(NSFW) V Magazine: Couture 2011

Posted on October 26, 2011

Darlings, who’s up for a big heaping bowlful of haute couture?

Wedding dress in draped ivory satin, train embroidered with silver sequins, boots CHANEL HAUTE COUTURE. Brooch CHANEL FINE JEWELRY.


V MagazineModel Issue
“Couture 2011″
Photographer: Daniele + Iango
Stylist: Joanne Blades


We don’t know about you, but we’re always up for some hardcore pretty to end the day. Can’t say we love the styling, though.  Couture doesn’t always have to have the crazy hair and heavy makeup and boobs, y’know. But we’ll focus on the clothes and leave the boobs and such for other, more interested parties. Enjoy the pretty, darlings.

 

“Bareback” evening gown in ivory washed satin, blouse with pleated herringbone basques, ivory bolero sweater embroidered with macramé lace and pearls, satin and metal belt GIVENCHY HAUTE COUTURE BY RICCARDO TISCI.


Multicolored pleated silk dress DIOR HAUTE COUTURE. Necklace and rings DIOR FINE JEWELRY.


Embroidered tangerine bustier dress with plissé floral jacquard underskirt, and shoes GIORGIO ARMANI PRIVÉ.
Bustier dress entirely embroidered in iridescent sequins with floral details, and shoes GIORGIO ARMANI PRIVÉ.
Nude sequin bodice, velvet skirt with knotted yoke and embroidered floral detail, tubular belt in patent leather, shoes GIORGIO ARMANI PRIVÉ.


“Patch” dress in hand-painted metallic gold lace and headpieces VALENTINO HAUTE COUTURE.
“Art Nouveau” twin ring in black gold fully set with black diamonds (on right hand) REPOSSI. “Magic Gardens of Piaget” rose ring in white gold and diamonds (on left hand) PIAGET. Gloves CAROLINA AMATO.


Striped top in Chantilly lace and marabou feathers and full skirt embroidered in grizzly, swan, and guinea feathers GAULTIER PARIS. Gloves GEORGES MORAND.


Crinoline skirt “à danser” entirely embroidered in white macro-sequins and three-dimensional mirrors ATELIER VERSACE. Shoes IRIS VAN HERPEN.
Asymmetrical baroque-patterned evening dress in nude metallic leather ATELIER VERSACE. Veil JENNIFER BEHR. Gloves PERRIN.
Sheath dress in silk net, leather petals, and chain mail ATELIER VERSACE. Veil MAISON MICHEL. Shoes CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN.


Laser-cut black velvet dress with silver underlining, black cut-out suede belt with silver studs, suede booties with square silver studs AZZEDINE ALAÏA. Shoes CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN.

“Chemical Crows” dress of brass pins edged in black leather IRIS VAN HERPEN.

 

[Photo Credit: Daniele + Iango for vmagazine.com]

    • Anonymous

      Is it just me, or is it weird that the two topless women are both women of color?

      • Anonymous

        Wow, I didn’t notice that (hi, privilege, how you doin?), but you’re right.

      • scottyf

        Naw. It’s not just you.

        But I’ve decided to look at it from this angle:

           –Some of the gowns feature sheer tops, so it’s not like they’re the only ones showing their breasts.

           –The female breast is an exquisitely beautiful thing.

           –Models of Color have better titties than their white models.

        Done.

        • Anonymous

          So evolved!

          But don’t forget:

          – It’s just not good for one to go around pissed off ALL the time. Gotta save it for when it’s worth the rise in blood pressure.

           

          • Anonymous

            Noticing something and getting pissed about it don’t always go hand in hand…

            • Anonymous

              Totally agree. Being able to do that is why scottyf is so evolved – I just thought it was worthy of being included in his list. 

        • Anonymous

           Let’s go with that.  You just saved me 515 characters.

      • http://profiles.google.com/ballinger.jl Jessica Ballinger

        Is the woman in the 7th photo?  I can’t tell, but I think she looks white.

        • Anonymous

          Yeah, I couldn’t tell about  her, either. But this is a couture editorial. They incorporate so much blatant objectification, perpetuation of extremely narrow definitions of “beauty” and just weird/ugly juxtapositions in an oh-so-done and tired-out attempt at creating “contrast” & “interest”  in a manner supposedly artistic/sophisticated/pick a “we are smarter than you” descriptor – it’s just better (for me) when I just look at the clothes. Unless the presentation is egregiously offensive or stunningly beautiful, I’m happier if I don’t think too critically about the big picture.

