PR: What’s this show about, anyway?

Posted on October 19, 2011


Y’know, we joked about Laura’s inspiration of “circles” being kind of shallow and flat, but at least we could remember what her inspiration was. We had to go back and re-watch to see what Viktor’s was. In his case, it was the skyline of Manhattan from the viewpoint of Governor’s Island.
And in Viktor’s case, it worked out pretty well for him. We can understand the inspiration and the collection has a simple clarity to it that most of the others lacked.

For once, Michael said something in the judge’s chair that we supported and agreed with wholeheartedly, and it gets to a larger point about just what the hell this show is trying to do – aside from get ratings, that is.

Yes, this is a bit secretarial, and yes, it’s not “fashion forward” or “pushing the envelope.”  It is, like everything else in this collection, a put-together look made of chic, wearable pieces.

The kinds of clothes women want to have in their closet.

And he did manage to do something interesting with that skirt.


But to us, after 9 seasons, we have to ask: is the focus on “editorial” and “fashion forward” really serving the audience? Have ANY of the winners of the competition made their name as “fashion forward” designers? Most successful designers – Kors himself being foremost in our minds – are NOT fashion forward in any way. Neither is Marie Claire, possibly the most pedestrian of all the fashion magazines, with a focus on wearable, “real women” clothes far beyond such magazines as Vogue or Elle.

Isn’t it time for these judges to cut the shit? This is a great look and it would sell like crazy.


As is this one, although we’re not crazy about all the foofaraw on the front of that jacket. It’s a bit too overdesigned for its own good. In other words, it was Viktor’s attempt to satisfy the judges’ insatiable need for a “wow” factor and it doesn’t work.

No, this isn’t head-turning in any real way, but it’s urban and wearable with a low-level chicness to it. Like most of Viktor’s work, it demonstrates an understanding of what women want to wear, rendered with perfect tailoring and execution; two things that used to be met with hosannas from the judges before the focus on “story” and trends overwhelmed the judging process. For just a second there, Kors made that point. But then Nina started praising Josh’s ugly tank top as “editorial” and the point got lost.

We’ll admit that the judges were right to come down a little hard on this one.

This is still a design competition and as much as we’re frustrated by the judges’ insistence on arbitrary things like “fashion forward,” even we have to admit a basic LBD is not the way to go at this point.

Sure, it’s chic and well-made, but there needed to be something a little interesting to justify it as an entry.

He tried with that structured hip, but it only gave the dress an odd shape. And it gave the judges another opening to opine that “NO women would…blahblahblah.”

But like we said, it’s chic and well-made.

It’s indicative of this season that Viktor consistently gets over-criticized while obviously less talented designers with better “stories” get overpraised. He’s not the strongest designer the show’s ever had, but he’s consistent, impeccable, and has a real understanding of clothing. We’ll see how the judging shakes out for the finals, but for us, a lot is riding on how Viktor is treated and what the judges say. If “on trend” is heavily featured as a point then he’s in trouble. To which we say this: supposedly, Gretchen’s collection last year was on trend and that was a big reason given for her win. Guess what? It wasn’t that on trend. It’s time to start asking the question of why, after nine seasons, the winners of Project Runway (with the notable exception of Christian Siriano) don’t have post-show careers distinguishable from the designers who don’t win, or even from many of the designers who never made it into the finals at all. We’re not gonna lie: we hope Viktor wins it, because if he does, it’ll be because the judges recognize his professionalism and the potential for his work to sell well. No, he’s not “fashion forward,” but the tagline is “The Search for the Next Great Fashion Designer,” not “The Most Fashion Forward Designer.” And when you’ve got a Marie Claire editor, a Victoria’s Secret model, and a designer who made his name by churning out well made classics, all this talk of “fashion forward” comes off like a lot of bullshit.

[Photo Credit: Barbara Nitke/MyLifetime.com - Screencaps: tomandlorenzo.com]

    • http://twitter.com/jaythenerdkid Aaminah Khan

      Hear, hear.

      • Anonymous

        I second that.

    • http://profiles.google.com/rosatcollege Ros Clarke

      Agreed.  And though Christian is a notable exception, it was always pretty clear to me that Christian was going to make it, with or without PR.  What made him different was that he actually aspires to be The Next Great Fashion Designer.  So many of the designers, and that includes previous winners, are a million miles from that.  That’s fine – there are good careers to be had dressing rich middle-aged women, or designing clothes for QVC or department stores.  But I always wanted more from PR – I wanted them to be about finding something new and exciting to challenge the runways of New York, London and Milan.

      • Sobaika Mirza

        I think Christian is an exception in every which way. He had a strong reality TV personality (without becoming a villain), proved to be a very smart business man, and of course, supremely talented.

        • Anonymous

          Not to dismiss the efforts of the many others who’ve been on the show, he came into the competition with some perfect traits to make the most of his experience (beyond the aforementioned, vital, actually aspiration to be a “Great Fashion Designer”) He had a track record of working like a crazed energizer bunny (which a number of designers have had) and he was ready to devote his life to pursuit of his goals (which a number of designers have done), but nobody’s had all that plus the talent and the business sense (or willingness to listen to well-chosen advisors).

          • Anonymous

            He had some killer internships also. And I believe took full advantage of them in the best way possible. I still laugh when I see him doing the model sway in the workroom.  And he owes a debt to Chris Marsh.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            The willingness to listen to advisers was a big one — Tim credits that with being a lot of Christian’s success: he took EVERYTHING he could get out of the show, making the most of possible connections.  He also has no problem hearing “no”, so he asks for every opportunity. 

            He also wasn’t a snob about it;  he does a lot of down-market stuff to keep money coming in.  I think some of these designers feel like they shouldn’t have to lower themselves to that.

            • Anonymous

              He’s been very savvy and hardworking and it was fun to see Tom and Lorenzo give his latest show such a good and thoughtful review.  I like that CS does stuff like Payless too.  I can’t wear heels anymore unless they are espradilles which I then run into the ground and I miss being able to wear heels a lot and have nothing against Payless.  He’s been very smart and likable and I would love to support his efforts.  Am also looking forward to seeing Kara.  I so miss Daniel Vosovic.  Adored him.

            • Anonymous

              Christian really is a business wunderkind, and I applaud him for it. Better to be designing something and making money so you can design your high-end stuff than sitting crosslegged in a loft sewing gowns no one will ever see because you don’t have the funds to put together a show.

      • Anonymous

        When they called Chris March too “costumey,” that was the death knell of real creativity on this show. The last season to really award that what his season, with he and Siriano.

        • http://twitter.com/wednesdaydreams Natalie

          Season 4 has always been my favorite, because of Chris, Jillian, and of course Christian. I wished I heard more about Jillian! 

          • Anonymous

            And Rami!

            • Sobaika Mirza

              Rami is one of my favorites across the seasons. So glad he’ll be back for All Stars!

            • Anonymous

              Rami was-is, I hope, really talented and focused.  He was stern and not always pleasant but I love his work and liked how he conducted himself at panel.  He was articulate and proud and I loved that about him.  I too wonder what became of Gillian as someone posted earlier.  That was a good season. 

            • Anonymous

              And he looked great in all those tight t-shirts!

        • Anonymous

          I think Season Four was the strongest season, but creativity was also awarded in Season Five.  Leanne Marshall did a beautiful and thought-out collection.  She doesn’t have Christian’s pizazz personality, but she’s serious as a designer.

          I actually think Chloe Dao was the weakest winner creatively.  Kara Janx should have made it into the finals as she actually had the strongest collection, but she got bumped because, clearly, the producers wanted Santino in and thought that Daniel Vosovic would turn out a stronger collection.  

        • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

          I really love the work Chris March did with human hair. I thought those pieces were outstanding. And haven’t we seen human hair show up on the runway over the past few years (the real runway, not Project Runway)? He was ahead of the curve.

          He’s so talented and imaginative. Isn’t that what a great fashion designer should be? Plus, I just want to hug him every time I see him.

        • Anonymous

          Actually Leanne’s win was, as far as I’m concerned, the last victory for creative design. Some of her sculptural pieces were really quite beautiful wearable works of art.

    • http://www.gregmce.com Greg McE

      “No, he’s not “fashion forward,” but the tagline is “The Search for the Next Great Fashion Designer,” not “The Most Fashion Forward Designer.” And when you’ve got a Marie Claire editor, a Victoria’s Secret model, and a designer who made his name by churning out well made classics, all this talk of “fashion forward” comes off like a lot of bullshit.”

      Bam!
       
      You guys just knocked this one out of the park.

      • Anonymous

         But, you know?  I could live with that if the show was still about design and talent.  Now, I’m just patently aware all through the broadcast that they are attempting to manipulate and play me while hitting me over the head with endorsements.  I’m done.  I’ll see this season through, and truthfully, I’m glad I did.  It confirmed to me that I’m not interested anymore.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

          Like, a 1000 per cent.  It’s fine if they want to try to act non-commercial and fashion forward, but if they go that route they need to quit the hypocritical bullshit of pandering to the advertisers. 

        • Anonymous

          I know what you mean.  I can’t relax and enjoy the 5 minutes of fashion/design per 90 minute program because it’s all tainted with the heavy hand, and everything that happens- the challenge, a twist, a crazy accident, a surprise visitor- smacks me upside the head with the reminder that there’s no real drama as to the outcome, despite all they tried to create.  And considering how fashion forward they claim to me, bombarding me with the same products I can see in advertisements in TV Guide and Redbook does not really give me that “unique” quality they periodically seem to want. 

          • Anonymous

            Last week I was shopping in a Bed, Bath & Beyond, and what did my two eyes see but a display for L’Oreal’s bird-themed cosmetics collection? And, if you can buy it in BB&B for a discount, it isn’t exclusive, fashion forward or unique in any way.

        • Anonymous

          I think they are aware that they get the most buzz and attention when the judges say something to piss us off and make us talk.  They’re trying to milk that and may go (have gone?) too far and piss off the audience too much.

    • Sobaika Mirza

      You guys put into words everything I want to say. Once upon a time, I think the emphasis was a bit more fashion-oriented. Seasons ago, on Bravo, it was much more Elle than Marie Claire. But it hasn’t been for a long time. It’s time the judges recognized that and adjusted accordingly to move forward and make a better show. 

      There’s nothing wrong with that. It’s won’t be a downgrade, more of a refocusing. Marie Claire is the only magazine that I always end up reading cover to cover, and I subscribe to them all.

      • Anonymous

        Nina used to be the fashion editor of Elle when this show started, and she moved to Marie Clare around the time the show moved from Bravo to Lifetime-the winner has a fashion spread with their model in the respective magazine. Wonder if that’s also a deciding factor to it’s slow and painful demise?

    • https://profiles.google.com/104791269167429064986 Judy S

      From your lips to b&m’s ear, or whatever.
      Viktor & Bert are the only ones whose work I actually looked forward to seeing this season with confidence that it would be worth looking at–and Viktor more than Bert. I was not disappointed here.
       

      • Adella Thompson

        Agreed. I am so looking forward to their future collections. There are spaces in my closet reserved for both designer’s lines!

    • http://twitter.com/mrsjetplane mrsjetplane

      WORD!  This season is handcrafted by the producers, its becoming more and more obvious with every episode. 

    • http://twitter.com/thedogsmother thedogsmother

      Spot on.

    • Sobaika Mirza

      Also, I’m not sure if it’s Tom or Lorenzo who does the actual writing of these posts, but they’re always well-crafted, articulate, with just the right amount of bitchy. Bravo to you both!

      • http://joyouslifesf.wordpress.com Kiltdntiltd

        Right on, Sobaika!

        TLo, you guys are supremely talented in your own sphere.  You clearly know the industry and its players, love fashion something chronic, and manage to maintain a clear, concise and smartly wicked voice at all times in your posts.  Props and loves to you both!

      • Now I am The Bee

        Yes.

      • Anonymous

        Yes. Bravo T & Lo.

    • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

      I want Viktor to get the money. But you’re right, the title doesn’t mean a whole lot.

      Chin up, guy. No really, keep your chin up because I don’t want you to get impaled on your bowtie spikes.

      • Anonymous

        Ha! Thanks for my Wednesday smile!

    • Kim Sheehan

      Amen!  You hit on my frustration–what IS PR? It has clearly lost its way.

    • Anonymous

      Cheers

    • http://michjeff-quiltersparadise.blogspot.com/ Michelle Young

      Absolutely!

    • http://twitter.com/ILikeShiny Cindi Williams

      For all those reasons you stated, and more, I don’t blame you if you giving up blogging PR after this season. What a crock of shit.

      • http://twitter.com/pinup_ghoul Pinup Ghoul

        Sad but true, unfortunately. I don’t even like watching the show any more, but I look forward to TLo’s hilarious and insightful recaps, but their frustration is pretty clear this season, and in the end of last.

        I think that all of we diehard fans are just sad to see what used to be a totally awesome show just boiled down to its worst aspects for the sake of increased viewership. It’s ‘The Real World’ with sewing machines and more product placement, and we’re all upset, and worst of all, bored.

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          It’s NEW Real World, which is the appropriate insult.  The first couple years, The Real World was great and wasn’t so over-produced or self-aware like it is now.  Those casts were just totally genuine people reacting to what was around them.  Now it’s (just like almost all other reality TV) trying to force that drama and interest by pushing certain storylines ahead.

          • Anonymous

            The Real World is still on TV? WTF? 

            • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

              I know! I think this is season 742.

            • Anonymous

              lol…it’s like a bad penny

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

        I was reading down the comments, thinking, “Yeah!” and “Totally” and “That’s so true!” and came to a SCREECHING halt on this one.  As long as PR is on the air, we minions need TLo to blog about it.

    • Anonymous

      Bingo. [nothing more to add!]

    • Anonymous

      Amen, TLo. But I think the viewing public is resigned to Queen Anya being coronated and Viktor walking off empty handed.

      The pattern Viktor chose was interesting and a nice reference to the skyline. His “secretarial” skirt was wearable and heads above Kimberly’s bunched up fabric goiter. Yea, the jacket was a bit overdone, and that last silhouette was just fugly. Still I’m rooting for him, but I’m afraid it’s Mondo all over again.

      • Anonymous

        I still don’t think they are going to give it to a girl who learned to sew 20 minutes ago. Knowing how to sew clothes is much more than knowing how to put stitches into thread. It is understanding fabric, how things lie when connected, what can and cannot be done with material. It is an understanding that takes years to develop. If they give the crown to Anya, they are saying all that counts is a pretty fabric and an easy, flowy design. I can see Heidi doing that, but not Kors and Nina. Also, can you imagine who will try out in future seasons if they do this? Chaos!!!

        • Anonymous

          Also, can you imagine who will try out in future seasons if they do this? Chaos!!!

          I think they are already there.  When TLo posted the link to the application for Season 9, I took a look at it.  The thing went on for pages and there were at least as many questions about personality, interpersonal skills and personal history as there were about design experience and aesthetic.  If I were a young designer trying to establish a serious career in the industry, I would run the opposite direction as fast as possible, for fear that my credibility would be damaged by appearing more interested in getting famous than in showing off my good work.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EYYAY25W7VS5BYCOCTK62SSUBI tw125

          Anya’s designs, while not well sewn, are more interesting that most of what the other designers have put out.  For the final collection, she’s going to have more time to get the sewing right.  I don’t remember her collection, nor do I feel like looking for it, but I do remember that it was considered one of the better ones.  If Anya’s collection is well done, the fact that she’s not as good a sewer than some of the other contestants shouldn’t preclude her from winning.

        • Anonymous

          Yes– I totally agree with you– but don’t forget the producers have so much say now when determining the winner.  It’s a “brand” for them…a money maker.  It’s a money maker for Marie-Claire as well.  They chose Gretchen for controversy.  Now they’ll choose Anya because she has a sex tape, is a beauty queen, and has a “story”.  They can override those judges (who are all enraptured by Anya anyway).  She’s the fan favorite and they probably want that this season as opposed to last.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        I think Anya may turn out to be Emilio rather than Gretchen. 

        I wouldn’t be surprised to see her win it, but I wouldn’t be shocked to see Victor take it either.  Especially because they have been so quiet about Victor all season.  A lot of his good stuff has gotten a praise at a significantly lower level than other pieces, even when they loved it. 

