Lancôme and Maybelline Ads Banned

Posted on July 28, 2011

Well, everyone else on the internet is talking about it, so who are we to deny the world our opinions? Great Britain banned the use of two ads; a Lancome with Julia Roberts and a Maybelline with Christy Turlington. Check it:

 

Guy Parker, chief executive of the Advertising Standards Authority has this to say:

“If advertisers go too far in using airbrushing and other post-production techniques to alter the appearance of models and it’s likely to mislead people, then that’s wrong and we’ll stop the ads,” he said.

“Advertisers must be able to provide appropriate material to us to demonstrate what retouching they’ve done in the event we question them, and they mustn’t mislead,” said Mr Parker.

Goodness, what a revolutionary concept. Big companies aren’t allowed to lie to the public. It’ll never fly in America.

Anyway, we thought two of the rebuttals were hilarious. First, this one:

“L’Oreal admitted post-production techniques had been used in its advert featuring Turlington to “lighten the skin, clean up make-up, reduce dark shadows and shading around the eyes, smooth the lips and darken the eyebrows”.

However, the beauty firm said it believed the image accurately illustrated the results the product could achieve.”

HAHA! Oh, those French, with their croissants, and their ooh-la-la, and their apparent talent for spewing horseshit. We especially like how they admit that they reduced the dark shadows in the ad that sells a product claiming it reduces dark circles but still maintain that the picture is accurate. Très amusant.

And then this one:

The company, which provided the ASA with pictures of both women “on the red carpet” to show that they were naturally beautiful, admitted that digital post-production techniques had been used on Roberts but maintained that the changes were not “directly relevant” and that the ad was an “aspirational picture”.

See, when we implied that the use of our product will make you look poreless and taut like Julia Roberts, we meant only that it was going to make you want to look poreless and taut like Julia Roberts!

Bitches, please.

Whether or not you think Photoshopping is responsible for eating disorders or plastic surgery abuse, the bottom line is, it shouldn’t be used in order to sell products claiming to provide the very effects that Photoshop is being used to achieve. There’s the whole “unrealistic images of women” side of the argument – which we’re not discounting or playing down in any way, but it’s less of a legal issue and more of an ethical one – and then there’s the far more egregious (from a purely business and legal sense) open dishonesty about what the products do. In other words, it’s one thing to make Julia Roberts look 30 on the cover of Redbook, but it’s quite another to do so when she’s shilling beauty products.

It seems to us that the people who have the most power to change this sort of thing are people like Julia Roberts. Presumably she got paid big bucks to be a spokesperson and due to her huge worldwide appeal, she has the power to say, “I’ll do these ads, but don’t make me look like someone else.” Do it for self-serving reasons, if nothing else. Even if Julia doesn’t give a shit about the self-image of other women or the dishonesty of advertising, she HAS to be mortified that the entire internet is talking about how old she normally looks in comparison to these ridiculous ads.

    • Anonymous

      What is interesting is that the reason L’Oreal had to provide red carpet and other photos of Roberts to show the similiar look is becasue she has it in her contract that they CANNOT release any untouched or original photos from the shoot.  She is every bit as complicit as the ad agency and L’Oreal.  i still have enormous respect for jamie Lee Curtis for doing her make up free, air brush free photo shoot she did a few years back.

      • http://phantomminuet.blogspot.com/ MinAgain

        Luv huh.

      • Anonymous

        Sorry, realized I typed in L’Oreal when I clearly meant Lancome. Apologies to L’Oreal.

        • Anonymous

          L’Oreal owns Lancome, so you don’t owe them any apology.

          • Anonymous

            Thanks!

          • Anonymous

            L’Oreal is the world’s largest cosmetics company.  In additiion to Lancome and Maybelline, L’Oreal also owns Kiehl’s, Redken, Shu Uemura, Garnier, Biotherm, Kerastase, La Roche Posay, Skinceuticals, and The Body Shop. L’Oreal and Estee Lauder pretty much monopolize the skin care/beauty/fragrance industries. 

            • Anonymous

              Holy crap!

            • Anonymous

              well why do you think the question of the mental health of Mme Bettencourt is so touchy ?
              L’oreal is a multinational and make huge money.

        • Toni Mitt

          Yes–L’Oreal is the cheaper drugstore version of Lancome, so no apology is needed. 

          • Anonymous

            Thanks!

      • http://twitter.com/ginpeck Gin Peck

        And Jamie Lee Curtis looked fabulous in that photo shoot. She looked fresh and healthy and, most of all, normal. (Well, normal if your normal is absolutely rocking!) I want to be her at that age or, heck, at my current age.