          • Anonymous

            wow.
            I’m……speechless.
            Don’t want to start anything, but where is this coming from?
            I genuinely would like to know.

            • Anonymous

              I don’t have anything that new or unusual (I would have thought) to say, but I’m happy to answer. I’m not sure which of the three strands of things I often find it better to ignore in a couture editorial to start with.

              It’s maybe just my idiosyncratic set of personal prejudices, but I do think 90-some per cent of fashion (couture & otherwise) is displayed on the backs of a very narrow selection of humans – both in body type and in features – and that many (I suspect most, but don’t really know this) of those humans have to work pretty hard to stay within the standards of appearance required of them. In the interests of showing the clothes to what we have come to believe is best advantage, the models’ comfort & even safety (some of the shoes they walk in!) is deemed unimportant.  Basically I find it pretty distasteful the way the job of modeling reduces a person to a collection of physical traits & the way that some people in the industry talk about models as if they were animated furniture.

              I’ll just lightly touch on the strand in which the standards of beauty presented in fashion editorials are faulted for feeding the idea that there’s only a very narrow range of physical characteristics that are desirable & what that does to young women.  That strand is done to death and the fashion industry isn’t any more guilty than a number of other sectors of our culture.

              And maybe I’m just ignorant, or old & jaded – either or both might be true – but so many high fashion editorials are presented & written about as if they were works of art – but to me seem to rely on a very limited repertoire of tropes – where industrial fencing, parking garages, bondage gear, and either vaguely physically threatening or broodingly sexual overtones are used to create ‘contrast’ with the pretty – or landscapes (pastoral or bleak,) glamorous hotels, nightclubs or beautifully furnished stately homes create a frame for the pretty.

              I guess for me, the art (or craft) is in the garments. Sometimes I enjoy the presentation, sometimes am impressed or even stunned by it, but it isn’t the main event and it often seems to me overblown and trite. And if I read magazine copy or a review of a runway show, or (less often) an interview with a designer where the presentation of the clothes is invested with Deep Meaning, I start feeling as I do about a lot of art criticism in general – real sophistication and knowledge often is less at play than a cult of the expert – certain persons or schools of thought are deemed The Right Ones.

              And, like the would-be vegan who just loves bacon, I continue to enjoy fashion editorials mostly by ignoring the pile of unoriginal reasons for righteous indignation I’d be stewing in were I to get on my high horse about it.

              ‘Cause dear lord, I love beautifully made clothes.

            • Anonymous

              Insert a clause on “objectification of women” and “slightly ominous settings hinting at violence against women and/or sexual violence” and add all the stats in the world about what a huge problem it is and how the fashion industry (and art museums) perpetuate images that are 1) done, done, done and 2) insidious re:  objectification/violent images and glorifiying them/desensitizing people to them.

              Re:  “Where is this coming from,” I think a lot of these arguments and critiques have stood for decades and when you become aware of them, it can be exhausting to try to enjoy beauty where you find it (heh, accidental Madonna quote) and ignore the ugliness that surrounds it.  Sigh.

              The multi-colored Dior gown is AWESOME.

              The Valentino metallic would have looked amazing with pretty styling instead of the hard edge stuff.

            • Anonymous

              Consider clause inserted!

            • Anonymous

              How sad that it has become exhausting to enjoy beauty. I’m slightly horrified at some of these arguments.

            • Anonymous

              Thanks for the thoughtful, measured and detailed response. I must admit I have never thought in such depth about any of these issues. I do have some observations:

              1)  It sounds as if you may have been a part of the fashion industry, and perhaps have intimate knowledge of the abuses.

              2)  Some of what you say sounds like it comes from a very strong place of feminism (and please believe me when I say that I am not criticizing that). It hasn’t been my path.

              3) You evidently have a much stronger sociological knowledge of fashion and art criticism than I do. Basically I’m out of my league here.

              As always, the Bitter Kittens often astound me with their erudition. Much to reflect upon here.

            • Anonymous

              Well, thanks for inquiring. It’s always an interesting exercise to try to articulate what one thinks and to see how other thinking persons react.

