MF: Let Them Eat Cake

Posted on November 16, 2011

Bravo always does a better job of summing up each week’s simple storyline than we could:

“Chris March turns back the clock to create a one-of-a-kind Marie Antoinette dress for Tracy Stern, owner of the ultra-chic Salon Tea, for her Victorian-themed fundraiser at the National Arts Club. Famous for her “Chari-tea” parties, Tracy has come to Chris and his team to create a look that will both impress the court and dazzle the press. With his over-the-top vision, will everyone think she is more Mad Hatter than modern Victorian-chic?”

 

We wish the show would stop trying to graft conflict onto it when no one involved on camera seems interested in providing it? It’s our one and only complaint about the show.

 

Of course she was going to love it. She went to Chris March and asked for a Marie Antoinette costume. What else could she have expected? All these long pauses and sideways glances that are so obviously being squeezed out of the footage in order to craft some form of tension – it’s just not needed.

He has a colorful, creative group of people working with him and they get to go interesting places and make interesting things. This isn’t the Real Housewives. It isn’t even Project Runway.

To us, the most interesting parts of the show each week are how they’re going to accomplish certain tasks and whether they’re going to get them done on time.

It never once occurs to us that any of the clients would seriously raise a stink about the final product. We can see if they might not love every aspect of it, but the show would have you believe they’re going to flip out at any second; a tone that made even less sense than normal given the client’s mild personality and specific requests.

So, yes. Of course she loved it.

 

We weren’t entirely sold on the teacup until they put dangled the teabag label off it. That made it.

We thought the idea of using bedding to get just the right kind of fabric was inspired, but we have to say, it didn’t look like expensive fabric. That’s really our only criticism of the garment. It’s brilliantly and beautifully done – and Izzy finally got someone to wear her wig! Of course, how could she not wear a wig?

 

[Photo Credit: Heidi Gutman/bravotv.com]

  • Sobaika Mirza

    The comforter just looks like it needs a good steaming. Then again, it’s not really a fabric that’s mean to lie flat. At any rate, my favorite Chris March costume from this show and definitely its best episode!

  • Anonymous

    Fabulous.

  • Anonymous

    Erm, for a “Victorian-themed” event, Marie Antoinette is about 50 years out of date and WAY out of style. You want Louis XIV, go for it, but don’t pretend it’s Victorian ANYthing. [but hey, I don't watch the show because no cable, but I love our SissyBear and that photo of him laughing is a joy].

    • Anonymous

      You took the words out of my mouth! Why on earth choose 18th century for a 19th century themed party! Nobody is expecting historical accuracy, but at least try and land in the right century! 

      • Anonymous

        Quoting (sort of…) Viktor, “Oh, who CARES about historical accuracy or who wore what when?  That’s so lame!”

        :)

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

          I was going to say the same thing!!!

      • Anonymous

        Quoting (sort of…) Viktor, “Oh, who CARES about historical accuracy or who wore what when?  That’s so lame!”

        :)

    • Anonymous

      I’m so glad there are fellow history nerds out here. It takes two seconds to check simple facts like that. Stay informed, people! 

      • Anonymous

        Not only was Marie Antoinette well dead before Victoria came to the throne, but I get really tired of the blanket term Victorian when the Queen’s reign spanned many decades and styles. Most people tend to read Victorian as mid 1870s to late 1890s, but Victoria ascended to the throne in the mid 1830s, and fashion of the 1830s, ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s is quite different from what most people label as Victorian era looks.

        • Eclectic Mayhem

          Watch out MoHub otherwise I’ll start ranting about US ‘Renaissance Fairs’ which take Medieval and Tudor fashions and MASH THEM TOGETHER with no thought of HISTORICAL ACCURACY!

          • Anonymous

            Not to mention the porn pirates and fairies that abound.

            We even actually get some Vikings at ours. Technically, Tudor is English Renaissance, but I’d love to see some 15th century Italian garb.

          • Anonymous

            “Porn pirates” is brilliant. 

