Allison Williams in Donna Karan

Posted on May 01, 2012

Here is a picture of Allison Williams in a very pink dress.

Girl‘s Allison Williams attends The Breast Cancer Research Foundation’s ‘Hot Pink Party’ in NYC in a Donna Karan dress.

It’s a pretty dress, if a little on the standard side of things, but we suppose one would strive for standard at a breast cancer event. Not to mention pink. Our only real issue is with the shoes, but you knew that already, didn’t you?

No, we really just slapped this picture up because we wanted to talk about the series she’s currently co-starring in, HBO’s Girls. Here is what we want to say about HBO’s Girls: Everyone needs to shut the fuck up about HBO’s Girls. It’s just a TV show, bitches. You don’t have to devote 600,000 words a day on the topic. Yes, the show is too white for Brooklyn; yes the characters and the women who play them are all insanely privileged. Guess what? Welcome to the entire rest of the entertainment industry, which is run by the privileged and tends only toward representations of white, Christian heterosexuals. You’d think all of these bloggers and critics wringing their hands over this show had just arrived on this planet. But really, they’re all het up because this time, all the characters look like people the average entertainment blogger or television critic knows. It’s the only reason why this show is getting so damn much attention.

Also, this: Everyone needs to shut up about how Girls is nothing like Sex and the City when anyone with half an eye and a functioning nervous system can see that it is. Four characters so distinctly different from each other that they’re close to archetypal, navigating through New York City via their careers, their friendships, and the men they sleep with and date. Puh-leeze, bitches. It’s younger, hipper, and less focused on material pursuits, but it’s totally Sex and the City. This reminds us of that period when Gaga broke into the mainstream and every entertainment journalist politely pretended she wasn’t doing a Madonna riff.

But we like the show! Really! We’re not falling all over it in love or anything, but it’s an entertaining 30 minutes. This concludes our discussion on HBO’s Girls.

Also, that dress is just way too pink for this early in the morning. We’re going to need another cup to get our retinas to calm down.

 

[Photo Credit: Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images]

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  • Sobaika Mirza

    The reason the show received so much negative attention for its all-white-overly-privileged -ness was because the creators and the show presented it as ‘the voice of a generation’ and something new and different and finally realistic. Which it’s not. It’s gotten more than its fair of flack, but the people behind it put themselves in that position.

    Beautiful girl, and great dress. I adore a bright pink!

    • charlotte

      Or at least a voice of a generation…I like this show, but I don’t want that girl to be the voice of my generation- so I just take it as a fictional show on TV, and I’m fine with it.

      • PaulaBerman

         Amen. The show is about four train wrecks.

    • SassieCassy

      I didn’t care about the racial politics of it all (because seriously caucasian casts have always been around and will always be around and I got over it a long time ago) until one of the writers sent out that horribly ignorant tweet in response. What an idiot!! The show was mildly interesting before and now I just refuse to watch it on principle.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2VBWWGHZEBKTVQMXE5SO5NCU2I Mich

        what was the tweet? i don’t twit, and i’m dying of curiosity now.

        • SassieCassy

          Something along the lines of “What I didn’t like about Precious is that it didn’t have a representation of ME.”

          She deleted it but not quick enough, plenty of people saw and were pissed.

          • brokephilosopher

            yes, in reply to people of color pointing out that the show isn’t their voice/representation.  My jaw totally dropped when I saw that tweet.  (sound of pointing racistly flying over her head)

          • Alisa Rivera

            Gawker has a great blog post on the racial problems with Girls (I’m doing a semi cut and paste since TLo don’t allow links anymore):

            A Girls Writer’s Ironic Racism And Other ‘White People Problems’

            Lesley Arfin was probably not thinking very hard about how her tweet would be taken when she wrote it on Wednesday. (She’s since deleted both that tweet and a followup apology tweet; reached by email last night, she declined to comment.) But it wasn’t, as eager bloggers pointed out, the first time she’d made a bad race joke. Her most popular tweet of all time, according to the Favstar.fm account she links to in her profile, is “Repost this if you are a beautiful strong black woman who don’t need no man”; in a post on her personal site, she calls pooping “taking Obama to the White House.”
            And then there was the Huffington Post interview Arfin gave to my editor, A.J. Daulerio, in 2007, in which A.J. pushed her to choose her favorite word out of three that Russell Simmons had condemned: “H-word, B-word, or N-Word.” After a short rant about the “ridiculousness” of banning words, Arfin went there:
            “N–” is a great word. It just packs so much punch. The two g’s next to each other are like literal two G’s, broin’ out, tough as nails, them against the world. It gives me chills that a word can hold so much power, it really makes me feel like I chose the right profession.

          • Alisa Rivera

            Please read the Gawker post on Girls writer Leslie Arfin (posted April 20). The racial problems with the show’s creators are deep and go beyond just the Precious quote. I tried to do a cut and paste of key bits of the interview, but the post got put into moderation, probably because the language is so offensive.

          • Sobaika Mirza

            I’ve researched a bit more into Arfin after seeing the comments here – WOW. Yeah, there’s no way I am ever supporting anything that writer has to do with. Disgusting.

          • brokephilosopher

            Thanks for the tip! It’s interesting to me when this stuff actually makes to it the (semi) mainstream media, because I feel like people often insist that racism isn’t really a problem anymore.  It’s not that racism ever goes away or people stop saying racist shit, but somehow lots of (white) people get to pretend that we’ve all moved past that…until something like this blows up in their faces.

          • Alisa Rivera

            Some hipsters seem to think that if they make racist jokes ironically, that totes makes it okay! Bullshit, of course.

          • BPlease

            Exactly – and she wrote after deleting the tweet that she let ‘gender politics’ get in the way of ‘racial politics’ – which is just such unbelievable bullshit.  She threw a really mean jab and couldn’t handle the blowback.  It’s one thing to write the show and another to act like all stories have an equal chance of being told.

            The other thing that I don’t think is minor is that different critics from the “Girls” demographic have thought they were just too fucking cute by calling the show “FUBU” — for us by us, of course, and showing no recognition whatsoever of the fact that the acronym was created and marketed by a young black male designer (from Queens).  It’s that smug garbage, that deliberate shit-eating grin-wearing manner of appropriation (I know, I know, but I can’t think of a better phrase) that rankles.