              I’m neither a fashion careerist, a strongly self-identified feminist or trained in sociology or art criticism.   I’ve just always gravitated to people in creative fields & so have observed their experiences at one remove. I have spent much of my adult life as a woman in a male-dominated field and in academia (though I’m not an academic, myself), as well as a number of years where my first priority was running a household & raising kids. My family is multi-racial and I do research that centers around listening to people talk about their work. I read a lot. I’m well into middle age and have become, if not pompous, maybe a little self-satisfied. I may have a gloss of vocabulary, but it all pretty much comes out of my observations and experiences.

              If what results fits into the box of feminism, or constitutional conservatism, or bleeding heart liberalism, I’ll own it – but I think all of our boxes overlap more than we realize. 

            • Anonymous

              Apparently we have things in common. I spent many years running a household and raising kids, staying at home and not being employed for much of it. I’m middle aged and read a lot. My favorite people to associate with have always been creative types. I can’t say that I’ve become self-satisfied, but that’s largely due to issues I won’t go into here. I am learning that it is much more difficult to assess people on line than it is face to face.

              Thanks for the dialogue.

            • Anonymous

              I think your response have been lovely and thoughtful. 

              FWIW, I do identify as a feminist.  I’m also married and a mother.  I have worked in programs aimed at at-risk families for a chunk of my career, but I’m no longer in direct services. 

              I’ve moved beyond my “angry” phase and now I’m trying to figure out how to raise my small son to respect women and be aware of ugliness in the world without destroying his enjoyment of its beauty.  I figure just being nice to him and being respectful to others should just about do it.  We can have deep discussions of fashion spreads when he’s in college. 

              Although he does enjoy looking at the “safe for work” posts here already.  (He’s three.)  And we just had a brief discussion about how Mommy *can* be a pirate for Halloween ’cause that’s not “just for boys.”  He loves dump trucks and doesn’t discriminate against princess dump truck drivers.  :)

            • Anonymous

              Three year old boys are at a very special age, and he sounds lucky to have you for his mom. I think mommy pirates for Halloween and princess truck drivers are awesome. Enjoy your boy, they really do grow up all too fast. I have three grownup *boys* and two grandsons (two and five.) I hope I did a good job too of raising them to respect women and all living creatures.

            • Anonymous

              I agree!  Reading this blog faithfully as I do, and looking at all these fashion shoots, I am struck by what I see as a fairly narrow and unimaginative idea of how to be edgy – and let me add that I am bored by edginess as the dernier cri of good fashion photography, or even of good fashion.  Those clothes are beautiful but I felt like I had to rummage through the busy images to find them.  Let’s go back to the 50s when Irving Penn, I think, just lit and photographed beautiful clothes.

            • Anonymous

              I wish I could like this 1000 times.

          • RocknLox

            “I’m happier if I don’t think too critically about the big picture.” 

            That’s the problem with any type of prejudice. People are happy to see it and not think about it. And so it continues…

            • Anonymous

              Of course, you’re absolutely right. & I struggle with that.

              I’ve arrived, at least temporarily, on the assortment of causes, issues & volunteer jobs that I think fit best in my life, where I have the most ability to make an impact, which are most critically urgent for my immediate community and, to be honest, which give me most personal satisfaction.

              I’ve quit beating myself up for not adhering to my highest principles in every area of existence.

            • Anonymous

              Of course, you’re absolutely right. & I struggle with that.

              I’ve arrived, at least temporarily, on the assortment of causes, issues & volunteer jobs that I think fit best in my life, where I have the most ability to make an impact, which are most critically urgent for my immediate community and, to be honest, which give me most personal satisfaction.

              I’ve quit beating myself up for not adhering to my highest principles in every area of existence.

            • Anonymous

              Well said.  Me too. 

      • Anonymous

        I think assuming that the woman behind the screen is “of color” is a stretch–I thought she was the model in the fifth photo with the same giant wig.  I suppose the editors might have been a little more careful about the possible racial implications of that hairstyle in a background shot.

        • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

          Yes, she is darkened by the screen. But the afro (and merkin?????) tend to muddle the matter. I don’t know if it was intentional or not. The whole layout is pretty lame anyway. Clothes are beautiful though.

      • Anonymous

        No, the second topless model  who looks naked and has nothing to do with the clothes looks white. At least the first topless model is seeming to serve a purpose by showcasing that skirt. The nakked woman in a cage serves no purpose except to objectify and degrade women.

