Project Accessory: Meet the Designers

Posted on October 26, 2011

As we wind down this season of Project Runway, and as the comment-section debating reaches a fever pitch, we figure now’s probably a good time to slip this in. Because no matter the outcome of Project Runway, there will be mass declarations of never watching the show again and days-long, if not months long arguing about who should have won. The poor little worker bees who put this little spinoff together are going to get completely ignored in all the shouting.

Yes, Project Accessory premieres tomorrow at 10:30 p.m. right after the Project Runway finale episode. While you’ll be screaming either in joy or in anguish. Since you will be likely to miss all the introductions (due to your screaming), let’s get them out of the way now. Because let’s face it: you’ll watch, just out of morbid curiosity. Look at it this way, if you wind up pissed at Heidi, Nina, and Michael, at least you won’t have to look at them for this show. Meet the B-Team: Molly Sims, lifestyle expert Eva Lorenzotti, InStyle Editor Ariel Foxman and designer Kenneth Cole.

Now meet the little attention whores you’ll be rooting for:

Adrian Dana
Adrian Dana began his design career at age 17, creating church hats for his mother. Since then, the milliner has studied at Parsons School of Design and attended The American College of Applied Arts in Atlanta. Adrian later moved back to New York, where he joined I.N.C.’s creative department for Macy’s and spent time working as Isaac Mizrahi’s personal assistant. He also worked for Banana Republic, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan, Limited Design Studio, BBDO, Avon Corporate inc, MTV, Audrey Smaltz, Aldo Hat Company and Nordstrom. Adrian has designed for celebrities such as Oprah Winfrey (for a 2003 cover of Essence magazine) and had his hats featured in the film “Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Family Reunion.” Some of his additional celebrity clientele are Kylie Minogue, Niki Taylor and the cast of “The Real Housewives of Atlanta.” Many of his hats have also been worn to the Kentucky Derby.

Brian Burkhardt
Brian Burkhardt is a graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and uses his sculpting background in the creation of his jewelry. Burkhardt is co-owner of the jewelry company Triian, with wife and fellow sculptor Trisha Brookbank. The two recently had their first child, a little boy named Oliver. Burkhardt’s work has been featured in publications such as Nylon, Time Out New York, Miami Modern Luxury and Cravings Magazine. His artwork has been exhibited at Miller Block Gallery (Boston), Judi Rotenberg Gallery (Boston), Bernice Steinbaum Gallery (Miami), Gallery Diet (Miami), Freight and Volume (New York), Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts (New York), Volume Gallery (New York), Wyoming Art Museum and The Museum of Fine Arts (Boston), among others.

Christina Caruso
At an early age Christina Caruso knew that she wanted to work in the fashion industry. When other kids were getting summer jobs at the mall, she was applying for internships. While in high school, she interned with Isaac Mizrahi and got her first taste of the fashion world. Caruso attended Parsons School of Design, where was encouraged to focus on accessories. In her senior year, Caruso started making jewelry and hand-knit bags out of her apartment. At a downtown party, her bold jewels attracted costumer Patricia Field, who selected many of Caruso’s jewelry and bags for Sarah Jessica Parker to wear in “Sex and the City.” Caruso went to an open call for Bendels and had her line selected to be sold in their stores. She also sold her handmade accessories to Fred Segal in Santa Monica, California, Patricia Field boutique, Hotel Venus and Takashimaya.
Her designs have been featured in magazines such as W, Vogue, Allure, Seventeen and Lucky, and have been seen on Sarah Jessica Parker, Britney Spears, Kim Cattrall, Claire Danes and Rosario Dawson. Caruso has also dabbled in fashion styling for Jive Records and was a spokesperson for Suave HAIR VIBE.

Cotrice
Cotrice founded her Atlanta-based studio, The Cotrice Collection, in 2000. The line is inspired by all things earthly, with a logo patterned of intertwining leaves, enveloped within a globe that protects its contents. Her designs first appeared in the pages of Upscale magazine and were featured at Brooklyn Fashion Weekend. At an accessories show in New York, Cotrice attracted the attention of an Urban Outfitters buyer, who ended up ordering pieces to be included in their Free People catalog. Cotrice is a self-taught designer who specializes in neck pieces, bracelets, cuffs and earrings. Her celebrity clientele includes Regina King and Angie Stone.

David Grieco
A former collegiate football player for University of Alabama, David Grieco is a self-taught designer who has been a fine-art sculptor for over 17 years. He is the creator of The Justice Bodan Collection, which initially launched with a line of belts and has recently expanded to include bags, jewelry and gift items. Justice Bodan is a fictional character who travels the world, journaling his experiences. He travels from country to country, continent to continent, searching for nothing. He is only seeking to have experiences that will enable him to feel more connected to everyone and everything. Each destination helps him relate a little more closely to himself and to the human experience. David feels each design in The Justice Bodan Collection is wearable art. David’s celebrity clientele includes Jennifer Aniston, Hilary Swank, Gwyneth Paltrow, Matthew McConaughey and Jason Bateman. David is married and a father of two.

Diego Rocha
Diego Rocha is a Brazilian-born handbag designer who started out in accounting in the financial field in Sao Paulo, before he began chasing his dream. His mother was a patternmaker, and he grew up playing with needles, scissors and colorful scraps of cloth. Diego is inspired by interesting skins and animals, influenced by growing up in a country known for its huge variety of unusual wildlife. Before choosing Chicago in 2005, Diego lived in New York, where he perfected his self-taught skills. Creating his own collection, he locked himself in his apartment for six months and experimented with materials, struggling with unsuitable equipment as he taught himself techniques to crystallize his vision. Although his specialty is handbags, he also designs cuffs, wallets, card holders and bags for men.

James Sommerfeldt
Originally from Denver, James Sommerfeldt currently lives and works in Chicago, Illinois. He also spent some time in San Diego and Canada while growing up. His affinity for design began at the age of five, when he was inspired by the magic and enchantment of Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella, who instilled in him a sense of grace and enchantment. His father, a design engineer, taught him design principles and fundamentals of engineering solid construction. Together, they built custom furniture to suit his mother’s taste. His mother taught him to draft and pattern fabrics, sew home furnishings and mend clothing, providing James with an essential foundation for footwear design in later years. In 2005, James enrolled at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he is currently a senior. The passion for patternmaking and building that his parents ingrained in him led him to pursue footwear design. Through his affiliation with the school, James was offered a studio assistant position with internationally acclaimed fiber artist Nick Cave in 2008. Over the course of the next two years, James became aware of the global impact and importance of conservation, recycling and repurposing materials as a contemporary artist and designer through his work with Nick. This past March, James left his position to be by his ailing grandmother’s side. Since then, he has devoted his time and energy to developing his shoemaking and footwear design career.