      • Anonymous

        Yeah, but didn’t even she renounce the “free to be me” and go back to the makeup, dieting, etc routines?  Seems I read that somewhere….

        • Anonymous

          I saw an interview maybe last year in which she talked freely (as she usually does!) about her purpose of the photoshoot in underwear with no makeup, ect was to show everyone the real her.  She never intended to ban makeup form her fae or exercise form her life.  She is a big yoga and pilates fan and does wear makeup.  But her point of showing the world EXACTLY who she is worked.

          • Anonymous

            Exactly. She never claimed that she didn’t watch her diet and exercise.  What she said, and what she showed, is that the everyday Jamie Lee Curtis isn’t the same as Jamie Lee Curtis in a movie after months of  careful dieting and strenuous personal training.  Still had a great figure, but it was a great figure by ordinary mortal standards.

        • http://profiles.google.com/ameliaheartsu Amelia Logan

          diet and exercise are healthy and not a trick if you’re doing it right.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_T24URKJGBLJQPBWCRPU37IIHLU Krab Louse

            This is true and I’d like to add that meditation will do, naturally, a better job at keeping the wrinkles away than botox could ever do.   AND, it’s long term. 

      • Anonymous

        Yeah, tomstl, I read that about JR as well.

      • Anonymous

        Julia Roberts is incredibly self-conscious about her appearance. Sometimes in interviews you can see the neurotic shame just pouring out of her in waves. 

      • Anonymous

        I already liked this post and have nothing to add to the discussion. Just wanted you, tomstl, to know that I enjoy your posts. They are routinely funny/informative/bitchy/honest. Proud that you are a fellow Bitter Kitten!

        • Anonymous

          So sweet, thanks!  I wasn’t aware anyone noticed how much I comment….. I really do work at a job, I swear!  LOL!

    • Anonymous

      As usual gentlemen, you cut straight to the core of things and present the arguments cogently and clearly.
      The relentless desire of marketing and advertizing to present totally unreal pictures of women and men has gotten so far reaching in scope that not even a twenty year old with skin that gravity has yet to discover is free from the photoshop brush.  As reference I will oint out the recent vogue shoot with Emma Watson.  If a gorgeous 21 yr old doesn’t really look like that, what hope does anyone else have?

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Moriah-Toepper/1583776532 Moriah Toepper

      I want to know if the Maybelline product will give me a sillyputtypenis on the side of my cheek, just like Christy’s.

      • http://twitter.com/Cakewalk_Queen Lauren Cooper

        Glad I’m not the only one who saw that.

      • Danielle Maillette

        I was wondering if I was the only one that made it look like the makeup was pulling away her cheek. That’s the only thing I see in that ad, can’t even get to what they changed.

        • Anonymous

          Reminded me of the disastrous facelift scene in Brazil.

          • Anonymous

            That’s exactly what I thought of when I saw this!

      • Anonymous

        According to the ad, it took 7 years of research and 3 patents to achieve that facial phallus.That’s pretty darned impressive, I say.

        • Anonymous

          I hope ‘Boy with balls on chin” from Sout Park sues their butts off!

    • Scott Hester-Johnson

      That was on the back of the last Vanity Fair, and I had to read the tiny print to tell who the hell it was.

    • MilaXX

      I doubt the US will ever do this, but good for the UK for banning these ads.

      • Anonymous

        I could maybe see the US going as far as requiring disclaimers, a la pharmaceutical ads (which themselves should be banned….).  Something like “Effects achieved by professional photoshoppers.  Do not attempt at home.”

        Anyway, there’s always the Internet to step in where government won’t, so bravi, TLo.

        Mary Ellen

    • Anonymous

      TLo – you guys have it right.  Not only is it an ethical/moral social issue of creating false assumptions and beliefs about the “normalcy of,” and therefore ability to have, perfect faces, bodies, etc.  It is also false advertising – which should be illegal.  I hope that Julia Roberts and Christy Turlington respond accordingly.  I’ve always admired Turlington and her tireless work on women’s issues around the world.  Hope she is brave enough to tackle this one.  Did I tell you today that I love you TLo?  Oh, I forgot?  

      I love you TLo.

      • Anonymous

        I’ll have to dodge the flying rotten tomatoes, but I do give Oprah credit for sometimes appearing on her show (or the never-ending Behind the Scenes) sans makeup, when she looks her age plus some.  She may be a preachy, sanctimonious woman, but Oprah without makeup and all the lighting looks like 99% of women her age. 

        • Anonymous

          Oh, I love how Oprah used to do that!

          • Anonymous

            I used to live in Chicago and people would see her occasionally out and about without any makeup on. Sends a strong statement. 

