boxes! I took it from my mother-in-law’s kitchen when she sold her house. I use it for storing tea bags.

          As for the glass bottle, there are prop houses that keep period stuff like that. The set dresser may hit thrifts shops too. Smaller towns can be a great resource for that type of stuff.

        • fnarf

          There are Tropicana bottles and metal Saltine boxes all over Ebay right this minute.

      • Aestro

        I expect to see in the Style write-up a bit of chatter about Don drinking orange juice while surrounded by red, including Megan. No subtlety in that scene.

      • Ally08

        My thought was, he even cheats on his fruit juices.

    • Hildegerd Haugen

      I got Mr. Ripley wibes from Bob.

    • johanna101

      I don’t think Sally was being especially devious when she said the friend tried to force her. I don’t think she was implying rape. He WAS being pushy and she did feel uncomfortable and did not want to do what he wanted her to do. I was glad she was able to go get Glenn and that he stood up for her, and didn’t accuse her of lying. She wasn’t lying.

      • mhleta

        She was a little turned on seeing Glenn beat the shit out of that kid on her behalf. I see a Glenn/Sally hookup in the offing.

        • oat327

          Not necessarily “turned on” but she definitely was enjoying wielding that kind of power. Reminded me of when Betty engineered the affair between her two friends from the stable and twisted the knife. She’s her mother’s daughter–they both like to cause trouble, in passive-aggressive ways.

          • johanna101

            well, sure she enjoyed that. I’m just saying, I didn’t like T&L’s implication that she totally made up a story about what was going on with Rolo…I think she was really uncomfortable with what he was doing, and I’m glad she was able to stop it.

            • oat327

              I agree she was uncomfortable. But she did overreact a bit, because while he was being aggressive, he really wasn’t “forcing himself on her.” I think it speaks more towards Sally’s views of sex, after seeing Sylvia and Don, and Roger and Marie; like Don, she sees sex as this dirty, illicit thing. And just like Don sees all women who have sex with him as whores, she’ll see men who try to have sex with her as her philandering father, in need of a good ass-kicking.

            • HairyBearyGuy

              Maybe she just didn’t want some horny clod pawing at her like day old meat. The junior misogynist was trying to collect on his quid pro quo. He was out of line and needed a good beating to wake him up. Maybe now he will learn how to properly treat a lady before he grows up to be Pete Campbell. Plus, she likes Glen. Shes been casting herself as the princess to his knight in shining armor for quite some time.

            • http://lauriekalmanson.blogspot.com/ laurie kalmanson

              so much this. he thought he could do whatever he wanted, and she didn’t want him to

            • formerlyAnon

              He needed to be put in his place and the line he was crossing identified (as in “Man, that’s not right, stop being an asshole. If she says no or moves away, you back off and move on.” The power of community disapproval exerted. It didn’t need to go to the point of getting beat up, though it’s not unrealistic in a bunch of drunk/high adolescents indulging in mating displays that it went there. Probably more realistic than that the boys’d have some kind of reasonable conversation.

            • housefulofboys

              I don’t think TLo implied in any way that she totally made up a story, just that she took her situation and manipulated it a little. Yes, she was uncomfortable with Rolo, yes she was jealous of Glen going in the other room and closing the door, yes she is responding to the events in the past weeks with her father, yes she was drunk – and she is 14, a very confusing year in my recollection.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              That is pretty much exactly what we’re saying.

            • quitasarah

              I disagree that she was jealous of Glenn going off with the other girl, she looked more amused than anything else. I also don’t think her reaction or Glenn’s was that far off-base, especially for a crowd of drunk teenagers. Rolo got what he deserved. Hooray for Glenn.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              I agree that she probably wasn’t jealous of Glenn. Don’t agree on the rest, though.

          • 1carmelita

            It takes a master to be able to turn the truth into a weapon with such ease. She’s learned to manipulate from the experts.

        • sweetlilvoice

          I think she likes Glen like a boyfriend but he likes her like a little sis. That may change. I predict she will lose her virginity to him. They’ve been through a lot together.

      • Aestro

        I think she was being honest at first but laid it on thick when Glenn stuck up for her. She was obviously far more rattled by Glenn being in the other room than by his friend trying to put the moves on her.

        Momma’s little girl.

      • greggers

        I gotta back you up here. As I watched the scene, I detected genuine discomfort on Sally’s part, and it seemed like she was in over her head. I actually thought she was going to reluctantly submit to the guy, and I was surprised when she took a stand. She was definitely pleased with her power over Glenn — especially when it seemed like she had none when he left the room with the other girl. But I didn’t see the scene as a more coldly calculated manipulation gambit.

        • quitasarah

          I think she was pleased that someone, FINALLY, is in her corner, backing her up and willing to fight for her. I disagree that she has the hots for Glenn. Nothing in her demeanor has conveyed that, he’s a friend, probably her only friend.

    • Tara O’Donnell

      I’ve always thought of Bob Benson as an Eve Harrington(All About Eve references ahead!) and to see Pete go from Margo Channing to Addison DeWitt is quite the intriguing change-up! Hope this twisted relationship continues into next season because this opens up several new possibilities for Pete,in my opinion.

      • EEKstl

        Agreed – brilliant turn of events. Sadly, however, Pete won’t be able to say to Bob: “You’re too short for that gesture!”

      • 1carmelita

        Pete may be the smartest one of the bunch. He surprised me with his reaction to Bob in their last scene, but it was totally the right response. They could make an interesting team, or there could be some serious backstabbing ahead. Can’t wait to see how that plays out!

    • Pennymac

      Dammit. They are actually making me work at work today. So on my lunch break I’m home, sign in to Disqus, and we’re at 468 comments already?
      I’ve got nothing pithy to add, other than 2.5 lawn mowers for the birdshot to the face!

    • HairyBearyGuy

      I just don’t know which end is up. I feel like I just saw the six-carat Harry Winston on her bony, unpolished finger. To use a colorful Elle Woodism:

      “Wait, am I on glue…or did we not get into the same law school? I’m never going to be good enough for you, am I?”

      When all else fails, Jack Twist says it best:

      You’re too much for me, Ennis, you son of a whoreson bitch. I wish I knew how to quit you.”

      I wish I knew how to quit you MadMen. It’s because of you that I’m like this.