            I’m personally in-between and I love Allison Williams on the show, and I love her earrings and dress here.  But I don’t love the attitude that SassieCassy and others have pointed out.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2VBWWGHZEBKTVQMXE5SO5NCU2I Mich

            many thanks to everyone who educated me! i had no idea. i only have the most basics of cable, and have only heard of the girls through the internet. and i had no idea who arfin was. seems i’m not missing much.

      • lovelyivy

        If we accept that the racial politics were ‘always’ that way and don’t try to change it by calling out this garbage when we see it then it will never change. I do not take offense at all-white casts in general, but on shows that claim to be representative of reality or shows that are set in a place where white people are actually a damn minority (heeeey Brooklyn- 36% white) then I think it is totally fair to call them on their bullshit. The writer actually being a bigoted pretentious hipster twit to boot does not make it worse, just highlights how it got that way.

      • lovelyivy

        If we accept that the racial politics were ‘always’ that way and don’t try to change it by calling out this garbage when we see it then it will never change. I do not take offense at all-white casts in general, but on shows that claim to be representative of reality or shows that are set in a place where white people are actually a damn minority (heeeey Brooklyn- 36% white) then I think it is totally fair to call them on their bullshit. The writer actually being a bigoted pretentious hipster twit to boot does not make it worse, just highlights how it got that way.

    • UrsNY

      Plus, a heaping scoop of “show about how the lazy children of rich people live” promoted as an artifact of authenticity in the middle of the worst economic disaster in nearly 80 years. Controversy that was probably anticipated, or at least welcomed, by the network marketing department. Yeah, I’m throwing them no bones.

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        Not that I have cable (see: worst economic disaster in nearly 80 years), but this is why I wouldn’t watch if I did.

        • UrsNY

          Yeah, the fact of it is just so tone deaf.

          Oh, my cable company lets me suspend my cable for a certain number of months, so I’ll be skipping the summer to bring down the total annual bill. If you’re ever on the bubble about affording cable, that can be an okay option.

        • formerlyAnon

           When I found I couldn’t justify the cost of cable, I was astonished to discover that with the exception of decent coverage of the the four Grand Slam tennis tournaments and two or three shows (familiar to those who read this blog) which I watch with charming and generous friends-with-cable, or later, on line, I didn’t miss it at all.

          And it absolutely simplifies many conversations which I simply sit out, nodding & smiling as if my grasp of English were tenuous.

  • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

    Oh god, the SHOES!!

  • http://6things.blogspot.com par3182

    Less Girls, more Drag!

    (please)

  • http://twitter.com/PlanetSandisan Sandisan

    Ooh, yes!  Girls is a fun little show, but damn am I sick of hearing about it.  And that dress is wayyyyyy too pink for my taste.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=558631967 Ivona Foster

    Reading all the hoopla first and then watching the first 3 episodes in a row: I don’t get it! Why all the excitement?  Probably won’t watch another episode of it. On the dress front: can even Breast Cancer label excuse something this pink? 

    • SassieCassy

      Not sure. Judd Apatow is behind it and the main creator and lead actor girl had some indie that got a lot of buzz also and I kind of hated it. But with those people involved it was bound to get a lot of attention.

  • http://twitter.com/laura_valerie Laura Curtis

    I excuse the non-real parts because I think the real parts make up for it.

    The truth is, television can never fully capture Real Life because… Real Life cannot be captured in 45 minutes. There will always be a superficiality to certain aspects, whether it’s financial or social or racial or sexual, etc. 

    As a 20-something “girl” I find this show incredibly relatable. It is EXACTLY how my life would be… if I lived in a fantasy world.

    • amf0001

      wouldn’t you have nicer manboys in your fantasy world?  That show makes me sad… it reminds me of when I was 21.  I don’t want to go back there.    

    • drdirection

      I’m with you.  I’m a 40 something “girl” and this could have been me in my twenties.  Certain parts of all 4 could have been me.  I find it relatable.  I dated the assholes and the over-attentive. I asked my parents for money and I danced in my room by myself.  I had a fantastic roommate who understood me the way those two women do.  I did live in Seattle though.

      • mshesterp

        All those things you mentioned are all the things that make me relate to the show myself, as a white woman in her early 30s.  So maybe it doesn’t speak to anyone (or even 10% of the population), but I’ve been watching every week and it makes me cringe regularly with recognition of myself in a few of those characters.  I think Lena Dunham is spot on with some of the writing and characters.  

    • lovelyivy

       Your fantasy world has no minorities in it? Scary.

      No one is saying that you can’t or shouldn’t relate to the show, just that for those of us who never ever see ourselves represented (nerdy Caribbean American here- not expecting to see that show up on my tv any time soon) it sucks and it can actually be damaging, look at media studies done on the topic.

      What I don’t understand is why the rest of the world gets offended when minorities have the temerity to point out that the shitty systematic lack of representation for the rest of us is shitty.

      • xay

        Because the experiences of white people are universal but if you add too many black characters, no one can relate! Haven’t you heard?

        • lovelyivy

           Yup. That’s why movies like “Think Like A Man’ never make any money….

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

             Didn’t it beat out Hunger Games as the number one movie the week it opened?

          • Alisa Rivera

            More importantly, it beat out Zac Efron in a Nicholas Sparks film that opened the same weekend. That sad trombone you hear is the sound of Efron’s career slitting its own throat.

          • lovelyivy

             Ah well, at least he’s still pretty.

          • lovelyivy

             It also beat the latest Emily Blunt/Jason Segel film, Five-Year Engagement, which is what most reviewers seemed to expect to take the weekend.

      • http://twitter.com/laura_valerie Laura Curtis

        By “a fantasy world” I don’t mean it to be “MY fantasy world” or how I would like the world to be.

        I just meant that, by definition, the worlds we see on television are fantasies.

  • Jessica O’Connell

    If it makes you feel any better…I had never even heard of HBO’s Girls until this post.

    • butterflysunita

      Me neither.  And I live in NYC.  The show sounds tiresome.  

    • JosephLamour

      You’re luckier for it.

  • http://twitter.com/ILikeShiny Cindi Williams

    I think she was trying to match her shoes to the lining of her dress (see first pic).