      • Anonymous

        And even if makeup did have an effect close to that –who wants to be parading around like Kim Kardashian, with a 2 inch cement layer on your skin? If anything, that makes you look more insecure than pretty. 

      • Anonymous

        It reminds me of before-and-after shots in plastic surgery ads. No photoshopping, but the “befores” have no makeup on and are frowning, with their heads bent downwards. In the “afters,” they have full makeup, restyled hair, broad grins, and uptilted heads.

        • Anonymous

          Before, I was an unshapely lump in an ill-fitted wifebeater and a bowl-cut.

          After, I was a svetle yogi stepping out of a Parisian stylist in four-inch Giuseppes!

          Commit just thirty minutes a day to our cardio program, and you too could be - 

          Yeah. :)

        • Anonymous

          I remember a “celebrities without their makeup” feature in some supermarket tabloid.  Oprah with makeup was shown as she was on her show.  Oprah without makeup was crossing the finish line when she ran that marathon.  Hardly a fair comparison.

          • http://profiles.google.com/mmara00 M M

            hmmmph! since when are supermarket tabloids “fair”?

      • shorty j

         exactly! Regardless of anything else, it’s freakin’ false advertising to claim your product does something it can’t.

    • http://twitter.com/AnnaPBrittain APB

      “Whether or not you think Photoshopping is responsible for eating
      disorders or plastic surgery abuse, the bottom line is, it shouldn’t be
      used in order to sell products claiming to provide the very effects that
      Photoshop is being used to achieve.”

      *starts the slow clap*

      I do feel bad for Christy and Julia though — they didn’t ask to be photoshopped past the point of recognition. I think Julia has aged beautifully.

      • Mary O’Neill

        Actually, Julia Roberts INSISTS on being photoshopped.  Read the article.  It’s in her contract that NO un-retouched photographs can be released.  She wouldn’t even allow the Advertising Authority to see her actual photos.  

        That could be why you have the impression that she is aging beautifully.  And speaking of impressions, mine is that her behavior and attitude is anything but beautiful.

        • http://twitter.com/AnnaPBrittain APB

          Ew. Reading comprehension fail on my part, I guess.

    • http://twitter.com/magdalenebloom magdalenebloom

      That Maybellene Eraser actually made my fine lines more pronounced….it was quickly passed onto my daughter who has about 20 years before she has to worry about fine lines….

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_NMIFZ6A7BHP66M546AO77BWVQ4 Bonnie

      I noticed this kind of Photoshopping carried to excess earlier this year in a print ad campaign featuring Kate Winslet, in which Kate looked completely totally unreal. It’s deceptive, and also somewhat creepy.

      • Anonymous

        Was it that or a different photo, where she came out and announced “I don’t look like that.”

      • http://profiles.google.com/sara.e.munoz Sara Munoz

        Or when that Kardashian (I can’t be bothered to know which one) appeared on the cover of a magazine with the headline “How I lost the baby weight”. The answer of course being “photoshop”. They even retouched the baby.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_NMIFZ6A7BHP66M546AO77BWVQ4 Bonnie

      I noticed this kind of Photoshopping carried to excess earlier this year in a print ad campaign featuring Kate Winslet, in which Kate looked completely totally unreal. It’s deceptive, and also somewhat creepy.

    • Anonymous

      I just turned 50. . .  I don’t and won’t lie about my age.  My attititude is that I rather someone hear 50 and say “Dang, you can’t be 50, you look no more than 40″   than liesaying I am 38 and have them say (or think) “Damn, you look like crap for 38…Hard Life”?

      Totally understand and agree that when they are selling products claiming that they improve your skin and then won’t show the actual results… Wait why again are we paying taxes to the FCC and the Consumer Protection Agency?  (Let alone the FDA)

      • Toni Mitt

        I agree.  I am on the other side of 50 as well, and I do appreciate products that improve skin texture with REAL results.  90% of the products out there, whether from hoity-toity companies from France or drugstore brands, are bullcrap. 
        I have always liked Lancome products, but this does border on unethical.  I think I may try other, quieter lines of skincare that don’t make these outrageous claims.  Like Vaseline! 

        • MilaXX

          As much as I love makeup, my skincare is pretty basic and one of my staple products is vaseline. I’ve tried all kinds of things both high end and drug store and vaseline always works best.

          • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

            Ponds Cold Cream for me!  That shit is amazing.  I had always used if for removing my make-up because that’s what we always used for theater make-up.  But I started using it as the only product I used after forgetting my cleanser and moisturizer on an trip.  (Don’t ask me how it happen — probably the same way I once ended up with 5 right socks for my Vibrams and 1 left sock in my suitcase)

            My skin was softer and clearer than ever after a week!  My pores have never been that small… It was great.