        • http://twitter.com/yankeefoxtrot Alex McGeagh

          How is female nakedness degrading to women? That in itself is disrespectful to our half of the population.

          Also, what’s wrong with female objectification? We do it all the time to boys here on this blog…

          • Noelle Haland

            It’s not the nakedness, per se, that is degrading — it’s the naked woman *IN A CAGE* that’s degrading.

            • http://twitter.com/yankeefoxtrot Alex McGeagh

              Would you say a man in a cage would be degrading? 

            • http://www.facebook.com/people/Deborah-Jozayt/100002949685297 Deborah Jozayt

              Yes. A naked man in a cage would be.

            • Anonymous

              What about a naked dog?

            • Anonymous

              Not sure how putting a human being in a CAGE could be anything but degrading.

            • http://twitter.com/yankeefoxtrot Alex McGeagh

              It seems that people are claiming it’s degrading to women in particular rather than all people in general. I feel like people put way too much credit or thought into what is a prop used on set for a photoshoot. JMO.

            • Anonymous

              That said, Alex, almost everyone on these forums is an idiot.

            • Anonymous

              Do you think there wasn’t a lot of time, work and thought put into creating the photoshoot? 

            • Anonymous

              It would be degrading but would have a different connotation, given world history and women’s history.  Slavery still exists, but sex slavery is more prevalent and more a problem for women.

        • Anonymous

          I agree that the fully naked model looks white. She looks like the same model who is in the fourth picture from the bottom. She has very big backcombed hair too. It’s difficult to tell what race the naked caged model is; the light’s so dim that it also kind of looks like she could be wearing the world’s largest merkin.

          • Anonymous

            Please don’t use the term ‘white’. The preferred nomenclature is ‘woman of no color’.

      • Anonymous

        Nope, that was the first thing I thought, too.

      • MilaXX

        Yep *SIGH*

      • http://www.tomandorenzo.com Tom and Lorenzo

        The second topless model is Valerija Kelava and she’s white.  

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Amanda-Miller/1124460923 Amanda Miller

          But with lighting and hairstyling, she is made to look like a woman of color. It’s about perception, not reality.

      • http://www.celestiae.net Isy

        Not just you! This is very, very common in fashion editorials. Clothed white women surrounded by naked black women (and sometimes men). It’s really weird, and disturbing, but… I’m going to look at it Scotty’s way in order to not give myself premature wrinkles and grey hairs! That, and I mostly refrain from looking too much at fashion editorials. :)

      • Anonymous

        I think it is just you, the second woman doesn’t look to me to be a woman of color.

      • Anonymous

        Black women, you mean?

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_NNAIG6A25HOPJWIU7J6S6S3GUA p

      the “chemical crows” dress is stunning. the hair, however, is ridiculously distracting.

    • muzan-e

      Ten shiny new internets for anyone who can identify the lipstick used for that final photo.  It’s probably a little too cool-toned for my colouring (the lipstick equivalent of Someone Else’s Dress) – but nevertheless it must be mine.

      • http://www.tomandorenzo.com Tom and Lorenzo

        Estée Lauder Double Wear Stay-in-Place Lipstick in stay mulberry.

        • Anonymous

          Man, you guys run a full-service blog!

          • Joshua

            They sure don’t dick around. Color me impressed, lol!

        • muzan-e

          … I am in awe.  Thank you so much! Rich colour and a nearly-matte finish ravishes my heart. 

        • Anonymous

          How did you get that information?!

          Wow.

    • Anonymous

      Gorgeous, but yes, WHAT IS WITH ALL THE BOOBS LATELY?

      • Anonymous

        They are, as usual, pointless.

        • Anonymous

          I disagree with their being ‘pointless.’  Of course, you are entitled to find it in bad taste if you wish!  I wonder how else you could show that skirt?  The woman in a cage with the vaguely sinister woman in front, that’s a political and taste issue, yes.  But breasts are beautiful!

          • Anonymous

            A simple, tight fitting top tucked into the skirt would show it off just as well. I don’t have a problem with boobs, but I’m just sayin’.

            • Anonymous

              I don’t agree with your option.  But bitter kittens can agree to disagree.