    *shudder*

  • http://twitter.com/margs4 Margaret Grace

    I like it. There are so many shows depicting women the same age who are beautiful and hold very low-paying jobs while also wearing couture and living in a great apartment. This isn’t completely “real life” but it sure is an improvement. It’s great that they don’t sugarcoat things. So many young women will be unemployed at some point, and so many will be taken advantage by a boy. Yes, the characters are stereotypes, but my friends and I can see a little bit of ourselves in each girl–I’m not a Carrie or a Samantha here–I’m like all of them, just trying to figure out who I am and how to survive in this strange new world of adulthood.

    • Carly Warnock

      I like your comment about the ‘girls who are beautiful and hold low paying jobs and wear couture and live in a great apartment’. The scary thing though is that TV is helping make girls think they can have this reality. I don’t understand how they do it. I used to work at a high end clothing store (last year) and we made 12 bucks an hour. But the girls that worked there bought Daimler Louis Vuitton’s and Marc Jacobs and Alexander Wang bags on the regular. One of them posted on fb about her 10,000 dollar credit card debt. She was 20. How do these people ever become functioning adults? And how do they not understand that TV does not translate to reality?

      • http://twitter.com/foodycatAlicia foodycatAlicia

        And then they walk into job interviews for graduate internships and say that they expect to earn $120k in their first year. Hilarious, but very, very worrying.

        • SassieCassy

          Hah I IWISH for half that salary.

          • buildmeatower

             Seriously. Hell, I’d be happy to make 20k a year.

          • http://twitter.com/foodycatAlicia foodycatAlicia

            I know right? It makes me laugh every time I talk to someone who interviews those candidates! Almost 20 years in the workforce, a couple of degrees and I don’t get half that!

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        Credit card companies promote that kind of thing — when my husband was in college, his tuition was so expensive (he was an aviation major, so tuition+flight training… yeah, it was nuts) that he had NO aid money for living expenses except for his work study salary of around $100 a month, and that was only for 9 months of the year.  Yet he had credit cards IN HIS NAME ALONE that had limits of 4 – 5 THOUSAND on them at 18!  I was appalled to discover this, since at the same time, I had 3 cards, none with a limit over $500 and I worked full-time (granted, I worked at a hotel, so my pay sucked, but still…)  Why?  Because I didn’t ask for anything higher since I wouldn’t be able to pay it and because I had regular cards instead of student cards.  The second a company sees the “student” box checked, they inflate the limit so they can get high fees out of kids who can’t pay until mom and dad bail them out…

        • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

          Yeah, the credit card reps pretty much issue cards at the door. Financial aid? Sure, that counts as income, let’s put that on your application. No car? No matter, let’s hook you up with a gas card anyway!

      • http://twitter.com/iJenmac Jennifer McClory

         Chick lit is going the same way too.  I’m a novelist and I was told by an agent that “chick lit should feature a 20-something woman who lives in NY and has a great job at a magazine or PR firm.”  Well, that’s all fine and dandy, but there are what, maybe 20 girls in the world who could relate to that character.  Needless to say, that person is NOT my agent.  I’ve since continued writing books about real life girls who have real-life jobs.  I even had a main character who *gasp* had to move into low-income housing.  The horror.

  • http://joyouslifesf.wordpress.com Kiltdntiltd

    Love me some hot pink. And gurl is working the hell out of it. But yeah, the shoes make me wanna cry real hard.

  • janetjb

    Those shoes are depressed that they aren’t as bright as her dress.  I don’t understand what’s going on with her hair.

  • Sara Leigh Merrey

    The girl writing it is steering it. It’s about her and her make-believe friends based on who might really be her friends. People just need to deal with it. I thought the first two episodes were pretty funny. My daughter is in her 20s, living in Brooklyn. I found it very relatable to her group of friends. You have to have a multicultural team behind a show to get a multicultural/multiracial core cast. Why does it have to be anything other than an entertaining show? It’s not reality TV, which as we all know, is very unreal and for me not very entertaining unless it’s a cooking show.

    The dress is entirely too pink for me, but at least it’s not too strong a color for her.

    • SassieCassy


      You have to have a multicultural team behind a show to get a multicultural/multiracial core cast. ”

      Disagree with that entirely. Shows like Greys Anatomy (bad show but still) 30 Rock and Community have some diversity because the show runners cast people who didn’t exactly look/act like them in order to be well rounded. Its called not being an asshole. Its also recognizing that a varied cast can bring in differing outlooks, a range of viewers, and interesting stories.

      • xay

        Grey’s Anatomy has a black show runner. 30 Rock and Community have diverse writers.

        • Sobaika Mirza

          The creator of Community is Dan Harmon, who has spoken openly about searching for a range of people to hire in order to – as Cassy put it – “not be an asshole.” Tiny Fey has said similar things, particularly about not wanting to have the token black guy in her cast.

          As for Shonda Rhimes and Grey’s Anatomy, going by the original poster’s logic, she would have cast mostly black actors. I believe the show operates on a color-blind casting philosophy with characters of varied backgrounds and sexualities, whose arcs include but are not defined by their background.

          • xay

            First of all, your response is needlessly patronizing.

            Secondly, you are ignoring the fact that all of the show you named have multicultural teams. That was the point the OP was making. Show runner /= team.

          • Sobaika Mirza

            Didn’t think I was patronizing or rude or anything but okay. I’m sorry. But I think you’re missing my point, and it still stands. 

            If the people behind a show (in this case, Lena Dunham, in the others, Dan Harmon, Tina Fey, and Shonda Rhimes, want to include people of color in their teams, cast, and crew, they can and will. It’s really that simple. Dunham originally responded to the critiques by saying she didn’t realize how white the show was until they were done. No way do I buy that level of ignorance.

          • SassieCassy

            Exactly! I remember over 10 years ago S&TC was also getting the side eye because it its lack of POC. So was Friends. It was a thing then and its still a thing now and we cant really pretend otherwise and we can’t say, ‘well it’s not really their fault, a bunch of white girls wrote about a bunch of white girls and cant be expected to write about anything else.”

          • Verascity

             That wasn’t patronizing at all, though. It’s almost entirely fact: both Dan Harmon and Tina Fey *have* specifically spoken about doing colorblind casting and/or including actors of color, for exactly those reasons, as stated by them (and yes, Grey’s also does do colorblind casting).