Kelly Horton
Originally from Philadelphia, New York City–based handbag designer Kelly Horton has designed a line of handbags inspired by the lifestyle of the metropolitan woman. A self-taught designer, Kelly first made her way into the world of fashion not as a designer, but instead as a support assistant for fashion guru Jeffrey Kalinsky, the director of designer merchandising at Nordstrom’s as well as the owner of the popular boutiques Jeffrey’s, Bob Ellis Atlanta and Jeffrey’s New York. Her passion for fashion and love of the arts inspired her to take a chance and branch off on her own to pursue a career as an accessory designer. Kelly began conceptualizing and designing original pieces, making jewelry for herself and friends, which eventually evolved into her making handbags. Stylists began taking notice and requesting designs, using them on-set for photo shoots and red-carpet events. In spring 2006, Kelly launched Madison Kelly NYC, a designer label of her handcrafted handbags. The collection consisted of unique contemporary pieces with creative design structure, various textures and vibrant colors. The designs are edgy originals with the functional simplicity of a great handbag. Kelly decided to redefine the traditional handbag and push the envelope with oversized hobos with nontraditional dimensions, custom hardware and exotic skins.

Nicolina Royale
Nicolina Royale’s design career began as a child, when she used to dig through junk drawers or through her grandpa’s toolbox to find a treasure, take it apart and create a piece of jewelry from whatever she was able to find. From the age of three, she competed in beauty pageants, winning crowns that later served as an inspiration for her line’s signature brand, logo and designs. At seven, a trip to Paris and London inspired her craze for fashion, art and design. A Minnesota native, Nicolina attended the University of Minnesota as journalism major with an art minor. Craving a more artistic lifestyle, Nicolina moved to L.A. for an unpaid internship at “Entertainment Tonight,” paying the bills as a server at The Rainbow Bar & Grill on the infamous Sunset Strip. The minute she stepped in the door of the Rainbow, she fell in love with rock ’n’ roll. Nancy Sinatra was her first customer, followed by CC Deville of Poison. Those meetings led Nicolina to begin creating rocker-inspired jewelry. Her signature aesthetic blends fine leathers or exotic skins with industrial hardware, studs or spikes and intricate Swarovski crystals. Her handcrafted, rebel artistry, along with her endless imagination, unites classic elements such as pearls with oxidized chains or industrial hardware hinges with Italian leather, door knockers with crocodile or stingray, or even mixing in real nuts or bolts. In 2007, a Bloomingdales executive discovered Nicolina Royale on the streets of New York. Within weeks, Nicolina Royale was a Bloomies brand, launching her signature guitar-pick cuff links, followed by her cuffs, bracelets and necklaces. Nicolina Royale’s celebrity fans include Steven Tyler, Miley Cyrus, Rihanna, Nicki Minaj, LMFAO, Far East Movement and Linkin Park.

Nina Cortes
Named one of Sofi Magazine’s “33 Emerging Creative Minds to Know” in 2011, Nina Cortes was born and raised in Miami by her Cuban family. The tomboy-turned-popular-cheerleader didn’t discover her design ability until she took a jewelry and metalsmithing class while in college. After that, she began creating jewelry as a hobby and soon started selling her wares to friends and family. She later signed with business partner Iliana Ruiz, and within two years, opened her own studio and store. Her jewelry company, Nina Loren, strives to create jewelry for women of all ages.

Rich Sandomeno
Influenced by his multi-generational roots as a heavy-duty diesel mechanic in the post-industrial wasteland of east New Jersey for 15 years, Rich Sandomeno’s aesthetic was formed early on by his love for machines and the decaying urban cityscape, as well as the obscure and organic. Jewelry making began as a hobby, but the growing interest from friends and collectors alike led Rich to the path of designing accessories. In 2002, Richard launched his company, Spragwerks, and moved to Brooklyn. The steady rise of demand and attention from both clients and media led to Spragwerks’ 2006 relocation to Los Angeles. Spragwerks designs are favored by Hollywood luminaries and can be spotted on numerous commercials, and in television shows and movies. Spragwerks has been featured in countless media outlets, including Inked Magazine, Juxtapoz, Time Out NewYork and Vogue, to name a few.

Shea Curry
Actress-turned-jewelry-designer Shea Curry began hand-making jewelry in her trailer on the set of “The Princess Diaries 2 – The Royal Engagement.” While working in the film, she made a unique piece of jewelry for each female member of the cast and crew. But it wasn’t until she designed her own pink wedding dress, bridal jewelry and bridesmaids’ jewelry, which was featured in InStyle Weddings magazine, that she really began taking her design seriously. Shea went from hand-making each piece of jewelry to learning every aspect of jewelry/ accessory design, from creating a sketch, making waxes, models and mold, to soldering before creating her finished pieces for her Shameless jewelry line. Her pieces make a statement for the woman who wants to stand out in the crowd, with Swarovski stones, feathers or hand-painted enamel. Shea is inspired by the beautiful, confident women in her life as well as the organic beauty of nature. Big on charity work, Shea also designed a piece for the Breast Cancer Charities of America. Her celebrity clientele includes Fergie, Neve Campbell, Sophia Monk, Lucy Hale and Lo Bosworth. On the acting end, Shea will next be seen in “New Year’s Eve,” directed by Garry Marshall and starring Josh Duhamel, premiering this December.

 

[Photo/Bio Credit: myLifetime.com]

    • http://joyouslifesf.wordpress.com Kiltdntiltd

      Trying to look away from the train wreck that is about to happen.

      • michelle shields

        but you just can’t!

        • Anonymous

          I fear to look and yet I cannot turn away!

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_5KDTLDJA7ZBCPDP6HV4FZMJDII Indigo

      looks like a fun group

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344922354 Eric Scheirer Stott

      There’s a lot of Butch Attitude in those photos…want to bet on how many of them are really prissy queens?

      • Anonymous

        97%?

    • Anonymous

      I don’t really understand why some of these designers need to be on Project Accessory.  A good many of them seem to be very successful already, peddling their wares to celebrities, showing up in high profile magazines, and showing at numerous art galleries.  What exactly is the prize on PA?  Most of these artists already have their own line and their own boutique and a high profile clientele.

      • Sobaika Mirza

        The potential to become a household name (buzz factor) and get more people buying your wares. That’s always been the appeal of PR, accessory or otherwise.

        • Anonymous

          it seems to me, and perhaps I am wrong, that the PR designers were never as “successful” as these contestants with regard to periodicals and high-profile clientele. Reading some of their bios (the first dude designed a hat for Oprah for the cover of Essence) it seems like the challenge winners on PR receive magazine covers or advertorials or whatever as challenge wins. And these designers have already been there and done that (not all of them, but quite a few of them). So what will the show do to up the ante? Design accessories for Anne Hathaway when she hosts the AA?

          • http://www.notacomplexperson.tumblr.com Anonymous

            Getting a little bit of press and one or two celebrity clients (who often borrow, rather than buy) your wares is no guarantee of success. If you really want to know how successful someone is, ask what their margins are, their wholesale numbers, their international distribution, and so on. Being famous ≠ being commercial.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Most PR designers have not had credentials as good as these.  But they were designing clothing.  If Oprah wears your stuff as a clothing designer, it’s a big deal and people who are into that kind of thing remember your name.  Accessory designers have to be far more visible to get the same recognition.  I mean, how many top accessory designers can most people really name?