        Maybe they edited it to show ALL the good comments about Anya and more of the negative ones about Victor to set up a “shocking” ending.  Certainly more interesting than giving the win to someone who’s gotten win after win all season and been praised to the heavens.

    • Anonymous

      PREACH.

    • Anonymous

      ” although we’re not crazy about all the foofaraw on the front of that jacket. ” – you want to know something?  I bought clothes in August and September for Fall and Winter and that foofaraw on the front was ALL OVER all the clothes I saw on major websites (Macy’s, etc.).  Viktor’s clothes could be in a clothing store tomorrow.  Period.  It isn’t the look I prefer, but that is what is available this season.  What the store buyers are buying.

      • Deana Grenberg

        that flappy bit in front was on every car-line mom’s oversized sweater two falls ago.

        • Anonymous

          unfortunately it is still there!

        • Anonymous

          not mine.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        Ugh, I know!  I hate all the flappy bits — I’m large-busted, and while I don’t object to it looking even bigger, I don’t want to inflate it at the price of everything else looking bigger too, and that’s what always happens!

        • Anonymous

          Took the words right out of my mouth, SS! ;-)

    • Anonymous

      Victor to me is the clear winner, although I’m sure it will be Anya.  At least Anya isn’t as dislikeable as the one who one last season.  What was her name?  The earthy girl with the horse face….

      • Sobaika Mirza

        Wretchen.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

        Ouch, wasn’t a fan, but horse face is HARSH…

        • Anonymous

          Sorry. If she wasn’t an awful person, probably wouldn’t have used that descriptive term. Could have been harsher…

      • http://twitter.com/ms_smartiepants Beth M.

        We don’t utter her name here…you’ll have to look it up elsewhere.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        You Know Who or She Who Shall Not Be Named will do…;)

        • Anonymous

          She was the fashion equivalent of Dolores Umbridge from the Harry Potter books.

          • http://twitter.com/Alloyjane Alloy Jane

            I dunno, I think she’s more of a Gilderoy Lockhart.  A total phoney.  Plus she seems the type to have many many pictures of herself on the wall for “affirmation.”  Ugh.

            Also, maybe I’m over-thinking it, but I find it ironic that once again, the tiny homosexual Mexican boy is going head-to-head with the teacher’s pet who JUST SO HAPPENS TO BE FEMALE AND BEAUTIFUL.  And this makes me think that they’d give the win to Viktor, to somehow undo the damage of Mondo losing last season.  It’d be nice to see him win, he’s the best of the lot.  But considering how gleeful Anya seems in that After the Runway show, I doubt it.  

            • Anonymous

              I know!  On the one hand it’s not really fair to compare Mondo and Viktor, but on the other it’s hard to miss some of the parallels. 

    • Anonymous

      Well honestly, it’s not even about couture, wearable or any other fashion anymore. It’s about the drama of the contestants and their blah lives and foibles. Meh. I don’t care and I’m really in a funk about this show anymore.

    • http://joyouslifesf.wordpress.com Kiltdntiltd

      I was a trifle confused about Viktor’s offering this past week.  It sure didn’t reference the city skyline or and dissonance between the green space of the island and the sharp angularity of the city.  Granted, his work was very well crafted, as always. I was confused about the black dress since it was such a dense black, and read so poorly on the runway I couldn’t even see what the judges were discussing about the shape and boning.  The jacket was a total meh for me.  Unlined gray pleather? really?

      • Anonymous

        Yeah, the lack of lining really killed it.  It was like he cut up an old couch to make a jacket.

        Although a “furniture store” unconventional materials challenge could be interesting, now that I think about it….

        • http://joyouslifesf.wordpress.com Kiltdntiltd

          A pant suit with the legs made out of stacked lampshades?   An outerwear jacket made from quilted pillow forms?  A dress made from table runners and napkins?  I love it.

          • Anonymous

            Well, the “raid your Atlas apartment” challenge a couple of seasons ago was similar. Remember the wackadoodle breadbasket hat Vincent “made”?

            • http://joyouslifesf.wordpress.com Kiltdntiltd

              How could I forget it? It was scorched on my retinas forever.  And the sad thing was, as an essential notion, making a hat out of the basket was rather clever.  It was his final vision that sucked loud enough to be heard in a galaxy far, far away.

            • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

              Just thinking about that hat makes me laugh. And Vincent was so proud of it. What a nut.

            • Anonymous

              OMG, yes! How could one forget little Vinny’s breadbasket hat?  My fondest memory from that challenge is still Mycheal Knights’s coffee filter dress!

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Too much actual fabric, I’m afraid.  It’d be way too easy for designers.

        • Anonymous

          Oooh, this is a great idea – and PR should be all over it with product placements galore – Pottery Barn, anyone?  Love to see this.  (that is, if they up the talent and cut the drama next season!).  

    • Anonymous

      Perhaps we expect too much? It’s a reality show competition with all that that implies, and it may have run its course. I will continue to watch regardless, although I can’t really explain why except that it is good therapy toward the end of the workweek. And I will watch Accessories and All Stars for the same reason, but I don’t really expect to see the next great anything.  

      • Anonymous

        Totally agree, and honestly?  I find it kind of refreshing to observe how winning a relatively high-profile contest does not necessarily lead to great success, while losing a contest does not mean you will never find success.  The PR designers are unknowns trying to make it in a highly competitive creative field, and in fields like that, there aren’t a lot of hard and fast rules about what will make you The Next Great ____ and what won’t.  “Making it” is a matter of luck, really.  Talent, personality, timing, the current zeitgeist, perseverance, impressing the right people…these all have a lot to do with it, but they’re never any guarantee.  So it doesn’t matter very much who wins PR.  *shrug*  I’m OK with that. 

    • Anonymous

      I’m going to watch the All-Stars show but, after that, I’m done.  The judges are full of cray-cray every season.  

      • Mary McClelland

        i know I am hoping with different, possibly more fresh judges and a far higher talent pool we’ll get to see some of the old PR that made us fall in love. I’m sort of hankering for All On The Line to return. I loved that show and thought it was a fantastic illustration of the fashion industry. 

        • Anonymous

          YES!  That is a brilliant show.

      • Anonymous

        And not even AMUSING cray-cray. Maybe BM should redo the judging to be more like The Gong Show.  I wonder if Jaye P. Morgan is available?

        • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

          Jaye P. Morgan!

          I suggested a few weeks ago that they should go The Gong Show route. Could it be any worse?

      • Anonymous

        And not even AMUSING cray-cray. Maybe BM should redo the judging to be more like The Gong Show.  I wonder if Jaye P. Morgan is available?

    • Anonymous

      The first outfit is somewhat editorial. Every other  month or so even Elle or Vogue will show suits/ skirt blouse combo’s suitable for work in an editorial. Plus let’s not kid ourselves here, unless you can afford to buy ad space in Vogue they aren’t going to feature your clothes in an editorial anyway. Maybe a blip on the trend page with a bunch of text and other pictures , but no editorial no way.
      I don’t like the blouse untucked with the 2nd look, other wise fine. But not his best work. 
      The little black dress, shoulda been the little orange dress and it would have been outstanding.
      VIVA Viktor!

      • http://profiles.google.com/gillianholroyd gillian holroyd

        “I wish Viks could find a way to eject some of the playfulness that he exhibits in his own wardrobe into his designs that he presents in this competition.”

        That’s an interesting point. His work on the show seems constrained; I wonder if he feels that way too.

      • http://twitter.com/mme_hardy MadameHardy

        “I wish Viks could find a way to eject some of the playfulness that he exhibits in his own wardrobe into his designs that he presents in this competition. ”   This in spades, clubs, diamonds, hearts, and notrump.   So many designers we’ve said “STOP DRESSING THE MODEL LIKE YOURSELF!”   Viktor is the one I really wish would dress the  models in his own style.

        I hated the hip on the black dress; it looked like bad fitting rather than a construction choice.  The black skirt, on the other hand, was adorable.

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          And how do you sit in that dress?  The boning there would not only be murderously uncomfortable, but it would look awful sitting as well.  A dress which requires killer heels should not also require one to remain standing. 

    • Anonymous

      I was disappointed with Viktor this week. The second look seemed too…dressed-down? for his aesthetic (REALLY not a fan of the jacket-front foofraw), and the third was a non-event. Take away the accessories and there really is just nothing there! Viktor’s definitely much stronger when he does separates – think the 70s cream pantsuit, that cute outfit he made for the architect lady…he knows how to put together a chic, well-made made outfit, but when he branches out into gowns and cocktail numbers he seems to struggle.

    • Patsye Peebles

      Absolutely on target.  I will be totally shocked if Viktor wins, despite his obvious talent.  The judges seem to be so blinded by Anya that they can’t see anyone else.  And for Josh to be in the finals is a total sellout.

    • Anonymous

      and the congregation says..Amen! Preach TLO!

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ZBFH32YG44LIIZYLSQPMBXMYCU Sarah

      I might have to go back and look at Victor’s collection, but if memory serves, he is also a very good styler-of-models. This is incredibly important in a runway show, so mayhap that will help him out? I hope so. I am, too, resigned to seeing Anya for the win, but I suspect that in this iteration of the show, it may not be the best thing to be the winner, in a sort of American Idol “If you win you’ll never be free of this label” kind of way. Nobody is like ‘Christian Siriano, PR WINNER!’ when they talk about him…he rose above it, but at least in his day there was some cache to the title. Not so much, anymore, unfortunately.

    • Anonymous

      Viktor’s clothes don’t “wow” me. But they’re nicely made and he’s consistent, organized, and efficient. He knows what he wants to convey and generally seems to make it happen. I don’t think this collection was fashion forward in any sense, but it’s commercial and I would wear all of it. I loved how he interpreted the Manhattan skyline and I loved the combination of grey and orange (which, interestingly, Kimberley also used). 

      When looking at the design submissions, the judges always ask, “Who is this girl and where is she going?” When you have the answer, you will produce a consistent product. As you so eloquently said, the judges and the producers are now at a place where they need to ask that question of their own show. 

    • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

      First, I would like to add something about Gretchen and her “on-trend”-ness from last season: I would like to give her credit, I have seen a TON of ugly shapeless sweaters this fall, so maybe she was onto something:)  Of course, the only way one should follow that trend is if one has a shoplifting problem or if one is trying to hide a pregnancy;  my guess is they’d be great for that kind of thing. 

      I agree completely with the critique of the basic concept in the judging: wearability is important in clothing.  That’s one thing I’ve always valued about MK on the panel.  He frequently comments on how wearable a garment is, rather than Nina who is concerned if it will work in the photoshoots that are her art projects. 

      In fact, I always think it’s odd when they criticize a look because “you could buy that in a department store.”  Um… isn’t that kinda the point?  Are there a lot of beginning designers who don’t want their clothes in Saks or Neiman Marcus? 

    • MilaXX

      I have to say compared to the talent bank on the show this year Viktor should be doing better than he is. I think if the buyer had been Macy’s or Banana Repbulic he would have and should have won that Piperlijne  challenge that Anya/Bert won. At this point I think Anya Viktor will be the final 2, but I’m not sure on who gets the win. Neither collection was all that to be honest.

      The other thing that bugs me is how the judges will talk about how these are clothes women will buy and wear. When Emilio lost they told him his collection was “just clothes” and they were looking for the wow factor. Personally I think had simply fallen out of love with Emilio. other than his Emilio Sosa monogram fabric, I loved and would have worn his clothing. I would even characterize his style as similar to Viktor’s.

      I guess the question is which do we get, on trend or what women would wear?

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_AIQJKUWFMABQ4O7A7J5TLMN6OU Ella B.

        Absolutely agree — I just watched the Season 7 runway shows again, and I liked all three collections.  I didn’t like Emilio as a person and was rooting for Seth Aaron, but Emilio’s collection was very nice, and wearable by the average woman.  So when Gretchen won for many of the reasons Emilio lost, or Mondo lost for being too much in the Seth Aaron vein, it was evident that series had gone upside down. 

        I’ve also wondered if BM wasn’t happy with the demographics of the Season 7 finalists — they were all in the 35+ age range, and the drama they produced was minimal in comparison to the last two seasons.    

        • MilaXX

          Agreed. No slight against Seth Aaron. He was a nice guy and I like his collection. It was bright and showy. I was genuinely happy for him when he won, but I also thought that part of Emilo’s lost was because the judges disliked his attitude.

          • Anonymous

            I liked much of Emilio’s final collection, but understood that Seth Aaron’s final collection had a drama and wow factor that appealed to the judges, so that is a season that I remember fondly.

        • Anonymous

          Yes, I also wondered about the demographics of the designers. I liked watching the Season 7 finalists because they were adults and acted like it. The group this time is much younger–with the exception of Kimberley (who looks ten years younger than she is)–and they acted young as well. 

    • Anonymous

      Is it “what every woman would want to wear,” which implies purchasers hoping to find it in the local boutique or department store, or “fashion forward,” which implies buyers hanging out at runway shows looking for ideas to modify down the road? The focus seems to change depending on the judges’ mood of the moment, and the same judges consistently contradict themselves.

    • Anonymous

      I agree on many levels. My only thought is this: if I understand correctly (a big if, considering the inconsistency of this show), Gretchen’s win was considered a vote for “wearable/RTW” over Mondo’s more bold, forward looks. So I can see the judges saying, “We gave you wearable last season and you hated it!”

      Nevertheless, if Viktor keeps churning out stuff like this, he’ll have a nice career. I love his models’ styling — they look so cool NYC professional. But I can’t stand his main model. She always looks pissed, not in a good way, and she’s a bit of a clomper, IMO. 

      • Anonymous

        And of course, what they miss is that Gretchen’s was NOT wearable. Seriously, who’d go out in that cotton underwear thing? Mondo’s was far more ready-to-wear, and his ability to sell online at his store shows that. Back to this season, I like Viktor’s clothes in a way that I can see an artistry, however subtle and would also see myself wearing them (if he created a plus size line at Macy’s).

        • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

          I totally agree about Gretchen’s clothes not being wearable. I love hippie inspired clothes, but hers were mostly just dowdy and unattractive. She usually looked good (except for the week she fired the make-up gun to “clown”), but I think, overall, her designs were drab and would make Bea Arthur come back to life just to tell her that her work sucks.

        • Anonymous

          Her clothes were not wearable to any woman who wears a bra.

    • Anonymous

      BRAVA darlings.  I was thinking the same thing myself today.  Why is it that no designers on this show have really hit it big aside from Siriano?  While Christian is arguably a very talented man, there have also been equally as talented designers, certainly in the earlier permutations of the show (Jay springs to mind as one of them).    I think where my frustrations lie with PR is that it seems that more and more the crap is kept in the show for reasons in Season 1 would have sent them packing.  Horrific sewing work is being praised when they would have been horrified before.  The worst thing you can be anymore is “commercial” on this show which given Kors’/Garcia’s/Klum’s wheelhouse is a joke.  There has only been a tiny handful of clothes this season that made me gasp out loud at how beautiful they were.  In the past we had some amazing clothes being show to us, this season has been a tragic disaster.  I feel that B/M have sent this show into the ground.  I miss it so.  I don’t even watch the show anymore, I ff to the very end when the clothes come out on the runway just to see the end.  I don’t care about these people and their inane interactions of bitchery.  I still tune in to see if any of them have made anything of worth, and they really don’t each and every week.  So depressing.  Farewell PR. 

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        Well, Jay had a much harder road than Christian because he didn’t have the start-up capital.  He turned down his prize because there was (in S1 only) a clause saying that PR would own a share of his brand if he took the money.

    • Mary McClelland

      Was Nina once the editor of Elle before Joe Zee took over? 

      • Anonymous

        I don’t think she was ever the big cheese, Editor in Chief. I think she held the title of Fashion Director, which is the same one she holds at Marie Claire.

        • http://joyouslifesf.wordpress.com Kiltdntiltd

          You got it in one, Anathema.  Nina has never held the main chair.
          Lets face it all three of the judges are really second stringers. Heidi was an underwear model, Michael has made a name by remaking what other people have made before, and Nina, who I have a lot of respect for, has never been placed in top spot.