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_K7VOQSAYZ7H2OBX6LOJNNIBSSE Amanda

            Porn Pirates!!! Hahahahahahahahaha

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CNDPMVO4W23R5TVC2QMTJ5BZE Heather

            I stopped going to Renfest years ago, but it was mostly just hippie chicks wearing as few clothes as possible.

          • Now I am The Bee

            Oh yeah.  I dress as a Viking woman when I go to our Ren Fair here in the midwest. And I don’t mean like the Valkuries–just a gal in a linen dress and scabard with silver and amber jewelry  There is no rhyme nor reason to the costume at Ren Fair–just a fun time to dress up as someone else…

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Are there more accurate Ren Faires in the UK?  I thought that was just an American thing in general…

          • Anonymous

            They don’t really happen here in the UK. There’s a smattering of living history, re-enactment type events but not on the scale of the US ones :)

          • Anonymous

            I read something that made me nod, that Americans love to recreate time periods they never had to actually live through.

          • Anonymous

            There probably is a link between a relatively young country and recreating these periods. When you’re tripping over historic buildings there isn’t really the need to try to create a facsimile :)
            There are some medieval, and English Civil War reenactments, and in Scotland (where I am) some Bannockburn etc events. Also some of the big houses and castles have costumed staff to give some authenticity. But the big Ren Fair things seems to be peculiar to the US.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_6RS6NLL44AED3E4QWIYTDQGU6I Psy_Chick

            Strangely, in the UK they’re much more into recreating the American Old West. They’re not the only ones who like to recreate time periods they never had to live through.

          • Anonymous

            I can’t say I’ve seen any of that in the UK, although I believe it’s quite popular in Germany for some reason. There’s a country & western club near me in Glasgow where some of the patrons dress up a bit, but it’s pretty niche.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_6RS6NLL44AED3E4QWIYTDQGU6I Psy_Chick

            I got this from a friend of mine here in the US who goes to the UK for LARP (live action role playing) events often. They just love dressing up and reenacting the Wild West. shrug. 

          • Anonymous

            I saw a few battle re-enactments in the UK (Middle Ages), but nary a Ren Faire.

          • Anonymous

            A guy I knew used to work at Ren Faires, and he had my favorite anachronism story: Star Trek geeks dressed in Trekkie garb at the Ren Faire. When asked about this obvious aberration, the Star Trek nerds replied: “Oh, we’re doing this at the holodeck.” I find this brilliant and nerdy and delightful.

          • Anonymous

            That’s actually brilliant. Wish I’d thought of something like that.

          • Lauren Maier

            Yeah, it’s true.  You get everything across the board, but that’s not the point any more.  People just want to dress up and play pretend, regardless of the era they’re playing dress up in.  Where else can you go and wear Tudor headdresses with faerie wings and not be made fun of?  

          • Anonymous

            Oh, I have made fun of plenty of people at the Ren Faire, Lauren. ;-)

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1235612578 Maggie Smith

          I think that only happens here in the US where we tend to call Early Victorian the “Civil War” period.  I noticed my fellow historical costumers use the description “Rococo” less than they do “American Revolution” as well for much of the 18th century.

        • Anonymous

          Victorian is completely accurate for the (long) period of her reign but clothing styles are more categorised – romantic, natural form, bustle etc.
          People tend to generalise too much overall :/

    • http://www.facebook.com/mary.nease Mary Nease

      I couldn’t even focus on the post due to the physical reaction I was having to the historical inaccuracy. Like twitching and the urge to vomit.

      #historymajorproblems

    • Julian Betkowski

      It is worth noting, though, that costume parties were a popular pass time, so it might not have been all that odd to see someone dressed as Marie Antoinette at a Victorian Era party.

    • Anonymous

      What’s funny is the correct term would have been Georgian-themed tea party. Sadly the the person who did the write up clearly doesn’t think much of the audience

      • Anonymous

        The cape on the back of the dress, and the silhouette (the hips) are Louis XIV, not XVI.

        • Miranda Loeber

          Yeah, I thought the square hips were earlier than Marie Antoinette.

        • Miranda Loeber

          Yeah, I thought the square hips were earlier than Marie Antoinette.