          • Verascity

             That wasn’t patronizing at all, though. It’s almost entirely fact: both Dan Harmon and Tina Fey *have* specifically spoken about doing colorblind casting and/or including actors of color, for exactly those reasons, as stated by them (and yes, Grey’s also does do colorblind casting).

          • http://tigergray.blogspot.com/ Tiger Gray

            That’s refreshing. I think if people love saying they’re colorblind so damn much they should truly act like it and put their money where their mouth is by doing this kind of casting etc.

      • Andrea Rossillon

         I’d also like to praise Grey’s Anatomy, because while it did drag there for a bit, once they let the main characters relax and achieve “happily ever after” (i.e., get married), now they’ve moved onto the really interesting things: how to be an independent, fierce career woman in a demanding field–and be married. I find it awesome–the women are smart, frank, sarcastic, and torn. Christina Yang is the best character, ever.

        • Sobaika Mirza

          Really? I quit watching regularly somewhere are George/Izzie and then REALLY quit after the ghost sex. I might go back to it if it’s really that much better now.

    • lovelyivy

      Some of us ‘deal with it’ by calling these so-called ‘creative’ industries and people out on their bullshit.

      What a remarkable point of view- if we don’t like something shut up and let it pass without comment? How does that ever help anything or make things better?

    • Daniel Hoerner

      I think the criticisms of the show have less to do with the “It’s about her and her make-believe friends [and is thusly accurate to that experience]” point, and more to do with the “It’s a voice of a generation!” touting. It’s one thing to oppose material because it’s simply not to your taste; it’s another to be made to feel inferior and odd because you are unable to relate to this “normalized” experience.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jessica-TallGirl-Freeman/1043623567 Jessica TallGirl Freeman

    The difference in the sleeves is ridiculous.  Either a sleeve or a spaghetti strap, but not both!! 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UXHOYXPNJJ4MQH6IHYSI3G5ILI M

    Agree.  100%.  People are losing their goo over it, and I mean, 4 girls in NYC and one is a gallery curator and one is a promiscuous blond….come on.  SatC it is not, but then again, it sort of is.  It’s SatC in their 20′s. 

    • PaulaBerman

       If it was totally unglamorized, if they actually wore ugly clothes and lived in ugly apartments and dated ugly guys who are mean to them. I think it takes SaTC and completely turns it on its ear. It’s an ironic homage, not a straight up homage. The girls, despite being privileged, have nothing enviable about them, really.

  • http://twitter.com/foodycatAlicia foodycatAlicia

    Well she looks happy. I think that’d be a great dress for a guest at a twilight beach wedding. No one would need additional lighting.

  • http://twitter.com/bredalot Bridget Smith

    I can’t watch that show the way I couldn’t read books about high school when I was in high school. I’m living it: why would I want that to be my entertainment when it’s also my life, but actually so far away from my life that it’s unrecognizable (despite the fact that I’m a 20-something living in NYC and working in publishing)? I watch it and I’m just bored. So I don’t watch it.

    She looks good here, though! Except, of course, for the shoes. 

  • Judy_J

    It’s an OK dress.  The sleeve (or lack of) really bothers me.  Pick one.

  • http://twitter.com/AdaLOliver Ada Oliver

    I love those earrings.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/ZFKRECRF5BOBWB4RXAJGI4D6KA mmc

    Her make-up is just right for a bright dress like that!

    Laughing at the shoes….yes, terrible.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/ZFKRECRF5BOBWB4RXAJGI4D6KA mmc

    Her make-up is just right for a bright dress like that!

    Laughing at the shoes….yes, terrible.

  • http://twitter.com/TigerLaverada TigerLaverada

    I like the dress and hate the cadaver-colored shoes as always. But my main issue is this: When did hair that looks like it was styled by a six year old without a hairbrush become OK? Over and over I see stringy, messy, just-got-through-with-pilates hair combined with evening gowns. What the hell?

    • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

      Totally agree! And cadaver-colored shoes is EXCELLENT! :)

  • http://twitter.com/TigerLaverada TigerLaverada

    I like the dress and hate the cadaver-colored shoes as always. But my main issue is this: When did hair that looks like it was styled by a six year old without a hairbrush become OK? Over and over I see stringy, messy, just-got-through-with-pilates hair combined with evening gowns. What the hell?

  • Anathema_Device

    Yes, way too pink, but it is a good color on her. I don’t even mind the shoes with it. Or maybe the pink has blinded me to them.

  • Anathema_Device

    Yes, way too pink, but it is a good color on her. I don’t even mind the shoes with it. Or maybe the pink has blinded me to them.

  • nannypoo

    I don’t like this color on anyone, but I think she made a great lipstick choice to go with it. And her hair’s a mess.

  • nannypoo

    I don’t like this color on anyone, but I think she made a great lipstick choice to go with it. And her hair’s a mess.

  • NurseEllen

    The dress is an unmemorable mess of neon but those earrings are grand!

  • NurseEllen

    The dress is an unmemorable mess of neon but those earrings are grand!

  • sarahofalessergod

    Sorry, but I disagree.  I’m exactly the kind of person who should love the show — white girl who just turned thirty, lived her whole life in Manhattan, bounced from job to job, partially supported by well-off parents.  But the show is firstly not that good and secondly really problematic in terms of diversity.  No, it’s not the first all-white NYC show, the difference is that it’s not a cheesy sitcom but something presenting itself as a real experience.  And nobody I know in NYC has a group of friends solely that…white.  It’s off-putting that they couldn’t have the good sense — for reality’s sake, to say nothing of inclusion — to bring a non-white cast member on board.  Oh, and then there’s that obnoxious writer for the show who wrote an article in the last few years actually praising the word “n*gger” for her, as a white woman, to use in writing, then whined about not being represented in “Precious” when people understandably asked why “Girls” is only white.  TLo, please don’t tell me to “shut the fuck up”.  I love your blog, but I wasn’t aware I had to agree 100% with what you like to enjoy your posts.

    Oh, and that’s an ugly dress.

    • Sobaika Mirza

      WHAT.

      “…wrote an article in the last few years actually praising the word “n*gger” for her, as a white woman, to use in writing…”

      W H A T

    • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

      Oh, for God’s sake. Do you really think we’re telling you, individually to shut up about the topic when we opened the topic up for discussion? Or do you think the “shut up” was in reference to all the articles being written about the show by the bloggers and entertainment journalists we actually referred to in this post? Come on now.