          • BuffaloBarbara

            I think there’s probably a bit of focus-exaggeration here. One Oprah magazine cover is absolutely wonderful, but isn’t going to pay the bills forever.  This is like a several-weeks-long bit of national exposure.

            I think the problem most PR contestants have is that they’ve gone for a mass market exposure, then try to make it in essentially boutique sales.  PA contestants will have the same problem if all they’re trying to do is garner publicity for their boutiques.  What they should be aiming for is name recognition for a mass market line (not ignoring their boutique lines, of course).  But your audience on PR (or PA) shops at Target and K-Mart, with department stores like Macy’s or Talbots being for big, expensive special occasions.   You’re not going to make a big success from the exposure on the show if you then turn around and make a lot of hyper-expensive pieces that the viewers can’t afford.  The jewelry makers here might have some advantage, if they got a line at one of the jewelry chains–“Cotrice for Jared’s” or whatnot–because people expect to pay big bucks of some variety for jewelry, mostly based on what it’s made of.  But the shows don’t prepare them for the kind of benefit that the mass audience provides–giving them a mass audience then loosing them to sell to elite buyers.

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              Yep.  That’s the biggest reason why Christian has been so successful.  His line for Payless has really capitalized on that market, and he’s used that to keep his name out there and generate capital for the runway shows.

            • BuffaloBarbara

              I sometimes think PPS is the only one who understands what kind of fish he happened to hook here.  And he then uses it to fund his boutique collections.  Smart.  As a contestant, I liked him all right, though I thought half of his success was attitude.  As a professional, I respect his business sense and intelligence, which, after nine seasons, shouldn’t seem like quite as rare a bird as it is.

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              That doesn’t surprise me honestly.  I would guess a good chunk of designers go out of business because they just don’t handle the business side of it well at all.  A lot of specialized programs (even those that are focusing on jobs where you will almost certainly want to run your own business someday) don’t teach you ANYTHING about business. 

              One of my best friends is an eye doctor and she said the only reason she’d be able to handle running her own practice is because she worked at a bank all the way through high school and undergrad. 

            • Anonymous

              I was a Research Asst twice in college and my refrain was, “Academics should take management classes!”  I did not get a business degree, but I took a couple of business classes as electives after that experience.  So glad I did!

            • Anonymous

              You all make very valid points regarding PA/PR essentially being a marketing tool more than actually giving the designers their “big break.”  Christian Siriano’s success with his payless shoe collection being a prime example of exactly what you’re asserting.  One thing is for sure – if resumes are any indication of the level of talent on the show, this cast is leaps and bounds ahead of this season’s PR cast.

          • Rebecca Zmarzly

            But but…Ms. Curry has already designed something for Anne Hathaway. Been there, done that. :P

      • http://twitter.com/kbshee kbshee

        Yeah, but now they could possibly get their own line on QVC. Ka ching!

        • Anonymous

          That’s what I’m thinking.  QVC deals have been a reliable moneymaker for more than one PR winner and  accesories are actually better suited for QVC than clothes.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Isabeau-Mochrie/1580631451 Isabeau Mochrie

        I see your point . . . but, I hope it can raise visibility that fashion is not just about clothes.  For those that love fashion, this will show a world beyond sewing.  IMHO, accessories really augment the versatility of garments.

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        Plus you don’t really know how much of these successes are recent or old. Maybe they look good on paper, but their careers are stagnant. Nothing like a reality show to get your name back out there. 
        Also, maybe they are trying to branch out.

      • Anonymous

        I’m really encouraged by their credentials – think we are in for a good season (fingers crossed)

    • Anonymous

      It’s George Costanza!

    • http://twitter.com/thedogsmother thedogsmother

      Will be interesting to see how a shoe designer competes against a jewelry designer. Not sure what to expect.

      • Anonymous

        Yeah, that’s probably the most confusing aspect of this show. Are the judges going to compare hats, jewelry and shoes? That seems odd.

        But damn, those shoes. Fabulous.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2VBWWGHZEBKTVQMXE5SO5NCU2I Mich

        yeah, i think that’s what i’m most interested in for this show-how the format is going to work. are the challenges going to be general (design something to complete this look), or specific (make a hat or bracelet). and how will the judging work. i just can’t really imagine how it’s going to work. so that’s what’s bringing me in, plus i looooove accessories, and want to see something cool.

    • http://fafafab.tumblr.com/ fafafab

      I hate them all already, I’m not watching this shit

    • Anonymous

      I’m confused. Some of these people seem vastly overqualified for what I would expect to appear on such a show.

      It appears reality tv is becoming a legitimate marketing tool. Much cheaper than a nation wide ad campaign. Just a chunk of your dignity. 

    • Anonymous

      Why is Cee Lo on Project Accessory?

    • Anonymous

      I kinda like the look of Diego Rocha’s bags, and coincidentally enough, there’s a company on the craft show circuit, with the name Roche (very close spelling and very similar bags) and I’m now wondering if he’s behind that. Also

      As for the guy with the shoes/torture devices; funny, he’s wearing flat shoes. I’d like to see some of these designers who make these horrifically uncomfortable shoes, wear them themselves.

      I’m still not sure how this show will work when the skill sets are so specific, but I’ll give it a shot if you boys are blogging it.

      –GothamTomato

      http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/2561006

    • Anonymous

      I love this sentence: “Influenced by his multi-generational roots as a heavy-duty diesel mechanic in the post-industrial wasteland of east New Jersey for 15 years…”

      But I don’t get why most of these folks are on the show–they already seem to be well established in their fields. What’s their motivation? Just more exposure?

      • Anonymous

         Aren’t most of the chefs on Top Chef already working – with varying levels of success?

        • Sobaika Mirza

          Most are, and some were already pretty well known in their field before appearing on the show. Similar stuff happens on SYTYCD where some dancers were already members of professional ballet corps or had worked on Broadway. Shows like these are always just another way of getting their name out there and increasing visibility for people at home.

        • Anonymous

          Well, I think there’s a difference between just working and having Oprah as one of your hat clients. If I was at that level, I wouldn’t bother with this. Imagine if you don’t do well–will your high level clients then ditch you?

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        Well, it’s not easy to really make yourself a name in accessories, because it is a niche market.  The prize may also be really good.

        • Anonymous

          Do we know what the prize is? I don’t have cable so unless this show gets put on the website, I won’t be watching it…will just have to read about it here. 

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Found it!

            “The winner of Project Accessory will receive $100,000 from eBay Fashion
            to start their own line, a feature spread in InStyle and a year of
            professional runway hair styling courtesy of John Frieda(R) Precision
            Foam Color.”http://www.thefutoncritic.com/news/2011/10/03/project-runway-all-stars-and-project-accessory-to-premiere-back-to-back-thursday-november-3-on-lifetime-198505/20111003lifetime01/So… yeah.  Doesn’t seem like that great of a prize for them.  But I’m sure it will go up on the site, because Lifetime’s pretty good about that — especially since a lot of PR viewers don’t even get the channel, let alone watch anything else on it.

            • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

              I’m trying to figure out what “a year of professional runway hair styling courtesy of John Frieda(R) Precision Foam Color” actually means. How often are these people expecting to be on a runway? Also, those feature spreads that PR designers win are usually crappy. I remember being highly disappointed by Jay’s feature spread in Elle. I had to go through the magazine twice, maybe three times, before I found it. It looked like an ad – a tiny ad, at that.

              The eBay thing could work out, but whoever wins it will have to do a lot of self-promotion. It’s too easy for your work to get lost, and it’s possible that the only people who will find you are the ones who are already looking for you.

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              Well, and it’s not a guarantee of a line placement with eBay, just that they’re the ones putting up the money. 

              Though, to be fair, winner have never been guaranteed a line — you’ll notice it always says “the opportunity to design a line for Piperlime (or Neiman’s for the All-Stars series)”  That means the company still has a chance to turn down the line.

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              Accessories have runway shows too. So I have heard.

            • Anonymous

              But if you win a nationally-televised competition in your field, a lot of people will look for you.  Even if you don’t get the line, your Etsy/Ebay/custom website will blow up.  

              I hope the contestants are all prepared inventory-wise in time to take advantage.

          • Anonymous

            It’s online.  I don’t have cable, either.

      • Anonymous

        Yeah, the writing for these blurbs is execrable.

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          Well yeah!  IT’S LIFETIME!  Good writers aren’t allowed to work there — clearly, since we’ve seen the drivel they show!

        • Anonymous

          As an artist myself, my guess is that these are artist statements written by each individual contestant (or for them by someone they chose). That would explain the wildly different tone and diction between blurbs, and the tedious tendency to list individual galleries. Many artists are not very good at summing up what they do, and why you should be interested, in writing.

          • Anonymous

            I can’t imagine ever calling myself a “tomboy-turned-popular-cheerleader.” It seems so…juvenile. 

          • Anonymous

            That would be my guess, too. 

            • Anonymous

              I thought these sounded self-written as well. Ending on “to name a few” just reeks of amateur self-promotion.

      • BuffaloBarbara

        Maybe they just want to compete for the hell of it.  I mean, honestly, the game sounds like fun.

        • Anonymous

          Well, there is that!

    • Anonymous

      The thing is, I really love watching people make things; I love to see the creative process in action. BUT the chances of seeing any of that during a 30 minute PR spinoff are infinitesimal and I really cannot swallow any more schlocky drama – especially if I have to sit and listen to another series of odes to dead relatives.  And this crew looks armed and dangerous and silly in their poseur fierceness. I’ll read your recaps. They will undoubtedly be far more interesting.

      • Anonymous

        Oh, it’s only 30 minutes? Yikes. That doesn’t seem like even worth bothering with. 

        • Anonymous

          No, I checked again, it does look like it’s going to be an hour, then followed by After the Runway for anyone who is a glutton for punishment. That just means 30 more minutes of unnecessary drama, as far as I’m concerned.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        I really wonder how they’re going to make shoes — cobbling is a fairly unique skill set.  And while most designers don’t sew anymore, they do know how.  I don’t know that the same is true of shoe designers.

      • Anonymous

        I was going to post your exact first two sentences! But my love is such that I’m okay with also watching any drama/poseurs. I know this season of PR has been especially bad, but I feel like almost every season of every reality show suffers from some silly manufactured drama and mugging. As long as I get to see some talent on PA (the lack of which is what I think hurt PR9 more than anything), then I’m happy.

        Definitely skipping the PR finale though. I’ve already seen the collections and I just don’t care anymore.

    • Tamara Hogan

      No, really. I won’t be watching.

    • Anonymous

      Model, actress,beauty queens?

    • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

      Oh, I was SOOOO hoping that was the church hat guy! He was my favorite in the group shot, but I had no idea what his specialty was. Looks like I have a definite fave.

      • Logo Girl

        Agreed. I already want Church Hat Guy to win. Plus he has one of the less irritating bios. And I love hats. (Edit: have I slipped up already? Am I really going to watch this? I think I will watch this but not PR. Oh who am I kidding.)

        • Anonymous

          I loved his stuff in the first episode.

    • Anonymous

      I probably won’t watch this, but for the record I like the guy who looks like a blacksmith. 

      • Lori

        Uh-oh, now I can’t unsee Creepy Skillet-Wielding Blacksmith from the commercials that run during PR.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QF4Y553ZONNUZJN5AVBU6VY33U Renee

      They do all seem to be established professionals as opposed to up and comers or hopefuls.  I’m rooting for the milliner just out of solidarity though.  And Nicola totally reminds me of Stella, stylewise anyway ;)

      • Rand Ortega

        Read. My. Mind! I took 1 look at her & went, “It’s Lethah!”

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QF4Y553ZONNUZJN5AVBU6VY33U Renee

          I suspect there will be much hammering of studs and spikes. Yay!

        • Anonymous

          And I heard a chorus of “I’ve got a hammer” in my brain.

    • Logo Girl

      I’m already sick of it. I’m sick of the mugging and the “attitude” and the designers trying to look “scary” and the INXS song used in the promo. Speaking of songs used in promos, does anyone remember that they kept using “You’re gonna reap what you sow (sew)” back in July? Maybe they should have used “You’re gonna reap what you prettily drape and pin and cajole others to do for you”. I say I’m taking it all off my DVR. Let’s see what really happens come Thursday.

      • Anonymous

        Great, now that stupid INXS song is stuck in my head.  Getoutgetoutgetout!!!

      • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

        ‘You’re gonna reap what you glue”

      • Toto Maya

        The guy cracking the whip makes me laugh every time. You are SO not tough.

    • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

      Where the hell did they find these people?  AND WHY DIDN’T THEY TAP THAT WELL FOR S9??? 

      Those are some pretty impressive resumes, particularly considering that they are going on reality TV. 

      • Anonymous

        I agree – it seems surprising

        • Anonymous

          wondering the same thing…if they’re so accomplished, what’s the draw to be on a Make An Accessory game show?  Is the $ really that big?

    • Anonymous

      Who are the producers? Magical Elves? Yea!

      Oh, not Elves? Bunim/Murray, you say?

      (sniff)

      Oh. Well, I might watch it, just so I can read TLo the next day.

    • Anonymous

      They all just trying sooo hard aren’t they*

      *they being the people attempting to make necklaces and handbags edgy.

    • Sobaika Mirza

      Here’s what I don’t get about the show – how will a jewelry designer be expected to make a handbag? And vice versa. Maybe it will all become clear with the first episode, but it doesn’t seem as much of an even playing field as PR.

      • Anonymous

        I’m thinking they will be allowed to design their medium in a challenge. Black and White. Using materials from a scrapyard. Getting items at the Goodwill and jazzing them up. Make an accessory for the red carpet. Be it shoes or handbags or jewelry, they will fit into the challenge of using whatever or designing for whoever.