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          I thought she was something like “Editor-at-Large” which is a generally meaningless term…

          • Anonymous

            I think that Editor at Large title was in the interim between Elle & Marie Claire, but I’m not sure. It could have been a parting gesture to help her save face, or she could have been consulting for them. After I left my position as a managing editor at a magazine, I was listed as a Contributing Editor for years. I wrote and edited for the magazine regularly, but I also functioned as a consultant.

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              I know it’s used as a term that can mean anything really:  you may be an important contributor and consultant who just doesn’t want the structure of a position within the company or you may do no real work whatsoever or anything in-between. 

              I remember that one simply because I really wondered where on the spectrum Nina fell, while other titles didn’t strike any chords with me.

    • scottyf

      Sewing Siren said…
      “I wish Viks could find a way to eject some of the playfulness that he exhibits in his own wardrobe into his designs that he presents in this competition.”

      See? That’s the thing about Viktor for me: that disconnect between his personal style, and his design sensibilities.

      I absolutely agree that his garments are–and always have been–leaps and bounds above anyone who is left, and that he should win. But there seems to be no playfulness or true passion in just about everything of his that we’ve seen. He seems to design from the head, and not from the heart. I’d know a Christian Siriano design anywhere–even at Payless! His style oozes out of everything he touches. Sometimes I think it’s overkill, but he has a very clear brand. Other than the impeccable craftsmanship, I couldn’t pick out a Viktor Luna design. He reminds me of the “good student” in High School, who’s real goal was to make the teacher like him, and not really to learn and develop his own knowledge base and sense of self. I just don’t know who he IS as a designer.

      On a totally different tangent: in his bio, Viktor was the one who said his favorite type of model had long blonde hair, and was light-skinned.

      Karma is a bitch, ain’t it?

      • Anonymous

        The quote about the blonde light skinned model was include in is pre show  bio/sound bite. Interestingly , in his Bio on the Lifetime site he lists his model muses as Heidi Klum (no surprise the little ass kisser) and Naomi  Campbell. I don’t know what that means, except that it rather contradicts the other statement.

      • Stefanos Mantyla

        Do those bios even mean anything? Anything at all? He was also the one with those tacky, ill-constructed pre-season garments, so how is it that now his output is anything but? Also, what happened to our Bryce with the feather-cape? What happened to the Bryce who wanted to design something for Lady Gaga “so over-designed it would be offensive”? His output on the show was what? Low-key and relatively tasteful?

        I understand that those pre-season bios are the flimsiest pieces of evidence, but THAT flimsy?

        Anyway, Viktor seems to be doing just fine with his model, regardless of his “favourite type of model”!

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        This is the man who wore those shiny gold shoes and said he wanted to dress Bjork. I love Viktor but am still waiting for that promise.

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        This is the man who wore those shiny gold shoes and said he wanted to dress Bjork. I love Viktor but am still waiting for that promise.

      • Anonymous

        To your point about Viktor the teacher-pleaser who lacks playfulness — despite my distaste for the over-emphasized “personal stories” this season, I did think it was kind of interesting when Viktor offhandedly mentioned on the runway that he originally hated design and wanted nothing to do with it, before pulling a 180 for some undisclosed reason.

        • http://iamthelizardqueen.wordpress.com Lizzie

          Yes!  He told that story about how his mom sewed samples and so he was bound and determined not to go into fashion, and I thought, why haven’t we heard more about this?  Maybe it doesn’t have the same tearjerker quality to it that, say, Kimberly and Ms. Clinique Counter’s stories have had, but it was still interesting!

          • Anonymous

            I know!  Especially since now he’s the work horse of the group.  Obviously a big change occurred.  If the home visit sheds any light on what happened, I will be pleasantly surprised.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        Well, I can understand a preference for certain coloring in a model, if that coloring works better with the palette you prefer.  I have a hell of time with a friend of mine because she canNOT wear WHITE.  White!  I love white, but she looks like a corpse in it, so I always have to tweak colors for her.  Though I question his suitability as a winner if he doesn’t understand public relations better than to say that!

    • Anonymous

      “Tlo said: Isn’t it time for these judges to cut the shit? This is a great look and it would sell like crazy.”

      Yep. I felt this way even the year Christian won. Yes, he’s the one with the biggest career, but that’s due more to his tv-ready personality than anything else. I thought Jillian Lewis should have actually won that season – that collection she presented was store-ready and would have sold out. Those were great separates and coats that any working woman would want in her closet.

      –GothamTomato

      http://www.blurb.com/my/book/detail/2561006

      • Anonymous

        I agree, Jillian’s clothes were unbelievable beautiful. So much talent that season!! Except I couldn’t stand One Note Rami. But Nina loved him, and sourpuss Posh Spice loved Siriano, so Jillian was overlooked. As was Chris March, who has a talent as big as his heart!!!

      • Anonymous

        Hey, GT: cool looking book project & for a good cause, it seems!  The EastEnders fans among us: click that link! 

        • Anonymous

          Thanks! 
          –GothamTomato

      • Anonymous

        Yep Yep Yep GT.

      • Anonymous

        But wasn’t the reason Emilio Sosa* lost ostensibly because his runway presentation was too store-ready and not theatrical enough?

        (*Yet another designer the judges thought could do no wrong.)

        • Anonymous

          Mila got the same criticism.  Tim said in his blog that she was actually the runner-up according to the judges, but the producers stepped in and decided it would be Emilio vs SethAaron.

          • Adella Thompson

            Incidentally I miss Tim’s blogs/vlogs! I am so sad that his role has been so marginalized recently. 

      • Anonymous

        Thanks for saying that.  I agree.  Not many people would concur and most can’t separate the personality from the talent.  No doubt Christian had/has talent, but his subsequent collections have shown me that he was so young that he really needed to find himself as a designer.  He struggled when his “tricks” (i.e. ruffles, over the top frippery) were tired.  Then he stripped it all down as a reaction to critics and had nothing.

        I’ve always thought Jillian has more of a pulse on what was cool and fashion forward.

        • Anonymous

          I thought Jillian’s final collection was the strongest in Season 4 – and in fact thought Christian’s was the weakest – but I do wonder if she would have made as much of winning it as Christian has. Christian is talented, but not the most talented designer to come out of PR; as importantly, or more importantly, though, he seems to have a combination of other personality factors which have served him well.

          I absolutely agree about Christian needing to find himself as a designer; I always felt that his work on the show, up to and including his final collection, and even after it, was more of an extremely well-made pastiche of high fashion, in particular à la Westwood and McQueen (where, unsurprisingly, he had interned), than it was a genuine personal reflection.

          • Anonymous

            Well Christian had the personality going for him– the *character*.  To many he is a “caricature” of a fashion designer, and that got him such notoriety.  The whole package is what made the Weinstein Company invest in him.  Would Jillian have had that?  Who knows.  She was more soft-spoken and less of a “celebrity” than Christian was.  It just slays me now, though, that he and his boyfriend get so pissed off when the media and critics make digs at him for being on a reality show.  I mean sure, it would piss anyone off, but seriously the guy would NOT be where he is without Project Runway.  They recently said that they have instructed their publicist to NOT take or address any questions that have to do with the show.

            • Anonymous

              Oh, I did not know about that last bit. Interesting! Yes, I think Jillian herself would be harder to package and sell as a commodity; I think she’s fantastic, but she was the wrong sort of person for Project Runway as a character. It’s hard to tell much more based upon what was shown, so I don’t really know how business savvy she is, but that would affect things, too.

              No contestant from PR will ever live down having been on a reality show and they would be better off not thinking they had to.

      • Adella Thompson

        Thank you! I have to say that I watched Season 4 long after it aired and after being very familiar with Christian’s post-PR work. I was far less impressed than I expected. He had the personality, but I thought Gillian’s was stronger and Chris certainly had more interesting ideas. 

    • Stefanos Mantyla

      Am I the only one who finds that last model really attractive? Too bad she got eliminated early because she was paired with the designer unlikely to go far, just because. I think she is causing me to like that LBD more than I should (meaning it was a good move on Viktor’s part, no?)!

      The more I look at this, the more I believe he should win (as probably everyone here does). He also puts in the effort to dress himself well for the runway presentations, which I appreciate, even if a bit, well, made-up (?).

    • Anonymous

      Viktor has made several pieces I would wear, including the “secretary” look featured here.  Anya has shown nothing I would wear except for the pieces last week that Bert made for her.  Josh is not worth mentioning and I don’t think they find Kimberly dramatic enough for the final competition.  So I like Viktor, but I’m confident Anya will win.  And if we all need a nice beach cover-up we will know who to go to.

    • Anonymous

      I liked that first skirt.  I was yelling at Laura ‘girl, that is how you reference a circle!’  It makes it a different silhouette, w/o padding the hips.  I think he deserves the win, but it’s going to Anya.  Although, I wonder if she sends down garments with no zippers after she’s had time to make things, will they hit her for that?  It’s one thing if you get one day to make a dress and maybe don’t do it in the interest of time, but it shouldn’t be acceptable if you get weeks and weeks to finish.

    • Anonymous

      I’ve thought the same thing along the lines of this statement: “…after nine seasons, the winners of Project Runway (with the notable
      exception of Christian Siriano) don’t have post-show careers
      distinguishable from the designers who don’t win, or even from many of
      the designers who never made it into the finals at all.” I think this is at the crux of the crappy talent level this year. There are probably many designers who look at PR and think, “Ugh, most of the designers don’t end up much further ahead than if they hadn’t done it, and it could be a knock on my credibility.”

      As for Victor’s mini collection the only missteps for me were the black dress. I really didn’t like the hip treatment. It isn’t dramatic enough make a statement. It is subtle enough to look misshapen. I liked the jacket, but would have liked it longer. Didn’t care all that much for the blouse under it. I liked the whole first look. I’ll even grant him the ass zipper. But just this once.

      I hoping Viktor wins it. This episode sets it up nicely. The judges didn’t want him to reign it in too much, so now he can come back and wow them.

      • Anonymous

        I would add that unlike a few seasons ago, aspiring designers may be afraid to quit their day job to appear on Project Runway for fear that there would be no job to come back to. And unless I’m mistaken, if you quit, in most cases you are not eligible for unemployment benefits. 

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          And there’s a big enough applicant pool that your employer isn’t likely to give you a leave of absence in return for mentioning them on your bio/the show.

          • Anonymous

            Good point. Also maybe a reason why we see more younger designers. They would be more likely to have entry-level jobs to begin with, and not as many economic commitments (house, family, etc.).

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              And it is EXPENSIVE to do PR — if I did it, I’d not only be losing my income for that time, but I’d still have to pay for child care, and rent, and food, and all the other things that people who have already started their adult lives have.  The only reason I’m even considering it is because my mom would come stay with the kids since she’s retired.

            • http://twitter.com/KathleenGillies Kathleen Gillies

              Shannon, I haven’t seen any of your work but I think the only way I’d ever watch this again is if I “knew” someone designing in it.

    • http://twitter.com/susanpcollier Susan Collier

      Word to your mother.

      I really like Viktor and his aesthetic. He’s been my favorite for a long time, and I am a bit astounded with the Bizarro World judging this season and praise heaped on other contestants who would have been axed, or at least in trouble, by the later challenges.

      And Viktor can make sleeves.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1006374212 Berna Starling

      I think, I love you. 

    • http://www.facebook.com/WendyLKaufman Wendy Kaufman

      Yep. Spot on.

    • BuffaloBarbara

      It was okay.  I was underwhelmed, and didn’t like the skirt detail, but whatevs.  Agreed that it’s commercial, and there’s nothing wrong with that.

      I guess I’m always underwhelmed at the “Look how inspiring New York is” challenges, because I think NYC is just overdone as an inspiration.  It was fine the first six hundred times.  But not being a particularly huge fan of New York, I tend to start yawning as soon as it comes up.  And they had so many different inspirations from art and being outdoors that picking the city skyline as the inspiration kind of irritated me (fairly good example of the mentality that inspired that old New York Magazine cover… except they knew they were joking) and set me up not to like the result.  Looking at it without thinking about the “storyline,” it’s all fine.  And it certainly looks urban, though I’m still not clear on why that’s a compliment.

    • http://pleasewelcomeyourjudges.com/ Brian @ PWYJudges

      Yes yes yes! Preach it, T Lo!!!

      To me, Viktor is the clear victor this season (ha ha..). He understands women, understands what they want to wear and understands how to sell it to them. He is like a good mix of Chloe Dao and Meana Irina. Unfortunately, we are in the age of the Gretchens and Anyas and Joshes getting praised. Hopefully the judges can turn that trend around and give it to Viktor.

    • Anonymous

      Preach.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_M2PXKBMV7NJBBEXEL2KHAO2UU4 Martha Stickle

      Granted that he’s not the strongest designer the show has ever had.  But the strongest designer this show (i.e. season) has had? By far.  In a better incarnation of PR, Viktor would have got the praise he deserves for turning out consistently excellent and, more to the point, coherent clothes that almost always meet the parameters of the challenge (which is really saying something, given how the goal posts are subject to change on any given challenge).  He plays it a little safe, to be sure, but there is no doubt in my mind that he is capable of stepping it up in a way that neither Anya nor Josh could begin to fathom.  Their basic skill set (Anya) and sensibility (Josh) just isn’t up to it.

      I love when TLo gets “editorial” like this–in the sense of producing a really trenchant op ed on the show.  This post zeroes in on precisely what is so jarring and off-putting about the show these days.

    • Anonymous

      YES. The over-criticizing of Viktor has been driving me insane ever since the real women challenge – my jaw hit the floor when the judges dinged Viktor for getting a more “fashion forward” couple to work with.  Nevermind that Viktor himself picked his client in the first place, and should have been applauded for his perceptiveness. 
       
      They seem to be giving him a mini-villain edit, trying to portray him as the soulless taskmaster compared to Anya’s “natural genius,” but in my view it’s undercut because he is so blatantly getting screwed by the judges’ grading on a curve.

      • Anonymous

        So true!  And remember–that was also the challenge in which the “judges” actually had the gall to criticize Viktor for making a beautiful clutch to go with his original and flawlessly made outfit.  For me, that was the moment when the other shoe dropped, and I was forced to leave my denial behind and realize that this show that I have loved and looked forward to so much since Season 1 was dead and beyond fixing.

        Imagine this happening in the Magical Elves seasons: They shamed him for picking a stylish couple, then shamed him for having extra time–as opposed to rushing around sewing his client into unfinished clothes at the last minute, then shamed him for making a really good-looking accessory.  Wow.

        • Anonymous

          The judging overall in that episode was shame-filled, towards not only the designers, but towards the clients. I still cringe when I think about it.

          • Anonymous

            Ugh, yes.  I felt so bad for Anthony Ryan’s couple.  All of them, really.

            • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

              I don’t think I can ever forgive the judges for that. It was crass, cruel, and uncalled for.

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              I always hate that part of the real woman challenge — why not just have the women come out if you need to see something else on the dress?  Let them spend the rest of the time backstage with no cameras on them, so if you must be rude, they don’t have to hear it or have their reactions broadcast. 

              The fashion industry already causes enough women to feel bad, they don’t need it on camera!

        • Anonymous

          All that plus he had to stand there and listen to the judges rave about Clinique Counter’s LBD.  Talk about salt in the wound.

        • Anonymous

          In the Magical Elves’ day the retail retail sponsors were Macy’s, Banana Republic, so Viktor wouldn’t have been penalized for making that clutch.  With Piperlame, God help the designer who doesn’t use enough of their shit as accessories.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

        I agree completely.  Obviously in the Bert/Viktor episode Viktor didn’t come off all that great (nor did Bert), but other than that I don’t get a lot of the negativity toward him.  I obviously wouldn’t describe his work as “whimsical,” but I think it is beautiful and interesting.

        • Anonymous

          I don’t get the negativity either.  He actually scored some points with me during the Bert episode for making a game attempt to salvage their partnership.  While his own behavior had been unquestionably assy, unlike Bert, Viktor at least appeared to realize the partnership was in a hole and tried to stop digging.  All of his other team challenges/partnerships have been drama-free and he’s excelled at the “dress real people” challenges.  He seems to have a strong sense of professionalism, for all his private hissing.