    • Anonymous

      This really isn’t even Marie Antoinette.  It’s more Louis XIV than Louis XVI (Marie’s hubby).  For Victorian, he should have gone Can-Can, Moulin Rouge, if he wanted color.  Victorian women were rather drab. 

    • http://twitter.com/OperaSickness Opera Sickness

      Maybe they were being super authentic?  If this fun game from the McCord Museum is to be believed (http://www.musee-mccord.qc.ca/en/keys/games/17), then wearing 18 century costumes to fancy dress parties was fashionable during the Victorian era.

      • Anonymous

        Nah, not super authentic – an ‘accidental’ rationale for the anachronism.

    • Anonymous

      I was going to say the SAME thing! “Victorian” seems to have become a catchword for anything that’s got a full skirt. :(

      • Anonymous

        Or a bustle.

    • Grace Armstrong

      yeah, I must say that this stuck out to me too. Wrong time, wrong place. Then again, who doesn’t want to dress up as Marie Antoinette? Queen Victoria is not a fun costume.

      • Anonymous

        I would totally wear a Queen Victoria costume, especially Younger Queen Victoria (widowed Queen Victoria is not so much fun). I’m much more a fan of Victorian fashion than anything the 18th century has to offer.

      • Anonymous

        But the Queen of Hearts (1865) is. They could have done Victorian in a very creative way.

      • Anonymous

        Best Marie Antoinette costume ever was on Roseanne, with Dan dressed as a headless Marie and Jackie inside the skirt with her “severed” head poking out and held in one of Marie’s hands.

    • Rachel Sawyer

      That annoyed me too. And it happens all the time. Anything that didn’t occur this century or the 20th is called Victorian.

    • Anonymous

      Thank-you. I SO wanted to say this, but then I figured that surely she knows that & just wanted to be costumed out of the period?

      In any event, we KNOW any sort of costumer knows that so March & his team did, and (non-drama whores that they are) saw no real point in potentially making the client feel silly.

    • http://profiles.google.com/a.pesicka Anna Pesicka

      That bothered me too.  I feel validated in my costume geek fume.  Thanks for that. 

    • Now I am The Bee

      Yes–my only question.  Why go all MA when she was throwing a Victorian party?  But–they turned out a great outfit and the wig and teacup was fabulous.

    • Miranda Loeber

      As a big fan of historical fashion, I’m very disappointed. Seriously? It is not that hard to Wiki that.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QF4Y553ZONNUZJN5AVBU6VY33U Renee

    I may actually need to watch an episode now.  Also can I just say that his workshop makes me want to drop everything and run away to NY and beg Chris March to hire me.  I really miss working in a costume shop some days.  Other days not so much

  • scottyf

    T&Lo said…
    “We wish the show would stop trying to graft conflict onto it when no one involved on camera seems interested in providing it? It’s our one and only complaint about the show.”

    But of course you both know that it wouldn’t be a narrative without conflict. I think it’s finding the types of conflicts that remains the challenge for shows like MF, because beating the time crunch gets tired after while. Maybe highlighting some more of the team’s individual personal life-challenges and how they affect their performances week by week. I’d love to know more about each of their lives outside of the studio.

    On a more somber note: is it me, or is Chris getting larger? I was getting concerned about his heavy breathing and seemingly puffier cheeks. I love a big guy, but I don’t want anything happening to Sissy Bear.

    • http://twitter.com/1carmelita 1carmelita

      I’ve thought the same thing. The labored breathing is alarming given his size.

      • Anonymous

        Yeah, I really wish he’d do something for himself before it’s too late, which it almost is.

    • Anonymous

      darling scotty, i so agree with you.  the time crunch is putting me over the edge, why would someone wait so long when they know when the event (which had to be planned so far in advance) wait till the last minute.  i would freak out if i did that.

      but i do love the show & all who work with our sissy bear.  so much fun. 

       

    • Anonymous

      Yeah, I worry about him too. Diabetes can really beat a person up.

  • Anonymous

    Victorian? Eh? In what way is that remotely Victorian?! If they were going to use Home dec fabric couldn’t they just have stuck with Scarlett O’Hara and her drapery dress, at least it would be in the right era :/
    The wig is great fun, the rest – not so much.