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          That’s what I was thinking too — otherwise I don’t see how it could be done.  Especially if they do end up making the items themselves.  No jewelry designer is going to know how to cobble shoes!

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Ginny-Ellsworth/534496198 Ginny Ellsworth

            If they all have such different skill sets, where the heck are they going to shop? Michael’s??

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              I can’t wait for the premiere just to find out that very thing:)  I’ve been wondering how they were going to work this show since it was announced. 

              (Though I must admit that I am a bit sad — when I watch PR, if I really want one of the pieces I can make it.  I won’t be able to do that here…)

      • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

        I suspect it will be along the lines of Work of Art. They’ll have a challenge in which they work in their own media. But just as in WOA, it can get tricky. Outside of technical skills, how do you judge a piece of jewelry against a handbag against a shoe?

        • Sobaika Mirza

          That’s what I mean, I don’t know how that can be judged on an even playing field.

          • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

            Yeah, after I posted that comment I realized I was just repeating what you said. I guess it will be like a dog show (honestly, it’s the closest comparison I can come up with). Poodles compete with mastiffs, and then the Best in Show is chosen. It’s like comparing apples and… poodles.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QFW22QV426LUOEPGASPZJWJMDE MishaFoomin

              By the time the judging gets down to Best In Show, you’re comparing the attitudes of the dogs, mainly. Try to figure out which ones look healthiest, feel in the best condition, the most fit, but it seems to be which dog walks the walk the best. It’s like a model stomping down the runway and seeing who gives the most face, who is the most fierce, who is selling the look the best.

              It can be the same with this competition. You can put the poorly made items at the bottom, as well as  the items that look like no effort was involved with a crap design. PR liked things to look expensive and “luxe.” That can be applied here too. If someone makes a necklace that looks cheap and is barely holding together, they’ll rate lower than a handbag that is meticulously crafted or a shoe that looks luxe. 

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        Maybe they will do teams? Making a suite of accessories with a common theme?

      • Anonymous

        I’m curious and puzzled along with everyone else. But I am looking forward to see how it all comes together. I would hate to see too many team challenges. Best in [dog] Show is funny, but maybe the best concept for judging.

    • Anonymous

      I like James Sommerfeldt’s background. But I probably won’t watch this show. *

      * I’ll read about it though.

    • Anonymous

      I almost stopped reading after David Grieco’s University of Alabama football career past was revealed but thankfully, I read on to see what his story was…and it appears he had one too many head injuries, way back when football helmets were even less protective than they are today. I can’t wait to see what this guy comes up with. Roll Tide!

      • Anonymous

        I’ll always *like* when someone says Roll Tide!

        Long family history with UofA.

    • http://opinionandamovie.blogspot.com/ Deitra S.

      How you like those ankle straps on Christina, there, TLo?  Broken out in hives yet? ;)  Yikes, this looks terrifying.

    • http://twitter.com/ILikeShiny Cindi Williams

      “He is the creator of The Justice Bodan Collection, which initially launched with a line of belts and has recently expanded to include bags, jewelry and gift items. Justice Bodan is a fictional character who travels the world, journaling his experiences. He travels from country to country, continent to continent, searching for nothing. He is only seeking to have experiences that will enable him to feel more connected to everyone and everything. Each destination helps him relate a little more closely to himself and to the human experience. David feels each design in The Justice Bodan Collection is wearable art”
       
      Because you can’t make this shit up…so funny! I will make sure to steal this when I write a sitcom.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        I’m hoping he brings the crazy in the fine old PR tradition — someone like Vincent or Blayne.  You know, the guy that you suspect isn’t staying at the Atlas with everyone else, but has to return to the institution every night…

        • http://twitter.com/ILikeShiny Cindi Williams

          I *do* enjoy the delusional. Let’s hope David has a healthy dose of hubris like Emilio Sosa.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Any bets on how often we hear one of the guys tell us he’s straight in the first episode?  You know there’ll be at least one!  I’m betting on the Alabama guy…

      • http://twitter.com/ILikeShiny Cindi Williams

        I finally figured out why the Justice Bodan thing cracked me up…it sounds like an advertisement for a parka in the J. Peterman catalog from Seinfeld.

    • Anonymous

      I will give them this: they have included some people with impressive educational and work experiance.  Hopefully no “I won a beauty contest, made a sex tape and learned to sew 4 months ago” contestants.  I have a pair of Nicolina Royale cufflinks that I love.  My only concern is how difficult is it going to be to put on a compelling show of accessories and are they all going to have to branch out into different areas than their experianced in?  “Jewelry designer – craft me a pair of shoes in 1 hour!”  Could be difficult.  And dull….

    • Anonymous

      Shea Curry’s photo is hysterical.  I wonder if Gold Shorts knew she had a camel toe when she posed like that. 

      I’m still interested b/c I want to see how a shoe designer competes with handbag designer.  I am also interested in the creative process.

      • Anonymous

        I could not take my eyes off the camel toe.

        • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

          It’s a total eye magnet.

    • Anonymous

      Before I finish even reading all the profile, I just have to say: 

      “His affinity for design began at the age of five, when he was inspired by the magic and enchantment of Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella, who instilled in him a sense of grace and enchantment.”

      Who is writing these blurbs?! Do they make the designers do it? Some of them are so masturbatory I wouldn’t be surprised. 

      eta: now that I’ve read ‘em all… I feel like Shea Curry wandered onto the wrong set, and actually meant to audition for the role of Wonder Woman, because yowza, dem muscles! She looks ripped. (not an insult, srsly) Other than that I don’t even know who to root for.

      • Anonymous

        I am a photographer and I’ve been instructed to be use flowery language in my artist statement to make it sound more, and I quote, “deeply profound and artistic”. However, being the sarcastic little smart ass that I am, I can never bring myself to do it. After reading these, I would not be surprised if they all wrote them themselves. They sound ridiculous.

        • Anonymous

          I mean, hey, I can sell myself in a paragraph if I have to, but I think I could write it a lot better. And also not use phrases like “ailing grandmother” when talking about my design aesthetic and history. And let’s face it, twinks love words like ~enchantment~. 

      • Anonymous

        I missed the camel toe — all I saw were those weightlifting thighs.

    • Anonymous

      I never saw this before, but Kenneth Cole looks a lot like Tim Allen. That’s disturbing.

    • Anonymous

      Project Messessory! Should be fun; I’ll watch because these guys look like fun, and I am vaguely curious as to how these challenges could possibly work. “Design and create a collar for Charo’s dog to be worn at a gay bar mitzvah in Sao Paolo! You have $0.45 and 27 minutes! Go!”

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002673395871 Roadkill Writer’s Camp

      1. Taking bets on which one’s been using a Dremel for only four months. 
      2. Hope to see the diesel mechanic in a team challenge with the Swarovski actress (who should win something just for that set of quads).
      3. Points off the shoe designer for playing the sick relative card so soon.

    • Anonymous

      I would just like to have Shea Curry’s legs…

      • Anonymous

        Please dress & accessorize them better.  That photo is all kinds of wrong.