    • Anonymous

      Hear, hear and bravo

    • Cathy S

      Viktor for the win! I love that skirt and blouse. I like both black and white prints he picked. I could do without that jacket though. Viktor’s clothes almost always look fantastic. If he loses to Anya . . . well, I just hope someone sees how fantastic he is.

    • Anonymous

      I want Viktor to win so so so badly, but just cannot imaging anyone other than Anya winning with this season’s judging.

    • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

      Viktor has been my pick (by which I mean I hope he wins) to win for weeks now. He’s the only one left who is focused on what he wants to do, and who generally puts out well made, good looking clothes. No it’s not high fashion, but that’s just not happening this season anyway. If he were high fashion, he’d be getting even more criticism, for being too out there instead of being store-ready.

      I really like the first like. It’s sharp, and simple in the best way possible. I agree the the jacket in the second look is fussy and over designed, but it’s well made and doesn’t look ridiculous, unlike the jackets (or “jacket” in Josh’s case) in some of the other mini-collections. I’d like his LBD more if it had straps, but that’s just a personal preference.

      Viktor is, IMO, the only designer who’s currently at a level that can justify winning. Anya has a lot of potential and a very creative eye, but her aesthetic is too narrow and her technical skills are abysmal. Based only on what I’ve seen on the show, the other three couldn’t design their way out of a paper bag.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=691569288 Christopher Coyle

      I don’t want Viktor to win, if Mondo, who was a better designer, better dresser, and a better person, lost. Period.

      • Lauren Davies

        I don’t think that makes much sense.  Two wrongs don’t make a right: Viktor and Mondo obviously aren’t competing…and hoping for Viktor’s loss won’t make anyone feel more justified about Mondo’s loss.

    • Anonymous

      I’m done with getting all worked up over these judges’ arbitrary decisions. I used to get pissed off and declare that I’d never again watch this pile of crap, but I always come back. Yes, Viktor deserves the win, but who knows what will happen? They’re always full of shit anyway. All this talk about fashion-forward, but didn’t they give Chloe the win because her stuff was marketable and she had good business sense? Since when is this Project Businesswoman? Nothing at all against Chloe; I’m just saying. There’s no rhyme or reason to any of the judging.  

      I LOVE Viktor’s first look. I would buy that skirt in a heartbeat. The folded detail is great and flattering, without being your run-of-the-mill, overdone folded napkin skirt. It looks like it would be ridiculously flattering. I want that skirt RIGHT NOW. The belt too.

      • Anonymous

        To be fair, I think that if you listen to what the judges had to say when deciding between Daniel V. and Chloe, they were looking for some factor that would help them decide in what they considered to be a very difficult decision if based on design alone. I don’t think that Chloe won solely because she already had a successful business and knew how to work within the business, but that was one deciding factor–another being that Daniel V. was right out of fashion school and might not do well in the industry at that point in his career. Remember that Jay had just turned down the prize money and gone off on his own because he couldn’t–or didn’t want to–deal with some of the business realities. I’m sure they wanted to avoid that in Season 2.

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

          While Daniel V may have been more fashion-forward during the season, I don’t think he OR Chloe were all that fashion-forward during fashion week.

          Didn’t Jay turn down the money because he didn’t like some of the contractual provisions that were deleted for later winners?

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Yeah.  Essentially any line he started as the winner, PR would get a share of because they gave him a launching platform.  It was total bullshit that they could pull on young designers who didn’t know any better, and they had to take it out because Jay turned down the prize and made a stink.

        • Anonymous

          I didn’t say she won SOLEY because of it, but it was a reason that was given. I didn’t remember all those details you pointed out (it was a long time ago and I’m not getting any younger), but my point remains that the decisions these judges come to and their reasons for coming to said decisions are completely arbitrary. Always have been. Granted, fashion is subjective, but the judges are ridiculously inconsistent on this show.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1033387282 Beverly Bethard DeFabio

      AMEN !!!

    • Anonymous

      Sing it sistahs.

      I agree it’s time for those judges to get off their self-crafted pedestals; they’re wobbling pretty badly. 

    • http://twitter.com/MandySCG MandyJane

      I want Viktor to win, but I won’t be surprised if Anya does. I don’t think I could even muster up any outrage at this point, I think I spent all my outrage last season when Gretchen won.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1303837450 Lauren Dorsee Dillon

      I’ve really begun to despise this show. It’s like a boyfriend I’ve had forever who’s not the charming cad he once was. I really want to break up with him and move on with my life; but he’s a hard habit to break. Maybe if I stop putting out.

    • http://asskickingadviser.com/ Ass Kicking Adviser

      I really hope his collection, um, fulfills his potential. I sound like his Mommy but seriously, he is very talented and I won’t be cryin’ if he wins that is for sure. I think Anya has so much talent but she isn’t near ready to the be ‘next great fashion designer’ and Kimberly probably isn’t there yet either. I will not discuss Josh who clearly is only there to ‘wow’ us with his eyebrows. Viktor has been getting short schrift all season – I hope he knocks the final out of the park – literally and figuratively.  I am prejudiced towards the sewers. There. I’ve said it.

    • Anonymous

      “And when you’ve got a Marie Claire editor, a Victoria’s Secret model,
      and a designer who made his name by churning out well made classics,
      all this talk of “fashion forward” comes off like a lot of bullshit.”

      You, gentlemen, have hit the nail on the head.

      For me, it’s the orange belt that puts the first look over, without it, it’d not have much exceeded the second, at least in my estimation.

       

    • Anonymous

      Oh come on.  Viktor’s clothes are well made but ultimately very pedestrian. Maybe he deserves to win this season but I really don’t care enough to get worked up about it.  He can sew but has no imagination. Anya has imagination but can’t sew.  As long as they don’t give the win to Josh I’m fine with it.

      What this show has proven to me over the seasons is how very RARE that combination of deep fashion love, raw talent, knowledge of clothing construction and ruthless killer instinct really is.

      Christian is the only one who had all of those attributes and yes, he would have made it without the show. Irina is the only other contestant who’s come close.  As an aside I do think the judges score for killer instinct, they’re just not particularly overt about it.  But I think  it’s why they couldn’t get too enthused about the extremely talented Leanne or Chris March or Mondo, and why they wet their knickers over Christian and gave the win to Wretchen.  They know that without it, all the talent in the world won’t help.
       (And I think that’s why they’ll give the win to Anya, she has a single-minded ruthlessness about her that Viktor just doesn’t have.

      • http://profiles.google.com/trashilove { edi } ilovetrash

        lubilu:
        What this show has proven to me over the seasons is how very RARE that combination of deep fashion love, raw talent, knowledge of clothing construction and ruthless killer instinct really is. 

        you know, it’s really easy to find this:
        ruthless killer instinct

        it’s harder to find this:
        combination of deep fashion love, knowledge of clothing construction

        it’s much much harder to find this:
        raw talent {at least in impressive quality & quantity}

        if you have the third it usually comes w/ the second, although, as per viktor, you can find enormous heaps of the second w/in someone whose talent is in no way proportionate.

        but to find serious raw talent combined w/ a whole lotta killer instinct is almost impossible.
        i’m tired, i gotta go to sleep so i can work this evening, or i could write an entire treatise, or thereabouts, on why. but it’s almost absolute enough to be an axiom.

      • Anonymous

        lubilu said… Oh come on.  Viktor’s clothes are well made but ultimately very pedestrian. Maybe he deserves to win this season but I really don’t care enough to get worked up about it.  He can sew but has no imagination. Anya has imagination but can’t sew.  As long as they don’t give the win to Josh I’m fine with it. 
        Viktor has not been particularly imaginative in this competition , but his dream client is Bjork and he has made dresses out of butterfly wings so I wouldn’t say he has no imagination. Anya has done some salable pieces during the competition, in fact two were produced, but I can recall none that were what I would call imaginative.                                                                        
        lubilu.said…What this show has proven to me over the seasons is how very RARE that combination of deep fashion love, raw talent, knowledge of clothing construction and ruthless killer instinct really is. No. This is a TV show with a very in which a small group auditions and an even smaller number is cast, for very specific reasons (roles),  one of the least of which is their design skills. There are many people in the fashion industry and at school who have extraordinary talent. The reason you do not see innovative creative clothing in the market, is people will not buy it.

        • http://joyouslifesf.wordpress.com Kiltdntiltd

          The only thing I might contest here, Sewing, is that people would not buy innovative clothing.  Its far more likely, (in my opinion) that innovative clothing is more often difficult to construct because it requires a higher skill set, so no one will produce it in a factory setting. 

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Actually, she has a point — I just got done talking to a client who didn’t understand why I wouldn’t make 12 knock-offs of her favorite skirt because that one looks so good.  She wanted them down to the seaming and everything! 

            Now, I have no problem copying a favorite piece if it’s wearing out, or if you need a different size or something like that, but on this I said absolutely not, just because no one should be that boring.  We then had to have the same conversation about her favorite pants.  Every work shirt in her wardrobe was the same boring women’s blouse in different colors and prints — and not particularly exciting ones either! 

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Actually, she has a point — I just got done talking to a client who didn’t understand why I wouldn’t make 12 knock-offs of her favorite skirt because that one looks so good.  She wanted them down to the seaming and everything! 

            Now, I have no problem copying a favorite piece if it’s wearing out, or if you need a different size or something like that, but on this I said absolutely not, just because no one should be that boring.  We then had to have the same conversation about her favorite pants.  Every work shirt in her wardrobe was the same boring women’s blouse in different colors and prints — and not particularly exciting ones either! 

      • Anonymous

        “Anya has imagination but can’t sew.”

        Anya has imagination? Really? Most of her designs have looked exactly like Uli’s designs from Season 2. Except those that have looked like Bert’s. I haven’t seen anything particularly imaginative or original.

        • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

          Totally agree. Now, I’ve liked several things she’s made, because I’m a sucker for a flowy dress. But I haven’t seen anything particularly imaginative from her either. It think her lack of technical skills, plus the insanely short amount of time the designers are given to complete the challenges, stifled any imagination she might have. She has a good eye for… something, and could be creative. I’m inclined to think of her as artsy as opposed to artistic.

          And, man, I know Anya’s been called Uli-like/lite, but Uli really knows what she’s doing. I’d crawl over glass for one of her dresses.

          • Anonymous

            Word.  I think Anya has an eye for certain aspects of fashion, but the judges and producers just seem to be so enthralled by her storyline and personality to the point that they’ve lost their ability to be anything close to objective about her designs.

            • Anonymous

              It seems to me she’d be an excellent stylist.  While I find her designs to be nothing new, she does seem to get the makeup and hair right- although that’s another one of those points that I wonder how much say they really have in it- do you really think L’Oreal or whoever would let Joshua send a model down the runway looking garish in their makeup or with their hair product? 

              Maybe Rachael Zoe or whatever her name is looking for an intern, although I somehow suspect our golden girl doesn’t do intern

            • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

              She would make an excellent stylist. But I think she would willingly do an internship for someone like Rachel Zoe, then going “All About Eve” on her ass.

    • Anonymous

      Beyond turning out chic, wearable looks, I do think that Viktor has a good sense of the woman in the clothes. Not just that women would wear them and would want to wear them, but that it feels like his clothes “work” for them instead of trying to shoehorn them into whatever he sees in the abstract. Anya dresses herself but I’m not sure she could dress a woman who actually needed to wear a bra in public (even if we ignore her limited sewing skills and inability to figure out where to put things like zippers so that the models can get out of them). Josh doesn’t have any actual idea who his client is. (And if a woman had designed clothes like his so much of it would have been dismissed as “artsy-crafty-etsy” with an unnecessary vest over the top.) Bert could also see the woman in the clothes, but he had a hard time making it modern. Kimberly, as much as she’s the most likeable designer left, seems to be hit or miss. Her skirts seem both unflattering and difficult to walk in and sit down in.

      On so many challenges, Viktor’s clothes were head and shoulders above the rest. He’s not super inspiring, but he has range and skills and consistently turns out good chic modern work. He should have won.

      What’s become so tedious about the show is that I can mostly predict who wins and who goes home before the show even starts. I predict an Anya win for the whole thing. Kimberly gets cut before the final. Josh is third. And the judges fawn all over Anya for a collection that’s all maxi dresses that basically only Anya and models can wear (and for being such a modern edgy wow-factor only learned to sew four months ago girl). While they pan Viktor for being “too commercial” and lacking “wow-factor”.

      • Anonymous

        Totally.  I predict the same.  And the sad thing too is that clearly Anya has a ton of “fans” already because to many she is charming and beautiful.  The thing is, she’s not as talented and extremely limited as a designer.  But the producers just want to crown someone who’s going to be the most popular, not the best designer.  The show is that pathetic now.

        • BuffaloBarbara

           Yes, I can see from the comments here and on the PR blogs how “popular” an Anya win would be.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            But I guarantee you they aren’t reading all the blogs, and we were only a few challenges in when the winner was announced — so I don’t think fan opinion in ANY direction would change anything. 

    • http://twitter.com/bigknittrouble Big Knitting Trouble

      Amen, brothers, preach it.

    • Anonymous

      Bravo! (No irony intended.)

    • Judy_J

      I have to admit, Viktor’s designs are the ones I would wear.  I love that first look…the plaid shirt with the black skirt and orange belt.  I hope he wins, not only because he is talented and professional, but also because the other two in the finals have never really shown me anything that I would consider purchasing, much less wearing.  Viktor’s designs are the most wearable, and therefore have the most potential for selling well.  And after all, isn’t that what they are really after?

    • Anonymous

      For all the talk of taste levels, the judges rarely reward those with good taste. Nina and Michael used to be exciting judges to watch and a big  part of the appeal of the show and now they are both such complete sell outs that it is hard to watch. It is like when someone lies right to your face and you know it.  And its become boring, the judging used to be the best part and now half the time I  go to the bathroom or get another drink. There is no integrity left to this show. 

    • Anonymous

      I’m wondering if (make that ‘hoping that’) the editing is steering us to expect an Anya win and then– surprise!– Viktor pulls it out at the last minute.

      Naaahhhhhh.

      • Anonymous

        Oh please, please please let it happen.

      • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

        A girl can dream.

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        ONLY if there is a scandal. Which is entirely possible with Anya.

    • Cheri Lee

      Amen!

    • Anonymous

      Hear frickin’ hear TLo. Could not agree more. 

    • Anonymous

      Part of the problem with Victor is that for several challenges, he created the best look on the runway, yet the judges awarded either Josh or Anya the win.  When they do that (producer manipulation anyone?) it’s hard for the designers to know what the judges are looking for.  I think Viktor is the best one still there, but I have to admit that this last collection lacked oomph.

      • Anonymous

        Yeah, he said in the extended judging that he was trying to give them what they wanted (understated), so clearly he was confused as well.

    • Anonymous

      You guys raise a really interesting question. I’m thinking back to Season 1 and remembering all the comments about Kara Saun’s collection–“what young women today want to wear.”  Jay’s winning collection was also extremely wearable, but it had an edge to it. He didn’t create a line of clothes you could find in any department store. (Which might have been why he floundered after the show ended. Which still makes me sad.)

      So my sense of what PR is about has always been that the winning designer is someone who creates original but wearable designs. Not couture, but not run-of-the-mill either.

      And that’s a pretty fine line. The “judges” (I can’t refer to them without putting that word in quotation marks any more, since they don’t judge at all) seem to be confused about what they’re looking for, and they go back and forth–criticizing one designer for making something without the “wow” factor and praising another by saying, “I would totally wear that!”  Maybe it’s because they’ve done nine seasons and they’re jaded and bored. Maybe it’s because the BM producers are more or less telling them who to keep and who to send home.

      Whatever. It’s a mess.

      I have liked Viktor’s designs from the very first piece he did–the little white dress with black accents. I think he is clearly the most talented of this sorry crew. But does he have that extra something that previous winners–hell, previous LOSERS!–have had?  Don’t think so.

    • Anonymous

      When I first started watching PR I would get upset if I missed an episode or fell asleep.  Now…not so much.  This group of designers are nowhere near as talented as previous groups.  I long for the days of Santino doing Tim impressions – Andre with his bug eyes crying on the runway – Laura accusing Jeffrey of cheating – and precious Austin Scarlett winning the first challenge with a dress made of corn husks.  Perhaps next season it would be great to revisit the fan’s favorite challenges from seasons past.  Oh…and get some talented designers – not just drama queens.