    • http://gabyrippling.tumblr.com/ Gaby

      I went to boarding school (albeit not in the 1960s, and my school had been coed since the 70s) and so did my grandfather in the 40s – one of the shmarmy “name brand prestige” boarding schools – and I can attest that an environment of no parents/minimal supervision, high academic rigor, and college-like independence can lead to extremely early sexual maturity/cynicism as well as casual drug use. There were lots of high achievers, sure (often on Ritalin bought off peers), but I knew plenty of students, even brilliant ones, who burnt out on drugs and booze and ended up in rehab or dropping out early into college. It’s kind of an intense environment; I always think of my time in boarding school as academic boot camp (and I came out mostly unscathed because I was mostly rule-abiding, but for some late curfews and minor things, and ended up a dorm proctor my senior year).

      So I worry for Sally in that environment, because the two girls she had her dorm overnight with reminded me once again of some of the most toxic boarding school girls. Sally seems to be a magnet for cruel girlfriends which worries me. Hope she doesn’t end up a “mean girl” (we called them “posse”).

      • Not applicable

        she will- she’s learned manipulation & the art of deception from her parents. She’s even manipulating Betty to a certain extent. And, it seems she’s smart enough to really scan a situation (as she did on the one overnight) to see what needs to be done to fit in. By scene two she was ‘in’ you know? I don’t think she will wind up a total burn out- I just don’t see MW taking lovely Kiernan to that place. But I do think she’s going to cut all ties with Don and just move on with her life (jeez, wonder where she learned that…)

        • not_Bridget

          Oh, she’ll eventually spend more time with Don. She’ll be cool and definitely not his little girl any more. He’s got the money and she wants what it can buy….

          • formerlyAnon

            Yeah, I’ve seen this play out in some divorced families. Except she *will* be his little girl for whom he can buy cotillion dresses and a car, he’ll just be turning a blind eye to anything too grown up going on in her life and she won’t be sharing.

      • formerlyAnon

        I think she’ll tend to mean girl for the same reason that her drug/alcohol use will stay on the safe side of the line: she’s blossoming into a fully fledged control freak. She has learned, and learned well, that life goes places she doesn’t like and thinks the more she can control the happier she’ll be.

    • ashtangajunkie

      I have always found Glen to be a bit creepy and I wasn’t enthused to see him – until he defended Sally and said that she’s like his sister. Cute, not creepy. Finally. I don’t know that my heart can handle any further scenes where it appears that Ken Cosgrove has died tragically. Two is plenty. Harry Crane just gets more repulsive by the minute. I’m dying to know what the deal is with Avon and Joan. Okay, Bob Benson. I have also been rolling my eyes at the conspiracy theories surrounding him and thinking that his big secret is that he’s gay, but I am thrilled with this twist!

      • masspatriot

        Interesting that there was a partners’ meetings (I think it’d qualify as that) in this episode, but Joan wasn’t included. At the meeting with the St. Joseph’s rep, she told him she’d show him the way out — as a good secretary would do. Her percentage of ownership may be small, but she deserves a real seat at the table, and the guys don’t even think to ask her.

        • P M

          I have a feeling that a) the meeting was called by Pete? and b) well, they’re all idiots.

          • 3hares

            I remember two meetings. One where Pete was called into Cooper’s office with the others and the other that was just Cutler/Ted/Don/Roger, the guys who represented Ocean Spray vs. Sunkist.

        • HairyBearyGuy

          Well, it’s still 1968. Nothing has really changed least of all the old men. Joan just can’t show up at a client meeting and rock out with her clam out. Joan’s backdoor Avon pitch and then the exchange between Joan and Peggy a few eps ago shows that the despite her upward progress, Joan’s paradigm hasn’t shifted yet. Plus, she can walk the client out and continue the “what SC&P can do for you” sales pitch. One of the secs can’t do that.

    • megohd

      I loved how terribly bad Megan was in the brief moment of her Don saw.

      • Not applicable

        that was awesome… you can’t watch her even if you love her…. :) She really should’ve stuck with advertising!

      • decormaven

        That truly was some soap opera acting in the worst possible way. What I loved was her dialogue- “I’m talking to you! Don’t you dare ignore me!” – and he immediately flipped the channel!

    • Aestro

      The shot from Patty Duke also bore a VERY strong resemblance to Sylvia. The show black-and-white after Megan being in color was especially funny given how drab and dated Sylvia is as a character.

    • Lattis

      Ken is my hero.
      He will write a great book using all the terrible truth he knows.

    • Susan Collier

      Another thing I thought about… how Peggy acted out that pitch with Ted (when she’s comfortable, encouraged, engaged). Compare that to her filling in for Megan on that uncomfortable Cool Whip pitch with Don. I guess pitches are easier when the actors are infatuated with each other.

      • P M

        The actors or the characters? Or did you mean the actors as in the parties involved?

        • Susan Collier

          The characters acting out the parts of the commercial.

      • Chris

        Remember with Cool Whip Don wouldn’t even practice with Peggy. If he couldn’t have Megan he was going to punish Peggy instead.

    • Liz B.

      I have a point to make about the green, yellow, and blue imagery that has been a motif in season 6 and an ongoing topic of interest here. The conflation of birth and death has been a major theme in this show, and green is a symbol of both birth and death. If you’re incredulous about that, think of all the ways birth and death have been conflated in season six, a season in which a character hasn’t even died — references to Rosemary’s Baby (pregnant woman terrified Satanists are plotting to sacrifice her baby), the hullabaloo over Megan’s Sharon Tate shirt (pregnant woman brutally stabbed to death), Megan’s miscarriage. The blue and yellow, possibly symbolizing transition, accent and support the green.

      The reason I think green symbolizes birth and death mostly originates in season 3, though, in the episodes “The Arrangements” and “The Fog”, episodes in which the death of Betty’s father is followed
      closely by the birth of her son, named after him. I just re-watched season 3, and I was struck by all of the green in “The Arrangements”, culminating in the green police car at the episode’s end that heralds news of Betty’s father’s death. In the next episode, Betty gives birth in a hospital with eerie green walls, accented with the disturbing yellow glow of bright lights shining in her face. Strangely enough, that scene kind of reminds me of the rape scene from Rosemary’s baby (in the vulnerability of Betty/Rosemary and the “fog” of their disturbing dreams).

      Basically, I don’t think anyone will necessarily die in season 6, but I think the series is intentionally upping the birth/death imagery, and the green with blue and yellow accents is a part of that effort.