            • MilaXX

              That’s what Vaseline does for me. I use it as my makeup remover & moisturizer. I have super dry skin and only that or baby oil gel can keep it from being dry and ashy. I gave away all my body butters and fancy lotions. Vaseline is it for me.

          • Anonymous

            How do you use the vaseline? Just smooth it over your skin?

            I always get compliments on my skin, but I was lucky to inherit my mother’s English rose complexion. I’ve never worn makeup regularly (just for a special occasion), never used high-end products. I am religious about sunscreen, drinking lots of water, and getting enough rest. I use Burt’s Bees products (the Radiance line) and really like them–a lovely fragrance.

            I think it’s mostly about having good genes.

            • MilaXX

              For makeup removal, I smear it all over my face, then take a  wash cloth hot as I can stand, but not scalding and place over my face.I guess it sort of steams the makeup off. I gently wipe the makeup off and then wash with face wash. I prefer with The Body Shop tea tree face wash or Johnson’s Baby magic because it’s gentle on my skin, pat dry and apply a tiny stab to my face and lips as moisturizer. For all over body, after a shower, dry off and apply all over, just make sure to wipe up whatever the body doesn’t absorb before dressing. I’m fairly dark so daily “greasing the legs” as my gran used to say is a requirement or I’m an ashy mess.

              I LOVE makeup. I use a mix of whatever works, high end and drug store. I wear makeup often. I have scarring from shingles so I have to use cream foundations to get good coverage. So I often have green color corrector, concealer and foundation on as a base, then you add blush/bronzer, lips, eye shadow and mascara. No way am I sleeping with all of that on. Special occasions means I add lashes to the mix. My skin is pretty good but I drink loads of water and work at keeping it nice.

        • http://visceralresponse.com Dina dV

          Yeah, no product is as effective at “reversing the signs of aging” as improving your diet, drinking enough water, and getting enough rest and cardio.  But as for my skin care routine, just switching to a mild, paraben-free facial wash and moisturizer is the best thing I’ve found.  And much more cost effective since I can find anything I need at the local, old-school health food store.

          Oh, and having good Mediterranean genes.  The aging process practically comes to a halt between the ages of 35 and 50.  (Not that I know about 50…yet.)

        • Anonymous

          Vitamin E cream for my face. Which is about as spendy as Vaseline, allowing me to splurge quite comfortably on the imported shea butter stuff for my hands. Which from two years’ experience I can say most certainly does generate a 90% improvement in the texture and appearance of my hands. :)

        • Anonymous

          There WAS (I of course cannot find it anymore) a very good Neutrogena Healthy Skin Night formula (with a little pump) that had some salicilyc acid.  It was good and didn’t clog my pores.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_EYYAY25W7VS5BYCOCTK62SSUBI tw125

        The FTC oversees truth in advertising.  Anyway, all of those agencies are severely underfunded and understaffed and will probably be even more so when government gets through with its spending cuts.

    • Anonymous

      I just turned 50. . .  I don’t and won’t lie about my age.  My attititude is that I rather someone hear 50 and say “Dang, you can’t be 50, you look no more than 40″   than liesaying I am 38 and have them say (or think) “Damn, you look like crap for 38…Hard Life”?

      Totally understand and agree that when they are selling products claiming that they improve your skin and then won’t show the actual results… Wait why again are we paying taxes to the FCC and the Consumer Protection Agency?  (Let alone the FDA)

    • Anonymous

      Great commentary. Spot on, TLo.

    • Anonymous

      Great commentary. Spot on, TLo.

    • Anonymous

      Everything you said.

      And Teint Miracle? You’ve got to be kidding. 

    • Anonymous

      Everything you said.

      And Teint Miracle? You’ve got to be kidding. 

      • Anonymous

        Hah! Thank god I wasn’t the only one who noticed that. I was worried I just had a terribly dirty mind. Because I read it as “Taint Miracle” and went “Ewwwwww!”

      • Tamara Hogan

        I KNOW!!!!  Boggling at Teint Miracle. 

    • Anonymous

      JR doesn’t look 30 in this photo, she looks like a plastic mannequin.  As for Ms Christy Turlington (sigh, what I wouldn’t do to look like her on her worst day), at least the ad had the decency (haha) to airbrush the entire thing, then draw in leetle teeny tiny lines for the next layer of photoshopping to get rid of.  It is to laugh!!

    • Anonymous

      I fully support anything that results in less Julia Roberts.