  • Anonymous

    Victorian? Eh? In what way is that remotely Victorian?! If they were going to use Home dec fabric couldn’t they just have stuck with Scarlett O’Hara and her drapery dress, at least it would be in the right era :/
    The wig is great fun, the rest – not so much.

  • Anonymous

    I agree with your assessments of the “conflicts” grafted on to this happy show. I much prefer it when the conflicts arise out of situaations such as cutting up the gorgeous vintage coat and then realizing it isn’t going to fit the way you planned it.  And the pink feathers look like hell as a lining, so they all have to be ripped off. I’d also like to see more of Chris’s process: Surely he doesn’t hit on the final design with the first sketch every time, does he?  It’s a difficult situation for the producers, because this *IS* a basically happy show, but working against the clock can’t be the only issue week after week.

    It might be fun to see more of Chris and the minions outside the studio, as Scottyf suggested, but one thing I do not want to see on this show is personal problems.  God knows, we get enough of that on every other reality show there is.

    As to the question of historical accuracy, the problem was that the client asked for a Marie Antoinette costume to wear to her own Victorian party.  What do you do at that point?  Tell the client she’s a dummy and that Marie Antoinette has nothing to do with the Victorian era?  Or just give her what she wanted? Now, there’s a conflict it would have been interesting to observe!

    • Eclectic Mayhem

      I honestly don’t think I could have stopped myself from telling her.  Hopefully in a sweet, polite way!

    • Anonymous

      He absolutely should have convinced her to go Victorian.

  • Anonymous

    The wig and tea cup are reminiscent of Beach Blanket Babylon where Chris worked in the 1990’s(?).

  • Anonymous

    I don’t have BRAVO so I don’t know if they tell us this but how much do these outfits cost? 

    I love them by the way. looks like a great show. Thanks for blogging it. 

    • http://www.GiftedCollector.com Nancy Abrams

      I’ve also wondered about the budgets. The designers seem to have carte blanche when they are shopping and there is never any discussion with the client about cost. Is it covered by the producers and the client receives the garment in exchange for appearing on the show? Inquiring minds want to know.

      For the record, the deadlines do seem to be there strictly for the sake of creating unnecessary tension. 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EI345KNFZQDXGUYPDQR3ASHI7E Jaime

    Marie Antoinette was not a Victorian–that’s only off by a hundred years.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Linda-Harris/1358701372 Linda Harris

    Why do they always only have three days to make these things?

  • Anonymous

    Hmm…a Marie Antoinette costume for a Victorian theme? Something’s off…. However, kudos to her for rocking this look, it was fabulous. Hated the dog.

  • MilaXX

    This was my favorite episode so far. Loved this look, teacup and all.  FYI Chris is also on Pinterest

  • Anonymous

    I agree – the dress is stunning but the fabric just doesn’t look over-the-top expensive, which it would need to for it to be a Marie Antoinette-inspired garment.

  • Anonymous

    I wasn’t really getting this until the outdoor shot. Wow, I didn’t realize how much the scale of our buildings and rooms has changed, because the scale looks correct outside, but indoors it looks huge. Well, I guess it is huge, but inside it looks wrongly huge, outside it is proportional.

  • Anonymous

    Why did she dress like Marie Antoinette for a Victorian themed party?

    I love the wig. A long time ago  I made a mini pannier dress out of upholstery fabric. And a friend of mine dressed a white wig in the Antoinette style. It was awesome.

  • Anonymous

    I have one word for the girl who made the skirt:  STRIPS!  Every quilter knows you don’t piece together each individual diamond.  You sew the fabric together in strips, cut it on the bias and re-stitch it accordingly to achieve the alternating pattern.  Why, in a room full of seamsters/stresses, did someone not point that out to her?  Especially when she complained that it would take all nite!  Duh!

    • Anonymous

      Yeah. I’m guessing that none of the people in the room were quilters.