      • Not applicable

        I think Roger will die in season 6. He had 2 heart attacks and then was fine? No way… Especially not back then. I think don will be don at the end… In his corner office, arm over the sofa back, cigarette, gazing out the window. Camera will pull back and he will have white hair and thick glasses, but he will basically look the same. The true old fashioned.

        • formerlyAnon

          Don’t know if he’ll die, but we’ve seen him smoking which doesn’t bode well.

    • 1carmelita

      I’ve been thinking about Sally all day. I don’t usually get to watch the show twice, but it really makes a difference in your perception of the characters. At first I thought Sally was really turning into her mother, but on second viewing I realized that she is actually becoming more like her father. She went into that school and put on the personality that worked in each situation—modest good girl for her mom and the admittance woman, bad girl “trouble” for the girls in the school. She is able to be everyone and no one and work the situation, just like Don. She has an old childhood friend in Glen that really knows her, just like Don had the woman in California that knew him as he was (sorry, I forget her name). Just an interesting twin-ing that I didn’t catch on the first watch. She may be modelling herself on her mom, but its the chameleon act that she learned from Don. So she may say her father never gave her anything, but he’s given her more than she realizes.
      One other little thing I noticed: on the ride out Betty asks Sally for one of her fries—on the way back it flips to Betty offering Sally a cigarette—there’s your end of childhood moment!

      I love this show.

      • housefulofboys

        both really good insights that I hadn’t thought of – thanks!

      • oat327

        Well, keep in mind that almost every teenager is the modest good girl for her mom, bad girl for older, cooler acquaintances. Sally’s not a bad kid, but she definitely had an edge even before she saw Don and Sylvia.

        And I wouldn’t say she was being everyone and no one–I think, especially by inviting Glen over whose known her for almost a decade and making the Tom Collins that Don taught her, she won them all over by being very much Sally Draper, not by being a chameleon.

        But I do think that what Sally did in this episode was complete Betty–using a stand-in to punish Don. Sally got Glen to beat up a guy to stop him from having sex, much like she wish she could do to Don; Betty orchestrated and then berated her friend from the stable for having an affair, when she wouldn’t talk to Don about his affair.

    • judybrowni

      Don starts the episode as a “monster” — he’s relieved his daughter refuses to see him, because she could spill the beans to Megan.

      Boarding school? Great! That postpones the possibility he’ll ever have to be confronted by his daughter — or ratted out by her.

      Don has chosen to keep his cover over his only daughter.

      • Angela_the_Librarian

        I think more than being worried about being ratted out he feels enormously guilty and embarrassed. Paying for her to attend boarding school is also his way of giving her something she wants (the old tactic of buying someone a gift to assuage your own guilt)

        • judybrowni

          Just rewatched the scene, and Don starts the conversation with Betty relieved Sally isn’t coming — and if she is, to have Betty tell her he’s going to be in the office the whole weekend.

          But by the end of the conversation — only after hearing his daughter never wants to see him again — Don’s guilty and embarrassed and passes on the word he and Megan “miss” Sally.

          Still a monster.

          • lockmm

            If Don was afraid that Sally would spill the beans to Megan, why would he be all “tell I won’t be here”? Wouldn’t that give Sally the opportunity to tell Megan? If he was trying to block Sally, wouldn’t he say “Tell her I’ll be around all weekend”?

            He told Betty to tell Sally he wouldn’t be around because he knows Sally loves Megan and wants to be with her. (Or thinks so.)

          • 3hares

            I loved Betty’s annoyed “Why would I tell Sally that?” about him working all weekend.

          • Cheryl

            Don is distraught at what happened with Sally. That’s why he curled up in her bed. He looked like hell in the beginning of the episode – rumpled, sweaty, unusually unattractive. I don’t think he was glad to get rid of her as some say, I think he agreed to the school so he wouldn’t have to face her. (Her telling Megan about what she saw doesn’t seem to be an issue. It’s more likely she’d have told Betty, but she didn’t.)

      • HairyBearyGuy

        So what exactly is Don supposed to do? He can’t unring the bell.

        • JANE LANE

          He could admit he fucked up and stop cheating on his wife?

          • HairyBearyGuy

            Admit to who? Then they all live happily ever after? That doesn’t happen in real life, let alone in Don’s world.

            • Chris

              He could admit it to Betty- they have both cheated with each other lately it’s not likely she would rat him out to Megan. It would give her an opportunity to try and help Sally with what she is dealing with if she knew.

            • HairyBearyGuy

              Well, we still one episode and an entire season left, so anything could happen.

            • Chris

              It’s true- and we don’t even have misleading previews to pore over! My theory is it is Sylvia who somehow lets the cat out of the bag but we will have to see.

            • sweetlilvoice

              It’s one thing to cheat, it’s another to get caught! I can old imagine the words that Betty would use to berate Don for letting his daughter seeing him screwing someone!

            • Cheryl

              Don and Betty are very “surface” people — I don’t see them participating in any self-esteem conversations with their children. They only connect with their children in these little acts — singing with Bobby, sharing a ciggie with Sally. At this point in 1968 I was the only person in my family in therapy, (age 18, living with my parents but engaged) and several therapists refused to treat me if my parents didn’t participate. They chose not to. It was not a very introspective generation.

            • fnarf

              Yeah, that’s not going to happen.

            • Eric Stott

              Betty might be able to deal with Don cheating on Megan, but she wouldn’t stand for his being so stupid and careless to let himself be caught by Sally.

            • Frank_821

              you are so right. I think it’s safe to say Betty assumes Don has cheated on Meagan even before she and Don did it.

              She definitely would not tolerate Sally finding out the way she did. Betty would read him the riot act and Don knows this. Whatever tensions there have been between her and Sally, it says a lot that she never divulged all the cheating Don has done. In fact despite all the bitching she can do when she’s on the phone with him, Betty hasn’t done nearly as much badmouthing about him in front of the kids as you might think. Certainly a lot less in recent months

            • JANE LANE

              I was being facetious. I know Don would never admit he messed up, but that’s what he’s supposed to do. Admit it and quit it.

      • Wellworn

        I think he’s also relieved because he doesn’t want to face her. He doesn’t want to see the look of betrayal on her face.

    • buddy100

      I love this little subtle joke, as cruel as it is.