    • http://profiles.google.com/christine.jain Christine Clark

      Love. This.
      I totally agree. I lived in Holland last summer and when I watched TV at the gym, I loved that the makeup ads all had little disclaimers at the bottom. I’m fine with a beauty standard (as screwed-up as it may be), but I’m not fine when the beauty standard becomes impossible and not even based on reality.

    • Anonymous

      Wow, the phallus comments are pretty funny.  Christy Turlington looks like an alien.  With a phallus on her cheek.  If I were her I’d be pretty angry about that ad but I guess 7 figure paychecks make things all better.

    • Anonymous

      Wow, the phallus comments are pretty funny.  Christy Turlington looks like an alien.  With a phallus on her cheek.  If I were her I’d be pretty angry about that ad but I guess 7 figure paychecks make things all better.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2VBWWGHZEBKTVQMXE5SO5NCU2I Mich

      more than the adds for skin care products, i hate mascara commercials. none of those bitches are wearing their actual eyelashes. i’d be more apt to buy your mascara if you actually showed me what it can really do to real eyelashes. but the commercials showing me obvious false and cgi enhanced eyelashes just tell me your product doesn’t do anything on its own, and is, in fact, worthless.

      • Anonymous

        Mich you couldn’t be more right on.Having consulted with makeup pros, I know for a fact that nearly all of those mascara ads use fake eyelashes. but I’ve only seen ONE that actually admitted – in fine print, of course (still better than nothing) that “inserts” were used to “illustrate” the effect of the mascara. But how can anyone really see the benefit (or lack thereof) of that mascara if the model is wearing falsies? Unfair, unethical and actually fraudulent.
        TLo – I love you – no one says it better! thank you!

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UXQWW72ST3LHXVPD4TYD4FCZ2U Susan

          I noticed this fine print disclaimer myself the other day — on a Maybelline ad featuring Drew Barrymore (weirdly, only her two front teeth were showing — made me wonder what TLo would say about it).  Mascara ads have always irritated me as well.

      • MilaXX

        Like that creepy Jessica Beil commercial. Her eyes are so photoshopped she darn near looks like an Anime

    • Anonymous

      If it’s not Photoshop, it’s something else.  What about all those mascara adds telling you how full and lush your lashes will be, meanwhile the model is wearing about 10 pairs of false lashes?  Or “after” weight loss pictures where the person is clearly sucking in their gut?  Not that I support false advertising, I just think consumers need to not be so gullible.

    • Anonymous

      I don’t spend much (any) time looking at cosmetic ads, but I’m wondering if there are any cosmetic companies that DON’T do all this airbrushing on their ads for makeup? We all know it’s a fantasy, and who would think that anyone would actually looks like the airbrushed ads? We’re all pretty bitchy about someone’s appearance on a runway for an opening, but at least they’re (usually) not airbrushed to oblivion.

      • Anonymous

        wow, wouldn’t that be a fascinating ad campaign:  here’s an unretouched before & after, using our products.  Otherwise, normal aging.  You be the judge.  I’d buy that stuff!  Better than the aptly named Hope in a Bottle.

        • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

          That would be a great campaign actually! 

    • Anonymous

      Okay, I’d believe it IF these women had an affadavit that they used these products, and ONLY these products (no other prescription goops or surgery or other gazillion dollar procedures) to achieve their lumenescence/youth.  Okay, I’d probably not believe it then, either, but I’m a cynic.  That doesn’t stop me from buying more sh*t to try to look younger, smoother, etc, mind you.  I have a drawerful of 1/2 used failed products.

      • Anonymous

        I agree! None of these women use L’Oreal or Maybelline. That’s just as insulting a pretense as the idea we can actually achieve this look. I’m so skeptical, I don’t even believe they actually use their own makeup in ads. Like on Project Runway, I laugh at the idea that they’re using L’Oreal makeup on those models.
        The best people to ask for advice on skincare are people who have great skin in real life.

    • AWStevens

      Um… I LOVE TLo’s take but I just don’t care about this issue. I am way more worried about the debt ceiling and Obama than misleading ads…

    • https://profiles.google.com/104791269167429064986 Judy S

      I am amazed. Thanks for the clear-minded run-down. I have recently, for the first time in my life, been looking into “anti-aging” treatments and I am flabbergasted that they all show pretty young models with perfect skin. The only conclusion possible is that it’s too late…
      I have noticed that when you feature magazine covers there is usually a strong negative reaction to the airbrushing. Maybe they should try putting out a magazine with 2 covers–identical except for the photoshopping?

      • Anonymous

        Ha, yeah, anti-aging products on 20-year old models is about as appropriate as putting tummy-flattening foundational garments on 90-lb models.