            • Anonymous

              I usually dislike corset tops but perhaps one would be the right choice to accompany this amazing skirt. brilliant white + macrame applique — wow! If the purpose of having the model be topless was to make it clear that the skirt is so fabulous that they didn’t want to pair it with anything that would diminish its fabulousness, then point taken. if looked at this way, then the naked upper body makes sense. whereas the naked model in the cage is just faux edginess distracting from the clothes. 

          • Anonymous

            Sure, breasts are beautiful.  But, their beauty isn’t why they are here.   They are here because some dumbass photographer/stylist decided to make a Mad Libs “edgy” pictorial by checking the boxes marked “industrial crap”  “cool-shaded lighting”  “messy hair” and “Breasts.”  

        • Anonymous

          If they were pointed, one would hope someone would turn off the air conditioner.

          • Anonymous

            Had that thought when I was typing and didn’t fix it…

            In this particular editorial, I think the nudity is gratuitous.  I don’t always think so, but do in this and many other instances.   

        • Anonymous

          Ahaha. I see what you did there. WHETHER INTENDED OR NOT.

    • Anonymous

      Wow. The WORK on those Atelier Versace gowns. I would happily pay to see the “Asymmetrical baroque-patterned” one up close. I’d wear gloves before I touched it. I swear.

    • Anonymous

      cool.  I especially like the Armani Prive set of 3, the Atelier Versace ‘nude metallic leather’ (!) gown.  That last shot, of the ‘chemical crows’ dress and headpiece is fab fab FAB!  I would love to be able to love that Dior fluffy creation but I just don’t like the colors in combination there.

    • Anonymous

      Some of it’s pretty, but nothing compared to the Vogue Korea editorial.  

      • Anonymous

        me too

      • Anonymous

        I did like that one – and if my attention strays from the clothes I can lust after the furnishings. Those chairs are more appealing than chain link fencing.

    • http://twitter.com/#!/Space_Kitty Space Kitty

      What I wouldn’t do to see these in person.

    • Anonymous

      Thanks guys for the dose of true haute couture. I think we all needed it.

    • Anonymous

      Some of these are exquisite but I find myself not interested in taking a closer look because the styling and the freakin’ boobs distract me from the actual garments. Heavy handed styling does not make it avant garde. I wonder what Grace Coddington would have done with these?

    • Anonymous

      Sorry but that is a lot of ugly going on, even though it is couture. The Atelier Versace are the only ones that I find that interesting. Dior really needs to hunt for a new head designer. The dress looks like a Project Runway challenge that is pooping fabric. The styling in this editorial is also not showing these clothes to their best advantage.

    • Anonymous

      I like the clothes and the ridiculous hair. I’m always a fan of absurd haircuts. I’m also okay with nudity when its used artfully, but I think the nude lady standing randomly in the background behind a cage is stupid. Aren’t we supposed to be looking at the outfit the other lady is wearing?? Then why would you stick that giant distractor in there? I’m a straight woman and I find it distracting. Poor choice. 

    • Anonymous

      the multicolor Dior gown is beautiful to look at. imagine wearing it though. it would need its own limousine, and you’d have to put it on once you got to the event site. 

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_GFMOZFM3WT3T56EZHVZFK7UXSI Ramon

        I love that Dior gown. It’s like a big sherbet explosion. The background of that Alaia photograph is right out of the movie “Gia.”

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_CQPXLNCBM5CZSHZZXJDHPVFS7E Buffy

      Chanel or not, I don’t think I want zebra stripes on my wedding train… but the Givenchy blouse and the Dior dress are stunning.  The rest doesn’t thrill me.  Or maybe it would if it was presented in different circumstances.

    • Anonymous

      These clothes are pretty magical.  I try not to get too wrapped up in the styling…though I DO wish they wouldn’t tell me about jewelry I CAN’T SEE (like the rings with the Valentino).

      I’m also happy to see the Armani Prive’ goldfish dresses make a reappearance!

    • Anonymous

      …what the fuck is going on with the second-to-last photo, though? Like… Is anyone else seeing what I’m seeing? Because I have my unsure-if-horrified-but prepared-to-be-way-horrified face on. 

    • Anonymous

      Gratuitous boobs + crazy hair and ugly setting = ugh. Bring back the fabulous Asian ladies from last night. 

    • Anonymous

      Has Manila Luzon become Giorgio Armani’s new muse? 

    • Anonymous

      It’s possibly a whiff too much of Gaga, but the colors in here are stunning.

    • Joyce VG

      Breathtaking!