      • Anonymous

        While I agree with you about those wonderful blasts from the past, I think a lot of it is the fact that the whole thing has felt so preordained.  There is a reason they label things with “spoiler alert” and that you don’t find out who the culprit is until the end of a book.  Once you know it was Professor Plum, there’s no real need to finish the book and it’s been pretty clear since week #1, or maybe even that audition episode, who had the candlestick in the library.  I almost accept the crappy designers in the premise of the script this season- had they had any more people with actual skill, they would have had to scrap the planned plot line and go into a script re-write, so the casting of lesser talents makes sense, although I’m not sure even the auf’d bunch was lesser enough to justify some of the victories.

        • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

          I love that you’ve compared PR to a murder mystery.

          • Anonymous

            Must be my subconscious acknolwedgment that, to paraphrase Cartman, they killed Project Runway. 

            • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

              Yep. Every week, without fail. See also: Rory on Doctor Who.

    • jeneria

      Jay and Chloe both went off-track so to speak, in their own ways, so it’s hard to judge them.  But other than Christian and those two, the track record is pretty poor for PR winners in general.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_OSYAJATXUH3QX7ZDDF52GXG4PU Janie R

        Jay turned down the prize money due to a ridiculous clause that first season. Whatever he has accomplished has been on his own. The clause (owning his designs in perpetuity) was removed after the first season. Jay is the reason I got hooked on PR in the first season. 

    • Anonymous

      Agreed! 

    • Anonymous

      Amen.

    • Anonymous

      Well, for what it’s worth, this from Tim Gunn’s FB page: 
      “Hi everyone! The home visits are this week. Don’t allow them to trigger any assumptions about who the winner may be. This is a season of surprises!”  I guess we’ll see whether Tim’s idea of a “surprise” matches ours. For me “surprise” would mean that Josh wins the big prize. No surprise if either Viktor or Anya wins. And I am assuming by how deeply bitter Kimberly appears in the After the Runway episodes (taped after Fashion Week), that she is unlikely to be the winner. 

      • Anonymous

        Anya was shown crying her face off in the preview, so I’m guessing there will be a “disastrous” home visit followed by a “miraculously” great showing at FW.  Basically a repeat of the $11 jumpsuit episode.

        • Anonymous

          yeah, he also said somewhere (I think it was an interview) that he went to one home visit and there was absolutely nothing to see. Not.one.thing. So Tim’s comment makes me think that if she has nothing in the home visits, she will win. Of course. Were we _really_ expecting otherwise?

      • Anonymous

        You know, this is what really makes me sad: I don’t even believe Tim any more. “A season of surprises?” First, that phrase was created by someone in the BM public relations office. And second, the only surprises this season have been how awful everything about the season has been.

        I remember that, at some point in a much earlier season, Tim revealed that he lived in a tiny little apartment and had for many years. So it must be wonderful for him to have money now, and I hope he’s moved to a bigger place. But it sure would be nice if he would reclaim his own integrity and tell BM where to shove their checks. I know it’s asking a lot. But I sure would love to be able to take him seriously again.

        • Anonymous

          That is one of the big problems with the show in a nutshell.  For Tim, Nina and Heidi, the show is now the foundation of their careers rather than an interesting sidelight.  Nina’s TV gig played a part in her landing her current position at Marie Clare after being forced out of Elle.  Tim’s celebrity has led to all kinds of commercial opportunities he never would have had.  Heidi’s probably looking toward a future where she will be asked less often to model for Victoria’s Secret.  Everyone other than Kors is probably more beholden to the show than they used to be …  (Of course, it’s great advertising for his clothing but I don’t know enough to know if it’s as personally important to Kors as the others.)

          • Anonymous

            According to Wikipedia (yeah yeah, I know!), Heidi officially split from Victoria’s Secret in October 2010.  But she’s the producer of PR, so she’s got a stake in keeping it going.  Now, the fact that it has totally gone off the rails is another story, but it probably still matters to her.

            • Anonymous

              Exactly — the show matters too much to her (and the others) so she doesn’t just give honest feedback anymore.  She is invested in advancing the production team’s narrative.

        • Anonymous

          I’ve been thinking that for a while, too.  I like to think Tim is genuine, but sometimes I think he, too, has turned into another puppet.  Money talks…

          But yeah, he’s got hutzpah and I prefer to think he’s gonna crack one day and tell B-M to fuck off.  Maybe he’s already tried to, and then Heidi just begs him to stay and they pay him more.  Or maybe when things were good, he signed a mega contract that’s kept him locked in.

          Whatever the case, I can’t help but think he’s mortified, and he literally just comes in and does his job and then goes to his apartment and self-medicates to not have to think about it.

          • Anonymous

            You know, the more I think about it, it seems like Tim has just checked out of the show.  And really, I can’t blame him at all.  What’s he supposed to do when he is expected to mentor a mediocre-at-best group that was chosen for drama?  He put up with BS for 9 seasons while out-and-out *making* the show.  If he is now keeping to himself and raking in the dough, good for him! 

            But dammit, we’d better get a really juicy tell-all book out of it once the show is cancelled!

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Actually, according to Tim, his contract is only for a season at a time. 

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Actually, according to Tim, his contract is only for a season at a time. 

        • http://twitter.com/KathleenGillies Kathleen Gillies

          I heard on NPR that Tim’s father was an FBI agent who worked for Hoover or something like that.  Maybe he has some plans we don’t know about as he must have had to learn to keep much under the radar.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Yes, in fact, his father was pretty high up, because he worked personally for Hoover.

            • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

              Oh my god, really? For some reason, I love knowing that.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

        That’s so true.  I wouldn’t be surprised by Viktor OR Anya winning.  Of course, that isn’t based upon any of their actual collections, because that doesn’t seem to be the deciding factor.

      • Anonymous

        I think Tim’s been living in the monkey house.

      • Anonymous

        I think Tim’s been living in the monkey house.

    • Laura Lee Washburn

      TLo, you’re getting so bitter!!

    • Anonymous

      Everything you said, Tom and Lorenzo.  I do like the first look very much … Love that blouse.  And the second is okay.  Don’t love the waterfall jacket but do like the print underneath.  I also like the third look and think that on a  young, slim around the hips girl it would look great.  He may not be the most exciting but he’s on the graph for sure:  design talent and sewing/tailoring skills.  I like the out of the box challenges and the attempts at pressure-cooker avant garde, but watch the show mainly to see who can crank out a goodlooking garment.  And I used to enjoy the judging sessions before it turned into Project Random.

      I’d love to see the two of you asked to guest judge. 

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

        OH MY GOSH, that would be SO awesome if they had TLo to guest judge.  Can’t imagine them picking TLo over the fashion icon that is Kim Kardashian, though.

        • Anonymous

          Not to talk about them like they are not in the room, but should be easy enough to get a campaign going to get them on the show as judges should the program survive this season.  Then again, I may be doing something horribly wrong in even suggesting any of this and don’t want to be banned.  Tom and Lorenzo have certainly earned the right as the blog has helped keep the show alive and vibrant.  And I want to see what they look like. 

          • Anonymous

            Let’s do it!  They’re the bloggers that put the show on the map.  Everyone of the designers tweets and retweets them.

            • Anonymous

              I don’t know how to achieve this but if it were up and running, I’d have everyone I know sign on.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

              I would start a Facebook page in support of it if I was on Facebook.  I know, I know, it’s ridiculous that I’m not on Facebook in this day and age. It’s my own personal protest.

            • Anonymous

              You’re not missing much of value there. ;-)

            • Adella Thompson

              Agreed and good for you! I’m in the slow and painful process of disentangling myself. FB is like some kind of particularly vicious weed or parasite: if you don’t keep an eye on it, it will choke out all other life and require a raze and burn to escape!

          • Anonymous

            I think TLo have said more than once that they have absolutely no interest in being judges on the show.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

              Now that you point that out, I seem to remember them saying something about it.  It would be SO great, though!

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              I think it was that they didn’t feel they could write well about the season if they met the designers in person. 

            • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

              Well, after this season, maybe they won’t want to blog it anymore anyway!! I wouldn’t blame them.

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              Shhh… don’t say that, they might hear you!  And then how would we make it through another season?

    • http://www.facebook.com/ehormell Eric Hormell

      Sorry, but I really hope this doesn’t become “The search for the next designer who can make clothes that look like the clothes you can already see at the mall.” I don’t think any of us wanted that when Jay won the first season, and I don’t want it now.

    • Anonymous

      Meant to add that it’s almost like the ghost of Bravo followed them on over to Lifetime — and by that I mean that the dreaded Housewives vibe has seemed to infect the show.  In the work room and at judging–too much emphasis on flare-ups & impossible tasks, and, at panel, weird and random pronouncements about the contestants’ intentions in the face of some really ugly looks.  See Josh and artillery and Nina and fun.

    • Anonymous

      Amen!  Viktor is the only designer remotely qualified to win at this point, but I wouldn’t be surprised if Miss Anya takes it.

      As for “fashion forward,” they threw that baby out with the bathwater when they anointed Gretchen the winner after Episode 1 last season.  Unless hemp-woven granny panties are all the rage next year, at which time she can be considered a visionary.

    • Chantelle James

      Agreed. Honestly, I’m done with this show. The Lifetime and Bunim/Murray changes and manipulations (not to mention the Kluminator’s influence) have taken a show about design and made it into just another Survivor-type reality show. It’s just not fun or good anymore.

      • Anonymous

        “The Kluminator!”  I’m saying it with a thick German accent.  Good one, Chantelle!

    • Anonymous

      the thing is, I *do* wear things with a structured hip. All the time, to an office. It *is* fashionable and interesting.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=521921974 Ellen Novak Tiene

      Finally, you’ve said what most of us have been thinking.  Not all fashion designers are successful at the high end, couture stuff.  Most are successful at wearable, every day clothing.  I’d love to see a season where all they design is clothes for the average woman – not the breast-less, size 2 woman – the size 14 and above woman who wants to look nice with a designer touch.  Forget the circus challenges, the pairs, the couture look that most of them don’t understand anyway.

      • Anonymous

        I would venture to say that more of the contestants understand what couture is than the producers. A couture dress cannot be slopped together in a 15 min sketch session and less than 2 days of off and on sewing with one speedy fit session.

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          A true couture dress can’t be produced by any of these people anyway!  Couture is custom-made exclusively for the client and generally includes difficult hand-sewing. 

          And haute couture cannot be produced by anyone who doesn’t have a full workshop employing at least 15 people full time in Paris AND shows each seasons to the Paris press.  It’s actually legally defined by the French government and those are SOME of the requirements before a house can claim to be haute couture. 

          Sorry, that drives me nuts every season!!! 

          • http://twitter.com/KathleenGillies Kathleen Gillies

            Well, couture in the US can be anything, usually indicates high end clothing.  In France it’s meaning is exactly as you have written!

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              I know, but I hate the way that the screw with it — couture requires such ridiculous skill that I don’t like the tendency (and it’s not just PR, the entire America media does it too) to water it down that way.  It’s incredibly difficult to do couture, and those who have the right to it shouldn’t have to share it.

              Though I do think that requiring your shop and line be done in Paris is a bit silly.

        • Anonymous

          Agreed– and whenever people think that the designers can do “couture” in this platform, they are delusional.  As viewers we all have to remember that these people are human, and have no help…and that they have to make entire outfits in basically 12 hours, on top of all the pressure and stress they endure.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            I wonder how much time they ACTUALLY get to make their garments.  When they say it’s a two day challenge, that’s two days total.  Which means all the time they’re spending in confessionals is shot.

            • Anonymous

              Yeah you have to consider break time/time to eat, and definitely confessional time, which I’ll bet is an hour each time they do it.

      • Logo Girl

        I actually did not realize that was the average American size – I thought it was more like 8 or 10. It becomes even more startling the divide between the industry standards and real women’s needs. I sometimes want to scream when I see tops built out of what seems to be a couple of hankies. 

    • Anonymous

      Based on your comments and the state of the current season I think Project Runway is done and should be taken off the air after the All-Stars season. It is too bad. It was a show that I loved to watch every year and see the cool designs but this year it has fallen down a well and Lassie can’t get to it. I doubt Viktor will win, although the one prize this season is that we know Josh did not win it.

    • Anonymous

      The guest judges haven’t been fashion forward either. If Tilda Swinton, Raf Simons, or Viktor & Rolf were guest judges, they would be in complete disagreement with Heidi, Nina and Michael.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

        I love Tilda for the goddess that she is, but frankly I don’t think I would want to wear anything she liked.  I could probably appreciate it for it’s artistic value, though.

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          Something she likes and something she’d wear are two different things, though.  She may go with the very unusual looks because it suits her, while still being able to find value in more traditional items.

    • Anonymous

      Viktor’s black gown episodes back was the ONLY garment to wow me this season.  And he lost that challenge bc of bullshit.  This show is over for me.  Mondo’s loss to boring granola Gretchen was the nail in the coffin.  This season is a definite post-mortem.

      Do I want Viktor to win? Absolutely.  Will he? Nope.

      • Anonymous

        I also loved that black gown.  For all the (reasonable) criticisms that Viktor doesn’t have a distinct signature, that dress is one of the few pieces all season that I can instantly call up from memory. 

        While a lot of Anya’s pieces made me go “ooh pretty!” at the time, I have to go back and look at pictures to remember exactly why I liked it.

    • Anonymous

      Viktor’s black gown episodes back was the ONLY garment to wow me this season.  And he lost that challenge bc of bullshit.  This show is over for me.  Mondo’s loss to boring granola Gretchen was the nail in the coffin.  This season is a definite post-mortem.

      Do I want Viktor to win? Absolutely.  Will he? Nope.

    • Joyce VG

      Victor will win!  I take back that Anya would win. Oh I don’t know anymore.  I just read TLo’s blog and enjoy the show that way.

    • Anonymous

      “It’s time to start asking the question of why, after nine seasons, the winners of Project Runway (with the notable exception of Christian Siriano) don’t have post-show careers distinguishable from the designers who don’t win, or even from many of the designers who never made it into the finals at all.”
      Do people who win these type of shows ever become remarkably successful?  All of Tyra’s picks for America’s Next Top Model have become…. models.  Not Top Models.  Models.  None of RuPaul’s Next Drag Superstars have really broken out of the drag world yet.  

      In order to become household names, it helps to get the audience more involved in the selection of the winners.  Perhaps if the top two or three final collections went up for sale, it would help select a designer that people would want to buy.  It certainly seemed as though Bert won out againsst Anya when their creations were put to the practical test (although we don’t know that both were available in the same quantity, and Anya’s cost $100 more).

      I like Victor as a designer and as a person.  He may whine and hiss about the other designers copying him, but he’s always calm and polite in front of the judges.  His clothes aren’t splashy, but they are beautiful.  Looking at the photos of this week’s designs, I thought the orange belt and clutch were nice callbacks to the orange sculpture that framed his view of the city.  I really love that black and white blouse, and the leather jacket.

      I don’t know why everyone this season seems to love bunching up the fabric on one side of the skirts.  But maybe you could use it as a pocket in an emergency….

      • BuffaloBarbara

        I really don’t like Viktor, which is probably why the season is problematic for me.  The hissing and whining is part of it, but the bigger part is that, while he’s busily slamming other people for seamstress skills, this is the same person who, when Bert pointed out that he meant “Elizabethan” rather than “Victorian,” didn’t slap his forehead and say, “Sorry, brain fart,” but instead acted like it was absurd to know fashion history.  Sorry–it’s important to know the history of  your own field.  He lost me on that episode, and has done nothing to change my mind.

        • Anonymous

          honest question (and one I’m wondering about for my own perspective) – do you think it’s more important to be a good designer or a more likeable designer?

          • BuffaloBarbara

            In terms of the win, a good designer–but no one this season really stands out for me as that.  A knowledgeable designer would also be good.  In terms of enjoying the show, I want someone I like to root for–that’s why it’s problematic.  He’s fair, which is about all I’m expecting this season, and certainly a good tailor, but I can’t muster much passion to root for him.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Honestly, I think likability becomes more important every day, because of the fact that EVERYTHING can now be analyzed to death on the internet.  People don’t like to buy things, even beautiful things, from people they hate.  That’s why my mother won’t see an Angelina Jolie movie in theaters even though she thinks she’s a wonderful actress, and why I won’t buy from Lagerfeld, no matter how many clothing sensibilities we may share.  There’s only so much bad you can know about a person before you start disliking the product too. 