      Megan on TV: “I’M TALKING TO YOU! DON’T YOU DARE IGNORE M – ” *click*

      In one click of the remote, the writers perfectly summed up Don’s current relationship with his wife.

      • charlotte

        Not only that, but he didn’t seem impressed/proud/capable of a reaction at all.”Oh, my wife is on TV….whatever…”.

    • SoulMo

      One of my favorite parts of the episode: When Betty gives Sally her first “Official” cigarette, and when she leans over for Sally to light hers she takes her eyes off the road for what seemed forever (it was only 3ish seconds). Plus the shoulder belts neatly tucked away in their clips… never used.

      • P M

        And the crack from the Chevy guys about shooting Ralph Nader

      • Cheryl

        I learned to drive in 1966, and we were taught to put on our seat belts immediately. But they didn’t become mandatory until the early 1980s. I’ll bet Sally would have been a texter while driving if such technology had been available in her youth.

        • Eric Stott

          Betty would never use the shoulder belt – it would crease her jacket and possibly muss her hair. Anyhow, in 68 there were still a lot of vehicles out there without belts & wearing them was not enforced. One of my first cars in the 1970′s was a 60′s station wagon. No belts & I could have driven without them (made before the law was passed so it wa grandfathered in) but I had them installed. I felt creepy without them.

          • janierainie

            Don’t forget the dashboards were hardly every padded. Metal all the way! How did we survive? The speed limit was 80 here in Texas!

            • housefulofboys

              We had one of the infamous Chevy Corvairs, cherry red, with the metal dashboard of which you speak. Perfectly situated to crush your forehead in a crash. I used to watch it while we drove (yes I was a morbid child.)

        • SoulMo

          I want to say either 1989 or 1991 in California. As late as 1985,My grandfather used to let me stand on the Console of his Mustang II and stand up through the sunroof while going down the Freeway.

      • housefulofboys

        Whenever my mom put on the brakes she would put her right arm out to keep me from sliding forward on the bench seat, like that would have done any good in a real accident!

        • HairyBearyGuy

          The original parental air bags.

        • siriuslover

          I do that with my son in the front seat and he’s 15 and wearing a seatbelt!

        • Chris

          I was thinking of that during the show. No one wore seatbelts in the 70′s and 80′s that I knew. Not the kids or the adults. Kids would sit up in back of the station wagons essentially rolling around when the car made a turn and everyone’s Mom did the “throw the arm in front of you at stop lights” thing. It’s funny how everyone just accepted that as the thing to do.

    • decormaven

      Gotta love that Bob Benson has traded out his jolt of joe in the classic blue take-out cup to a new SCP logo mug. Company man, through and through.

    • decormaven

      Hope TLo offers some screen caps from the interior of the girls’ room at Miss Porter’s. In the background, the iconic Milton Glaser Bob Dylan poster that was packaged in the Greatest Hits album.

      • sweetlilvoice

        I have to say that I actually own on the cheesy wall decorations in the room–it’s a plastic scene with frogs on it. It’s in our bathroom. I hope there is a screen shot. I knew exactly what it was just from the tiny bit behind one of Sally’s future buds.

        • decormaven

          How fun! I’m hoping we get closer looks in the Mad Style installment tomorrow. There are a lot of tchochkes on the mantel. The per-episode budget for set decoration has got to be a whopper- there are so many period pieces in each scene.

    • Not applicable

      Does anyone pay attention to the exit songs( at the credits?) I recall the Sopranos was always very telling with the final song each episode. Sometimes cheeky, sometimes a little clue. But always played with some sort of intent.

      Hmm… Sounds like a good rainy day Netflix activity!

      • HairyBearyGuy

        Someone posted earlier that it was The Monkees “Porpoise Song, (Theme from Head)” playing. Something about drowning. It’s just adds another layer to the mystery.

        • Cheryl

          I’ve been reading about this online. It was used in “Head,” the Monkee’s movie, as they jumped off a bridge, symbolically signifying the end of their pop phase, and providing the writers (Bob Rafelson, among others) a jumping-off place for their career.

        • Not applicable

          From Wikipedia: In the Monkees’ 1968 feature film Head, the song appears at the beginning and the end of the production, when the group’s members jump from a bridge as a means to permanently escape their lives. Solarization visual effects are used on screen to mirror the psychedelic nature of the song’s lyrics.[4]

          • Not applicable

            jump from a bridge to permanently escape their lives…

            • Not applicable

              Songwriters: GOFFIN, GERRY/KING, CAROLE
              My, my the clock in the sky is pounding away
              There’s so much to say
              A face, a voice, an overdub has no choice
              And it cannot rejoice

              Wanting to be, to hear and to see
              Crying to the sky

              But the porpoise is laughing good-bye, good-bye
              Good-bye, good-bye, good-bye

              Clicks, clacks
              Riding the backs of giraffes for laughs is alright for a while
              The ego sings of castles and kings and things
              That go with a life of style

              Wanting to feel, to know what is real
              Living is a lie

              But the porpoise is waiting good-bye, good-bye
              Good-bye, good-bye, good-bye
              Good-bye, good-bye, good-bye
              Good-bye, good-bye, good-bye

    • SoulMo

      Also: Anyone notice how Bob’s Voice becomes remarkably more “NEW YAWK” when he’s thrown off his game?

    • lockmm

      Can someone explain how Kenny lost an eye and didn’t die?

      I’m hoping its just bruised and stuff and not actually gone forever. I can’t image even the SCP folks being that callous.

      • P M

        Let’s not hold our breath, shall we?

      • HairyBearyGuy

        Well, doesn’t Kenny die every time and always come back later or in the next episode?

        • Cheryl

          I don’t watch South Park, but I was told that they stopped that, “Oh no, Kenny is dead” thing a few years ago. (Maybe it was considered too gruesome for kids?)

          Ken didn’t really lose his eye; he got his with buckshot which made all those little pockmarks on his face, and his eye was just bruised.

          • 3hares

            Yes, South Park stopped it years ago–just because it was old. Though they later did a twist on it.

            Though the idea of them not doing something because it’s too gruesome for kids is hilarious–it’s sooo not a kids show and there’s very little that would be too anything for them to do.

      • Mike R

        He didn’t lose an eye, I don’t think. Just shrapnel or whatever from the gun. Buckshot. I don’t know what it’s called.

        • urbantravels

          Birdshot. They were hunting birds, probably pheasants or quail or similar.