      She didn’t seem to be into what she was doing so much, and she may not be all that bright, either. But she’s very young and can work with her hands — one hopes she’ll learn the tricks of the trade. What an opportunity she has working with Chris!

    • Now I am The Bee

      Agreed!  She coulda done that panel in a fraction of the time! 

      • Anonymous

        really.  and the problem with piecing it in diamonds, in addition to the time factor, is that if your template (pattern) for the diamond is not 100% perfect- i.e. with all sides equal and the angles correct- any error will be multiplied by two for each seam.  so if one side of your template is 1/16th of an inch too long, after you sew eight of them together you’ll be off by a full inch.  this is why you see so many incomplete Lone Star quilts, which are composed of diamonds radiating out from a center, at flea markets and rummage sales.  the quilter gets to a certain point and realizes it’s a tent instead of a bedspread.

        it’s amazing how many excellent seamstresses don’t have a clue when it comes to piecing a quilt.

  • mitchell settoon

    For the record, 18th century fashion, especially that of Marie Antoinette, had a huge impact on women’s fashions from the late 1860’s through the early part of the 1880’s, so a Marie Antoinette costume wouldn’t have been out of place in a Victorian setting.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_SX7LMAF3VCGIUF6QYHQ2BU3PUY Caz

    I missed the first five minutes last night so wasn’t 100% sure why she wanted the costume – no biggie, because in the end, as I said to my husband, I just love this fun little show, who cares why they want an over the top costume. He likes it because it is only 1/2 hour and they are not trying to stretch it to an hour with contrived drama and other such BS. It makes me laugh out loud at least once per episode, usually more often, and makes me yearn to be working in a costume shop again.

  • Anonymous

    Can I just put out there how adorable his ginger assistant is?

    nice + smart + ginger + beard = my dream man

  • Cathy S

    I think she looks fantastic. The city streets shot and the one with Chris laughing were the best. The ginger guy with the beard is hot hot hot.

  • Anonymous

    I love Chris but I’ve not watched his show. I keep up with him on these recaps, so thank you for doing them, and they’ve pushed me off the fence and into dvr’ing this show to see it myself. I am relieved that it’s remaining drama free. 

    It occurs to me that this show is more like an HGTV Design Star spin-off show vs. straight reality tv. These shows are at their best showcasing the creative process, the inspirations, where to get unique or budget materials, and designer’s likable personality (which Chris definitely has). ‘Drama’ is not necessary, or even wanted. David Bromstad or Antionio Ballatore hardly ever worry about a homeowner’s reaction. 

    Showing how a viewer can apply over-the-top design to their own home or wardrobe (and/or how to overcome common obstacles creatively) is a nice way to fill extra time instead of generating non-drama. I also like the idea of a little peek into the designers’ lives outside the studio environment. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mary-Stone/100001328135240 Mary Stone

    the avatar is really me, I am an 18th century revolutionary war (american war for independence) reenactor, I own 18th century women’s clothes, have made 18th century men’s and women’s clothes, and the above, though fun, is not even remotely victorian, nor even a passable “sketch” of 18th century court dress.  I’m not offended by it b/c it’s a costume after all, but jeebus, seeing the underpinnings and some of the details  in the screen grabs is making my eyelids twitch, given how hard me/my fellow hobbyists work to present a more realistic impression of this time period. After all, these were clothes, the shapes though fashionable also had to be at least marginally wearable to some degree. :gets off soabox:

    • Anonymous

      In fairness to Chris, he did talk about how to make the outfit accurately, but also pointed out that it would take more than the Bravo-allotted 3 days.  Hence his use of pet tents (!) for the panniers — it was a quick, easy way to produce something that looked approximately right.  And since clearly nobody was going for historical accuracy as much as over-the-topness, I’d say this week’s outfit was his biggest success yet. 

      And I *love* the way he comes up with quirky solutions to construction problems!

  • Anonymous

    It confounds me why Tracy Stern asked for a Marie Antoinette outfit for a Victorian-inspired fundraiser. What, Victoria isn’t enough? Chris and Co. should have advised her to go big Victorian, maybe even steampumpitup. file://localhost/Users/alyceconrad/Desktop/queen_victoria_-3a_cropped-2.jpg

    • Anonymous

      Oh God, seeing Chris et al make a steampunk Victoria costume would have been epic beyond all imaginings.