    • Anonymous

      Bottom line here from a science standpoint is that the skin on the surface 2-4 layers is already dead and nothing you can do chemically is going to change that.  What these companies sell is hope, not results.

    • Lizzie Joy

      Blah…blah…blah. Hollywood…advertising…it’s all imaginary. Anyone that buys into any of that crap that you need botox, plastic surgery and photoshopping to look like a “real” woman probably deserves the debt they are in to try to achieve it. Me? A $7.00 jar of Ponds Cold Cream every coupla months and I still easily pass for 10 years younger than I am.

      • Anonymous

        Yes, those of us who are old enough (with a fair amount of wisdom gained through experience) know it’s slick, deceitful advertising.  But I’m more concerned about the children and teenagers who are fooled by these images and the self-esteem/body image problems that often result.     

    • Anonymous

      Yes, in fact Make Up For Ever recently had a completely un-retouched campaign. http://www.temptalia.com/make-up-for-ever-unretouched-campaign

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Hanna-Watts/1683606598 Hanna Watts

        I bought that foundation they advertise in your link (not based on the ad), and it REALLY is the sh*t.  That Make Up Forever HD foundation is magical and super pricey.  Worth it.  Just thought I’d put that out there even though it’s not really relevant.

    • Anonymous

      “Tlo said: Whether or not you think Photoshopping is responsible for eating disorders or plastic surgery abuse, the bottom line is, it shouldn’t be used in order to sell products claiming to provide the very effects that Photoshop is being used to achieve.”

      Sing out sisters!

      –GothamTomato

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_64HSRZWCSJ5RBFGCWDLFQOICYM G

      What is weird and a tad annoying about all this is that when JR is out in public, she is looking more and more like “one of us”.  Wrinkles, heavier – trying to hide her pooch all the time, messy hair.  Why so perfect in cosmetic photos? 

    • Anonymous

      Isn’t that the slogan? “Maybe she’s born with it, maybe it’s Photoshop.”

    • Jill Roberts

      You guys are so spot on.  Sadly, it’s pretty unenforceable to legislate a threshold for photo retouching.  What measures would you use?  I do wish celebrities would stop being so freaking dishonest and greedy in their endorsement deals, but then I wish that about the fashion industry at large.  Good luck with that, me.

    • Amanda in Austin

      I saw an ad with Kate Winslet in it the other day, and wondered this exact thing. I don’t remember if the product was for anti-aging or anti-wrinkles or whatever, but I do remember thinking, “Where are the wrinkles around Kate’s eyes?!?”

    • Anonymous

      Agreed!  Sadly, the effect of stuff like this will be more young girls shilling these products, not honest photos of beautiful middle-aged or older women.

    • Anonymous

      Totally agree, T Lo. 

       And it really has to come from government regulation.  I don’t think we can rely on anyone from the entertainment or fashion industries to do the right thing about digital retouching of photos and films.  It’s just not in their self-interest because their professions are based on a world of make believe. 

      And we know the fashion and cosmetics industries don’t want us to find out the truth.  Their whole business model is based on their customers wanting to look better, often unrealistically so.  

    • Anonymous

      Good old Advertising Standards :) They already got l’Oreal to put a disclaimer on a hair product advert featuring Cheryl Cole after it was pointed out to them she had extensions. They narrowly escaped that one being banned too.

    • Judy_J

      There’s so much photoshopping going on now that I find myself questioning every photo I see.  There once was an old saying, “Pictures don’t lie.”   Well, they do now!

    • Anonymous

      It’s so interesting that I just re-watched season 4 of Mad Men! Don was talking about how it’s not okay to lie about a product “anymore”, and from that standpoint, I get it. I really do.

      But then again, I’m a photographer (got a degree to prove it), and fixing wrinkles and blemishes is standard business for us, so I can’t say that what they’re doing is wrong. It’s our job to make people look good.

      I think if you’re banning photoshop, you have to ban cosmetic surgery as well, because that’s just as fake.

      • MilaXX

        There’s a big difference in cleaning photoshoping for a mag cover, even the ridiculous amount they do today and photoshoping away dark under eye circles and saying the product the star is shilling removed them and not the computer program.

      • Anonymous

        And the big issue here is the product being sold, not whether people are being helped to look good.  For an anti-wrinkle cream, it’s not cool to photoshop out wrinkles and imply the result is from the cream.  For an anti-acne cream, it wouldn’t be cool to photoshop out blemishes.  Even if both are acceptable as standard business for a magazine cover.

        • Anonymous

          So you’re okay with someone getting filler, botox, cheek implants, facelifts, ect before modeling in a makeup ad? You think it’s fair for Cindy Crawford to get work done before filming an infomercial for Meaningful Beauty, yet not okay for someone to touch up a photo?