          Birdshot is smaller than buckshot, which is actually used on deer and larger game. I don’t think you’d get off quite so lightly if you got half a faceful of buckshot. Although, Dick Cheney’s unfortunate hunting buddy was hit with birdshot (it was a quail hunt), and he did suffer long term health damage because some shot lodged near his heart. Odds are that birdshot won’t hurt you much but a lot depends on dumb luck of where and how you’re hit.

          It seems pretty certain that Ken did not lose his eye, but did have damage to his eye area that called for an eyepatch.

    • Notsorandom

      I take issue with the statement “[Sally} used groovy Glen Bishop to beat up his goofy stoner friend by claiming that he’d tried to force himself on her. The stoner friend was in fact trying to force himself on Sally and she was terrified. I think the scene was more about Sally’s uncomfortable transition into adulthood than it was to show her being manipulative.

      • HairyBearyGuy

        The junior misogynist thought it was quid pro quo time. Sally wasn’t putting up with that. Plus, she’s saving herself for Glen.

        • P M

          First 2/3rds – agree. Last 1/3 – We don’t know that.

          • HairyBearyGuy

            LOL, obviously it’s conjecture like the rest of the 600+ comments here. I don’t claim to know a MM EP or sleep with one of the writers.

        • judybrowni

          Doubt it, Sally didn’t seem the least bit jealous when Glenn takes off with her new mean girl pal.

          She’s not ready for sex, and Glenn is family she can depend upon, not like her father.

          • HairyBearyGuy

            I picture it as being a “When Harry Met Sally” type of relationship. There’s still a year left. Anything can happen.

            • judybrowni

              Not a working analogy, since both Harry and Sally were jealous — even if they didn’t realize it –when each began dating others, during their friendship phase.

            • HairyBearyGuy

              Mother warned me about people like you. Boorish pedants who have nothing better to do than red pen their way through life. There’s always one in every crowd.

      • P M

        See: my comment below. The problem is many ppl focus on the male POV rather than the female intent – which is more subtle and multi-layered.

        • inchoate

          My thoughts exactly. The focus seems to be on “the guy didn’t deserve to be hit” — but his behaviour *was* scary and I genuinely wonder what else would have stopped him.

      • http://lauriekalmanson.blogspot.com/ laurie kalmanson

        sally was scared and rightfully so. he was making demands he had no right to make. no means no.

    • wolcotte

      Jon Hamm delivered the funniest line of the season when he was arguing with Ted: “We’ve all been there! I mean… Not with Peggy.”

      • judybrowni

        Said in such a way that it means, “You’re the only one to think Peggy’s attractive enough to be fuckable” — insult heaped on insult to the girl Ted loves.

        • wolcotte

          I didn’t see it that way. He said something about Ted’s “little girl” having beautiful eyes just a few sentences prior and I think he really was talking about Peggy. Don has always seen her as a little sister, and the way he delivered that line meant, to me, that she was on the Madonna end of Don’s Madonna/Whore complex but not meant as an insult.

          • judybrowni

            No, Don said Ted thinks his crush has “beautiful eyes.” — and in a nasty sarcastic tone, at that.

            That same nasty sarcastic tone, when Don says, “we’ve all been there, but not with Peggy.”

            • wolcotte

              I watched it several times, and to me it came across very much as “Oh god, that came out wrong. I don’t want you to think we’ve all slept with Peggy” in a protecting her reputation/big brother way.

              They’ve been at each other’s throats this season but it seems like Don and Peggy’s relationship has always been based on respect (or at least as much respect as Don can give a woman.) He’s never insulted her looks or acted repulsed by her that I can recall, and I thought he was trying to shut down the office romance out of a desire to not see her get hurt by a married man.

        • Notsorandom

          I actually thought it was more like he was trying to be respectful of Peggy and making it clear she wasn’t one to sleep around the office.

          • Frank_821

            Just thinking about it, this perfectly parallels the whole incident with Glen and Sally. You’ve got Glen coming to Sally’s rescue when she called to him for help. You got Don claiming to act like a guardian or big brother but of course Peggy never asked him to. Plus Peggy isn’t 14 years old or a virgin.

            That line of sarcasm in a way harkens back to how many people viewed Peggy as the office anomaly back in the early years. Neither 1 of the guys but not a woman

        • housefulofboys

          I don’t think this is what he was saying at all, I think he was just making clear that he wasn’t casting aspersions on Peggy’s virtue. It would have been worse if he hadn’t said it, like, implying that everyone has had a piece of Peggy. which would not be cool.

    • nonsensicallyrics

      Wow, no, Glen’s friend wasn’t goofy, he was a creep who was trying to pressure and manipulate (what are you frigid? you owe me) a younger girl who very clearly did not want to do anything with him. Little did he knew he was dealing with Sally fucking Draper and she wasn’t taking any of his shit – I have never been prouder of her and I have never liked Glen more. That kid deserved to get the shit punched out of him and it probably should have happened a long time ago.
      I came here hoping to see a better and less problematic discussion about that particular plot thread and instead I get that? Talk about disappointed.

      • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

        Sorry to disappoint you (not really), but I don’t think a 16 year old deserves to get the shit punched out of him for putting his arm around a girl in a social situation like that. In fact, I think it’s a little crazy.

        • Guest

          It wasn’t about the arm around her. It was about pressuring her and not listening or stopping when she made it obvious she wasn’t interested. I think her claim was somewhat of an exaggeration but it does seem that’s where it would have been headed considering how persistent he was.

          • http://lauriekalmanson.blogspot.com/ laurie kalmanson

            exactly this.

        • Eric Stott

          Glen may be feeling just a bit too protective of Sally.

          • Kathy G

            He was also a bit drunk/high; boys will fight over real or imagined slights in that condition.

        • Cheryl

          Glen has shown flashes of violence before — for example, trashing the Ossining house — but he did get a little carried away. Still I’m glad he was there for her – he’s the one constant in her life, her North Star. He’s been called “creepy” since the beginning, but his relationship with Sally has always been brotherly. (He’s definitely a better brother to her than mine was to me.)

        • Notsorandom

          I don’t think a 14 year old deserves to be pressured into a sexual situation she clearly doesn’t want to be in either. I”m sorry (really) but I think you’re off base on this one.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            Well yes, we would be off base if we said ANYTHING REMOTELY like “a 14 year old deserves to be pressured into a sexual situation.”