    • Anonymous

      After looking and looking I finally realized that NSFW = boobies. Which might possibly show what an old jaded queen I am, 

      Years ago I was styling a shoot with Cindy Crawford and other models and I walked into the motorhome on set where they were all changing. Cindy yelped and covered her breasts before exclaiming “OH MY GOD! I thought you were a man!” (And I’m 6’6″ and at the time was a Chelsea muscleboy). 

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        Hahahaaha! Cute story.

    • Anonymous

      That Valntino is soooo delicious!!  I want that fabric to use as curtains AND a client rich enough to afford curtains out of that fabric.  I’m not overly crazy about the uber structured hair, it seems a little distracting.  And the boobs?  Eh, not my cup of tea but I guess they keep it “provocative”.  Although in all fairness, in the next mens editorial I expect to see a penis or two hanging out.

    • http://www.notacomplexperson.tumblr.com Anonymous

      To be fair, Azzedine’s collection isn’t true couture; it was even presented to press as “demi-couture”. Though the latest collection was shown during Couture Week, it doesn’t meet all the requirements set by the Chambre Syndicale, so he can’t call it “haute couture”, though customers and editors clearly don’t give a damn. Out of everything shown, it’s probably the only thing that would translate to the real world, which speaks VOLUMES about how talented he really is.

    • Anonymous

      OH!  This editorial reminded me that I need to renew my subscription to V.

      It’s a great mag with glossy heavy weight pages, gorgeous pics and a subscription price that’s a steal.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Amanda-Miller/1124460923 Amanda Miller

      is it just me, or is the second to last picture hugely problematic?
      black woman naked in cage while a dressed white woman sits regally on a chair (throne)?

    • Anonymous

      Anybody else think of Angelina Jolie as Gia Carangi (probably her last good role!) in that shot of the naked woman behind the chain link screen?  There was that scene in the movie when she and her lover climbed naked on a chain link fence during a photo shoot, and it was also prominently mentioned in the Vanity Fair article the movie was based on.  Has that scene become iconic or something, or just a coincidence?

    • Anonymous

      Someday I want to see my boobs in a magazine.

    • http://twitter.com/younglibrarian Katie Dunneback

      I love that “Patch” dress from Valentino and the styling of it speaks to my inner goth girl :) Very rarely do I wish I had a skinny-minnie frame versus the zaftig one I do have.

    • Anonymous

      I really like the patch dress.

    • Anonymous

      Ahhhhhhh, the photo with the Dior silk dress is KILLING ME (in the best possible way)!  And I think the crazy hair totally makes the look for that one; the impact just wouldn’t be the same with normal hair.

      • Anonymous

        but isn’t it too “matchy-matchy”?? lol  ; )

    • Joshua

      I really do not love this editorial, but I can’t help but not notice it for all of the pretty. Just stunning. Absolutely stunning couture, but I really would have expected anything but from the above.

    • Vaniljekjeks

      The boobs do nothing for this.  It just looks like the girl in the 6th photo forgot her top.  It’s silly.  Nice clothes, though! 

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jessica-TallGirl-Freeman/1043623567 Jessica TallGirl Freeman

      The Dior and Valentino actually made me gasp.  Gah.  In. Love.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=558631967 Ivona Foster

      Not sure how they saw those clothes and thought Topless! Sadly, that Crinoline skirt from ATELIER VERSACE is pretty amazing and the boob just detract from it. A tight plain top would go much further in accentuating the skirt.

    • Anonymous

      I love the Dior and the Valentino. 

    • Anonymous

      I would really love to see closeups of the dresses in the 6th photo – also Alaia’s gown. He is one of my favorites, always.

      I have to confess, I laughed out loud at the Dior dress – staged next to an abandoned bathtub, all I could see in that gown was piles of laundry to be washed.

    • http://twitter.com/pinup_ghoul Pinup Ghoul

      Wow, those are some lush fabrics! I’m loving the pin collar and the leather evening gown. It doesn’t even look like leather! What incredible pieces of art these are, and lit so well!

    • http://twitter.com/capt_shiny Mags

      I love the colored pleated dress. So pretty.

    • Wrenaria

      The multicolored pleated silk dress (Dior) and the patch dress (Valentino) are both GORGEOUS.

    • Anonymous

      The patch dress, the Louboutins and the last model, SWOON.