        • Anonymous

          Thanks. And I thought it was just me.

        • Anonymous

          I loved the photos! I thought they ranged from intentionally over-dramatic to comic book.

          Guess it depends whether you assume they were intentional & tongue-in-cheek or not.

    • Anonymous

      “Because let’s face it: you’ll watch, just out of morbid curiosity.”

      Nuh-uh.  The promos have the distinctly BM funk about them, and the last thing I want in my life is more manufactured drama among half-assed “designers.”  If I’m wrong, I’ll gladly admit it, but there’s no way I’m watching another BM crapfest.

      I do look forward to the bitchy recaps here, though.

    • Anonymous

      So for the unconventional materials challenge, they’ll be shopping at Mood?

      Terrible time for the premier. I will probably be self medicating heavily to make it through the coronation of Queen Anya and the Drama Vortex’s predictable meltdown while poor Viktor walks away empty handed.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        They really should have shown it BEFORE PR.  Give us all a chance to get hooked before we decide we hate B/M forever!

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_OSYAJATXUH3QX7ZDDF52GXG4PU Janie R

      I’m definitely watching.  I’m curious to know how it’s going to work. I love how the last jeweler has a mini torch and a welding helmet. Ridiculous.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paul-John-Kostrzewa/1237573396 Paul John Kostrzewa

      Holy shit, look at the thighs on Shea! Damn, girl…

    • http://twitter.com/asciident Melissa Della

      So is Kenneth Cole going to spend the entire season looking like he’s going to spit bile on his own designer shoes à la his guest appearance on PR? His visible squeamishness at having to participate in those shenanigans does not give me high hopes for his ability to cope as a regular on PA.

    • Joyce Martin

      I am mesmerized by Shea Curry’s quads. Utterly mesmerized. I keep scrolling back up to try to decide if it’s a photoshop job.

    • Anonymous

      I still hate myself for watching PR and I’m embarrassed enough just reading about these guys.   I’m going to muster up some self respect and pass on it.  And besides, I can’t get past how silly Molly Simms looks in all the promos.

      • Rand Ortega

        I wish I had your discipline. But like the pathetic lemming that I am, over the cliff I go.

    • Anonymous

      Christina made hand-knit bags out of her apartment? Sorry, grammar police moment there…

      • Anonymous

        Grammar is dying, and I’ve already bought my funeral dress.

        • Anonymous

          I had to tell my daughter this morning that her college application essay clearly stated that her step mom’s ulcerative colitis completed a triathlon.

      • BuffaloBarbara

        Maybe it was a special materials challenge of some sort…

        Alas, poor grammar, I knew him well… but yesterday, I was at the county courthouse, and there was a sign plastered to every door that used a grocers’ apostrophe.  Did no one read Eats, Shoots, and Leaves?

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        Now maybe that was correct grammar and she was REALLY inspired by the Atlas apartment challenge on S3 of PR! :D

      • Anonymous

        I was wondering what she used for materials once the apartment was bare.

      • BuffaloBarbara

         By the way, did we also catch:
        Nicolina Royale’s design career began as a child

        Oh, really?

    • Anonymous

      My god, they all look terrifying.

    • Anonymous

      ps. I know that it’s Bravo grammar and not TLo grammar.

      • Anonymous

        Worse—it’s Lifetime grammar, which makes Bravo look as if it’s staffed by English professors.

    • http://profiles.google.com/emily.w.sings Emily Wilkerson

      What is going on with Cotrice’s arms?

    • Anonymous

      Oh, please… I am totally going to watch this. And I am not being facetious. These people look like they might actually have some skills.

    • Anonymous

      Why a blender? 

      I understand all of the other “tools of the trade” in the other photographs, but why a blender?

      • Anonymous

        Margaritas. We’ll all need ‘em with BM producing the show.

      • Anonymous

        Since he’s a sculptor, I assume it’s to make his sculpting materials, like paper pulp?

        Edit: But man, do I hope we’re not going to have to watch people make papier mache jewelry. Please let there be something besides papier mache in that blender.

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          I really hope he’s not trying to blend clay with it.  I tried that once — it didn’t end well for my blender.  (To clarify in the hope of not looking like a total moron, it was the super liquidy stuff that I used for filling cracks and that kind of thing.)

    • Anonymous

      Those are some impressive bios, which doesn’t make sense because isn’t the new Project motto something like “Hos Before Pros”?

    • Lori

      Grrrrr, now  we’re getting the”ailing grandmother” in pre-show publicity.  James, hope you’re grandma’s better but Lifetime and B/M, spare us. Magical Elves did it without all the bio drama and they still do.

      • http://jessieliz.wordpress.com/ Super Red

        I actually appreciated that, because I did the math of “Why are you a senior now if you started in 2005?” There’s nothign wrong with taking longer to finish, but taking time out for family (as long as he doesn’t continue to play tha card) is a great thing to have in your bio and helps fill the time gaps.

    • iCouture

      Do we REALLY need to know how many of you WILL NOT be watching this!??  Who cares!?  Don’t watch it then!

    • http://profiles.google.com/trashilove { edi } ilovetrash

      i went over to lifetime & looked at the work.
      it’s much more interesting than the work done on this season’s PR.
      some of it is better, even.
      some of it, however, is silly.
      lots & lots of bedazzling. more than enough josh at forever 21. definitely one dress that, while it looks nice on the person, also looks like nothing but a grey maxipad [ruched].
      &, of course, more bad sculpture than you can shake a bronze stick at.

      still, it seems that they cast for both wackoness & work this time.
      i gather it takes them a while to eschew the latter.

      ps. i really like the lucite locket thats filled w/ carrots in dirt–& the carrots have eyes.
      http://mylt.ltcdn.com/shows/sites/mylifetime.com/files/images/imagecache/photo_gallery_new_full/2011/10/18/pa1-brian-pastwork12.jpg

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        Well, that’s how PR USED to cast too… I miss that.  I never minded if a couple people were cast just for their sheer lunacy (I know for a fact that Blayne’s portfolio wasn’t what got him on the show!) but there was talent mixed in.  Maybe this show will have the same… maybe…

    • Terence Ng

      God I love these pretentious photoshots of contestants. Maybe Brian gets my vote for (possibly) having the least serious one. :D

    • Anonymous

      Nope.  I won’t be watching the finale, let alone this thing.  I need a serious break from both Lifetime and Bunim/Murray.   But I do look forward to your recaps for entertainment value, so fire away!

    • Anonymous

      That top makes Shea Curry’s proportions all wrong. Nothing wrong with having shoulders that are broader than your hips (that’s my figure as well), but tops like that are *not* flattering for that body type.

      I will totally watch this. I love jewelry design, and these people actually seem talented. I’m sure we’ll see some pretty things.

      • Anonymous

        Is it the top’s fault? Or is it an effect from how hard she’s flexing her muscles in the photo?

    • BuffaloBarbara

      When other kids were getting summer jobs at the mall, she was applying for internships.