          • Anonymous

            But when a make-up ad is photoshopped, it’s the product that’s being sold that’s being tampered with. What they’ve done to the canvas it’s on beforehand isn’t relevant.
            It’s like photographing a wall for a paint company – it doesn’t matter that the wall has been plastered nice and smooth before it was painted, but it does matter if you photoshop out their streaky poor quality paint to a nice even colour. That’s misrepresenting the product.
            I worked in graphic design for ads for years, I know how it works, but it is wrong in that context.

            • Anonymous

              I completely disagree that there’s a difference, if one is wrong then they are both wrong.

              They’re both lies and fakery, that show the results of other processes not related to the product being sold.

            • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_VJMQEBSJRUNQHEEWTXI5BCS6HI D J

              If a chick with 34DDD totally plastic boobs is in for a bra ad, no retouching on her boobs, properly sized bra, I’m totally okay with that. As Corsetmaker has said, the product is not being tampered with. If the company took that same 34DDD person, added tape, inserts, or photoshop to make her boobs look bigger and then said the miracle results were due to the bra, I would be mad at the company because of the TAPE, INSERTS, and PHOTOSHOP. The model has NOTHING to do with the company’s wrongdoing. 

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_QCJEZMOV4VYMXC5WJALLZNYEB4 Mari Rose

      Good for them! There really is a world of difference between that picture of Julia Roberts and oh, say, this one:

      http://gawker.com/5817878/the-week-in-celebrity-snapshots/gallery/
       

      • Anonymous

        Wow–she looks like a real person here! 

    • Anonymous

      Any product that gets a Teint near my face would be a miracle. 

    • http://twitter.com/VicksieDo Vickie Lord

      These don’t bug me as much as the mascara ads that are CLEARLY both photoshopped AND false eyelashes.  It’s insulting.

      • Anonymous

        I Liked this… but only for the second part.  This bothers me as well 0 but I am constantly annoyed with the obvious false eyelash – mascara ads.

    • http://profiles.google.com/shannonlstewart Shannon Stewart

      What really boggles is me is that they could have done the same things with make-up and lighting and a good photographer.  I have PERMANENT dark circles that I can hide with enough make-up for long enough for a photo shoot.  Now, on a daily basis, there’s no way I could do it because it wouldn’t wear well AT ALL and because it only works as long as I control the lighting.  But it can be done.

    • Anonymous

      I don’t think that picture even looks like Julia.  Take away some of the lines and other facial characteristics, and you take away some of what makes that person unique.  She looks plastic and fake.  There’s nothing wrong with a few lines/wrinkles on a face, or looking your age…well earned character in most cases.

      I’m all in favor of zapping out a zit or removing a blotchy patch or something else that is unsightly though…to a point. The ads take it way to far with the air brushing and photoshopping…it is outright false advertising..  Hopefully the magazines will cut out a lot of  it too.

      • Lisa

        Exactly.  It’s not a big deal if it’s just covering up a zit.  But to make someone in her 40s look like she’s 29, and then claiming it’s due to that makeup, is just going too far.

    • Anonymous

      When the word “aspirational” comes into play, you know it’s all just b.s. designed to part consumers with their money. Last time I saw it, it was in conjunction with some godawful amenity more suited to a resort destination in some 4,000 sq. ft. house intended to house a couple whose oldest child was 18 & leaving for college in a few months.

    • Anonymous

      Nobody who spends even just part of the year in New Mexico, as Julia Roberts does, looks anything like that picture. It just ain’t possible. The sun, the wind, the dry air–all do a number on your skin, no matter what you put on it. 

      • Anonymous

        Or Colorado. I moved here 20 years ago from West Virginia (much more humid) having been told all my adult life I looked 10 years younger than my actual age. Not anymore. The sun, the wind, the dry air, the altitude, took it all back.

    • Anonymous

      You do realize, of course, that Maybelline, L’Oréal, and Lancôme are all the same company.

      • Lisa

        Yup, true.  But the problem is, it’s not just those three that are guilty of this.  All the cosmetic ads have this ridiculous kind of airbrushing and photoshopping!

    • Anonymous

      You do realize, of course, that Maybelline, L’Oréal, and Lancôme are all the same company.

    • Anonymous

      Spot on, T Lo. Outrageous.

      Some of you bitter kittens know that when you turn 50, you get your invitation from AARP. If you accept, a magazine arrives at your door every month with a different celebrity featured, who, of course, must be 50 or over. A few years ago, I canceled my subscription the month I saw Goldie Hawn, who is the same age I am, looking at least 20 years younger due to the extensive photoshopping. She’s still cute, but she’s not the *girl* on Laugh-In anymore.