        • Adella Thompson

          Awww, I think he’s kind of a goober, but in a cute-bratty-little-brother way. I want to smile and give him a noogie every time I see him. And frankly, he’s less obnoxious than Christian was during the show, although I also kind of think Christian’s adorable in a similar vein. 

      • Anonymous

        I agree.  As far as the hissing goes, I think Viktor’s bark is worse than his bite.  And his apparent “strategy” is almost shockingly quaint for a reality competition – pure hard work!

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

        I don’t think getting the audience involved would help the winner be more successful than the runners-up–just look at American Idol.  It is based entirely on the audience, and the runners-up are often a lot more successful than the winners.

      • http://twitter.com/yankeefoxtrot Alex McGeagh

        How does one “break out of the drag world”? Honest question, not trying to be snarky. 

        • http://xoxotara.wordpress.com Tara Melissa

          To jump in, I’d say it means basically that – to be relevant to pop culture outside of the drag world. All of the winners (and significant contestants) on RPDR have probably experienced an elevated profile, allowing them to record singles/make more appearances/charge higher booking fees/etc. But I wouldn’t say any of them are particularly well known to anybody who doesn’t watch the show and/or is an enthusiast of the drag scene. 
          Rupaul himself is significant because he was not only an extremely famous drag queen, but he was able to translate it into more mainstream exposure – perhaps most notably being the face of the Viva Glam campaign, the song Covergirl and his talk show on VH1, making him known to people who aren’t necessarily “into” drag. 

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EDI2DLE7DE3YPW2ONIHBWOVHMA ecallaw

            I can’t think of any drag queens that HAVE “broken out of the drag world” except RuPaul.  Are there any others?

            • http://xoxotara.wordpress.com Tara Melissa

              None are coming to mind for me except for maybe Divine. 

          • http://twitter.com/yankeefoxtrot Alex McGeagh

            I think RuPaul, bless him, is the exception, rather than the rule. Can anyone name another drag queen besides him? I love the show, and I love drag queens, but I don’t think it results in very much more than more bookings for their (comparatively) small market…

            • http://xoxotara.wordpress.com Tara Melissa

              I can’t think of any, either. Becoming the next Rupaul is my interpretation of “breaking out”, but I don’t think that is a feat that many will be able to achieve. 

            • Anonymous

              That would be my interpretation as well.  Or Divine.  Someone that the general public would recognize and appreciate.  

              I agree that’s it’s a difficult feat, but that seems to be what RuPaul is looking for, and so far, it hasn’t happened.  Although, I think Raja has the goods to become a cause celebre, and Manila could attract mainsteam attention..  So far, though, it seems like Carmen Carrera is making the most impact.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        Well, there is an explanation for the difference between shows like those you list and American Idol, for instance.  The public doesn’t employ models, and for both drag and design, it takes quite awhile to get things set up after the show run — a single can hit the radio in a matter of days.

    • kim i

      gretchen who?  as far as i’m concerned, mondo won that season, and, as far as i’m concerned, viktor is this year’s winner.  next!

      • Anonymous

        me too

    • BuffaloBarbara

      I wonder if they could serve both their fashion purpose and the producers’ purpose by including the contestants’ plans for their lines as part of the “storyline” more, doing some prep for the actual business part of it.  Maybe work in some challenge that would include setting up a collaboration, either with a real company of the contestants’ choice, or one of a handful of sponsors.  I know, we were bored with the fashion in things like Banana Republic challenge or Macy’s challenge, but that’s more likely where they’re going to make money.  Instead of what they usually do, which is, “Design something for our current line,” they could have a challenge to design your own “So-and-so for Target” line, keeping in mind the customer’s budget, the manufacturing concerns, etc, while making it recognizably “you” for your PR fans, who are, after all, shopping for it because they liked you on PR.  That would prepare them a little, I think, for post-PR life.  (And hey, how about that as part of the prize–your own affordable clothing line to be produced for such-and-so, maybe with the season’s pieces, while you’re getting  your next collection ready.  Income, plus keeping the name out there.)

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        PR’d have to relinquish the rights to the line, or the designers wouldn’t get any money from it.  Right now they own everything that’s made on the show.  The other big problem is that it would have to be a final collection because otherwise they wouldn’t have time, and that leads to a lot of boring runway shows.

        Personally, I’m still hoping for a Seth Aaron line for Target, like he said he wanted:)

        • Anonymous

          Not if Target handles it the way they did the Missoni line. That was a fiasco.

          • Anonymous

            yup. Remember that idiot selling the shoes on ebay for $30,000 a couple of weeks ago? My Target still has several pairs, plus a bunch of tops.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            No, I was thinking more like when Mizrahi used to design for them, where it was a constant line rather than the guest designers. 

            And I just bought one of the sweaters last Friday from Missoni — after they were sold out so fast in some locations.

            • Anonymous

              Yes, a regular gig would be great! Vera Wang has some nice things at Kohls, too. :-)

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              And he’s not doing anything else!  It’s not like he’s been setting the world on fire with his work since the show. 

              I think his stuff could be scaled down quite nicely — he seems like he could work with lower price points without too many problems.  Plus it would fit in so nicely with what Target already does, and with where Target wants to go with the brand. 

              Someone should call him or he should call them…

    • http://profiles.google.com/valencia.lucia87 Lucía Valencia

      You’re disappointed tone with the show has gradually increased with every post, a true reflection of all our feelings towards it. You always say it best, that’s why a lot of us don’t even watch the show, just read your recaps. Kudos to you.

    • Anonymous

      I’ve never understood what the judges mean by “fashion forward”. It always seems to really mean trendy. (I refuse to say “on-trend”). When they say a color choice isn’t fashion forward, what the hell does that mean? There aren’t new colors to create at this point, people. What these judges seem to mean is “it isn’t a color we’re currently showing everywhere”.  It seems like the contestants have to walk a very fine line to be fashion forward – they have to make something that looks like what all the designers are making right now but not too much like what all the designers are making right now.

    • Anonymous

      I think I may give up on PR after All-Stars.  I have always enjoyed it, but the last 2 seasons have been too frustrating.  The designers get their assignments and it seems like the judges go off a completely different set of rules. The powers that be need to decide whether they want a “fashion forward” focus or a commercial appeal.  I loved Joe Zee’s show for that reason.  He was ultimately finding the right commercial niche for the designers he worked with because isn’t that the goal??  Sell your stuff?  BTW, is Joe’s show coming back for an other season?

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        I think I heard All on the Line will be back.  I’m still mad I could never get the iTunes pass for it to work — it just wouldn’t go through for some reason.

    • Anonymous

      I would wear any of those pieces and I love the first outfit. I would totally rock that for a presentation and I really hope it gets made.

    • Anonymous

      I’m only watching to read here and comment. This show is completely off the rails. I guess Kors and Garcia love the money enough they don’t care they’re making complete asses of themselves.

    • Anonymous

      You guys are correct on just about everything (although, I hate these forced inspiration crap — “Be inspired in 46.5 minutes at a strange location!” Good grief.)

      I have to say, that exposed metallic zipper is NOT what this woman would have worn when I was a secretary. It is uncomfortable to sit on and would likely snag my tights or hose that I wear because it gets cold.

      • Anonymous

        Forget about secretaries — I don’t understand how anyone (other than a rockstar trying to draw attention to his penis) would want an exposed zipper.  To me, it just looks like the manufacturer didn’t want to pay for the extra time it takes to sew a proper zipper flap.  And makes me wonder why no one has yet invented a better closure.  

        • Anonymous

          There is a better closure, it’s called a hidden zipper, and it doesn’t go all the way down, but only 7-9″ from the waist, or can be installed at the side seam (now that’s really old fashioned, and rarely seen anymore) which works just as well. :)

        • Anonymous

          Isn’t that what Velcro is?  Poor Velcro, as unloved as elastic in the fashion world, worthy only of cheap tennis shoes and diapers.  

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            I love Velcro, but it doesn’t generally work all that well because it tends to pucker — though I’d put Velcro in before I did an exposed zipper that wasn’t a design element!

      • Anonymous

        Not to mention the railroad on your @$$.

    • Anonymous

      Viktor has been my favorite since the beginning, and I have a pit in my stomach knowing that the judges are going to reward someone else the victory (and all the prizes) because of their “story.”  I think a child of immigrants who learned to sew because his mother helped make ends meet as a sample make is a great story and Viktor should win. This was a good collection and it was his vision. He didn’t even allow Olivier to impose his thoughts. He simply said “thank you for your concern (now go get sewing)” and kept his design. Unlike the other two, who were so influenced by the aesthetic of their helpers that their work was not really individual.   Kimberly gets a pass.

      • Anonymous

        I can’t shake the cynical suspicion that they have de-emphasized Viktor’s backstory because somebody behind the scenes is afraid of Mondogate 2.0 (even though I don’t really think the two can be compared).  Regardless, I do agree that it casts his insane work ethic and perfectionism in a really interesting light.

        And yes, his very no-nonsense response to Olivier cracked me up.

    • Anonymous

      I disagree.

      I don’t want to see a show about who can design wearable clothes that real people might want. There are a million magazines and stores that are already showing me those.

      I want a show about style and fashion and art. I want to see how people can construct things that aren’t “real” clothes and still make them look interesting and make me wish that real people did dress like that. I want a show that demonstrates the thinking behind fashion, behind what sort of fabrics, cuts, and structures make what sort of statements. No one in day-to-day life is ever going to walk around in a women’s wrestling outfit or a skating costume, but it was fascinating to see how those were put together, and how different choices gave radically different effects. Those sort of challenges demonstrate just how much devil is in the details.

      Similarly, I love the nontraditional materials challenges, because they boil down to the essentials of design. By removing the quality of the fabric, by demonstrating how other materials can be manipulated, those challenges show how important structure is. They force the designers to show their design skills, not their skills for picking pretty fabrics of a texture they’re used to working with.

      PR at its best makes me see clothes and styling in a whole new way. PR this season has brought very little new perspective to my eyes.

      • BuffaloBarbara

         Agreed–there’s a lot that’s business-based in the fashion world, and I also find that interesting, but things like the nontraditional challenge are what I watch this for.  I want to see what they can do with these Odyssey of the Mind style challenges to their creativity (in fact, I swear I watch it mostly as an OM alum, because the first time I heard “Make a car out of a dress,” all I could think about was, “What a great OM problem”).

        I think the show needs a mix, and it will lose its reputation if its winners don’t go on and become “the next great fashion designer,” which means making names for themselves and making sales (Christian Siriano is very good at this, and made the very salient point that if they don’t make money with the Payless line, there is no cash for the couture).  But the challenges?  Yes.  OM-ify it.

      • Anonymous

        Is it possible for me to agree with both you and with TLo? Probably we all, including Tom and Lorenzo originally, years ago, began with the anticipation and high hopes that the show would indeed give us all that you have stated. Instead, over the years, it has become as T&L have written.

        This year is egregious, as much as many of us gnashed our teeth and wailed about what happened last year, the casting of this year’s show has brought us to this point, one designer who can design and construct well but who isn’t fashion forward, one designer who overdesigns and brings the extreme drama, one designer who quietly sneaked into the top four but who brings nothing new to the table, and the final designer who will probably take the prize who can put colors and prints together nicely but has minimal sewing skills.

        Two beautiful women, one drama vortex, one serious designer, mildly talented. No one, NO ONE, who actually ought to have been cast, if the producers were following your guidelines; which have summed up as well as anyone has what the posters and creators of this blog were hoping would be the show. I’ve always wanted what you wanted too. If it had happened the way you propose, it might have turned around reality television.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        But if you want good designers, it can’t be just about that — because serious designers know that those fantasy pieces we love to watch don’t make money.  If you look at earlier season, there weren’t any top names, but there were a lot of people who were running their own niche line already.  Those people aren’t going to look at a show that won’t help them make money down the road, because they can’t afford to.

        • Anonymous

          That’s a very good point. But whether the show is about spectacular design pieces or boring ready-to-wear, the field is still highly competitive. So following your logic, the show has a shelf-life of “when designers figure out this won’t make them household names and red-carpet regulars.”

          Which might be…now.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            The smart ones — the ones who USED to go far on the show — I think knew that going in.  But I think they need to know that they can show some ready to wear skills to help them line up buyer meetings.  Just doing the art side may be really great for us, but if that’s all a buyer knows of them, they aren’t likely to want to see more, because no matter how beautiful, it just doesn’t sell much. 

            If, however, they have the chance to show RTW on the show, as well as a couple shots at more innovative stuff, and they make a good showing for themselves, they can make the pitch to buyers that “I have a following already, people know who I am, and they know what I can do.”  Which is accurate.  If I saw Victor was going to be doing a line for Nordstrom’s, absolutely I’d go take a look — because I’ve seen his RTW and it’s good.  Not earth-shattering, but good. 

        • http://twitter.com/KathleenGillies Kathleen Gillies

          Agreed, there is also a big opportunity cost in which taping the show takes a chunk of time in addition to all the promo events prior to and afterwards.  Add to that the fact the production company owns your work.

    • Anonymous

      Hey people, we’re in for another Project Runway First..”For the first time in Project Runway history, a designer who cannot sew wins the whole shebang!”  I so hope Lifetime does not miss out on this magical marketing moment.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1046681022 Paula Berman

      I totally agree, TLo, and here’s the logical extension of your conclusion: being fashion forward does not work if your construction is not there.  I wish Project Runway would go back to valuing construction!  The fact that Anya wasn’t even in contention for the auf when the ass on her pants were split open and the collar was obviously just basted on for the Sheepdogs challenge is indicative of why the show is no longer as quality as it was. It’s become a cult of personality, all about drama and wacky designs, not about the real work of the fashion industry.  Even the most avante garde lines are made impeccably.  It matters.

      • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

        That mess Anya sent onto the runway for the Sheepdogs challenge is, to my mind, as  bad as Santino’s disastrous jumpsuit for Kara.

    • Anonymous

      Ooh, T-Lo!  I do so love it when you get irritated & tell it like it is!

    • Anonymous

      I have always felt that Victors issue this season, contrary to not having his own point of view, was the he was “Too Aware”. He knew where the show was going and what the judges were looking for ….and tried too hard to straddle the line between RTW and trying to inject some fashion forward elements into his designs. In the process he lost some of who he is. He may have done it had the judges not been all over the place this year or may have risen to the challenge in past years with with stiffer competition. I had high hopes that he would have pulled out all of the stops on the runway and proved that he could blow everyone away in an F everyone moment but I just didn’t see it. This newbie will be looking forward to the close ups and TLo’s take.

    • http://profiles.google.com/ballinger.jl Jessica Ballinger

      PREACH.

    • Anonymous

      What is this show about? Nothing. Absolutely nothing.

    • Anonymous

      Again I agree with just about everything you’ve said.  No, Gretchen’s collection may not have been the most on trend, but I know two things: 1. for most of this year, every magazine I opened had a story in it that made me think, “that is SO Gretchen”.  So to me that is on-trend (as much as I dislike the whole southwest-boho-90’s movement); 2. Gretchen has done a helluva lot more with her winnings than some winners, like SethAaron (has anyone been keeping up with him? I have, and it’s pathetic).  Did he drink his money away?  I mean really.  He only recently updated his website to look a skosh more professional that the rinky-dink site he had before, but guess what?  It’s predominantly pictures of HIM, and barely any images of clothes.  It’s embarrassing.  He certainly went the way of the “celebrity” and not the “fashion designer”.  His subsequent collections have been mediocre at best, and “collaborations” with eco-companies, which may be smart from a funding point of view, but let’s face it, it doesn’t get you orders.  He’s still selling to the same little rinky-dink store in Southwest Portland he was selling to before he was on the show.  And only one season after he was given the win, his clothes felt tired, as Nina said during Mondo’s final deliberation (when she compared the two of them).  