  • Lori

    I know many of you care deeply but she didn’t task Chris March with historical accuracy.  She wanted a fun dress and how many people there would even know it’s out of place, or if they knew, who would care.  It’s about the fun!!!

    I wish Bravo would give Chris a competition show with costumers competing, Chris presiding as host and chief judge.  Or else a drag fashion competition where the contestants wouldn’t all have to be queens but the models would.

    • Anonymous

      “how many people there would even know it’s out of place”
      Dozens of people who commented here, and many thousands more who just watched at home. 
      You can have lotsa fun with Victorian – the era spanned so many years and so many styles and possible offshoots.

      • Lori

        No argument, it’s not like I hadn’t read the comments.  My point was that it’s her party, she’s not bound by historical accuracy if she doesn’t want to be, the endgame was for Tracey to look great in a fun outfit that she loved, and Chris March brought it, bigtime. 

        • Anonymous

          Well yeah, but if you’re hosting a Victorian themed party do you really want a reasonable percentage of your guests whispering ‘why’s she wearing that?’ behind their fans?

      • Anonymous

        Why, thank you!

        • Anonymous

          Credit where credit is due! Even my 19-yr-old son (who otherwise doesn’t give a hoot) came up with the idea of steampunk, as a contemporary twist on Victorian.

  • Anonymous

    If she’d requested a something with that teacup that channeled Lewis Carroll, Chris and Co. would have knocked it out of the park—and it would actually have reflected the Victorian era.

    • Anonymous

      Lewis Carroll! Brilliant idea!

  • Anonymous

    I was literally choking when Chris plopped the bedspreads on the worktable. 

    Marry me Chris! I need someone in my life who makes me laugh.

  • http://phantomminuet.blogspot.com/ MinAgain

    It’s like Minnie Pearl meets the French Revolution.  I like it.

  • Anonymous

    Why does she want a late 18th-century dress for a Victorian-themed event?  Makes no sense!  But I like it anyway, particularly the teacup on the wig.

    (And Marie Antoinette never said that.)

    • Anonymous

      Supposedly it’s all a translation error; if the story is to be believed, Marie Antoinette did  say something nasty, only it was “let them eat the burned-on splatters left in the oven” not “let them eat gateau.”  Not exactly a sympathetic response either way.

      • http://naturallyeducational.com/ CandaceApril

        She did not say either–the phrase (I believe the original uses “brioche”) shows up a good bit earlier and was attributed to her as part of a propaganda campaign against her.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_PVIY3NBCZJAJNFWDBCWG2DMKL4 Jen R

          Coincidentally, I’m reading the M.A. biography by Antonia Frasier, which mentions the phrase “Qu’ils mangent de la brioche” at length. It’s unknown if M.A. actually said it; the phrase had been around for at least 100 years at that point. The original phrase was said to have been something that Marie-Thérèse of Spain, wife of Louis XIV, uttered and the original form was something like “if there is no bread, let them eat the crust”, presumably piecrust (pâté). The brioche form was attributed to Madame Sophie, the aunt of Louis XVI, as a reaction to hearing that her brother (the Dauphin at the time) had been pestered by the people crying “Bread! Bread!” while in Paris. It was also attributed to another one of the aunts, Madame Victoire.

  • Anonymous

    Why does she want a late 18th-century dress for a Victorian-themed event?  Makes no sense!  But I like it anyway, particularly the teacup on the wig.

    (And Marie Antoinette never said that.)

  • Anonymous

    Why does she want a late 18th-century dress for a Victorian-themed event?  Makes no sense!  But I like it anyway, particularly the teacup on the wig.

    (And Marie Antoinette never said that.)

  • Anonymous

    The dress reminds me of a costume I wore for ‘Tartuffe’ by Moliere written in 1664. Though I didn’t have such a great wig or teacup.