      Must be nice not to have to save for college, help with household expenses, pay car insurance to get back and forth to said internship, and otherwise be able to indulge in spending  your summer the way you feel like it instead of earning money by doing “lower” sorts of work.

      Which is totally not the point of the post, I guess.

      I’m probably going to watch, since I don’t know much about accessories and it will be fun to learn, but it doesn’t look they’re going to have an even playing field.  Clothing designers have some notion about fabric and construction and so on (even if they’re not good at it), so can adapt to different challenges.  But a hatmaker versus a jewelry maker?  Would they even have similar skill sets to pit against each other?  Did the show make sure the contestants have training in techniques outside their particular bailiwicks?

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        Maybe they were paid internships?  My brother did a lot of those back in the day. 

        • BuffaloBarbara

          I didn’t think they existed anymore… good for him!  (Sorry–my bitter factor on the unpaid internships that the well-to-do kids got in order to rub elbows in their fields while I worked at the dry cleaner down the street to help with rent… it’s not an attractive trait.  I do apologize.)

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            It may depend on the field — my brother’s were in computer programming.  Like I wouldn’t guess a high school student at a fashion house got paid. 

            Though she may have — by the time I was 18, I was getting paid internships on political campaigns, which are damn hard to get.  Of course I had worked at least one every election since I was 12, in a county with very few Democratic volunteers, so they knew me and I had cousins that were county chairs for both parties, which helped.  (BTW, I highly recommend campaigns to build up connections. You meet a lot of people working on them, and a lot of them go on to good jobs later:)

            • http://jessieliz.wordpress.com/ Super Red

              For what it’s worth- I didn’t come from a family with a ton of money- I figured out what field I wanted to work in, started volunteering when I was 15, was offered a paid internship at national HQ when I was 18, and when it was over, was offered a job. I”m not saying that my experience is typical, but if you have the opportunity to make those kind of connections for yourself at a young age, DO IT. College will still be there, but some opportunities are once in a lifetime.

            • BuffaloBarbara

              I’m sure it does depend on the field–things like publishing, where half the English majors in the country want to get in–and there are a lot of English majors–you can pretty much say, “Work for free… no, on the other hand, YOU pay US” and there will be plenty of people willing to do it, while figuring out how to live in expensive NYC at the same time (even if I hadn’t had to work for the money, I was still in Buffalo).  Computer programming, engineering, etc?  Rarer skills, highly sought after.  They’re competing for interns instead of vice versa.

              My problem with campaigns is that I work in the public sector… does not look good to campaign for who you want to be your boss!

          • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

            I get what you’re saying, having come from the same kind of family as you. But I can’t hold it against her for not suffering the heat of working in a dry cleaner, or some other lousy job, if she didn’t have to. And while they do get to rub elbows with people in their desired field, most interns are treated like crap anyway.

            • BuffaloBarbara

              But they have that leg up on their resume after college–it’s basically a way to reintroduce the idea that only people of a certain economic class may participate in a field.

              FWIW, I don’t blame her, either. I’d have done it if I had the means. I have something against the whole institution, not anyone who takes advantage of it.

            • Anonymous

              I DO have the means, sort of, and I think it’s crap too. My field is international politics/NGO work (hopefully!) and when i was looking for positions to apply for right after graduating (before I had my post-college flail and got a normal by-the-hour job to just get by and settle down for a while), it was ridiculous. You can forget about any paid work, and the unpaid positions want 40 hours a week (which we all really know means 60, so waiting tables on the side becomes pretty tricky) while figuring out how to live in NY or London or similar – some of the most expensive cities in the world. They’re amazing gigs if you have the money to bankroll yourself, but forget it if you don’t have rich parents or some other source of serious cash. If you ask me, this is why most of our poitical types are such entitled idiots – they’re competing with a very small pool, almost all of whom have mad connections anyway.

              I’m moving to my area of expertise (the Middle East), where at least the cost of day-to-day living is low, and I see no reason to come back until my resume is irresistibly bangin’.

          • Anonymous

            I hold onto that same bitterness. My friends were exploring Europe and Asia while I worked every summer. I’m better off for it though. 

    • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

      And btw, when you’re hosting a show about accessories, Molly, you should really put on better shoes for the promo image!

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_GFMOZFM3WT3T56EZHVZFK7UXSI Ramon

      Nicolina Royale is a fabulous drag name. Nicotina Royale would be my variation on it.

    • Anonymous

      I don’t know, I may have Design Show Fatigue Syndrome. These seem like the usual suspects for this type of show. I may DVR it just because I don’t quite comprehend how this is going to work given the dopey challenges and unrealistic time constraints we’ve been subjected to with PR. These contestant talents don’t seem to lend themselves to an 8 hour challenge. Also, Molly Sims should never wear a tight pony tail.

      I’ve lost my will to watch.

    • Anonymous

      I imagine I will watch this. I used to do jewelry design and still love it as a hobby so I’m interested to see how they’ll handle the different skill sets. Wonder if they’ll treat it more like art where the challenge won’t require a hat maker to make jewelry or a jeweler to make shoes, but explore a concept with their medium of choice.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QFW22QV426LUOEPGASPZJWJMDE MishaFoomin

      What does a dirty ladder have to do with hats?
      What does a blender have to do with sculpting?
      No one smiling like they actually love what they do?
      Damn, these pictures are so hardcore and extreme… XTREEEEM! Accessories are so badass.

    • Anonymous

      I for one cannot wait. Love those accessories!

    • Anonymous

      I actually really, really want to see this one. I blame it on those goddamn ads that play every 5 minutes on lifetime- “The devil inside! The devil inside!” Get it out of my head!

      In any case, these designers seem to have the skill to back up what seems to be overly large egos. I’m excited.

    • Anonymous

      I too grew up in the post-industrial wasteland of east New Jersey so I’m cheering for Rich. Plus he’s giving me a Dexter vibe. My interest is piqued and I will give it a chance.

    • Grace Armstrong

      all of these people look like lunatics and that should make for a good time. plus they have hammers and shoes to throw at each other. 

    • http://jessieliz.wordpress.com/ Super Red

      Yeah.. I’ll be watching. Mostly I’m fascinated by what kind of challenge they can do that is remotely fair to all the designers. Maybe they all have the same materials? Still… I think it will lend itself to crack judging for no other reason than a lot of it will come down o taste. How can you rightfully compare a bracelet or a hat to a handcrafted shoe?

      So yes, I’ll be watchig. And if the challenge is good… I’ll keep watching. Don’t hate any of them based on the bios so far. Should be fun. :)

    • Anonymous

      So all the designers are already paid, successful designers with their own companies, shows in galleries, etc.  I’m not sure, then, how this is like my beloved Project Runway (when it was on Bravo).  You know that this is going to be all about personalities – and I guess I didn’t feel that way about the early seasons of PR.  I was just so amazed at some of the creativity and talent; and I suppose I naively felt that PR was really a way for them to “make it” in fashion design.  I guess that might explain why the show is such a disappointment to me now (and, I’m afraid this one will be as well).  Now it just seems like a really lame Apprentice – driven by the egos (and wallets) of the producers.  Ooooh – I AM a bitter pussycat!