      It’s sad to me that hardly any winners have gone on to be successful fashion designers.  I don’t, however, think anyone expects a winner (or any designer for that matter) from Project Runway to go on to become a designer who rivals Michael Kors, Alexander Wang, etc…and even Christian struggles with the “stigma” of being on a reality show from all the reviews he gets.  Let’s not forget, he also had a huge advantage by being backed right out of the gate by Weinstein for several years.  It’s almost like being on the show is a double-edged sword: you get great exposure, but to whom?  Do the real people who matter (buyers, industry insiders) really care?  In fact, is it a detriment?  

      Project Runway is becoming a joke.  And the more they focus on personalities and drama and less on talent and design and end-product, the less likely these designers are to succeed and be taken seriously once they are off the show and trying to make it.  With regards to “editorial/fashion forward” vs. “real clothing”, there is a fine line between good “editorial” and costumey.  Probably what makes better TV is the showier stuff.  But how can a designer be taken seriously then?  The ones who have been more successful (Irina, Leanne, Christian, Daniel) have had the right balance of having a unique point of view yet being wearable and relate-able.  But Bunim-Murray and Klum had better think hard about the branding and reputation they are creating now with the show.

      All that said, I, too, believe Viktor should win this thing because he’s the one who’s going to take the ball and run with it.  The other two are personalities, “parodies” of fashion designers, as they love to create on Project Runway, and simply not as strong or tasteful designers who fit into where fashion is today.  He seems the most professional and evolved of the last standing.  (Oops, I said “two” because we all know Miss Kimberly sadly ain’t gonna cut it…and Josh and Anya are the fan favorites anyway).

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        I think winners have to be willing to ignore that stigma.  I think that’s part of Christian’s success — the catty comments and criticisms don’t phase him, particularly.  You have to just keep plugging away and assume that the “reality show winner flash in the pan” will go away as you continue to produce great work.  And you have to be fine with hearing the word “no” on a near constant basis until you get a “yes”.

    • Anonymous

      Very much in point.  My prediction is that Anya is going to win, Viktor will get robbed and come in second, and third will probably be Miss Clinique counter.  Please, someone move this show back to Bravo.  Pronto.

    • Anonymous

      Sing it TLo!
       I liked this collection. It captured the inspiration without being literal. It was simple, chic, beautifully made and very wearable. Lots of good design. This collection was under praised and I can appreciate Viktor’s frustration. It is ours. 

    • http://twitter.com/margot907 Margot Wiegele

      I could not understand how with straight faces those judges criticized Kimberly for using orange & gray only to turn and praise Victor for using gray with orange in the same freaking episode.  The same episode!  I’m rooting for Victor, too, but it was a small example of how the judges have lost their compass.

    • Anonymous

      I couldn’t agree more. Thank you for, as always, articulating things so well.

    • Anonymous

      Well said, TLo! Really, I wouldn’t mind PR being about well-made, interesting if not jawdropping clothes. It’d be a heck of a lot better than the tawdry soap opera trash that the show’s become lately. And anyway, who’s going to really think that an outfit made in a day or two could seriously “challenge” fashion in any sense?

    • https://me.yahoo.com/a/dLUE.9h6zdoHMLprP6AQrSQpKt0CZys-#e58b4 tom

      Viktor may be understated and not be forward but except for a few exceptions has shown  decent outfits.  His entries can be worn and not be stared at like they’re cut loose from a freak show.  I admit there is a fine line between forward and wearable but if it isn’t for theater design then it should be wearable.  The good designer seem to present things that are forward but still have commercial application. He really is the best of what is left and I hope that the judges will consider that in the end.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Susan-Maguire/1286325876 Susan Maguire

      God…i love you guys…BINGO and on point…

    • Anonymous

      “It’s time to start asking the question of why, after nine seasons, the
      winners of Project Runway (with the notable exception of Christian
      Siriano) don’t have post-show careers distinguishable from the designers
      who don’t win, or even from many of the designers who never made it
      into the finals at all.”

      Because that’s just life, really. Even if Viktor does win, even if he produces clothes people presumably want to buy, does it guarantee anything?  Even if, right from the very beginning, Project Runway is all about making clothes that will sell and the winners are all great at making clothes that will sell, it still wouldn’t work out that smoothly. That’s just how things are.

      Personally, I wish the “Next Great Fashion Designer” is great at everything – on trend, fashion-forward, clothes that sell, whatever. Just show that you can be good at everything. And whatever happens happens, that’s all.

    • http://twitter.com/hpenfield Hannah Penfield

      I NEED MORE RIPPING THE COLLECTIONS. I HAVE A FEVER, AND THE ONLY PRESCRIPTION IS MORE RIPPING THE COLLECTIONS.

    • Anonymous

      I still think Anya’s going to win, which means the judging will remain consistently cracktastic.

    • BuffaloBarbara

      I think it could be worked out with the contract, so PR gets about 75% of the non-Target profits and the designer gets 25%, which would probably seem like a complete cheat (to the producers, who’d want 100%, of course).  But in the end, I think they could work it into a fairly big win. So the final winning collection, let’s say, gets mass produced immediately–hello, sales, granted in the bastardized form of mass produced clothes for a discount chain.  But you’re already dealing with that, to some extent.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        But then you have the winner essentially chosen by a store, in this example Target.  You are NEVER going to find a retailer that is willing to agree to an ENTIRE LINE without the final say.

    • Anonymous

      On point-all of it!  Extra kudos for including the word hosannas. This is the first time I’ve read that word in a blog.

    • Anonymous

      On point-all of it!  Extra kudos for including the word hosannas. This is the first time I’ve read that word in a blog.

    • Anonymous

      I want that bowtie he’s wearing.

    • Anonymous

      THANK YOU!!!!

    • Anonymous

      I don’t know exactly how to organize my thoughts on this subject. On the one hand, there’s definitely something amiss about a trio of decidedly more commercial judges criticizing work for being too commercial, but I don’t really wish to see the show go down the road of trying to be about “real fashion for real people” – though I do fear it may. In fact, the better (relatively speaking) designers on this season have all been quite commercial, which of course makes the whole over-criticism of Viktor for not being “fashion-forward” even more ridiculous.

      I think the time to ask why the winners were by and large indistinguishable for the also-rans was a while ago, but it certainly gives one pause. I mentioned this some time ago, but, not counting this season, there have been 120 or so contestants on Project Runway and, to my knowledge, three of them showed at NY Fashion Week last month – two winners and someone who finished 14th place (oh Malan, must you have proven the judges were full of it so early on?). Only three designers managed on their own what the show has always granted to at least that number every season, and arbitrarily granted to nine this season. Why Christian Siriano stands out as the great success of the show is a complicated thing – he’s talented, but not uniquely so – but I would say it largely comes down to the cliché of “wanting it more”. In fact, the only other winner who actually seems interested in the same end as Christian is Irina, who, I would maintain not coincidentally, is also the only other winner to consistently show at MBFW. The other winners are either coming from some different angle or trying to be more successful in the same realm they were already in. Granted, Christian also had the benefit of a more than generous backing.

      Ultimately, though, I think the show acknowledging a more commercial approach would have a detrimental effect on the designs showcased, reducing its already reduced credibility and ensuring that the talent which applies for the show can hardly be called talent at all. I fear, however, that it will probably go in that direction.

      • http://twitter.com/_KarenX Karen Miller

        I don’t know exactly how to organize my thoughts on this subject. On the
        one hand, there’s definitely something amiss about a trio of decidedly
        more commercial judges criticizing work for being too commercial, but I
        don’t really wish to see the show go down the road of trying to be about
        “real fashion for real people” – though I do fear it may. In fact, the
        better (relatively speaking) designers on this season have all been
        quite commercial, which of course makes the whole over-criticism of
        Viktor for not being “fashion-forward” even more ridiculous.

        I dunno. I feel like if they’d just decide that it’s going to be a show about “real fashion for real people” we’d get a lot more creativity. It’s so much easier to explore and be creative within known expectations than always try to guess what the judges want and never know week to week what attributes will be valued. If it were more commercial and everyone knew it, we’d see much more interesting clothes.

        • Anonymous

          I suspect/wonder if that kept Viktor in check.  It didn’t take a magazine editor to know that he wasn’t surrounded by a lot of talent this year (or maybe he was but they never were allowed to show it).  But since they seemed so flip-floppy on what they wanted, it was easier/safer to just stick pretty much with classics and keep getting through.  Win or lose, at this point he has shown that he knows what he is doing, has a good eye, can create stuff what women would want, and can play well with others.  Better to be safe and seen for 13 weeks than ‘forward’ and gone. 

        • Anonymous

          It’s possible, but I have my doubts. True, Jay McCarroll’s Chrysler Building dress came from a commercially oriented challenge, but given the epidemic levels of boring produced this season, I don’t think it would be helpful to emphasize wearability and salability. Not that wearable and salable always mean boring, but I don’t trust them to strike the right balance.

          Known expectations are a different matter, though. Certainly, if there were some consistency to the judging it would be of great benefit to the designers, but focusing on the commercial aspects of fashion wouldn’t necessarily make the judging any more consistent. Indeed, I doubt it would affect that at all – the judges would simply change their criteria for what constitutes salable as much as they change their criteria now.

          It’s not that I think the idea itself is inherently problematic, but to see it executed at this stage in Project Runway? I don’t think it would spur creativity, I think they would reward mediocrity. I’m optimistic that way.

        • Anonymous

          It’s possible, but I have my doubts. True, Jay McCarroll’s Chrysler Building dress came from a commercially oriented challenge, but given the epidemic levels of boring produced this season, I don’t think it would be helpful to emphasize wearability and salability. Not that wearable and salable always mean boring, but I don’t trust them to strike the right balance.

          Known expectations are a different matter, though. Certainly, if there were some consistency to the judging it would be of great benefit to the designers, but focusing on the commercial aspects of fashion wouldn’t necessarily make the judging any more consistent. Indeed, I doubt it would affect that at all – the judges would simply change their criteria for what constitutes salable as much as they change their criteria now.

          It’s not that I think the idea itself is inherently problematic, but to see it executed at this stage in Project Runway? I don’t think it would spur creativity, I think they would reward mediocrity. I’m optimistic that way.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            I’d like to see them get a brief from the judges before the challenge.  Something like:

            In this challenge, we are looking for ease of production, marketability, and wearability.

            Or

            In this challenge, we want to see truly avant-garde pieces, something that challenges the status quo.  We do not care if it is wearable.

            I don’t really think that’s asking that much — and I think it prevents designers from getting auf’d just because the judges wanted to emphasize something else.

            • Anonymous

              Absolutely. Some effort, any effort, to ensure that the judges and designers are on the same page and everyone understands exactly what the challenge is about would be welcome.

      • http://twitter.com/_KarenX Karen Miller

        I don’t know exactly how to organize my thoughts on this subject. On the
        one hand, there’s definitely something amiss about a trio of decidedly
        more commercial judges criticizing work for being too commercial, but I
        don’t really wish to see the show go down the road of trying to be about
        “real fashion for real people” – though I do fear it may. In fact, the
        better (relatively speaking) designers on this season have all been
        quite commercial, which of course makes the whole over-criticism of
        Viktor for not being “fashion-forward” even more ridiculous.

        I dunno. I feel like if they’d just decide that it’s going to be a show about “real fashion for real people” we’d get a lot more creativity. It’s so much easier to explore and be creative within known expectations than always try to guess what the judges want and never know week to week what attributes will be valued. If it were more commercial and everyone knew it, we’d see much more interesting clothes.

    • http://www.facebook.com/suzie.vazquez Suzie Vazquez

      Here’s to VIKTOR winning!!  

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jenna-Ryan-Boatman/583622701 Jenna Ryan Boatman

      T-Lo, you nailed it again. Victor has definitely been judged on a different level to some of the other *ANYAJOSHANYAJOSHANYA* designers. I think they were doing the same to Bert. I was disappointed here, though I shouldn’t have been. Victor does classic American separates. When this collection walked out, I thought it could have belonged to Express. Maybe it was the pop of orange and the exposed zipper; V High Street fashion, right up Maire Claire’s alley. I do hope he wins this thing and gives the show back some of its credibility, what little it may have had. Maybe none of its winners have done much (except Christian), but I still expect better judging from these guys.

      The looks:

      Look 1: I bought that outfit at Express in 2001 for a job interview. I think my belt was thin and red, but that was my go-to, fresh-out-of-college interview look. 

      Look 2: I really hate that jacket. I hate that it is exposing the underside of that pleathery material, which makes it look cheap to me. Well-constructed, but those lapels look so unfinished. I was really hoping he was going to cover that exposed underside material with a contrasting pleather/leather because it reminds me of the inside of a cheap purse where they haven’t bothered to line it. Gross.

      Look 3: The black dress. I wish he had exaggerated it *more*. It’s an interesting shape — and with a bit more exaggeration, it would have been very Gaga. Real women don’t want to draw emphasis to our hips, but this isn’t supposed to be about Express clothes. Make the hips swing out, baby! I wouldn’t be able to pull off most of Galliano or McQueen’s looks, but I love to see exaggerated shapes on a runway. Give me a break, real women, ladies of the panel, and make up your dang minds.

      I wish he had thought to express High Street/Commercial, RTW and Couture.

    • Now I am The Bee

      I just happy that, with all the producer manipulation and crap, the judges at the very least decided to include Viktor in the final four.  It was a good deision. 
      And yes–it sure would be nice if the judges “cut the shit.” 

    • Anonymous

      I have had a sinking suspicion for the past couple of years that one of the main factors responsible for the show’s decline has been the move to Lifetime.   A channel which showcases movie after movie of women succeeding despite overwhelming odds, mean that their demographic is not primarily gay men. Personally,  I only watch lifetime for the Designing Women, and the Golden Girls reruns.  Anya is the poster child for this type of story, and that is why she will win the season.

      Bunim-Murray is the other reason.  The Real World has devolved over the past decade from an interesting thoughtful series to Jersey Shore Lite.  Fistfights and binge drinking were rare occurrences once upon a time, now they often have both in the very first episode.  This dysfunctional drama is why Josh will be the runner up this season.

      Somehow someone somewhere must be fighting against the destruction of one of my favorite shows.   Bravo may not be perfect, and neither are the Magical Elves…but good God.  Maybe they can save this show from itself before it becomes more of a joke than it has already become.

      • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

        I seriously don’t see what is so compelling about Anya’s story. I realize she’s suffered the absolute tragedy of not knowing how to sew, but her background isn’t all that interesting to me; and being a pageant winner doesn’t exactly make someone an underdog.

        I’m not disagreeing with you. I think you’ve nailed Lifetime’s and Bunim/Murray’s thought process. It just seems misguided on their part.

        • Anonymous

          I think in some kind of blind foolishness they tried to present her as an underdog.  Poor non-sewing girls up against people with their $100K design school educations.  But, in their infinite stupidity, they lost sight of the fact that with their blatant machinations, challenge twists designed to help her, and outright favoritism, they threw out her underdog status and instead conferred upon her sort of a ‘teacher’s pet’ vibe.  I imagine someone in a corner office somewhere is staring at the story board trying to figure out where they went wrong (here’s a clue- go back to the auditions and start there). 

          • Anonymous

            I can’t for the life of me figure out in what world Anya would be an underdog. She doesn’t’ sew well? That’s like feeling sorry for the kid that can’t be bothered to study for the test. And studying would be considered an unfair advantage.
            She incidentally has a very high level (and expensive I might add) design education from the likes of Parsons and Central Saint Martins. She also already has two fashion design business.  I see lots of advantages no disadvantages. There have been many very talented contestants like Laura Bennett and Rami Kashou ifor instance did not have a fashion design background . I think Rami learned to sew and construct by taking old garments apart. You do not need to go to college in Fashion Design to learn to sew. You just have to be curious and willing to work hard.

            • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

              I never paid for it either.  Buy a $100 machine and some thread and muslin.  Practice seams until you get them right.  Then buy some zippers and practice them.  Now you can move on to real fabrics…

            • Anonymous

               Well you know that and I know that and I think/hope that 98% of the people watching know that.  But I think in the heads of the network executives and producers, this was on a par with that ridiculous Tony Danza movie where he was the garbage man who became a field goal kicker for the Eagles.  And, in keeping with her underdog status, you notice the education never comes up.  All you hear is the sewing for four months.  They even downplay the beauty queen status because it’s kinda hard to paint them as too much of an underdog, as you pointed out. 