      • sarahofalessergod

        First of all, I actually have a few friends who have written about the show in another forum, so you were telling people I know to shut the fuck up.  And then implying that it shouldn’t be up for debate because everyone else has white casts, so why should they (as non-white women) examine the problem in this instance?  It bothered me.  Look, I usually love your posts, but this rubbed me the wrong way and I felt I should comment on it.  It’s not a personal attack on you guys.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

           Please re-read your last sentence out loud without the last word attached.

          • sarahofalessergod

            Okay well…I use “you guys” to refer to people of both genders to be honest, but that’s fine.  It’s actually been lovely reading your blog up until today.  Best of luck in the future.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

             The point went over your head. Read this (your own words) out loud:

            “IT’S NOT A PERSONAL ATTACK ON YOU.”

            And apply it to the post above.

          • amiface

            “Everyone needs to shut the fuck up about HBO’s Girls. It’s just a TV show, bitches. You don’t have to devote 600,000 words a day on the topic.”
            You literally just told everyone who has ever studied film & television or even has a blog to shut the fuck up so…

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            No we didn’t. We told all the bloggers and entertainment journalists who have been writing about the show ad nauseam for the past month to shut up about it.

            You have to work really, really hard to try and turn that into, well… what you just turned it into.

          • amiface

            Well, maybe that is how you should have phrased in in the first place.

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

             No, we’ll stick to our normal writing style. If we worried about people making everything about themselves, we’d never get any writing done.

  • Le_Sigh

    And suddenly I remembered I had some Pepto Bismol in my desk.

  • Ingnels

    However you feel about Girls, I’ll say this for the show: Lena Dunham has a real woman’s body and the show makes no effort to hide it. Seeing a real woman on screen is incredibly liberating for someone who has grown up in an age of photoshop, botox, plastic surgery at age 18, and size -0 actresses. As a 20-something, white, female, college graduate, of course I like a show that is essentially all about myself, but I maintain that it is still awesome for all women to see a woman on television who doesn’t look like a Victoria’s Secret model. In addition, even if Girls isn’t representative of everyone/100% realistic, it’s still great to have a woman making television for women, instead of a 40-year-old male TV exec making television for women. 

    • Sobaika Mirza

      You know, I would agree with you, but I like my feminism to be intersectional. Simply put, while there is a need for women on television that are actually written by women, it is not enough to outweigh the slew of other problems this show has. For me, anyway.

      • introspective

        This x a billion. I cant like this comment enough. You sum up the entirety of what is wrong with the show. And actually a lot of “women’s” shows in general. They could count as “feminist” but only weakly so. Girls musters only mild complexity around the conversation about gender and sexuality in a sea of other glaring problems of class, race, and space etc. Why cant feminist ideas be for example antiracist too? I guess maybe that asks too much of our entertainment?

        To use the overused word that often sufaces about this show (privilege) the layers of privilege are nauseating. And as commenters have already harped on the show is basically getting shittedon all over the internet for self styling as the “voice of a generation”. Had it shut the fuck up about all that shit and just marketed itself as a comedy about 4 young women that you might find dark humor in, then maybe I and others wouldnt have launched all this critique. The stakes wouldnt be so high if still in fucking 2012 a show about white women announces itself to be representative of everybody else. Lets try and let go of the whiteness as normative trope.

  • prettybigkitty

    Girls is totally Sex and the City if it were written by a 20 something hipster living in Brooklyn, which it is. And Sex and the City is totally Girls written by a 30 something gay man, which it was (much more fabulous and high fashion!)

  • formerlyAnon

    Dear god, it’s not the pink. It’s the ruffly ruffle and the slit to *there* and the strangely asymmetrical shoulders (though not asymmetrical enough to stand out on first glance, or to be an interesting design feature or anything) and those earrings which look like an upmarket version of something you could get at the hippest tchotchke stand on the boardwalk.

    And oh. dear. god, is that a demi train or is the dress asymmetrically hemmed  and 5 inches too long?

    Darn lucky she is that she’s cute and looks good in pink.

  • Snailstsichr

    I don’t know anything about the show, but – man, this is her color! 

  • quandjebois

    “Everyone should stop talking about HBO’s Girls…. Here are our thoughts about HBO’s Girls!”

    Seriously?

    You know what’s somehow more hurtful than outright prejudice? Someone telling me that they see said prejudice and not only do they not care about it, but they would like me to stop acknowledging it as well.

    But anyway… I think there’s something wrong with the fit of the dress. It looks a bit baggy in the second shot.

    • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

      No, NOT seriously. Are you new here?

      You know what else is hurtful? People who make up things and then attribute them to your writing. That REALLY sucks.

      • quandjebois

        I apologize if I missed the necessary snark in your first paragraph. I think reading the line, “Everyone needs to shut the fuck up about HBO’s Girls. It’s just a TV show,” for about the billionth time finally got to me.

        I’m happy to wrong. Thanks for taking the time to respond.

      • quandjebois

        To BE wrong, rather.

      • amiface

        You know what else is hurtful? Calling that prejudice and tunnel-visioned piece “writing”

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

           Bye now.

  • xay

    I have no interest in the show because it’s another show about priviledged white women in NYC. There is no shortage of shows about priviledged white women (priviledged white people PERIOD) in major cities who do not have any POC in their lives.

    But thank you, TLo for pointing out the obvious. POC blogs like Racialicious have been pointing out the lack of POC in movies and television for years and years, but it didn’t matter until Girls hit a little too close to home.

  • Pants_are_a_must

    Fugly-ass dress.

    I’ve never watched the show, and I feel no need to start.

  • Carina Green

    Are you saying that because the average show depicts privileged, white people with golden-rule morals, we need to shut up about wanting diversity?  I don’t have a horse in the game with this show, it’s *fine* whatever, but to say that we need to stop complaining about needing change because it hasn’t come YET? Cray.

    • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

      “Are you saying that because the average show depicts privileged, white people with golden-rule morals, we need to shut up about wanting diversity?”

      No. Not even remotely.