  • Anonymous

    Well, I just figured she wanted what she wanted & Our Gang saw no point in making a client feel silly by pointing out the historical inaccuracy. (Because if anybody knew as soon as it came out of her mouth that Marie Antoinette was out-of-period, it’d be a room of costumers, no?)

    And in a way, the Marie Antoinette wig was one way to get a silly tea-themed headpiece on her without it looking too Mad Hatter’s Tea Party, which I think might have been too much of a cliche?

    Whatever. I enjoy this show and hope it goes on for several seasons.

  • Anonymous

    Now this is the sort of costume Chris & Co. need to be making every week. So far this has been my absolute fave. How and why they tried to make such a sweet client out to be possibly bitchy is beyond me, though. No need and she was very kind and subdued.

    The fabric did indeed look cheap and was pretty wrinkled but all in all this was fabulous. And you’re right in that the teabag label is what made the teacup work and I loved it. 

    As far as the Victorian era vs. Marie Antoinette thing, whatever. It was her party and she knew what she wanted. Historically inaccurate? Sure. A crime? No.

  • Anonymous

    “Chari-Tea”?  I don’t need to read this.  Life’s too short.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1248212910 Jessie Melcher Brown

    I loved when Chris was wondering how she would get to her event since his costumes don’t fit into cars and cabs.

    Then the shot of her in a horse drawn carriage – perfect!

  • http://tigergray.blogspot.com/ Tiger Gray

    Honestly, I have long craved a fashion show that was just about the fashion. I hate drama vortexes and I had to stop watching a number of reality programs I used to enjoy because they actually became so full of yelling and hatred as to be triggering. (Hell’s Kitchen, anyone?) Please god, T.V., stop treating us like fractious five year olds fighting over toys. We’re adults. We’re capable of being entertained by nothing but nice people making stunning clothing. 

  • Kate Pearce

    Hmm… why have a Victorian themed party and then wear a Georgian costume to it? Fabulous though it is.

  • http://twitter.com/thedogsmother thedogsmother

    Bravo, listen to TLo. I loved learning about how that costume might have been made and then the shortcuts Chris took – inspired. And so glad someone finally wore the wig!

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_PVIY3NBCZJAJNFWDBCWG2DMKL4 Jen R

    Yes the historical accuracy was nonexistent. But I guarantee that none of the people attending the event had a clue how incongruous it is to be Marie Antoinette at a Victorian tea party. And for the record, that skirt is NOT quilted. It’s pieced. People may not realize it but there is a distinct difference.

    On a lighter note, did nobody DIE laughing when Chris walked in with the bedding bags and the camera focused in on the label that said “Extra Large Queen”? I almost fell off the sofa.

    I know that the manufactured drama is terrible but I thought we might have some real drama when little miss sunshine walked in with the dog. Chris had a WTF look on his face. Or when she took ages to piece the skirt panel. Yes, it was fabulous, but it shouldn’t have taken so long.

  • http://twitter.com/MandySCG MandyJane

    Still loving this show every week! Agree with T&Lo about the drama pauses, of course it’s always possible the client won’t like something about the outfit, but with only three days to whip something up, they can’t be too choosy. Why are they always three days away from disaster, anyway?

  • http://www.facebook.com/Cookie.Taz Aisa Ginger Jake Psenicnik

    poor thing, wont she be embarrassed when she turns up dressed as Marie Antoinette for a Victorian themed party?

    • Anonymous

      I knew someone would get there before I did. Poor thing is 50 years too early!

    • Anonymous

      and in a related issue, why does everyone in norcal call any house built before 1920 “a victorian”?  i guess it’s an architectural style rather than a time period, but i don’t know, it’s all so confusing.  it seems like people use “victorian” as a synonym for “antique”.

    • http://naturallyeducational.com/ CandaceApril

      And somewhere, Bert is rolling his eyes and muttering expletives.

  • Anonymous

    My major (minor) complaint is the inevitable “we only have three days to finish this”. There’s no way in hell Tracy Stern showed up three days before an event she’s probably been planning for 6 months to get her costume made. That’s really trying to cram the show into a PR challenge straitjacket.
    Otherwise, it really is a joy to watch a bunch of creative, slightly loopy, people who seem to enjoy each other’s company and love the work they do.