            Jesus Christ. When did you stop beating your wife?

            • Notsorandom

              Ok, my apologies for not being clear. Perhaps I am projecting from my experience being sexually assaulted when I was 13. But I just don’t think Sally was manipulating the situation, and I don’t believe Rolo was “just putting his arm around a girl”. That’s where I thought you were off base.

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              That’s absolutely fine. We don’t begrudge anyone reading that scene in their own way. Just don’t assume the absolute worst of us because we read it a different way. We in no way think Sally deserved the harassment she was getting and we absolutely think she was right to get up and knock on the door.

            • Notsorandom

              Thank you for clarifying. I wasn’t actually assuming the worst, I’m just not good at articulating my thoughts in writing. I look forward to your insightful weekly recaps and loved your piece on Bob Benson last week. Cheers.

            • caketime

              I think your experience makes you more qualified, not less.

        • judybrowni

          I disagree, if not to the degree of punishment, nasty trying to manipulate her into — what? — making out, sex?

          At 13, or 18, I would have run from a boy who pushed like that, asked for help.

          no the kid didn’t deserve to be beaten up, and Sally enjoyed it too much, but the kid wasn’t taking “no” for an answer from a 13 year old.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            “no the kid didn’t deserve to be beaten up, and Sally enjoyed it too much”

            Which means we are in total agreement on the matter.

        • housefulofboys

          I have to agree. As I recall the scene, she turned her head away once, she moved away once, then she stood up and called Glen. Very sensible. Yeah, Rolo was a schmuck, but you can’t beat someone up for what they might (or might not) have done.

        • quitasarah

          TLo, I love you, but I think you need to rewatch the scene. She clearly did not want to pick up what he was putting down, and he wasn’t going to have that. Maybe it’s because I’m a woman who’s been in more or less that situation, but even if he wasn’t holding her down, he was forcing himself on her and she didn’t want it. That’s a very scary position for a 14 year old to be in. Then he called her a tease when she went to Glenn with it. Even if Glenn slightly overreacted, I cheered when I saw that Sally has at least one person in her corner, willing to fight for her.

          • http://lauriekalmanson.blogspot.com/ laurie kalmanson

            exactly this

          • inchoate

            Agreed. I don’t think T&L or Darren really understand how scary that situation is, especially for a girl as young and small as Sally. Hell, I’m in my early thirties and I would still get scared at a guy acting like that. He was a stranger, he was bigger and older than her, and he was escalating from an attempt to kiss her (which looked pretty forceful to me; he was fighting her as she tried to move her face away) to whining to insults. (It was NOT just “putting his arm around her.”) He *was* trying to coerce her and she had no way of of knowing how much further he would go. On top of that she was in a strange place and somewhat intoxicated.

            I can see the anxiety of that situation, not to mention its novelty, contributing to both the imprecision of her language (“he tried to force me” isn’t quite right but “he tried to bully me into it” would be perfectly accurate) and her failure to appreciate that Glenn was already mad and ready to protect her. I think she enjoyed being able to sic Glenn on the guy, enjoyed the results, but that’s not the same as planning it that way or just trying to stir the pot.

            I took the other girl’s statement as a sign of her buying into the same values as the guy — you invite a guy over, you do what he wants.

          • caketime

            You can’t wait until someone actually has you pinned down to decide that it’s time to act. The situation was already scary. The way he was acting towards her raised major red flags.

        • nonsensicallyrics

          He was trying to manipulate and coerce a younger, smaller girl. Listen to the language he was using.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            We don’t disagree with that. He was not, however forcing himself on her or deserving of a beating for it, in our opinion.

            • HelenNPN

              Teenage boys beat on each other at the drop of a hat, and just for fun sometimes. I don’t like it, but it is true.

            • Darren Nesbitt

              Yes it seems Tlo’s definition (and mine) of the word Forced seems to be interpreted differently by many people here. I just don’t think Sally was FORCED to do anything.

            • quitasarah

              She said, “He tried to force me.” Perhaps a slight overstatement, but I think it’s plausible that it’s exactly how she felt. Rolo got what he deserved.

            • not_Bridget

              Peggy’s new friends enjoyed the drama. Rolo was a creep but he wasn’t trying to “force” Sally.

          • http://lauriekalmanson.blogspot.com/ laurie kalmanson

            the entitlement was worthy of a beatdown

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              “the entitlement was worthy of a beatdown”

              And that is exactly the part of this debate that we disagree with the most and find borderline offensive. We don’t deny how scared Sally was in that situation and that she had the right to determine her own safety and and the parameters of the interaction, but it’s outrageously extreme, as far as we’re concerned, to argue that a 16-year-old boy deserves to be beaten simply for WANTING and SAYING HE WANTED to be with a girl in his social group.

            • http://lauriekalmanson.blogspot.com/ laurie kalmanson

              His behavior was one step short of assault

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              …which is why we keep saying, over and over again, that Sally was both right and within her rights to get up and put a stop to it.

            • http://lauriekalmanson.blogspot.com/ laurie kalmanson

              What’s so interesting aboutbthebreactions to this is how differently people see it

              To me it looked like he wasn’t going to stop

              the lady wasnt interested and he kept going

              he wasn’t going to stop

              And he wasnt going to be stopped by someone smaller and weaker

              That’s how it looked to me

              There wasn’t any stopping him until someone else came into the scene

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              She got up and walked away from him. He stayed on the floor and whined and insulted her.

            • caketime

              I didn’t see that comment in your review though!
              The situation was a scary one. Her assertiveness in the situation a positive thing was worthy of more than an offhand comment about how Sally hasn’t fallen far from the Don tree (especially given that Don has been on a downward spiral lately, and has always been a manipulator).
              I still love you guys and will continue to eagerly read your reviews which I enjoy as much as I do watching the show itself. BUT I still think you blew it with this one. Respectfully, Caketime

            • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

              And we still respectfully disagree.

            • Chris

              I understand your point and although I wasn’t sad to see Rolo get a few punches from Glen, if it was to the point he was really beaten up badly I wouldn’t have been comfortable with it. Maybe it’s because I have brothers who used to end up punching each other then shrug it off, the fact Rolo got up and stalked off able to drive etc. and the fact that Glen didn’t think Rolo would even be mad enough to not give him a ride I didn’t think it was that much of a fight. Glen was also mad because he told Rolo before that Sally was like a sister to him and he didn’t respect that. It wasn’t as big as Sally calling for help but it also contributed to Glen’s anger. Maybe I’m inferring too much because of life experiences but it wouldn’t surprise me if Glen and Rolo had some dust ups before.