    • PaulaBerman

       Golden rule morals? Do you watch the show? Yes, they’re privileged, but that’s where the fun stops. They are a bunch of pretty screwed up girls, lacking self-respect, and unable to figure out why they are the architects of their own misery. UNLIKE Sex in the City, the show doesn’t glorify the women. They live in ugly apartments, wear frumpy clothes, and date horrible men. There is zero glamor, only bad choices stacked on bad choices stacked on crappy judgment and awful sex. It’s cringe-inducing. You can complain about not being represented on a show like that, but as someone who sadly can identify with some of these girls about 15 years ago, I wish I didn’t see myself up there.

  • SpcilK

    Simply Beautiful!

  • http://twitter.com/amberguessa Amber

    Look! White people deciding what we’re allowed to be annoyed by and what’s offensive! This is so new and trendy! 
    I understand that this isn’t a “personal attack,” but when POC are CONSTANTLY told that things aren’t a big deal, because it’s “normal,” yeah, that feels like a personal attack.

    • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

      This post was not a post from white people addressed to people of color. We thought it was obvious since they were the only group of people named in the post but we’ll restate: it was about TV and entertainment bloggers who have been obsessively writing about the show for weeks now.

      Secondly, we never even implied that the lack of diversity in entertainment isn’t a big deal. There’s nothing in the post that comes close to that sort of sentiment. The point, and it’s obvious we weren’t as clear as we’d hoped to be on this one, is that it’s pointless to single out this one show for this when the problem is systemic and industry-wide. The irony is that this show, with all this importance being stacked upon its every move, is being sanctified in a way it doesn’t deserve to be.

      • http://twitter.com/amberguessa Amber

        Really? Because “It’s just a show” really sounds like you’re saying it’s not a big deal.

        • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

          Sure, when you take those four words and ignore the couple hundred other words surrounding them.

          • http://twitter.com/amberguessa Amber

            You said that you never implied that the lack of diversity isn’t a big deal, I pointed out that that was not true. 

          • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

            No you didn’t. You took 4 words out of context and applied your own meaning to them. 

  • granddelusion

    What a great smile she has.

  • Lina_bee

    This needs strappy gold heels. She can keep the earrings.

  • Lina_bee

    This needs strappy gold heels. She can keep the earrings.

  • BrooklynBomber

    If you’re gonna wear a dress in a color a five-year old might love, I guess it’s fine if you can look like that in it. 

    BUT: I’m starting a new non-profit, the End The Trend Society (ETTS), which will attempt to pass legislation in key states (starting with New York and California) outlawing the wearing of pumps with evening dresses. Since this law will affect primarily women, and the relatively small population of men who dress like women, I’m partnering with several right wing legislators to push the bill through as quickly as possible. 

    • formerlyAnon

       I suspect that if you put in a provision requiring those approaching formal events in evening gowns to stop in a consultation room (they can stick it next to where they take the coats) for a short review of the dos and don’ts of shoes and evening dresses and a personal inspection of their own shoes and hosiery choices, all provided for the extremely reasonable fee of, say, $45.00, I am sure your legislation will sail right on through.

      • BrooklynBomber

        That’s a good idea. Once the law is in place, scofflaws can avoid arrest by paying a small fee to get inspected, and if necessary, borrow (for a hefty deposit) approved shoes before being photographed. 

  • BrooklynBomber

    If you’re gonna wear a dress in a color a five-year old might love, I guess it’s fine if you can look like that in it. 

    BUT: I’m starting a new non-profit, the End The Trend Society (ETTS), which will attempt to pass legislation in key states (starting with New York and California) outlawing the wearing of pumps with evening dresses. Since this law will affect primarily women, and the relatively small population of men who dress like women, I’m partnering with several right wing legislators to push the bill through as quickly as possible. 

  • Daniel Hoerner

    I’m a little disappointed, TLo; not gonna lie. I think this GIRLS conversation is an important one to have. I think it’s only through conversations such as this — highlighting inauthenticities (yes, I made up a word) and calling for a reflection of the world we want to see — that change begins to occur.

    Wow. My high school English teacher would hate me for that sentence…

    • BrooklynBomber

      I haven’t seen the show, so no comment on that, but there’s nothing wrong with the sentence, and “inauthenticity” is a word, so you’re fine.

      • Daniel Hoerner

         *phew*

        • BrooklynBomber

          :)

    • holdmewhileimnaked

      i dont think you made up the word highlighting either.

    • http://twitter.com/amberguessa Amber

      Agreed. We can’t change anything if we stop talking about it.

  • Daniel Hoerner

    I’m a little disappointed, TLo; not gonna lie. I think this GIRLS conversation is an important one to have. I think it’s only through conversations such as this — highlighting inauthenticities (yes, I made up a word) and calling for a reflection of the world we want to see — that change begins to occur.

    Wow. My high school English teacher would hate me for that sentence…

  • jmw1122

    I just barely made it through episode 1 and gave up about five minutes into episode 2. I just couldn’t stomach the priviledged hipsterness of it all, and the overabundance of hype also put me off. I didn’t like Sex and the City either so I guess four spoiled white girls whining about their first world problems just isn’t my bag.

  • http://www.lippsisters.com/ Deborah Lipp

    She looks like Amanda Peet and her earrings rule the world.

  • http://vhanna26.typepad.com Vera

    While there’s plenty of room for the discussion of the lack of minorities in mainstream media, I feel Girls got unfairly dumped on for the sins of an entire industry. That being said, I’m a middle aged, southern black woman, and I love the show. It’s well written, funny, and really, really awkward.

    • http://www.tomandlorenzo.com/ Tom and Lorenzo

      God, we wish we’d just written what you just did. You said it better than we did.

      Except the part about being a middle-aged southern black woman. That would have sounded weird if we’d written that.

    • Alisa Rivera

      I don’t think it’s unfair because of the history one of the writers (Lesley Arfin) has of making racist comments and tweets and embracing the use of racial slurs. At that point, dump away.

      • http://vhanna26.typepad.com Vera

        Frankly, I feel that Girls got so much vitriol about the casting because it’s a show about women. I can’t imagine a show primarily about men receiving the same level of criticism about the same thing. I read Arfin’s statements  and tweets, and I wasn’t that offended. Sounds like she tried to be funny,ironic, hipster, whatever, and it backfired very badly.  