      • Anonymous

        I had the same reaction when Gloria Steinem, who is now 77, appeared on the cover of Ms. maybe not quite a decade ago posing like she was on the cover of 17 and her face about as smooth as that too. Some of my feminist friends who were in their 20s at the time said it’s all natural, having no clue at their age that this was far from natural, I had to ask them how old their grandmothers were to help clue them in.

    • Anonymous

      If you think a 10 dollar bottle of goo is going to make you look like Julia Robert or Christy Turlington then you are an ass. Come ON! if  you are that damn dumb…PLEASE, use your dough on some therapy or college classes not cosmetics. Grown up people.

    • sonictofu

      These ads should be allowed to run, but as commercials – during Fox News…

    • Anonymous

      Bravo to youse guys. It’s all about ETHICS.

    • http://twitter.com/enuma enuma

      It’s amazing the amount of flat-out lying we allow in our advertisements.  Almay claims that their “SmartShade” foundation changes color to match your skin tone.  It does no such thing.  Basically, the pigments are suspended in tiny droplets that you break apart and mix into the base when you apply the make-up.  All Almay is doing is selling foundation that isn’t completely mixed. 

      From the patent on SmartShade: 

      “Emulsion makeup compositions for keratinous surfaces which change color
      upon application, emulsion makeup compositions that match a variety of
      skin or hair shades in more than one skin tone category [...] In the case of a composition applied to skin such as foundation
      makeup, the development of the color directly on the skin from a
      non-skin matching color to a skin matching color gives the consumer the impression that the composition is “smart” and capable of changing color to exactly match her skin tone.”

      It’s right there in the patent.  The make-up doesn’t actually change to match skin tone.  It can’t sense your skin tone.  It just fools you into thinking it does.  The pigment will be the same no matter what your skin tone.  You just can’t see the pigment until you break up the suspended pigment droplets by applying the foundation to your skin.  And yet Almay has gotten away with dozens of ads claiming that this make-up can do exactly what its patent says it doesn’t do.

    • Anonymous

      Great skin is gotten by, in no particular order, 1) staying out of the sun; 2) eating correctly; 3) getting enough sleep; 4) being genetically predisposed; 5) not smoking or being addicted to anything illegal; 6) having low stress levels; 7) moisturizing with just about anything (even Vaseline will do it); and 8) staying out of the sun.  Anything else is snake oil.  (And “staying out of the sun” means STAYING OUT OF THE SUN…….it doesn’t mean getting a savage tan in between applications of sunscreen.) 

      God knows I’ve wasted my share of dollars on fancy moisturizers & makeup foundations, and they’re fun & temporarily helpful when I need to impress, but I would 100% agree with everyone here who has said some variation on, “if you believe makeup advertising, you’re really gullible”.  These companies are not in the business of actually achieving results; they are in business to MAKE MONEY, and that’s all.  This is just a convenient and efficient way to do it.  Ethics?  Morals?  Consciences?  Truth in advertising?  Oh, please.  Before Photoshop, it was airbrushing, before that it was nylon stockings stretched over camera lenses.

      How nice that this agency has taken this stand, although it’s way too little and way too late.

      The older I get, the more rueful truth I find in Lily Tomlin’s famous quote, “No matter how cynical you become, it’s never enough to keep up.”

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LFQEVI44IYFNRS36BEOYZAE2FE Claudia

      Not to mention the fact that the Maybelline ad makes it look like Christy T has this weird ear flap thing coming out of her face!

    • Anonymous

      Truth in advertising. I honestly kind of took it that this didn’t apply to beauty products for some reason because it’s been so flamboyantly untrue for so long.

    • Anonymous

      Ok, I’m french so I have to step up for the firm which is the property of an elderly woman who still thinks she still lives in the 60′s and that the money is the “ancien franc” so giving 1 million euro to “young” political men is just enough to let them buy a couple of croissants.
      That being said, of course that product can make you look younger, suppress the dark shadows under the eyes and make your skin mooth. you just have to :
      1/ not watch yourself in the mirror after applying it
      2/have your picture taken by professionnal photographs
      3/have photoshop on your computer.

      Silly Tlo, tsk tsk tsk

    • http://www.facebook.com/sara.mcdarby Sara McDarby

      I just love, love, love your posts!  I don’t have anything interesting to say but I wanted to let you know how entertaining I think you guys are!!!!

    • Sandra Darst

      But makeup really CAN change your entire bone structure, in addition to removing every pore from your skin while simultaneously bending light to keep all shadows off your face!