      • Anonymous

        They’ve all had a  measure of success – but even a few celebrity clients & museum/gallery shows do not a self-sustaining revenue stream make.

        I know a couple of artists who could put together a similar sounding blurb (respectable gallery shows, maybe a museum show/purchase & a handful of celebrity clients), but who are working state jobs to pay the bills & have health insurance for the kids.  As one said: it’s easier than the arts & crafts show circuit, which is the only other way  to create a [fairly] dependable annual income stream so I can make a mortgage payment month after month.

    • Anonymous

      I just hope Bunim-Murray gives us a better peek inside the creative process than we’ve been getting on PR. At least that’s what I want to see, whether it’s jewelry, handbags, or shoes. But I’manot holding my breath…

    • Toto Maya

      I’m going to be watching this, if only to giggle at them acting tough.

    • Anonymous

      Shae Scary is more like it.

    • Anonymous

      I’m a little confused about who makes accessories and who makes power tools….

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1046681022 Paula Berman

      David Grieco’s “JUSTICE BODAN, international man of mystery, traveling the globe in search of… nothing!” is so hilariously pretentious that I’m not sure if I want to giggle or barf.  Is he for real?  I’m rooting for the milliner. You have to love a guy who made his bones designing hats for black women to wear to church on Sunday.  That’s the definition of fierce.

      • BuffaloBarbara

         Making up a character is an interesting approach.  That character is… I’m going with giggle rather than barf, but it’s a close one.

        And yay for church hats!  Those are awesome.

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1046681022 Paula Berman

          It’s a nauseated giggle for me, because Mr. Grieco obviously takes Justice Bodan! Zen World Traveler! very seriously.

    • Anonymous

      In my tradition of picking people from their picture-and-paragraph, I’ll take Adrian (he just seems cool), David (former football player), Nicolina (here aesthetic sounds like what I already like).

      FWIW, I like the way these intro pictures are styled MUCH better than the “I’m a sassy designer” stupid pictures for PR!

    • Wrenaria

      I’m incredibly confused by the blender. O_o

    • Anonymous

      I’m rooting for Adrian & his church hats. Wonder how many times people are going to ask what a church hat is…

      Is it just me, or is there some seriously funky photoshop going on in that last photo?

    • Anonymous

      MUCH better bio photos than PR usually has – do accessory designers have better instincts or does Project Accessories have better stylists?

      If I actually played SIMs I think I’d have to name an entire cast of characters after the design lines in these bios. Justice Bodan comes with his own back story, but I don’t think it’d be hard to create others. (Do NOT cosign a lease with Nicolina Royale. Just don’t.)

      Finally, I know it’s unkind but I just want to ask Mr. Sommerfeldt if his ailing granny has passed, or if she quavered from her hospital bed: “Oh no, Jimmy, go for those auditions! You’re guaranteed to make it to the end, they’ll be hoping you’ll get The Phone Call From Home, telling you that I’ve popped off. Though of course, honey, you’re so talented that you won’t need the drama to make it to the finale. And such a good boy, have I told you that today?”

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Clary-Lamberton/1172690700 Clary Lamberton

      I’m a little shocked at how badly some of these bios are written.  Seriously, in Jame’s the choemaker they used “enchantment”  twice in one sentence.  And in Diego’s: “handbag designer who started out in accounting in the financial field in Sao Paulo”, geez, we can’t say that in a more graceful way?  Obviously Lifetime does not run a good quality web site, but thios is just terrible.  

    • Anonymous

      Wow, that judging panel looks like the stand-ins for the PR people! From left: Michael, Heidi, Nina and Tim.

    • http://twitter.com/obscureobjects David Calder

      “Influenced by his multi-generational roots as a heavy-duty diesel
      mechanic in the post-industrial wasteland of east New Jersey for 15
      years, Rich Sandomeno’s aesthetic was formed early on by his love for
      machines and the decaying urban cityscape, as well as the obscure and
      organic.” Yes please.

      • Anonymous

        I know, right? I’m watching because I now have a crush on him.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_MBZQXGWCTBDTAZMEM4S2EJUNUQ Katie

      I’m not watching this, but it has nothing to do with Project Runway. The concept just doesn’t interest me and I have a hard time conceiving how it will work. It seems like comparing apples and oranges – how do you compare a necklace to a purse or a hat? I’ll keep an eye on TLo to see if it turns out more interesting than I imagine, but this just doesn’t seem to be my bag, really.

    • Anonymous

      Wow, all those designers look infinitely more legit and interesting than the last 2 seasons of Runway.  I’m guessing it’s because Bunim-Murray isn’t behind it….

    • Anonymous

      I would only watch for James Sommerfeldt, but honestly could care less.

    • Anonymous

      I’m looking forward to this, it looks like it won’t suffer from the “dwindling supply of talent” problem that PR has.  These guys must have written their own copy.  (Brevity, folks!)  My nominee for most unintentionally funny line:  Diego is inspired by interesting skins and animals, influenced by growing up in a country known for its huge variety of unusual wildlife.

    • Anonymous

      I cannot express how much I do not give a shit about this show. 

    • Anonymous

      Since I’m only hanging on to Project Runway out of a misplaced sense of nostalgia or sentimentality (much like the boyfriend you know you need to break up with but can’t quite bear to do so just yet), I have pretty much zero interest in a spinoff show on the same network (all the qualities of the bad boyfriend, without the good memories).

    • Anonymous

      So we’re just going to pretend that the two female judges aren’t made to look like slightly marked-down versions of Heidi and Nina?

    • Anonymous

      I endure the torture of watching PR (and now the spinoffs) shows solely to experience the joy of reading TLO’s recaps.   Without pain, there is no pleasure.    

    • MilaXX

      I’m going to watch and since it’s hard to see how the different styles will match I’m rooting for church hat guy and the home town Philly gal.

    • http://inkblotphotography.blogspot.com/ Cate

      I have a question: considering that a lot of the designers make different accessories (shoes, jewellery etc) how will they be judged? Would they have to style an outfit or be forced to make shoes when they only know how to make jewellery and vice versa?

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1294512334 Terri Griffith

      Diego Rocha handbag….$1,840.00. So affordable. LOL!

    • http://twitter.com/applecocola Stacy

      James Sommerfeldt looks like he could be Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s fashion designing cousin born on the wrong side of the sheets.

    • Anonymous

      Really? You think that people have enough emotional investment left in this season of PR to give a crap who wins? They only way they’ll get a shout out of me is if Josh wins. Which, now that I think about it, is probably what will happen.

      I’ll watch Accessory, because I”m an amateur jeweler and I want to see at least one episode.

    • Anonymous

      So, basically that Greico guy has created Mr. Peterson from Seinfeld?

      • Anonymous

        LOL  That was the first thing I thought of !

    • Anonymous

      I tried watching this…..I don’t know if I was so annoyed at the Lifetime/BM destruction of PR or what, but I found it boring. I took it off my recording schedule.