    • http://tigergray.blogspot.com/ Tiger Gray

      I think it’s odd that this is the one program that is getting the bulk of the criticism, when the problem has been around since forever. Though hey, I guess whatever gets people talking. And you bring up something interesting for me…a lot of times when I see someone get up in arms about including more minority folks in whatever context, they act like …well you just want to silence white voices! For me personally it’s not about silencing anyone. There’s nothing wrong with writing a show about four white girls. It’s a problem when SO MANY shows are about very specific intersections of identity, that there’s no room for anyone else. 

      • http://vhanna26.typepad.com Vera

        Now, while I do think that Girls got dumped on, I don’t believe that having a more representative media silences anyone.

        • http://tigergray.blogspot.com/ Tiger Gray

          Exactly my point. 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_F73LIJ3SJGI5AJQMXMWXCKILHI Pamela

    I watched the first 2 episodes of “Girls” and am not into it b/c I can’t relate to this age group.  Most 20-somethings (and don’t everyone get pissed b/c I don’t mean all of you) basically get on my nerves and I can do without yet another program on my viewing schedule if I’m not really enjoying it.  Am I not entertained?  No.

  • MilaXX

    I haven’t devoted any ink to complaining about the show, but I haven’t bothered to watch either. I’ll be perfectly honest and admit sometimes I pass on a show simply because I can stand watching yet another show that pretends the world is all one color or all 20 somethings.  I understand how Hollywood works, and it’s tendency to exclude minorities, but it doesn’t mean I have to like it.

    Bottom line; this show got a shrug and a pass from me.

  • sweetestsith

    The dress is pretty meh, but the earrings are beautiful. Want, want, want!

  • Trisha26

    Haven’t watched Girls after reading an interview with its creator – just thought “it’s sex and the city only contemporary.” Then again everyone steals from/borrows from/is inspired by everyone else – nothing is ever new. I do take exception to your (TLo’s) description of GaGa’s emergence on the scene as a “riff” on Madonna. She’s much, much more than that and it’s insulting to her creativity, similarities aside. 

    • moppet

       ”Nothing is ever new — except for this one thing I like, which is wholly unique?” I don’t know if that makes sense. Saying that Gaga riffed on Madonna doesn’t strike me as an insult to either one of them. We all build and expand on the foundations that were put down by those who came before us. Madonna herself, I’m quite sure, was a “riff” on some earlier performer. But some parts of her persona are entirely her own. Same with Gaga.

  • Alisa Rivera

    It’s being dumped on not only because of the lack of diversity, but because the creator has made several openly racist remarks, including singing the praises of the n-word. Gawker has a great post on it. This goes beyond white cluelessness and privilege and into outright assholery.

    And TLo, I get your point but I disagree because before the Girls controversy no one was talking about this, even though it’s a problem for the whole industry.

    • AnaRoW

      It does comes up from time to time. Friends got a similar treatment several years ago (What, black people don’t drink coffee?). The producers went out and found Ross a black girlfriend.  They never did really get the point though.  The problem wasn’t that the main cast members were all white but that they lived in an almost completely white world.  A lot of shows get around this nowadays by casting a “token” Black and/or Latino cast member.

      • Alisa Rivera

        I wish more shows were like Scrubs where one of the leads was black, his fiance was Afro-Latina and it was no big whoop. Their storylines didn’t revolve around their race and ethnicity and they weren’t simply comic relief.

        • http://tigergray.blogspot.com/ Tiger Gray

          See, this is part of the key to a good show of diversity I think. Include people of many different kinds and don’t act like it’s a circus show when you do. And I mean for a lot of us that IS reality. Every day we’re surrounded by difference. Why not simply include that in whatever fictional world is being crafted? It’s not even hard! 

    • moppet

       I’m not trying to defend Girls (haven’t seen it, don’t have HBO) but it’s not the creator of the show who has made racist remarks. As far as I know, she has been responsive and non-defensive when this critique has been brought to her attention. It’s a WRITER for the show who has made some racially insensitive comments.

      Also, the issues of white-washed TV was was being talked about long before Girls came along. But because that discussion was often in the minority community or minority spaces (for example, Racialicious,) it apparently was easy to miss.

      • Alisa Rivera

        Okay, but the writer hasn’t been fired, right? Or even openly chastised by the people she works with. It says a lot about the attitudes of the people working the show, not to mention the network.

      • holdmewhileimnaked

        who is the person who said that precious didnt have any characters that resembled her? i thought that was the show creator but i could be wrong. thats the comment i remember.

        • moppet

           Wasn’t the show creator. I was a writer for the show.

  • Sobaika Mirza

    WHATICAN’TEVENDEALHOWDOILIVEONTHESAMEPLANETASTHESEPEOPLE

    *deep breath*

    Wow. She seems like awfully ignorant human being. To put it kindly. Just… wow.

  • ThaliaMenninger

    I don’t take issue AT ALL with complaining about Girls because of its lily-white focus. But saying the entire industry is just as bad, which several of the critics have posited, isn’t accurate. There ARE sitcoms with characters of color, main characters, not just small roles for waitresses and maids and janitors. Happy Endings, Community, Parks & Rec, 30 Rock and The Office come to mind. So I would like more people to watch those shows (all of which I love. Well, not so much The Office anymore, but you can watch the reruns, which were good) along with dramas like House of Lies, Scandal, The Good Wife, Greys Anatomy, Leverage, Awake, Boss, various CSIs, Law & Order SVU, etc, and just not watch this Girls thing (along with Zooey Deschanel’s show, Whitney whatever-her-name-is’s show and that drek with the two waitresses in the yellow uniforms). 

    • lovelyivy

       2 Broke Girls is just.. it is the worst. How that show is on the air in 2012 is just amazing to me.

    • holdmewhileimnaked

      i think the reason people are angrier about this one is at least in part cos the demographic from which all of its main people [writers, characters, creators, etc & ect] arrive is the one thats supposed to have the most “sensitive”, if you will & please note quotes, white or off-white members attuned to this issue, an issue it just ignored. i think thats it. you are right about the industry’s improvement, btw, it’s just not done yet.

  • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

    … but does it pass the Bechdel Test??

    • http://twitter.com/besswww bess w

       barely, but yes. They do talk about things other than men, but only a few of those things so far.

  • sleah_in_norcal

    whatever would make her think those shoes with that dress were (are?) a good idea?  love the earrings, though.