  • Susan Walker

    I enjoy this show because of the lack of bitchiness and drama.  it is great to see cordial, talented people creating things.  The only thing that baffles me is why every customer waits until 3 days before the event to hire him?!

  • Anonymous

    Love it! A hoity-toity Minnie Pearl.

    • Melvis Velour

      LOVE YOU PRUNELLA!!!  That’s EXACTLY what I was thinking!

      Love your name too as I have a much loved and missed Great-Aunt Prunella who took “over the top” over the top :)

  • http://janeaustensworld.wordpress.com/ Vic

    You didn’t mention that dog tents stood in as paniers. Brilliant. I don’t need conflict to enjoy a series. The creative process is enough. 

  • Anonymous

    That teabag tag really is the perfect touch, but it does look a little like the costumes my mom would make me for halloween, with the drama upped. Not that that’s a criticism, just again that the fabric choices seem a little off for a professional with more fabrics at their disposal.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=583505025 Kelley Comfort

    After seeing the first picture, my reaction was “that fabric looks like a comforter my mother would buy!” Glad to see the reason it looks like bedsheets is because it IS made from bedsheets! Not sold on the colours, though. Marie Antoinette wore a lot of bright colours like pink and bright turquoise. Wish they’d gone in that direction. The all-over gold just doesn’t have the impact and it looks so cheap.

  • Anonymous

    TOTALLY agree with TLo…the conflict thing is not necessary.  The best part of this whole show is the actual design and assembly of the final product.  Seeing what works and what does not.  Being a bit crafty myself, it’s fun to see how professional designers pull off complicated visions.  So many times my simple craft ideas go awry, it’s fabulous to see how this stuff is really done.  LUV the wig on this one…absolutely Antoinette!

  • Anonymous

    Yes, the dog tents!  I enjoy what they use to create their designs. Who would think there were dog tents holding up the dress.
    I find this show so enjoyable and yes fascinating because I love Chris and his crew. 

  • Anonymous

    Um……didn’t watch this, but did no one realize that Marie Antoinette died about 25 years before Queen Victoria was even born? Yes, I am one picky-ass bitch when it comes to historical inaccuracy. Just call it a Louis XVI party and be done with it. That said, fabulous costume.

    • Anonymous

      Actually, everyone seems to have realized it.

      • Anonymous

        I meant anyone involved with the show, of course.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/NoFun-Angie/1002886920 NoFun Angie

    I can get over the whole “Marie Antoinette does not equal Victorian” thing since a lot of the general public doesn’t pay attention  when costuming to historical accuracy (sexy Marie Antoinette halloween costumes anyone?), but I can’t get over why no one else seemed to dress up for her themed event?! I’d be super pissed if it was my event and I encouraged people to have fun and dress up and no one put in any effort. What lame friends she has. 

  • Anonymous

    I didn’t like the way the dog tents bounced when she walked, but otherwise, it was truly inspired (and that’s just nitpicking). The teacup does put it in Alice in Wonderland territory, but when you recall that good ole Marie had a naval battle in her wig at one point, it seems tame.

  • Anonymous

    I thought I heard her say it was a Marie-Antoinette-themed party and she wanted to go as Marie Antoinette, obviously. But if everyone else here heard “Victorian” in there somewhere, I must have missed it. 

  • Anonymous

    OMG! So many comments written about an obvious oversight by an intern at Bravo who referred to Tracy Stern’s Tea Party as “Victorian”. She never did any such thing–in fact, the invitation had the headline “Tea at Versailles”. The “Victorian” description is on the Bravo website as a complete mistake. But, you know, they’re busy. Anyway, I love this episode and it comes the closest to what I wanted the show to be like…and yes, I agree with the ridiculousness of trying to squeeze the tiniest bit of drama and controversy out of nothing. It’s part of the deal for being on the airwaves–you do it their way or you don’t get to do it. 

    Enjoy next week’s show with the dog and another big wig!! Tweet us up on Tuesday nights with questions, comments, and how much you like the show….we really appreciate it.

    Chris March