        • HairyBearyGuy

          He was cashing in on quid pro quo. It didn’t read like he wanted a few innocent smooches. I see him as a junior misogynist. A Pete Campbell in the making.

          In fact, that entire scene was a lesson in manipulation and quid pro quo and Sally Draper was the clear victor.

      • caketime

        I didn’t see your post and commented similarly upthread. I think she learned something from the robbery that she won’t easily forget. I was really scared for her and didn’t know what was going to happen. I was so happy and proud of her too. And glad that Glen looked out for her instead of siding with his weasily little friend. She made it clear that she doesn’t put up with bullshit. I think Sally is going to be all right.

    • housefulofboys

      I loved seeing the McDonald’s take-out bag that Sally had, cause it was such a big deal when fast food came to my small town growing up. I looked it up and was amazed to read that by 1963 McDonald’s had already sold a billion hamburgers (at least according to Wikipedia.)

    • CAMeyer

      Finally, something Pete and I can agree upon: Bob certainly does have good taste in ties. How do I get the one Bob is wearing in the first photo?

      Also, re the St Joseph’s ad, Don, Ted, Peggy, and even the client are so focused on the budget that they can’t consider the wisdom of identifying the baby of Mrs Middle America with the spawn of Satan! Never mind 1968, if they made that ad today it would be yanked from youtube in hours.

    • Travelgrrl

      I wondered about Bob Benson and Beloit College when it was first mentioned. I wondered, if he was from an older money banking family, why hadn’t he gone to an Ivy League? Beloit, though it’s a proper private school, is located in a shithole of a border tavern town in southern Wisconsin. Now I realize that was a bit of foreshadowing, as if he had said “Harvard, class of 65″, someone else might well have gone there and known it was a ruse. No one in New York would likely have also gone to the much more pedestrian (while still being OK academically) Beloit.

      Also, Bob speaks Spanish fluently? All of a sudden I was in the middle of Megan’s soap opera / telenova.

      When The Patty Duke show flicked on, I died laughing. Identical cousins, all the way!

      • Peridot

        I was wondering about the Spanish too. It was nearly flawless – maybe Manolo’s influence? Not bad for an uneducated hick from West Virginia!

        • Macunaima

          No, no, no…it was grammatically flawless, but the accent was painful. Pretty clear that the actor (at least) just memorized the lines, but does not speak spanish.

          • Denise Alden

            Agreed. I now sound like one of those who complained about how terrible Marie’s French is. I speak Spanish, not French, hence Bob’s accent was painful, but Marie’s French sounds fine to me!

    • buddy100

      Don is gaslighting Ted. Wow. I’ve seen him attack men before, but never have I seen him pull the tricks he’s used on his own wives.

      First, he convinced the rightly suspicious Ted that he wasn’t aiming for personal attacks. Then he does this big doe-eyed act of wanting to help some kid. Ted, for the first time, feels like he’s seeing a vulnerable side to Don: one that is moral and selfless. You can tell that he’s forced to re-assess his conception of Don and begins to question his own suspicions.

      Then, RIGHT AFTER Don seems to sincerely express wanting to work more together, he humiliates Ted by throwing his moral hypocrisy in his face. He castrates the poor guy in front of the woman he loves, his co-worker, and his client. He throws both the guilt of his dead friend and his emotional infidelity in his face. And the worst part is that Ted believes him. He’s going to internalize this insult and see himself as the real enemy, not Don.

      Don has set the poor man on the path to self-destruction by making him doubt himself and his perceptions. He is the ultimate predator and, as Peggy rightly notes, monster.

      • not_Bridget

        Ted’s a grownup. Does he really care about his family, or is he willing to dump them for Peggy? Given the divorce laws, unless his wife cooperates it will be expensive & scandalous. Or does he have periodic affairs—emotional and/or carnal? And he’s got a responsibility to his company, too. If an alcoholic can beat him, he deserves to lose. Or maybe he will wake up.

        Don seemed a bit like Superman in the early years. Now it’s evident he’s all too human, with human failings. He is not a monster. Peggy needs to spend less time watching horror films and pay attention to the real world. Does she really want to be a home wrecker?

        • Chris

          I don’t think there is any evidence Ted has ever engaged in any affairs. The difference with Peggy and Ted vs Don is Don often does what he does with malicious intent and to hurt other people. It’s deliberate punishment. Peggy makes mistakes and she is usually the only one who suffers from them as a result (although Abe did get stabbed). I’d hate to see an affair with Ted and Peggy because part of what is so appealing about Ted is his “good guy” ways. I don’t want Peggy to make the mistake of getting involved with a married man again.

    • bibble

      Anyone else thing that Bob’s pass at Pete was meant to be calculated and strategic as opposed to out of infatuation? Duck mentioned that in his previous job, there were rumors that his boss had taken him on trips, etc. Perhaps he misread clues from Pete (gratefulness, camaraderie) as signs that Pete would be open, and what better way to secure your employment then by providing benefits to the boss. I think he miscalculated and it was a grave mistake, but I do think the pass was all part of the game and something that provided security for him at the previous job.

      • 3hares

        I suspect if that was the case in his previous job he probably slept with the guy first so knew he was gay and then accepted his advances rather than taking a chance that the married man who went to brothels who’d never made a pass at him at all and just use “degenerate” as a synonym for gay might be up for it. I just can’t imagine anybody in that world thinking that identifying themselves as gay=security. It’s exactly the opposite.

    • Donna B. Long

      Did anyone see Pete with his gun and say aloud, “Now he’s going to be eaten by a bear”?