  • http://tigergray.blogspot.com/ Tiger Gray

    What I don’t get is why. I mean I GET it, you know, but at the same time it’s like…why? Do we want ANOTHER show about a bunch of very narrowly defined White ladies? That’s the thing I feel like a lot of these shows are also talking about a kind of whiteness that makes no freakin sense to a lot of people, even white people. I know that I sure as shit don’t want to watch things about white people all the time and certainly not the same. damn. white. people. EVERY TIME. And it’s even weirder when it’s an environment that in reality is more diverse. Why change it? That’s not real. That’s not even an acceptable fantasy. Life isn’t as beautiful when we only look through a single lens. 

  • http://phantomminuet.blogspot.com/ MinAgain

    I loathe pink, but I’ll give her credit.  She almost matches the ribbons on the back drop.

  • frankystein123

    Nice outfit, gorgeous smile. The pumps? Not so much.

  • bellafigura1

    I rarely disagree with you, but any show that doesn’t help women Just Say No Ass Sex to weak, boring, non-committed, borderline abusive losers is terrible.  Sleeping with the wrong guy is one thing.  Ass Sex with the wrong guy is hard to bounce back from.

    • Alisa Rivera

      LOL

    • holdmewhileimnaked

      after the endless stream of porn availability which, in this case, is whats behind bringing up the matter [among other things], it’s really rare to hear anyone not ask for it. were the cause not so very obvious i would say this was strange, cos even the strangest people never asked before. but now it’s just a perpetual waterway of proposition. difficult to say no after the billionth request, i guess.

      edited to add:
      i also like the pink dress. &, yep, the shoes are stupid.

  • Lisa_Cop

    I was very offended by how the show dealt with AIDS 1 week ago, as thought it was just a common cold. Also these girls are so entitled; they expect their parents to support them forever. GROW UP

  • velomango

    Re: the commentary. BOOM.

  • holdmewhileimnaked

    there’s an article in the new yorker that makes a similar point, a point w/ which i agree, actually.

    otoh [actually it's the same hand, just an extension of it. easier to write & visualize than deliver in metaphor, if you will]–anyway–for the people who have mentioned racialicious? this has been a problem in the industry since before the people who write racialicious were twinkles in their parents’ eyes; in fact, it’s been a problem in the industry since before the parents of the people who write racialicious were twinkles in their parents’ eyes–& you might be able to bring that back more than two generations further! some similar has been a problem in the industry since there was an industry.

    it’s true that all of that history should not be heaped onto this one show [a show i will never watch]. it’s a much bigger problem than this show should shoulder. while the creator’s response to it was really pretty vile, pretty close to obnoxiously vile, the primary reason, i think, that this has been picked up now is it’s cos it’s suddenly a trendy issue which, i think, the people who are aghast at this tiny corner of it believe the trendy show creators should have noticed w/ equal furor & dispatched w/ great ease. but they didnt.

    whether they, she, did not cos of her own disinterest in the issue or cos the powers over her head decided for her the show’s parameters i dont know, i dont think anybody knows. but what everybody could easily know, & definitely recognize, is that the issue should be given more than lip service–which i think is primarily whats going on, even by a tremendous number of the yelling ruling majority members–& should, instead, be universally solved. that it shouldve been universally solved decades ago, that it should truly never have been a problem needing a solution–both of those things are truer than anything else. but to think in that fashion & then do whats required requires more depth than most people of our culture tend to have–or even tend to aspire towards having. so fixing it now right now, across the board, not just on this stupid show but deeper than that, is still what needs to be done.

    maybe this time.

    ‘nite all.

  • M Carlson

    What I find ironic is that Hollywood is supposedly soooooo liberal. Puh-lease.

  • ItsMeNotYou

     I’m coming from an Australian angle so forgive me if I’m not ‘getting’ the Girls debate.

    I thought the whole point of  Girls is that it unpacks and critiques (from within the narrative itself and from the vantage of being an observer on the sidelines) the privileged existence of white hipsters…? C’mon guys, we get to laugh AT them. Doesn’t this open up opportunities to expose and politicize the privileges inherent in being white and middle-class in the US? In comparison, the successful white NYC-based sitcoms of the 90s and early 2000s ( Friends, SATC et al) lacked irony, took themselves too seriously, and proclaimed (incorrectly) that they carried a universal truth for all. They washed out the politics of white privilege.

    So long as Girls continues to operate with a view to the
    ‘particular’ and not the ‘universal’, and remains heavily
    drenched in irony so that spaces are created to unpack and dismantle whiteness, then I’m fine.

    Where I will direct my anger is at the studio execs and the strategic choices that are being made to continue white-washing our TV sets with… whites. ‘Girls’ has a role
    and place on TV, its just that it is not counterbalanced by TV
    shows representing different experiences of race, class, sexuality and gender.  Same old story.

    Love Allison’s earrings. Her dress is giving me migraines. Need to lie down in a dark room.

  • ItsMeNotYou

    I’m coming from an Australian point of view so forgive me if I’m not ‘getting’ the Girls debate.

    I thought the whole point of Girls is that it unpacks and critiques
    (from within the narrative itself and from the vantage of being an
    observer on the sidelines) the privileged existence of white
    hipsters… C’mon guys, we get to laugh AT them, sometimes with them, but, mostly AT. Doesn’t this open up
    opportunities to expose and politicize the privileges inherent in being
    white and middle-class? In comparison, the successful white
    NYC-based sitcoms of the 90s and early 2000s ( Friends, SATC et al)
    lacked irony, took themselves too seriously, and proclaimed
    (incorrectly) that they carried a universal truth for all. They washed
    out the politics of white privilege. In Girls, it is stated up front for all to see and (finally in American TV!) it is recognized.

    So long as Girls continues to operate with a view to the ‘particular’ and not the ‘universal’, and remains heavily drenched in irony so that spaces are created to unpack and dismantle whiteness, then I’m fine.

    Where I will direct my anger is at the studio execs and the strategic
    choices that are being made to continue white-washing our TV sets
    with… whites. ‘Girls’ has a role and place on TV, its just that it is not counterbalanced by shows representing different experiences of race, class, sexuality and gender.  Same old story.

    Love Allison’s earrings. Her dress is giving me migraines. Need to lie down in a dark room.