              The producers et all have tried to turn this into the typical Lifetime made-for-TV movie (or I guess this would be a mini-series) where she gets to be the little engine that could.  As I said, a gross miscalculation on someone’s part; perhaps they expect their reality TV viewers to be dumber and more accepting of whatever story they put in front of them (I suspect they could convince a few people that Snooki was going for her PhD in literature).  They underestimated the PR viewers, and I don’t know if they can, or will even try, to dig themselves out of this disaster. 

            • Anonymous

              Right?  It seems a little perverse to paint Anya as the “underdog” against a guy who comes from an immigrant family and clearly isn’t afraid to work his fingers to the bone.  Not that Viktor should get some huge pity edit either, but it’s not like his skills were just magically handed to him.

              The Tony Danza comparison is still giving me a huge case of the giggles, btw.

            • Anonymous

              Given her design training at two reputable schools, that she has two businesses, has the looks and savvy to compete in the pageant world, how did B/M and Lifetime decide to promote her as an underdog?

          • Logo Girl

            This is true – poorly-conceived on the part of the producers – but true. But aside from not actually having any actual underdog credentials, Anya is missing the essential element of this trope: she has never once ever said a single witty, clever or hilariously self-deprecating thing. I actually can not even remember one thing she ever said. She usually just parrots conventional wisdom.

        • Anonymous

          Before the season, Heidi was on Regis and Kelly to preview the premiere.  She made a huge fuss about how in the first episode they met a contestant who had only been sewing for FOUR MONTHS!!!!!! and how SHE, the heroic HEIDI KLUM, had fought for her to stay on the show when the others had wanted to cut her.  The whole story was set up by then…that show was on the air (in real time)  between where last week’s episode ended and this weeks’ begins.  Heidi had her marching orders…the storyline begins…..

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        And back in the good ol’ days of The Real World, the fights and drinking weren’t staged or calculated — they happened as a result of real people having real problems. 

        I’m just so glad to see someone else remembers what promise The Real World had.  I feel like Stephen King: “I don’t mean to be too hard on my generation… yes, I do.  We had the chance to change the world and we invented the home shopping network instead.”

    • Anonymous

      Just noticed Viktor’s bow tie.  Looks like he borrowed some of those studs from Ms. Clinique’s cheerleader outfit.

      • http://twitter.com/yankeefoxtrot Alex McGeagh

        I think I saw something on twitter the other day that Clinique Counter did indeed make Viktor’s bowtie this past week ;) 

    • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

      And when did commercial and innovative become mutually exclusive?  Most “innovation” in any field is little steps: Steve Jobs didn’t invent the mp3 player, after all, he just made it so much better.  I think there are ways to bring in a signature style that’s a little different from what’s out there and still be very wearable and commercial. 

      I know you guys all get it, but the judges don’t seem to. 

    • Anonymous

      Amen, T Lo, especially that last paragraph! I’ve stayed a viewer largely because of yours and everyone’s comments. It’s too bad the judging has turned into a mass of contradictions.  

    • Anonymous

      Boys, you said a mouthful.   Right on point as always.  That’s why you are the BEST.  On another note, I have to say that the model rocked the shit out of Victor’s LBD.

    • emily mcginnis

      Viktor is the only one left who turns out impeccable garments. so what if his work isn’t fashion-forward. i honestly don’t think ANY of them are fashion-forward. Anya’s maxi dresses are most certainly not. Josh’s is more WTH than anything. and while i do like Kimberly, i think her work is pretty played out as well. i’m ready for PR to be about design and technique and impeccable work again. 

    • Anonymous

      You make good points, and I mostly agree. But. BUT. All the talk of “fashion forward” may be nonsense, but isn’t focusing on “chic and wearable” ultimately just as unhealthy for the show? Do we really want to see 10 collections that look like Viktor’s three pieces here? I’m not concerned with being on-trend but I do ask for a little wow factor.

      If I had to classify it as one or the other, I’d say Jay McCarroll’s winning collection was just a bit more “fashion-forward” than it was “what women want to wear.” And if I had to choose, I’d like to see more of the former on my tv screen. We get enough of the latter just walking around department stores now.  (Of course, we may have issues with finding contestants able to create the exciting/dramatic/editorial looks we want to see, but that’s another issue.)

    • Anonymous

      This 

      “And when you’ve got a Marie Claire editor, a Victoria’s Secret model, and a designer who made his name by churning out well made classics, all this talk of “fashion forward” comes off like a lot of bullshit.”  

      Egggaclty

    • Anonymous

      You last sentence says it all! Well done.

    • Anonymous

      You last sentence says it all! Well done.

    • Anonymous

      Do any of the past designers have any real design careers at all? The ones you hear about aren’t really designers, they’re professional reality-show contestants like Austin Scarlett. Maybe there’s some beavering away in the back rooms of Calvin Klein or whatever, turning out the lines, but that’s where half of them came from in the first place. I don’t think winning PR or even COMPETING in PR really amounts to a leg up at all. There’s no career differences between former contestants and non-contestants. Do you think anyone will ever go from the show to become a Michael Kors? No. 

      It’s about as relevant as Dancing With The Stars.

      • Anonymous

        I don’t agree with that all, now Jay McC may have said he a ‘professional reality-show contestant’, but Leanne Marshall, Irina, and so many others………… no. The show does have a name recognition factor, so I would not belittle the people that go on the progamme as a ‘Jersey Shore’ with sewing machines. 

      • http://www.tomandorenzo.com Tom and Lorenzo

        Austin worked for many years after the show as a bridal designer for Amsale. Off the top of our heads, the alums who have active fashion careers include: Austin, Vanessa Riley, Nota Caliguri, Chloe Dao, Daniel Vosovic, Kara Janx, Nick Verreos, Emmett McCarthy, Jeffrey Sebelia, Uli Herzner, Malan, Rami, Jillian Lewis, Chris March, Christian, Kevin Christian, Joe Faris, Daniel Feld, Wesley Nault, Leanne Marshall, Althea Harper, Irina Shabayeva, Mila Hermanovski, Carol-Hannah, Ivy Higa, Nicholas Putvinski, Gordana, Valerie Mayen, Peach Carr, Michael Costello, and Gretchen Jones.

        These careers range from private clients, to costuming, to red carpet looks, to lines sold in stores or on the internet, to owning a boutique, to working for a design house. There are many ways to have a career in fashion.

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          Isn’t Korto doing something with accessories now?  I thought I had heard that…

          • Anonymous

            I’ve heard that, too, but I believe she still does clothing. I’m not sure what is or will be put into production, but I do know she unveiled a S/S 2012 mini-collection last month.

          • Anonymous

            When the All Star Challenge aired, she had just launched a jewelry line. 

      • Anonymous

        I have a Mad Men Barbie doll (of Joan), designed by season 3’s Robert Best. I was thrilled to see his name on the package – he was one of my favorites from that season.

        • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

          I love Robert. Having something designed by him might actually make me want a Barbie again.

    • Anonymous

      Do any of the past designers have any real design careers at all? The ones you hear about aren’t really designers, they’re professional reality-show contestants like Austin Scarlett. Maybe there’s some beavering away in the back rooms of Calvin Klein or whatever, turning out the lines, but that’s where half of them came from in the first place. I don’t think winning PR or even COMPETING in PR really amounts to a leg up at all. There’s no career differences between former contestants and non-contestants. Do you think anyone will ever go from the show to become a Michael Kors? No. 

      It’s about as relevant as Dancing With The Stars.

    • http://www.facebook.com/nancy.flanagan1 Nancy Daquino

      You can find the waterfall type jacket everywhere and the design is pretty simple too. Not fashion forward at this point either, although it was attractive. 

      That being said, I did like this collection for the most part. Even better if he’d left out some of the gimmicky stuff on the skirt and LBD.

      • Anonymous

        Maybe Viktor is the smart one and he’s viewing it as one giant 13-week job interview.  Rather than trying to become a house unto himself, he’s positioned himself in a perfect position to get a job somewhere.   Throughout the show, he’s gotten a little catty now and then but not really any worse than you would see in probably any employment situation.  Aside from the initial Bert fiasco, he has gotten along in team challenges and worked well with other people.  He has made clothes that are trendy and while maybe not too far fashion forward, perhaps enough that he has caught the eye of someone looking for the sort-of upscale youthful urban vibe he has. 

    • Anonymous

      Thank you thank you thank you. That last sentence perfectly expresses my feelings about the judges, and I’m not just talking the last couple of seasons. I don’t think this crew would know fashion forward if it hit them dead between the eyes. I offer Chris March’s collection as proof — remember the one using hair as embellishment? It creeped the judges out (and many viewers, too, including me), but THAT was fashion forward. As in, hair embellishments began appearing in high end collections, particularly in Europe, in the next few seasons. Not that this was the first time ever that hair had been used, but the first time I know of since the early 1900s.

      I wish they’d drop the pretensions and fess up to the fact that PR has always pretty much been about what’s right in the middle of what’s currently popular in high end department store ready to wear, not what’s coming tomorrow in couture.The down-market move to Lifetime, along with Nina’s move to MC, has made it even more emphatically so.

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        I liked the human hair — why is it okay to use fur or leather (though I realize the show is fur-free, fashion in general is not) but not hair?  Where’s the difference there?  I’m sure it was all clean, and no creatures were killed for it, so what’s the gripe?  I never got how the same people who exclaim over a great leather piece were so icked out by hair — and it’s not like I’m some huge animal proponent, I just really do not get it.

        • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

          Yeah, I loved it. I don’t get the complaints of creepiness either. I assume he used extensions made from human hair, but no matter the source, it’s not a big deal to me. I also made the fur/leather comparison.

          Every time I watch season 4, I have to laugh at the way Tim equates it with being in the monkey house.

    • Adella Thompson

      Amen! I hear Viktor’s name and suddenly my purse is bouncing about because my credit cards are desperately trying to get out and ring somethin’ up! If I were rich, I would blow it all on having this man tailor me and frankly, exactly the reason I buy MK clothes is because they are chic, flattering, well made, and fit. Since “on trend” is usually code for ugly… I’m pretty ok with that being an absent quality. 

      • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

        “Everyone was wearing leisure suits!  It was the 70s!”
        “So?  What is popular is not always right and what is right is not always popular!  Ugly’s ugly, no matter how many people are in on the delusion”

        Exact transcript of a conversation with my mother one day:)

        (And I agree about MK;  I like his stuff.  And I like his attitude about his work.)

    • Lisa

      Yup!

    • http://inkyheels.tumblr.com Inky Heels

      Wholeheartedly agree with this post.

      I’m very much surprised that Viktor did not beat Anya, the judge’s pet promotional project for this season.  His stuff is well-crafted and well-thought out.  But I guess that doesn’t count for much anymore.

    • Anonymous

      So Heidi wants to be wowed, huh?  Well, there has been plenty of jaw dropping fugliness that left me mumbling ‘wow’ this season.  This just isn’t a fashion forward bunch of designers.  Give me the wearable, well tailored, flattering pieces from Viktor’s collection any day.  

    • Anonymous

      TLo, Bravo!

    • Cherrie H

      You made the light bulb go off in my head!! Here is the problem the producers are facing – a really good designer doesn’t always have a ‘tv’ personality but you can always find a mediocre (or bad) designer that has a fantastic ‘tv’ presence. Conclusion – the good designer (let’s face it they haven’t had a great designer on the show for years) falls away and the personalities stay. It pains me to say, Project Runway just became another overly contrived reality show.

    • Lies L.

      Viktor should absolutely win this season. He’s by far the most consistent and just the best designer on the show.

    • http://twitter.com/KathleenGillies Kathleen Gillies

      I liked this collection the most.  He made 6 pieces.  I think if he had a little more time, he would have tweaked that lbd perfectly.

    • Anonymous

      I do remember in previous seasons talking more about the clothes. While I have and did like Viktor’s stuff (and it’s consistently better than other people’s), I really haven’t really discussed the clothes much this season with my mom or sister who also watch. These are nice but they don’t seem that memorable. Even the ugly stuff this season is just poorly made and pedestrian–not outrageously ugly.

    • Anonymous

      man I hated the goofy front jacket in the second look. My least liked thing Viktor has produced all season. He is still and has been my fav to win all along. We’ll see.

    • http://inkblotphotography.blogspot.com/ Cate

      all of everything you said. i’m rooting for anya wholeheartedly, (i KNOW everyone here hates her) but objectively, i think that viktor deserves to win.

    • Anonymous

      And besides, the name Viktor Luna, as someone else has said, is “label ready.”  

    • Anonymous

      I love you guys. Audrey does, too. From our minds to your fingers.

      • http://beautyforrealgirls.blogspot.com/ accidental housewife

        I can tell Audrey’s no dummy.

    • Anonymous

      Geez, I hope the producers or someone over at Project Runway read TLo’s blog. Someone. Anyone. Are you listening? ANYBODY HOME OVER THERE? Although I suppose this is moot if PR is killin’ it in the ratings.

      And I’m with Cate (via the Diane Arbus avatar): I too like Anya, although I also respect Viktor for the reasons TLo outlined. (Don’t get me started on Clinique Counter – or see my comment on PR: Heavy Artillerary.) I could care less about her sewing – I thought the show was about design? She’s proven she can design, and in an interesting way, and her personal style is certainly compelling, and a major selling point in her favor. While I know I can’t pull off her style, due to my age and body shape, I would love it if I could.

      • Anonymous

        I agree that Anya has a great sense of style and design, but I think “America’s Next Great Designer” should know how to set a sleeve.

        • Anonymous

          Or create an entrance/exit into a garment.  She ought to become a stylist.  She’d be well suited for it and I’m pretty sure the only real requirement is that sense of style, and now that she has some doors open, they could maybe come up with the Lifetime equivalent of Rachel Zoe.  I don’t watch, but I would assume it’s another Bravo show that Lifetime could royally truck up.  

          • Anonymous

            See, if this was Project Stylist, I’d be all over Anya getting the win.

            • Anonymous

              You people obviously know way more about this than I do, so I’m down with that. Stylist it is.

    • Anonymous

      It may be just a little black dress, but it is stunning from the back. That structure makes her butt look fantastic, and the strapless back with the corner notches is very sexy. Heads will turn.

      • Anonymous

        PS: love the clutch. That little splash of “international orange” really unifies the collection.

    • Anonymous

      The seams on PR are starting to fray and the fabric is beginning to unravel.  One of the problems has always been that runway doesn’t sell very well for anyone.  The wild stuff walking down the runway is to create buzz so the accessories for that designer will sell.  Accessories are where the big money is.  It all comes down to making a living eventually, and designing conceptual shit that no one’s going to buy won’t getting anyone there for long.   

      Christian is working his tail off, but even he’s not assured of making it.  He’s working every angle there is, and I hand it to him for being the savviest of them all, but I’ll bet even he’s still scrambling.  Fashion is a tough, tough game where there is a lot more supply than there is demand.  

    • Anonymous

      At the PR auction site, they have Viktor’s looks listed as the ‘winning’ looks. Did he win this challenge?

      • Anonymous

        Not really.  They didn’t exactly announce a winner, but they at least implied that they were calling them out in order to design their collection for Fashion Week, and he was only the second one named (three guesses who was called first).  I also notice on there that the 70s challenge with his ‘safari’ outfit and the black dress, which he also didn’t win, are also listed as the winning designs.  I wonder if that was the way things were originally supposed to go, but then the script was rewritten somewhere along the way. 

    • Anonymous

      I have stopped watching the show.  I can’t believe it, but I have. This has never happened to me in all of the previous seasons.  I don’t record it, I don’t watch it on the website.  Nothing.  The only connection I have to it anymore is via TLo.  I can’t imagine how TLo stands watching it either.  Is there any way to find out if this show will continue to plummet in quality?  You’d think there would be some reader on here who has the inside scoop.  Otherwise, that’s it for me.  Turn out the lights, Gracie.

    • http://twitter.com/jillrussell1925 Jill Russell

      Viktor Luna puts his heart soul &blood in his designs. His food is fashion. @Project Runway he certainly deserves the win.Gifted fashion designer.

    • Anonymous

      The t-shirt in the second look is totally “Simply Vera Wang” for Kohls