    • masspatriot

      Re: the debate about Sally and Rolo:

      I agree that many of the comments are from a male point of view. Remember that Sally, just a few weeks ago, walked in on her father and Sylvia. That would have been really upsetting to a 13-year-old girl, who’s trying to figure out what sex is and what it means.
      Suddenly, she’s on an overnight at a strange place with two mean girls, where there is no supervision, and the only person she knows is in another room. Reptilian Rolo is pushing her — and she doesn’t know how far he’ll go. She’s admitted that she’s a little drunk. Plus, he was creepy. Plus, she was several years younger than Rolo. She called on Glenn so it would stop, and Glenn was the one who felt betrayed by his “friend” Rolo and decided to beat him up. That Sally looked on and smiled doesn’t mean she intended Rolo to be hurt. She just needed somebody, Glenn, to help her navigate the situation and all the new feelings she was having. He said she was like a “sister,” and she needs someone to help her out.
      She got back in the car with Betty the next day, who showed she was very proud that her daughter had been accepted by this snobbish, “blue blood” school. Little did she know what Sally had experienced. And Sally couldn’t tell her that Glenn had been on the scene, since Betty hates Glenn.

    • Travelgrrl

      The last song was by the Monkees – four sort of musicians who didn’t play on their own records (Boyce and Hart, et al). In other words, the musical equivalent of shams. Don Draper and Bob Benson.

      I mentioned a few weeks ago when people were positing that Sally would go hippie that she’d end up at a Seven Sisters school, but leading anti war protests. Going to Miss Porters for high school just speeds up THAT process.

      Joan was great as a Yiddish Yenta. Glad for Hendricks to get the chance to do a different bit.

      The meeting re: Chevy – Pete was all excited but his face fell when he saw who all was invited (including Bob). Bob was obsequious in the meeting but afterwards I was surprised how readily he stood up to Pete. All the power seemed in his court. (Of course this is before his past was unmasked.) Bob Benson: a Mystery wrapped in an Enigma, wrapped in Two Cups of Greek Coffee.

    • Ms_Flyover

      I just realized that, in the eyepatch, Ken reminds me of Nadine from Twin Peaks.

      • charlotte

        So I’m not the only one who thought of her. I hope he is not going to rip out trees and pretend he is still a kid in the next episode.

    • magnetschool

      Just want to highlight T&Lo’s trenchant “Don was punishing Ted
      because the returns are diminishing on punishing himself.” Having
      destroyed all of the relationships in his personal life, his working
      relationships follow. What will be next – destroying SC&P from the
      inside? Seems like a process of gradual self-erasure, until Don melts
      away and Dick leaves his life behind. Perhaps Bob is a funhouse mirror
      is that respect: you think he will disappear like the “hobo,” but
      instead becomes an even more valued member of the team, while Don
      withdraws from his job title and becomes a ghost of his former self.

      • mhleta

        “Perhaps Bob is a funhouse mirror is that respect:” Nice!

      • masspatriot

        Since changing identities seems still easy to do in the late ’60s, perhaps by the next season he’ll be transform into Dick Whitman and walks away from all his relations, family and work. He’ll end up as a pool boy in Beverly Hills, and will drink himself into oblivion.

        • magnetschool

          Yes indeed! Maybe the party scene was prophetic in that regard; “I told you my name wasn’t Don …”

    • littlemissstrange

      I just rewatched the episode, and while he’s on the phone with Duck describing Bob (before he finds out about Bob’s past), Pete says of Bob, “He’s eager to please….. handsome.”

      Something’s gonna happen between Pete and Bob, I know it. When Pete said that he’s off-limits, the look on Bob’s face says, “Hard-to-get… I like that.” Pete knows it too.

      • 1tsplove

        Yeah, I was really intrigued by the last bit of that conversation, especially Bob raising his eyebrow a little!

        • Guest

          Of course. :-)

      • Darren Nesbitt

        No Bob something is really off about Bob think about how infuriated he was calling Pete a Son of a Bitch on the phone with Manolo. His career comes first, as this relationship continues I think that love illusion Bob had will fall away.

      • masspatriot

        Loved how Duck appeared to be drinking a glass of milk, but isn’t reformed enough not to hope for a job on the Chevy account, and clearly needs the money when he demands $1,000 from Peter to do something about Bob.
        I was hoping Duck had reformed, but, no, he’s still the same fool.

        • siriuslover

          Didn’t he demand $1000 because he’s a head hunter and that’s what he does? It’s kind of in his job description to find jobs and seek out people for those jobs. But I could be wrong.

          • jen_wang

            I’m ambivalent; the cash part seemed weird, almost shades of seedy-private-detective, even though the work seems legit enough. Demanding cash almost seems a little desperate; what does it mean that you can’t wait for a check?

            • masspatriot

              That he’s hiding that income from the IRS and maybe from his wife/alimony.

            • Abigail Adams

              That he’s hiding that income from the IRS and maybe from his wife/alimony.

              Good call. My thought is that he wanted the cash because 1) he wanted Pete to take his time seriously and 2) what Pete was asking him to do (getting a current employee out the door) wasn’t something he wanted his name attached to.

            • Chris

              I took it to mean both Pete and Harry have wasted his time taking meetings for jobs they have no intention of applying for. Now Pete has called asking him to find a job (quietly) for a guy who isn’t looking for a job and who is not his client, because Pete wants to force him out. It’s not only because it’s shady work, it’s because Duck wants to be paid in cash to make sure he is not only compensated for this (because Bob won’t be paying him) but as restitution for all the other unpaid time and work they have gotten out of him. No more freebies.

            • jen_wang

              Aha! Sold. :)

        • MartyBellerMask

          He’s still shady and desperate, and I hope Peggy finds a different headhunter if/ when the time comes.

      • HelenNPN

        I think it is a remote possibility – “forbidden fruit” and commanding too! But Pete is a real horndog for women. Don’t forget how he longed for that teenager at the school, enjoys his prostitutes and chased every available skirt. Very very unlikely that he would ever experiment considering his prejudices and arrogant sense of himself and his place in the world. More likely – he’ll lord it over the suffering Bob and use it to his advantage, like an untouchable and sadistic mistress.

        • littlemissstrange

          This is true; Pete might just be getting his kicks by having Bob at his mercy… having ANYONE at his mercy. A mark of how low he has sunk. BUT…. because of the fact that his personal life has just completely gone to shit and everyone hates him, he could find himself opening up to Bob, the only one who may still like him. Yes, he’s a rampant skirt-chaser, hitting on secretaries left and right, but do they actually give a shit about him like Bob does?

          We’ll have to just wait and see how desperate Pete becomes.

          • 3hares

            I think part of his point was that he knows that he doesn’t have Bob at his mercy. He’s more wisely choosing to go for a balance of power. If he tried to make life bad for Bob, Bob would go after him.

          • Cheryl